35 Burst results for "Frida"

"frida" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

"frida" Discussed on WTOP

"Three 5 5 Enjoy It's 1138 We've got traffic and weather Every ten minutes on the 8s Frida Kessler in the WTO traffic center Well it's not a fun trip on northbound 95 right now Mark delays in Quantico off and on making your way into Dale City It is near the car rest area the mobile work crew looking like a pothole repair crew possibly in the center of the roadway Southbound 95 slows crossing the ark of Kwame but then good into Fredericksburg eastbound 66 is slow from 28 headed toward the fairfax county Parkway the work in the left lane then delays from one 23 headed toward nutley street that work usually along the left side as well Outer loop heavy out of Tyson's towards 66 the work in the right lane Inner loop slows approaching 66 as well so watch for work there In Virginia on the George Washington Parkway northbound after the scenic overlooks that was a single lane getting by the work but good news on one 23 or chain bridge road north of chain bridge that emergency work zone was utility work has been cleared traffic no longer alternating at the scene In Maryland the eastbound span of the bay bridge left gladed two blocked with the work westbound running two way traffic van dusen wrote at cherry lane in Laurel a report of a wreck If you're on the beltway in Maryland the interleukin year Pennsylvania avenue looks like that mobile work crew may have cleared not really seeing a delay The inner loop is also heavy after the split with the two 70s bird toward old Georgetown road with the work in the right lane Businesses that make energy efficiency upgrades can save an average of $3000 in utility costs each year Learn more at Pepco dot com slash business savings I'm Rita Kessler WTO traffic And now to storm team force chuck bell The rest of your Tuesday afternoon will be filled with sunshine a beauty of a day to be outside low humidity pond count is still in the high range That's about the only thing to complain about High temperature today right around 70°.

Frida Kessler fairfax county Parkway Dale City Quantico WTO Kwame van dusen Fredericksburg Tyson Maryland George Washington Mark Virginia Laurel Rita Kessler Pennsylvania chuck bell Pepco
"frida" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:32 min | 3 months ago

"frida" Discussed on WTOP

"Half later and the other half never Frida Kessler and the WTO traffic center In the district north bend D.C. two 95 is going to be the delay from benning road headed past the burrows This is the work set up in the right lane You may still find some volume out New York avenue headed toward bladensburg road This was the wreck that had been along the left side Also outbound on the suitland Parkway That's seeing a delay in Maryland after silver hill road trying to head towards suitland road between those two points is where we may have a crash south bay route one in jessup near patuxent range road was a wreck and southbound two ten delays from the beltway toward Wilson bridge drive with the work on the right side Northbound branch avenue the delays were out of brandywine headed toward earnshaw This was work taking a lane eastbound span of the bay bridge right landed two blocked with the work westbound continues to run two way traffic And one 97 is still closed between the BW Parkway and powder mill road a lot of repair is ongoing From an earlier crash Now the northbound Baltimore Washington Parkway still sees the delays out of greenbelt headed past powder mill road not sure if this is the mobile work crew or not but keep an eye out for anything along that stretch Also we are seeing a delay on the beltway This is the inner loop of the beltway slow off the toll road and before the toll runs out of Tyson's to a point past the toll road the work now set up in the two right lanes This support brought to you by regency furniture I'm Rita Kessler WTO traffic Storm chain four samora Theodore mostly sunny for your Wednesday highs today will peak in the low to mid 50s It is going to be milder a little.

Frida Kessler north bend D.C. suitland Parkway beltway toward Wilson bridge WTO jessup Baltimore Washington Parkway south bay bay bridge Maryland New York greenbelt Rita Kessler Tyson samora Theodore
"frida" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

06:19 min | 6 months ago

"frida" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Yes, can you describe the painting for us? Well, it's a small, but mighty painting. It shows Frida Kahlo. She's staring out at the viewer. And Diego's face is on her forehead above her iconic eyebrows. And she is crying three very powerful tears. Her hair normally her hair you see in portraits of freedom that it's braided, it's neatly piled upon her head, but here, it's tangled, it's loose, and it's also wrapping itself around her neck as if it's strangling her, which is quite unusual for one of her portraits. And in terms of what this meant, in her mind's eye, how do we interpret it? Exactly. So Rivera pops up quite a few times in Carlos portraits and often he appears on her chest, symbolizing that he's in her heart. Here he's on her forehead and it's the idea that yes, she is thinking about him. And I'd say in all of her portraits, what's interesting is she includes him, but the subject is still her. She's showing the effect he is having on her. So here it's the effect on her subconscious her mind, the pain. He's caused her. Yes, and that pain was complicated because it was infused with such love as well. Yeah, so they were in and open relationship. And they got married twice. They got married, divorced, remarried again. And I think this year was a particularly tough year in the second time around with the marriage because Ribera started an affair with one of Frida Kahlo's close friends, which felt like the ultimate betrayal to her and so this is what brought her to paint this really powerful portrait. And now showing that pain. Well, now, a record breaking portrait. And the record having been held previously by her husband. Yeah, I mean, brilliant. Ultimate act of revenge, but also I think ultimate acts of validation for her as well. I think there's something in that. People finally giving due to so many women artists among them Frida Kahlo and it's fantastic to see that. Yes. And I suppose just to ask as well because so many people, even if they don't quite know this painting, but thank you for describing it so well. They are drawn to her, especially so many women. Even if they don't know the stories, they don't know about her relationship. What do you think it is that is that language of connection? Well, I think she painted very honestly, her lived experience. Her experience as a woman, she painted miscarriage, abortion. She painted about the surgery. She underwent it really Frank terms. But at the same time there's something quite stoic about her paintings. And the Mexicans call her the heroine of pain. And she presents herself as sort of in control of that narrative. And I think that differs from the way that a lot of men are painted women as going mad from romantic relationships gone wrong..

Frida Kahlo Rivera Diego Carlos Ribera Frank
"frida" Discussed on The Film Buds Podcast

The Film Buds Podcast

03:39 min | 9 months ago

"frida" Discussed on The Film Buds Podcast

"Time so that was freda which came out in two thousand and two. It's directed by julie. Taymor who most people are. Not most people i guess but some people might know from her broadway for fame as the director of lion king if you know her that's probably when you know her and it stars selma hayek as frida. Alfred molina as Her husband and artist diego rivera Geoffrey rush Diego luna very young diego luna Antonio banderas ashley judd Roger reese And the plot is a biography of artists free ticao who channeled the pain of a crippling injury and her tempestuous marriage into her work. Did you nailed impetuous. I out loud and heard. Oh no like you. It helps that. I read this like a day ago practice. Yeah did a little up. He studied for the test. Folks so neck. Why don't you take this one away for us. What did you think okay. yeah Frida is pretty good Good acting here's probably the best salma high performance. I've seen that one of the best as she was nominated for the oscar for this. I think i'm pretty sure as she. If not the oscars in sure like a billion other awards nominee yeah Yeah i think you know the descript definitely has you know the same like bio-pic and you know the structure is similar to that but I think her her story is different. Enough and interesting enough It's still very smart movie. It's very very pretty movie. Very colorful. i love like the transition between scenes where they kinda like setup. One of payne's It's one of those movies in under the same moon the movie we're gonna talk about after the same. It was very refreshing to see like to smart. Well thought out movies. That i don't know maybe just from watching too much stuff to so much stuff. Fields barely put together a yeah or you know it just doesn't it's not operating on all levels. You know what i mean like. There's like for both of these films like every part of them is working in conjunction with the other. And it's telling you something about like the character or the characters and the whatever moment they are at in the story currently Like that goes through like visually eli dialogue and I i don't know it's you know. Sold the little things that that come together. Now for sure Were you an all familiar with like frida kahlo in any kind of capacity before the beyond like the obvious knowing no no no i'm not i'm not big into like art period. It's not like a free college specifically. I'm not huge into like the world of visual art.

selma hayek diego rivera Geoffrey rush diego luna Antonio banderas as ticao Taymor Diego luna freda Alfred molina frida julie Frida oscars oscar payne frida kahlo
Rental Assistance Programs Are Swooping In To Help As Evictions Resume

All Things Considered

01:46 min | 9 months ago

Rental Assistance Programs Are Swooping In To Help As Evictions Resume

"The Biden administrations eviction ban, There's even greater urgency to get billions of dollars in federal rental assistance to those who need it. Shelby County, Tennessee, is already facing that challenge. NPR's Laura Wamsley reports. SP KEY and apartments versus Delores Egleston in a courthouse in Memphis. Tenants are packed into eviction court as much as social distancing will allow when their cases are called. Tenants are asked this question by Judge Phyllis Gardner. Have you talked with anyone? Or are you interested in the rental assistance program? I've talked in case after case Gardner urges tenants to visit room 1 34 down the hall. Where Memphis area legal services attorneys help tenants start applications for rental aid. One of those attorneys, Frida Turner, stands up in the courtroom to speak about the program if you apply, and if you're approved We will pay up to 12 months of your back rent plus one month of futurist. We will bring you to zero and you'll get a fresh start a fresh start. That's what's new even if evictions aren't thanks to the billions in federal aid tenants who are behind have a chance to stay in their homes due to a federal court ruling in July. Judges here in Tennessee haven't been bound by the CDC order for more than a month. The judge Gardner, the CDC order delayed the inevitable while in Memphis, they started resolving cases. We've been able to deal with the problems to give these people and landlords some closure so that they can move on. The most recent CDC ban was intended to give states and localities more time to get assistance out to renters facing eviction. But it's been slow going by the end of July. Nationally, just over five billion of the $25 billion allocated had been spent. Several states have used less than 5% of the federal money so far. But in Memphis and

Biden Administrations Laura Wamsley Delores Egleston Judge Phyllis Gardner Memphis Frida Turner Shelby County Tennessee Gardner NPR CDC
"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:02 min | 11 months ago

"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Free to <Speech_Female> did. Continue to participate <Speech_Female> in her activism <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Female> painting <Speech_Male> shortly after <Speech_Female> contracting gangrene <Speech_Female> freighter <Speech_Female> had her leg amputated <Speech_Female> in nineteen <Silence> fifty-three <Speech_Male> with <Speech_Female> several operations <Speech_Female> and mounting <Speech_Male> health issues. <Speech_Male> Freda entered <Speech_Male> a period of <Speech_Female> deep depression <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in nineteen fifty. <Speech_Male> Four frito <Speech_Male> was readmitted <Speech_Male> to the hospital with <Silence> pneumonia. <Speech_Male> Despite <Speech_Female> her health issues <Speech_Male> to would have <Speech_Male> final public <Speech_Male> appearance <Speech_Male> at a protest. <Speech_Male> Against president. <Speech_Male> Jacob arbenz <Speech_Male> on july <Speech_Male> second nineteen <Silence> fifty four <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Male> little more than <Speech_Female> a week later <Speech_Female> freda passed <Speech_Female> away on july <Speech_Female> thirteenth <Speech_Female> nineteen fifty <Speech_Female> four at <Speech_Female> the age of forty <Silence> seven. <Speech_Male> There was some <Speech_Male> controversy surrounding <Speech_Male> her death <Speech_Male> but it was reported. <Speech_Male> Free to die <Speech_Male> due to a pulmonary. <Silence> Embolism <Speech_Male> after <Speech_Male> fritos passing. <Speech_Male> Her house was <Speech_Male> converted into a <Speech_Male> living museum by <Speech_Male> her husband. <Speech_Male> Immortalising <Speech_Male> her incredible <Speech_Male> style and individuality <Silence> <Speech_Male> free to live <Speech_Male> out loud <Speech_Male> embraced the <Speech_Male> bazaar and <Speech_Male> walked her own <Speech_Male> path <Speech_Male> her art <Speech_Male> inspired and <Speech_Male> move so many <Speech_Male> especially <Speech_Male> those who may <Speech_Male> have otherwise <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> overlooked <Speech_Male> underrepresented <Speech_Male> and invisible <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to put it simply <Speech_Male> freda was <Speech_Male> a feminist <Speech_Male> icon <Speech_Male> free to did not <Speech_Female> allow any <Speech_Male> limitations <Speech_Male> imposed by either <Speech_Male> society or <Speech_Female> own body <Speech_Female> to stop <Speech_Female> from doing what <Silence> she wanted. <Speech_Male> We were lucky <Speech_Male> to be <Speech_Male> grace with art <Speech_Female> ingenious <Speech_Male> status frida kahlo <Speech_Male> paving <Speech_Female> the way for years <Silence> to come. <Speech_Male> Now this <Speech_Male> quote from free that <Speech_Male> just may become <Speech_Male> one of my most <Speech_Male> favorite quotes <Speech_Male> of all time. <Speech_Male> I can <Speech_Male> tell right off the <Speech_Female> bat that her <Speech_Female> would have <SpeakerChange> been best <Speech_Female> friends <Speech_Music_Female> easy. <Silence> <Speech_Male> I used <Speech_Female> to think. I <Speech_Male> was the strangest <Speech_Male> person in <Speech_Male> the world. <Speech_Male> Then i <Speech_Male> thought <Speech_Male> there are so many <Speech_Male> people in the <Speech_Male> world. There <Speech_Male> must be someone <Speech_Male> just like me <Speech_Male> who feels <Speech_Male> bazaar in <Speech_Male> flawed in the same <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> way <SpeakerChange> i <Silence> do. <Speech_Male> I <Silence> would imagine her <Speech_Male> imagine <Speech_Female> that she must <Speech_Female> be out <SpeakerChange> there thinking <Silence> of me too. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> i hope that <Speech_Male> if you are out there <Silence> and read this <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> know that yes <Speech_Male> it's true. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> here <Speech_Male> and i'm just <Speech_Male> as strange <SpeakerChange> as <Speech_Male> you. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Music_Female> can follow made <Speech_Music_Female> of metal podcast <Speech_Music_Female> on facebook <Speech_Music_Female> and instagram. <Speech_Music_Female> That's <Speech_Music_Female> made of <Speech_Music_Female> metal m. <Speech_Music_Female> e. <Speech_Music_Female> t. t. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> l. e. <Speech_Music_Female> if you'd like to support <Speech_Music_Male> please review <Speech_Music_Female> and cried <Speech_Music_Female> to the show. Wherever <Speech_Music_Female> you listen to <Speech_Music_Female> your podcast. I'll be starting <Speech_Female> patriae on <Speech_Music_Female> and we'll be offering <Speech_Music_Female> live chats <Speech_Music_Female> bonus up <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> roads <Speech_Music_Female> early releases <Speech_Music_Female> so stay <Speech_Music_Female> tuned <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> as always <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> much for listening <Speech_Music_Female> and bloom <Speech_Music_Female> where you're <Music> planted. <SpeakerChange>

Jacob arbenz pneumonia depression facebook
"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:49 min | 11 months ago

"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Thanks to the support of the art community freda also featured her own paintings in her first major solo exhibition at a new york city gallery. Freda sold half the paintings. That were showcased. In addition to receiving a commission from the famous editor clare. Boothe luce around this time. Free to move two pairs to live where she also held another exhibition impairs galleries connecting with artists such as pablo picasso. It's so amazing. to me. That a brilliant mind like free to call with able to connect with someone equally amazing as pablo picasso as free to continued her progress in her own art career. Buzz began to generate over her work in nineteen forty. One frito was commissioned by her own home of mexico to create five portraits of prominent and impactful mexican women. Unfortunately freda was unable to finish the commission as her father passed away and managing her chronic. Health issues began taking a larger toll on her mental physical and emotional daily life during this period freed. His popularity continued to floors and grow free to establish yourself as a figure of exceptional style opinionated in open free to believe that women to had a voice and refused to allow herself to become overshadowed by her husband. Frito would not allow her ailments to prevent her from participating in her solo exhibition. Especially after all the hard work. It took to reach the position. She was in to be taken seriously. Enough to have a gallery. Exhibition was no small feat especially for disabled ethnic woman artist. She arrived at her first solo exhibition by ambulance and entertain guests while hosting the galley celebration from a four postal bed that she requested to have set up in the lobby. Freda enjoyed an almost like following with her work and would continue to live her life in such a way that people are mired in were fascinated by her paintings are often so portrait's depicting her own interpretations of her world. Some of her work would feature herself and others. Such as one of her most famous works titled frida and diego and miss work. Free to stands beside yego holding his hand while he holds a paintbrush in palate in the other and another work titled the to fritos. Freda painted two different self-portrait standing side-by-side each version of frieder has our chest opened in the heart exposed with one having a damaged heart in the other heart fully intact. A third famous painting by freda was her work. Titled the broken column in this painting. Frida is nearly nude into picks. Herself is being split down the middle with a shattered spinal column in her whole body covered in nails free to use her art work as an extension of her own voice showing herself to be expressive. Brash and bold. She did not shy away from the grittier side of life. Taking care to use her art as a way of highlighting personal issues that are not as easily expressed fritos work would have several themes from personal identity to feminism to family and fritos later years. Her health issues began to worsen creating even more pain in her daily life around nineteen fifty free to contracted gangrene in her foot and was hospitalized for more than six months during this time..

freda Freda pablo picasso new york city gallery Boothe luce frito clare Frito yego Buzz frieder mexico frida diego Frida Brash gangrene
"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

05:06 min | 11 months ago

"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Further encouraging freedom to pursue social activism while. Let's free to join the mexican communist party as well as the young communist league. Frito also suffered a devastating offense that would change her life forever. While traveling with the lover free was involved in a bad accident when a car hit the bus they were travelling on in september of nineteen. Twenty five free. His injuries were extensive in horrific she was impaled by a handrail which resulted in fractures in her pelvis as well as her spine frito was hospitalized for more than several weeks while she recovered from the accident it was during this tumultuous period where freedom i began her journey into painting in the arts free to paint during her recovery and eventually finished her first self portrait. During this time marriage is a pivotal step for anybody for free. Does marriage would become a major milestone in her life and iconic in history. Frida i met her future husband. The famous mexican painter diego rivera at her high school in nineteen twenty. Two diego was creating a mirrow in the school's auditorium and frieda would often visit looking on in miring lee. Some afrita france remarked that freda shared her feelings for diego saying that she would have his children in the future. Diego and freda officially started their relationship in nineteen twenty eight after reconnecting. Diego was a mentor. And one of fritos early supporters in her artwork as they were establishing their relationship. Diego and frieda would travel together based on where diego would receive his commissions. Frida and diego were living in. San francisco then traveled to new york city for show at the museum of modern art of eventually ending up in detroit for a commission with the detroit institute of arts and nineteen thirty three while in new york. Frida and diego stirred up. Some compelling controversy surrounding his commission diego was commissioned by nelson rockefeller to create a mural titled man at the crossroads the mural was located at the rca building in the rockefeller center a prominent and distinguished landmark..

mexican communist party diego Frito Frida freda frieda Diego diego rivera france detroit institute of arts museum of modern art San francisco new york city detroit nelson rockefeller new york rca building rockefeller center
"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

02:43 min | 11 months ago

"frida" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Hey there be wind. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable odd so first of all. Let me apologize. Because if i sound a little weird i had a really great weekend so it was doing a lot of yelling with a good yelling funneling so my voice is just a little little strained. So thank you for being with me but it was a great time so yeah but i was really excited to get back here and start recording really excited share this story in a shocking twist. This is someone who. I've always loved and admired but didn't know much about in terms of the finer details of their life. I really really enjoyed learning about this figure and now i'm so excited to share their on spiring story with few to me. This person has always represented a strong powerful thought provoking figure in the arts. This individual established themselves in a community that was historically male dominated and quite difficult to break into even for those with all the right connections. This individual spark dynamic debates about important issues affecting marginalized groups using their platform invoice to further the agenda of those who were usually silenced. They were a creative powerhouse. Full a prolific vision carving out space for themselves and the most beautiful way. They knew how so today. We'll be discussing the remarkable the radiance the renowned freda cowo- so let's get right into it. Free to kalo was born on july six nineteen o seven in mexico city mexico and i love beautiful unique names so i have to share fritos. Full name fritos. Full name was magdalena carmen. Frida carlo equal durham fritos. Mother was mexican of native american and spanish descent while her father was german of hungarian descent. Fritos father was a photographer who met her mother after he emigrated to mexico frieda and her father had a close bond with feeder spending much time with him in his studio watching him work in developed photos free to.

ari freda cowo magdalena carmen Frida carlo kalo mexico city mexico durham frieda
Five Minutes Too Costly

Joseyphina's World

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Five Minutes Too Costly

"Free to her nearest future sorted out out of school then with national service retained the company for her impressive work ethics a marriage proposal from her university sweetheart. Her life was running smooth and to make her white wedding dream come true her mother's best friend. Living in the states invited her over to spend some time with her so they could shop for big day. What else could she ask for kevin. Her fiance wasn't amused about the fact that they would be apart for some months but frida was able to convince him that it was just an effort to make sure they had a memorable ceremony and besides she was the one paying for the dress and the accessories. Who is he to complain so up in the air. She went her brain cataloging everything she had to do and get to sparkle her big day. She was on cloud nine. We're building castles. In the air was allowed. She met her auntie's yeah. Every friend of the parents automatically becomes an anti and uncle son at the airport. He was a gentleman by all standards and made her feel welcome instantly. They had had a brief encounter when his mother brought him along many years ago for the holidays they were both very young and the memories. Were quite faint. But they hit it off as if they had been in touch since then she arrived at her auntie's home and then she was received warmly. The three of them chatted for a long while. Catching up cacho. Can you believe fritos about to get married. You should sit up. You're not getting any younger you know. She said in a lighthearted tone but her message was loud and clear. He laughed it off but he excused himself to his room. Not too long after when free to retire to the guest room. She quickly contacted her parents and then her husband to be. They chatted till she does off the next day cut. You drove his mother and freed around town as they went window. Shopping free noticed that he kept stealing glances her in the rear view mirror. She thought his actions to be flattering in the beginning but when he winked at her a red flag waved in her mind. The gesture was harmless in itself. But what she sensed behind. The wink made her cringe.

National Service Frida Cacho Kevin
"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Embeds i can just by tunnel net flicks so to have the footage age yet. I'm going to create something from this. It just really presented that dove rebecca. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast and speaking so amazingly and passionately Fee carlo and. Yeah i really. I really appreciate your time at your wealth of knowledge that you've that you've shared with us and before you go. I do have one final question as the has to podcast after. Oh so my final question and you can take as large or as of small much as you weren't really but my final question is why is our and why are important to me. is important because we're all trying to make sense of the world. We're trying to make sense of our own. Our own existence is on a large scale as well. And i feel like all gives us a chance to recognize in ourselves while other people feeding to set kind of feeling that low bit lately unloving asking this question of getting so many buried responses so so great thank you so much or you go over becca. Where can people find you. So i actually Having a kind that is do with astrology and And crystal healing it so you can only cosmic cures actually cosmic undergo kua on that. It's a lot of that is about female empowerment and life made vacation and things. So i think that's why resonate. With friedrich well i kind of feel like she was she is really trying to trying to do women. Ask thank you so so much. I really appreciate it because it's a friend right. Great is great. Thank you for having me on and it got me to revisit. Some of my favorite pieces of Which.

friedrich Fee carlo one final question dove rebecca becca
"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"The henry ford hospital. If i go to the name again that one's as also known as the floating beds an. Yeah it was. You had the miscarriage nineteen ninety-two at usa painted. This like shortly after on your by a harrowing in haunting is exactly the ads A naked twisted freda still blighted from pregnancy on hospital bed are now these red ribbons the look kind of life. I suppose i'm below codes vein annette coming from hatton fighting ryan the bed at six objects and one of them is a snail to punish shy. Slow the operation.

six objects one nineteen ninety-two usa ryan freda annette hatton ford hospital
Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

WSJ What's News

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Digital artwork sells for record $69M at Christie's

"A digital artwork has set a new record at christie's selling for sixty nine point. Three million dollars that's higher than bids for artwork by frida kahlo and salvador dali. Our ceylan off says the collage by artist. People also set a record for the non fungible token market. She'll explain simply put an. Nf nafta is just this digital token that conveys ownership. so you can think of f. as digital collectibles the idea is that you have this asset online and there is only one owner of it and because of that that gives it some level of scarcity it gives it some value where it gets more technical is the fact that that authenticity is guaranteed through information conveyed on blockchain which is the same technology that underlies bitcoin. It's just saying here. Is these specific. Asset here's data. it was created. Here is the name of the work of art in this case. And here's all of that information preserved so that you can actually track who owns this digital asset because assets online. You know if you have an image you can share it. You can make an. Mimi can do all sorts of things with it and there really hasn't historically been one owner and this lets you do that.

Frida Kahlo Salvador Dali Christie Blockchain Nafta Mimi
Podcasting IS Branding with Chris Hines

Brands On Brands On Brands

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Podcasting IS Branding with Chris Hines

"So i want to hear what what you love about podcasting and when i say that i say it because i think for me i had to use my voice to find it and i. I like to say that. Because until when i started i didn't i was like i just need to. I wanted my reputation but in like talking about things and force myself to use my voice. I kind of found. There's this trend. Like i keep talking about these things because when you get out of your head and you're just you're forced to talk every week you start to come up with. This is what. I'm kind of pissed off about today. This is what i'm talking about. There's a trend and so by using it. I kind of found like what i want to be passionate about before you like when you started to get into podcasting or even just now like what is it about podcasting. That is really you up and made you kind of focus on that. I've always had a strong opinion. And i've never really been afraid to speak my mind like public. Speaking never frightened me. I can't remember one distinct moment in high school. It was kinda one of those lazy days where the class wasn't doing anything. And i i just went to the first class and i just started talking to everybody and asking people questions and it was like open forum where we will just have it as mass discussion. It was about basketball. But i was standing in front of the class talking to everybody. We're argued about sports. My professor is like easier going to be a comedian republic speaker. And i was like oh of non much to do that so i can't ignore it later on in college. Isos forced to take a public speaking class. And at the time. I still was speaking publicly yet but i wanted me take discourse and actually did it and i attended and everything and i loved it and has been one of the best things ever so they got me so deep into podcasting is it's a way arcane consistently like you say use my voice in share my thoughts opinions on different things. It's just it's freedom for me. This is frida. I love it. I could not imagine life without it now. You have a show called the personal branding. Playbook it's one of your shows you of a few and in that show you talk about building personal brands podcasting and more one of the episodes you talked about. Why podcasting is the future. And i want to be fully biased. 'cause i always hold my whole my punches back mike. Well you could also do a youtube. You can also do a blog for me. Podcasting is what's right. Let's talk about that a little bit like. Why is podcast future. Because i want to convince some people today to just get off their butts and like try man now is the time i keep trying to tell people time because five years ago when i started podcasting people looked at me crazy. My family literally asked me. Why are you talking to yourself in a closet awesome. It was crazy years ago. now it's mainstream. everybody either has a show or they know somebody with what so. Now's the perfect time to start with. Because they are so popular right so the main reason. Why park has it gives. A future is because of the networking aspect. This is probably the most underrated feature of hosting a show. When you're host of apart as you don't always have to do interviews. In fact i advise you don't always interviews but you get to connect with some amazing people and they teach you so much like i've learned a lot from having conversations with people there. Were all my show. We built amazing relationships and in those same people some of them come back on my show again like bestselling authors like millionaires they. I've learned so much from these people. It's like my own masterclass like so the networking aspect is like the top for me. Yeah i think it's the same for me. And it wasn't what i thought when i went into it when i went into it i was like i want to this so that i can create content and so that i can become known for something and i was like what when i started interviewing people in fact when i started show it was a solo show and thirty episodes only solo show but i got coaching. 'cause i was like i love podcasting but i want to do it. That guy so. I found someone that was doing it well. And it turned out that like adding interviews changed everything for me because the networking it opened up doors and now and i introduced myself to people that i really said of being a fan boy and saying hey i love what you do. Love your book and i can be like. Hey i actually like to get into your book and ask you some questions that got you know to really dive deeper on something and they love that and i love all. They love it authors. Love it because it's like you first of all you bought my book. I appreciate that. Oh you wanna talk to me of book. Oh for sure like very rarely. Do i reach out for an interview and a person is like no. I don't wanna do that like it's very tell people all the time like the best part of the is you get to network and then everybody you wanna talk to wants to talk to you now. You will have a few. that are like busy. Maybe later this year but most of them are going to say yes. It's very rare that they're like nah. I don't wanna talk to you at all. That's very rare. I'm curious about your opinion on getting people started. And how you get them to go. And then i'll give you mine. But how do you get people started. What's like your path step one-two-three if you had to give someone a sequence to follow to be. Oh may step one is to have a goal for your show to many podcasts star with no go there just like i kinda wanna to sponsor i would like to sellable or i just want host. Show wanna talk. Whatever your decision is. That's fine but you have to have one goal. Step two is to have a theme for your show because if you just talking about everything and it's which is up every week i'm not subscribing. I'm pretty sure every park has listeners. Like this you have certain shows that are for entertainment for a certain type entertainment. You have go shows that you go to for news. Maybe have educational shows. So you have to figure out what you're famous for show and number three is to really have a direction like are you gonna do. Seasons isn't going to be solo. The it up a bit a what's your style of producing your show so the first stages for me. It's always planning like plan i am. I forgot how the saying goes. Who said it. What is it a sharpened a knife for ninety nine times and cut once measure nine times and cut once there. It is so it's the same day Exactly i think my my stepdad. You say measure twice. Cut once so that you don't like yeah you can mess up the would you don't want you cut it right. You've got it wrong your script. I love that now. I'd say the same thing. Honestly when i get people on a call i offer you know by talking for twenty minutes for free. It's no problem. I can't teach you how to watch a whole show but at twenty minutes. I bet you will get you in the vicinity of what the show is going to be about. Because if i asked you just a few questions you are the one who knows not just your the realm you know the the category you wanna be in but you typically know what it is. It makes you different. You just haven't said it out loud enough times for to for you to hear yourself. So i think if i can give people there to where they have a sense of. This is what i want to talk about. Then the fires lit up inside of them. And if you can get the show somewhat named even then like then it's their baby and like they're off to the races and then from there like don't worry about the people getting it done better than than perfect and i'm like i have mixed feelings about that but for me. I'm more like getting it done to where you've recorded something and not distributed it not putting. It tunes that literally just record some things a couple episodes solo interview. Whatever records some things. You can get a sense of what this could be for you if i can get you there and just tell you. Those couple of things might help you with that. Then i think you're golden and once you've experienced it then you'll have the passion to want to learn the things that are harder usually stop people though. Yeah yeah man. Because you know it's funny coming from the basketball world it's normalized for athletes and players to invest in himself to get better like that's a normal thing. If i'm telling you i'm working on going to the olympics are higher three trainers and i have a nutritionist. You will look at me crazy and say oh. That's good do well but podcasters don't have this approach to podcasting yet. It is worrisome to me because the industry is becoming bigger and bigger and bigger and more money being poured into it. But if you're not a podcast you can't see any of those benefits is not gonna work so you have to invest in yourself as a host to get better at your craft like you wanna learn how to interview and be a great interview. You have to learn that you don't just wake up one day and you're amazing at it because you wished it on night. It doesn't work like that. So i think we need to make it normal for people to invest in themselves to become a better park.

Frida Basketball Youtube Mike Olympics
How O Magazines Arianna Davis Made It, on Her Own Terms

Latina to Latina

02:28 min | 1 year ago

How O Magazines Arianna Davis Made It, on Her Own Terms

"You're right anyone yearning for more creatively fulfilling life. Shouldn't strive to emulate or be. Frida the most impactful art is created when you tell your own story. What is the story. Then that you would want to tell me one of my goals in one of the stories. I want to tell through my career as a journalist and a writer is inspiring other women particularly women of color. And i think that. That's that's my point here in drawing from fritos life is not to say. Here's a blueprint of how to live your life. But it's more here's the story of a woman who lived her life boldly very far ahead of her time. And hopefully just by reading restoring gets no her. You'll be inspired to live your own life your own way but boldly treated a mascot a different way. Which is if you were telling your own story. Where would you want that story to begin with being a little girl. I grew up in outside of baltimore. Data's black my mom's puerto rican to grew up by racial. Ed grew up in the suburbs around the white kids and with the private school. So identity for me was always a very complicated thing especially as a kid. And i was also really shy kid and i was the kid who always heather nose in a book so i think my story would probably start with being a little girl and just finding such solace in such escape in the pages of a book. And that's really what i think kick started my love of writing and reading and storytelling and it would then kind of take me through. This journey of wanted to be a writer. Going to penn state in setting journalism thinking that i had to go down the newspaper track because that was what was accessible at the time versus magazines. What i really want always wanted to do. But the road of magazines so inaccessible. It was this glamorous world that only to be frank women who had access privilege and could pay to move to new york city in intern. Not make much money but it was. Thanks to I was a scholarship student at penn state in at a dinner that we had the publisher of seventeen magazine spokane. She gave this really inspirational speech. And afterwards you know this was either crazier genius. But i basically would follow her to the bathroom and told her i would love to break in journalism. I would love to be magazines. I asked her business card her name. Is jane jamieson. And once i moved to new york. I reached out. Should we had coffee. She was super helpful and she basically long story short helped me to get my foot in the door and get my resume to apply for postgraduate entertainment oprah magazine and that's really. What kind of kicked off my career

Heather Nose Frida Baltimore ED Jane Jamieson Frank New York City Spokane New York Oprah Magazine
Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

Q

12:19 min | 1 year ago

Big Freedia "Queen of Bounce"

"On stage in front of a sweaty crowd of people pushed together dress their best remember? Beginning crowds of people with other sweaty people and being dressed your best and not just wearing pajamas all the time. Bounce music is party music and big Frida will she's the Queen abounds. It's a sub genre hip hop that originated in New Orleans, where big Frieda is from people lose their minds when they see big freedom perform. She wraps torques and she Wants you to both rap and torque. Big Frieda has had a busy year despite the pandemic. Last time we spoke on cue, she had just released new music. She was hosting Friday night shakedown parties and a cooking show. And now she's got a new holiday deep and her 2015 memoir, God, Save the Queen Diva. Is out in paperback. I got up with Big Frieda over Zoom, and she started off by explaining what it is that she loves that she adores about bounce music. I mean, I love my crowd. First and foremost, I love the culture of bounce music. I love the origin way comes from my love The people that love the music. The sound the base the boom, they're not, You know, I love everything about it. It's You know is what I know. It's what I grew up listening to is what I enjoy. It is my type of music. What do you think it is that the audience gets out of it. Like when? What do you think that when people watch you and your dancers go like what do you think they get out of it? Well, A lot of people have told me over and over that it's like a bounce revival. You know, like they some type of spirit comes within them. And they, you know, they let their self loose and they lay their hair down and they party and they have a good time. I'm so happy you said about survival. I want to play this. Take a listen. Please don't harm being faces. Either room killers all read in about a minute Walk, Walk, walk, walk up in the room maker maker becoming a man's globules. No one's reading you. That is my guest. Big freedom. Performing the title track offer latest Keep Louder, which came out earlier this year featuring I kind of pop. So Bounce revival you in this in the video for that there's bounce and there's gospel music, So let's just let's just get their facts straight here. You started out in the church right in church choir. Did. I started out Very young in church. Um, I later became a choir director and my church home at my high school. I had my own choir somewhere Many quiet around New Orleans traveled the world with a choir. So yes, started in gospel music, and then you had to make a decision right between bounce and gospel. Well, at some point, I'd be it. You know, One sound. I started to get heavier. And so the bounce music and things kind of started to take off for me. I kind of have to make a decision. Yeah, but that was that a hard call. Itwas. It was very hard. Um, you know, I talk to a few people. First. I talked to my mom and then I talked to a few people at the church. I talked to my godmother, Georgia who's in the book. Um, you know about the situation and about what was going on in my life in these transitions, and yeah, it was a hard call. And, you know, my mom always said no matter what, long as you keep God first and everything that you do, I think you'll be okay and that stuck with me and I made my decision right? You're right, because it's not just a matter of like, I don't have a lot of time. Like I have. I have to get me That's part of it. But it's also sort of a spiritual decision, you know? Yeah, it is. You know, I was tossing and turning, you know, while making the decision off, you know, going into over crossing over to bounce music, but I never lost my faith. And I never lost my hope. And I never lost my love for gospel music. Still listen to it all the time. I still you know, Go back and saying what the quiet when we have unions, so I'm still you know, I'm still connected. And And you know, the building is the is just the place and I still have church in. They must love to see you when you come in to sing with the choir again. Oh, yeah, it be like old times. You know, we'd be all happy to see each other, You know, And then I go back into a whole nother person. I'm not freedom. When I go to church, you know, it's like I go back to when I was growing up and where my roots come from, so It brings me back in the aisle. I love to be reminded of where I come from. Well, let's let's bring it back to what you said earlier about about survival. What similarities? You see between bounce and gospel? Well, um, I see a lot of singularities first. I see that, you know, is a gathering of people and then You know, there's something that come over them. You know when they're at abound. Show that something that comes over them when they're at church. I'm also still directing. I'm directing. When I was directing in church. I will open my hands and people will, you know, saying now one pointing my finger and people shaking ass is so it has a lot of similarities. Still, you know, I feel still like, feel kind of feel like the director when I'm on stage. Yeah, The The intention in the process is the same. The result is a tiny bit different. I get it. Yeah. Most most of the time for church, people falling on pews. And, uh, you know, when I'm at abound, shield they're they're falling out with their ass is My guest is my guest is big Frieda. Another thing that struck me in your book, and you mentioned this. Just that actually was how strong your relationship was with your mom. Um, I know I know your mom since past I'm really sorry for your loss, and I I could only imagine what it would have lost. That must be because you get the feeling that your mom just gave you unwavering support. And you tell this story. I was hoping you might tell about the principle. Call in home on you and your mom having to stick up for you know what he well, you know, I always had issues when they came to my hair. And what do you mean? I always wanted to wear my hair all type of ways and exotic and you know hi to the feeling and there's one particular time I had went to school with a foul. That was kind of high like Marge Simpson, You know that high of a style. And the principal was just not happy. When I walked in school. He was just very much not happy. He called my mom right away. He was fun family, and he, you know, cousin. And my mom went to the school and put him right in his place and said that the Children should be worried about their education and not worried about my child's here. So she told him just the two bit where to get off at, But she always defended me. No matter what. She was my queen. She was my rock. She was my biggest cheerleader. And when I told my mom at an early age that I knew that I was gay, she said that she already knew and that she loved me for who I am. So once I had the support of my mom Um, I didn't need approval from anybody else in the world. So my life really begin at that point off, starting to make my own decisions and feeling really finding out who I was and finding my truth. There. I don't need to tell you. There are parents who would not be a supportive right? Oh, yeah, Most definitely. I had friends who Mom was not supported. That wasn't having it that you know, they couldn't do the things that idea or they couldn't go to places I went or, you know they couldn't be themselves. You know, I don't with that growing up as well. A lot of my friends around me had issues at home that they were fighting. And they will come from me and my mom as the outlet. She was the cool, mama. She must be still with you, You know? She's my guarding an angel. She walks inside of me every day. She's in. She's still within me, and she helps to protect and make things happen for me. If you're just tuning in, my guess is Big Frieda. She's known as Queen of Bounce. Her memoir is out now in paperback. It's called God Save the Queen Diva. You've been talking a lot about bounce you've been talking about, you know, keeping going during some of these dark moments, and in the book, you talk about it particularly dark moment You get pretty candid about Hurricane Katrina. You were with your siblings when it struck. Your niece was with you. Who was just a little baby. Can you tell me a little bit about that story? You know, Katrina was really rough in life changing for all of us. You know, we had to be evacuated by boat. Um, you know, we have to cut a hole in the roof to try to get your rescues to even see us who kept flying over us and picking up neighbors, right? Um, next door to us. So we had some really trying times We slept on the bridge. We slept at the convention center for a few days. We went on a cargo plane and got dropped off at an army camp base. What? Then we slept. Yeah, there we slept at a warming campgrounds. Then we went to ST or then we went to the class Louisiana. Then we went. I went to Houston. Then I moved back to New Orleans. So my life was in a really Um, it was a roller coaster, and it was, um Roller coaster of emotions and moving and restructure in my life and finding out where I was going to live, you know, along with my family and I think often Katrina, though, because it gave people a chance to start their lives over, especially if your life was in shambles, or you needed a new start. But for me it also let me know that material. Things don't mean anything long as you could survive and have your life you can get through anything and all that other stuff can be brought again. But you can't buy your life again. And that was the most important for me with survival moments for me and my family to survive during those times, and a lot of times we take tragedies for for granted when we see things on on TV and on the news and on, you know, on the radio. But After experiencing country Noah. I took everything that I saw into account and I felt the pain of those people and what they went through and whatever catastrophic disaster death he had, But Katrina was definitely life changing for New Orleans. On. We're still recovering each day. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was good. I don't want to, in any way imply that it was Ah, anyway. Good thing. It was absolutely devastating thing that happened her Katrina, But like do you think That you'd be Where you are today if you hadn't survive something like that. Not at all. You know, even surviving it. You know, it also put The sound of bounce music even further because we were displaced all over the world, and people started to want to know what's that music? What type of music is that? Can you teach me the dances? You know we were. We were all over the world. They had a little New Orleans all over the world, And when those New Orleans people were displaced, they wanted to listen to their type of music. And it was New Orleans bounce so people in Houston and Atlanta and you know, everywhere we were man. What is that music, you know? Teach me that. Show me that. And I thought if the travel all over people started requesting me And when I got to the different clubs and in venues, it was like Michael Jackson or Prince had a ride because the people were screaming and holiday and like running up to me, like, Oh, my God, I can't believe you here, you know, but it was felt. Like a sense of home and I wanted to bring some joy into those people like that was going through some stuff and I was still trying to bring joy in my own life, so it felt good to go around and see people of New Orleans. And how they missed the culture and how they missed the music. So the music really started to spray it and got me even further. Are you cool with that? Are you cool? When when? When

Big Frieda New Orleans Frieda Frida Katrina Marge Simpson Georgia Hurricane Katrina Houston Louisiana ST Noah Atlanta Michael Jackson Prince
"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"That <Speech_Female> in a while. So yeah. <Speech_Female> I really appreciate <Music> you <Music> asking me. Thank <Music> <Advertisement> key <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> there. <Speech_Female> You have it. The end <Speech_Music_Female> of another episode of <Speech_Music_Female> the jaws art <Music> history podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> opportunity <Speech_Female> once again to thank <Speech_Female> rebecca for coming <Speech_Female> on and speaking so <Speech_Music_Female> passionately <Speech_Music_Female> about <Speech_Music_Female> the life <Speech_Female> of leader carl. <Speech_Music_Female> I really <Speech_Music_Female> hope you've learned a thing. Or two <Speech_Music_Female> is certainly <Speech_Music_Female> socially <Speech_Female> have an. I feel aggrieved <Speech_Female> appreciation <Speech_Music_Female> now more than ever having <Speech_Music_Female> spent some time <Speech_Music_Female> reading <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> into this woman's <Speech_Music_Female> incredible <Speech_Female> life and i would <Speech_Female> once again. <Speech_Female> Aren't you to series <Speech_Female> the goal. We <Speech_Female> do some digging in diving <Speech_Music_Female> off your own. <Speech_Music_Female> The life and <Speech_Music_Female> works feeder carlo <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> in preparation for this <Speech_Music_Female> podcast. I came across <Speech_Music_Female> some incredible <Speech_Music_Female> videos <Speech_Music_Female> on youtube <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> a couple of them <Speech_Music_Female> in the show notes as <Speech_Music_Female> well as a link <Speech_Music_Female> to my instagram <SpeakerChange> page <Speech_Music_Female> on my <Speech_Music_Female> website. Which will <Speech_Music_Female> show you <SpeakerChange> over. Works <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that we <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> discussed and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> If he would like to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> get in touch please <Speech_Female> do. You can email <Speech_Female> me. Joe's <Speech_Female> art history <Speech_Female> at g. Miller <Speech_Female> or you can <Speech_Music_Female> follow me on instagram <Speech_Music_Female> at joe's <Speech_Music_Female> bar testing <Speech_Music_Female> and i will leave <Speech_Music_Female> linked to rebecca's <Speech_Music_Female> instagram peach <Speech_Music_Female> and the shoulders <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Music_Female> finally. If you <Speech_Music_Female> have enjoyed this episode <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> thank someone <Speech_Female> who would enjoy <Speech_Female> listening to <Speech_Music_Female> please do feel <Speech_Music_Female> free to pass on <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> hey why not <Speech_Female> while. You're doing that lake <Speech_Music_Female> rate and subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> to <Speech_Female> the series <Speech_Female> which means you will never <Speech_Female> miss another episode <Speech_Music_Female> on a partly <Speech_Music_Female> also helps other <Speech_Music_Female> people the <Speech_Music_Female> podcast. <Speech_Female> Also if you're <Speech_Music_Female> able to do so. I would <Speech_Music_Female> be really grateful <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> if you could leave <Speech_Music_Female> few to the show <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> backs with <Speech_Music_Female> helpful <Speech_Music_Female> fatally. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> much for <Speech_Music_Female> listening and i really hope <Speech_Music_Female> you enjoyed this episode. <Speech_Music_Female> I've been <Speech_Music_Female> clint your <Speech_Music_Female> host unfriendly <Speech_Female> art historian. And <Speech_Female> i look forward to welcoming <Speech_Music_Female> you next <Speech_Music_Female> on the chores. Art <Speech_Music_Female> history podcast <Speech_Music_Female> until <Speech_Female> then keep learning. <Speech_Music_Female> I <SpeakerChange> remember <Speech_Music_Female> art as <Silence> for all.

"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"frida" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"The henry ford hospital. If i go to the name again that one's as also known as the floating beds an yeah it was. You had the miscarriage. Nineteen thirty two at usa painted this like shortly after on your by a harrowing in haunting is exactly the ads A naked twisted free still blighted from pregnancy on hospital bed are now these red ribbons the look kind of life. I suppose i'm bill codes vein annette coming from hatton fighting ryan. The bed at six objects and one of them is a snail to punish shy. Slow the.

henry ford hospital usa hatton ryan
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:46 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her. Then eventually you take over an hour running freda yes fast forward. What something that people can't find out about you from google earth lincoln that i really you know up until that moment i really was not a risk taker at all. I told the line. I did what was laid out for me and i i would never in a million years have predicted that i would have veered off. Course

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Marlins Mets Amazon Miami Lehman Brothers American Airlines General Motors Burger King Miami Dolphins Burger New York King Florida Football Miami Beach
Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Chelsea Hirschhorn

"Hey everyone it's genial. I'm really excited today. And i have so many questions because today chelsea her short our guest on skinned from the couch. She is the founder and ceo afrita a company that makes products to make parents lives easier. I'm so excited. Because i like in my soon to be future. I will be obsessed with these products as my friends already are. It's one of the top selling parenting brands on amazon and you can find their products in over thirty thousand stores across the country chelsea. Thank you for being here. Welcomed skin from the couch. Thank you for having me a dory guys skin from the couch and take on a whole new meeting. yeah. I think everyone now is working from their couches. Okay we're gonna start out with an easy question. Skim your resume for us. Ooh okay. i worked in a candy store in high school in my town in in westchester my parents. Instill that of work ethic in both me and my siblings from a very young age but pressing fast forward too many details that far back i graduated from college went to law school where i met my husband and during law school. I was a legal intern for the new york. Mets my summer internship know the legal internship. When you're in law squad to your second year of law schools are a pretty big deal and it usually ends up. Hopefully if all goes well was an offer at the end of the summer and so my my summer internship after my second year of law school was with gotcha which was the pre eminent. Bankruptcy firm is started with them a second year of law school that was in two thousand seven and then got my offer. September two thousand eight. The world imploded. They actually asked. If i would start early. I started with them. I think it was like october. Two thousand eight. I joined the restructuring group and my first experiences. A lawyer was filing a general motors in american airlines bankruptcy and lehman brothers so spent about two years there and then my husband and i got married in about two thousand ten and he was general counsel for a brazilian private equity fund. That had just acquired burger king. They asked him and one of the other associates from the firm to go down to miami and run the restructuring. that's for burger. King is space and was founded. I left while you know shortly after we got married. Florida has what they call authorized house. Counsel's you actually don't have to take the bar if you work in house as an attorney. So it's really focused on finding an inhouse role and at the time removed. The miami marlins baseball team could had experience in baseball from law. School was opening a new ballpark so previous to that they had actually the facility from the miami dolphins the football team and they didn't have their own ballpark so they were building their own miami. I was brought on as associate in-house counsel director of non baseball revenues. So for the first time in franchise history. They were going to be trying to drive revenue that wasn't affiliated with baseball revenue. So it's sort of you know my first foray into running a peon. Al like an entrepreneurial or business unit within a large the larger confines of a much more resource organization and so i was there for four and a half years. I got pregnant with my first son a now three and we bought our first house in miami beach and my neighbor i was still working for the marlins in house. I was about probably six months pregnant at the time. My neighbor who was like the mayor of our blocks is lovely swedish woman. She invited us over for dinner and had been time about this business that she had started in her garage really and it was still in her garage. Had a few boxes of this swedish nasal spray that she sold to pediatrician's offices and baby boutiques and her kids were now teenagers and she wanted to know anyone. Miami interested in taking over the business. And i said you know about my okay my era i wasn't a parent yet. It didn't even it almost like went right over my head. Yeah i couldn't imagine what. The product was an eric as she wants you to buy the inventory for her.

Afrita Baseball Chelsea Westchester Mets Amazon Marlins Lehman Brothers Miami American Airlines General Motors Burger King New York Burger Miami Dolphins King Florida Football Miami Beach
A Conversation With Big Freedia

Unladylike

04:05 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Big Freedia

"Ri Babies, alright alright calm down. We talked to free and her five dogs from her home in New Orleans chef. So that's the five babies honey read offense. -Ation Yan. Say Royal and Farrell four girls and one boy and there are a hot mess right now 'cause they in heat. It is some stuff going on in here I'M READY TO WHIP ALL MED. Dig To grew up in public housing in the city's third ward and was super close with her family and neighbors as a kid free to pitched in with her mom's hairdressing business helped her aunt Organiz second line parades and saying in her Church's Gospel Choir every Sunday when she was in middle school in the early nineties, a new genre called bounce was starting to pop off in her neighborhood. It sounded like hip hop mixed with New Orleans brass band beats, and Mardi Gras parade chance. was planted like at the you know in our community and it was planted at the block parts at like the middle school dances and baby you hear that beat come on, you'll hit booming. You'll hear that trigger male. Brown. Cheeky Black Party was MAPA give because everybody getting hype an people starting to go crazy all the girls thought in the running these thought notorious though I'm getting excited like I'm saying it right now my leg was shaking my hands are moving because I'm featuring bill. You know I'm I have my hands on a flow in my feet on the wall and I'm upside down like shaking and. When you heard it is just with like infectious everybody just started to spray and we were just. In on rhythm in an hour own motion. Caroline, my legs were shaking right now to and. Not. Even they're not even those. Same So when Frieda was around twenty in the late nineties, her longtime friend Katie read emerged as the first trans bounce rapper and basically became the godmother of the genre and watching Katie. Read on stage really changed fritos life. Lock them. Why? Pay Him. Why We were friends before she started doing the music. And to see her. First doing the music our so. Happy and so excited because it's like damn my friend doing this. You know what I'm saying and she the first Gaiger in new. Orleans, like this is big. This is a part of history. This is you know this is a tone Saturday it was the thought of something new and fresh for her and us as friends and Orleans and. It was like an incredible moment like I'm just glad to be a part of that moment. fritos started helping Katie out dancing backup for her and helping her in the studio. Eventually she started performing herself using a nickname of friend had given her big. Frida. I was just like I gotTa have a face name that these girls is not gonNA forget I want to do something different. You know that everybody was doing. You know we had already we had Katie Ray we have Vaccari do I say, well, what's GonNa make me stay out different from them. So I when I do my stage introduction I was say this the one and only big the queen diva the either your best up on leave and the crowd would just go crazy and if you owe. Her name. Lucy. She created diva the. Believe. The late Nike.

Katie Ray New Orleans Orleans -Ation Yan Organiz Fritos Lucy Farrell Nike Black Party Mardi Gras Katie Frieda Caroline Brown Vaccari
"frida" Discussed on CXR Podcast

CXR Podcast

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"frida" Discussed on CXR Podcast

"Be behind the firewall. And I'm looking something that we can put on the firewall. Absolutely I agree. And she knows my only point mentioning Sharma's that was one venue but would be. I'm sure she'll be thrilled to have other venues. The whole point is to get it out there as much as possible right so and I think the the the other things to keep in mind is that it's not just preventing vendors it's for it's really intended as a practical guide for people that are developing a internally as well because you know we see that also happening more and more. Which is that people might be using. I met drinks but they might also have developed. A you know an attrition Algorithm or whatever it is and so just keeping in mind best practices around that as well as important. So Y- this for me and you know obviously Kerr crossroads is a is a private membership. But the fact is we. We worked to promote publicly those things that ought to be public and this is one of those things. I clearly I think. Eight on the Association talent acquisition professionals also would be by. I would love to be able connected in a way that makes sure that will be able to do that. I will do that. I will do that after the saw after we get off the podcast. We happened in touch with great and he any last thoughts relative to this whole issue of improving decision-making in that selection process. Yeah a couple of thoughts. I mean I think one thing is. We need to be mindful of the data that we're putting in there. I think that there are examples You know of people that are putting in data link and again. This is especially true for sort of big data mining and social media data by the facial announced. I mean they're just data set said you know. Academics have have shown to be problematic in terms of bias. And so he know. Ideally I would try to stay away from those as much as possible and I think we would also realize that you know we really want to look at. Is Their Job. Relatedness in in some of these variables. It's really just thinking about the data that we're putting in you know someone's twitter feed really job related. I don't know I don't not sure it is right now. So that's one thing and then I think the other thing is and this may be a little bit more controversial with Serge Traditional assessment providers. But I'm GONNA say anyways. I think that we've come to a time where we can build things that are both predicted from fair. And I think that the old adage is oh will be predictive bias or non predictive at but fair and United States. The time for that sort of false dichotomies over and we really need to push ourselves to say You know to to find that tool. That is the tool that technology multiple technologies hopefully many technology that can provide the best of both worlds. Because I really truly believe that that exists and I think that there's also this this notion that it's very embedded in the field that oh if we make something fair we are by definition. You know making it You know trading off some accuracy while you know quite frankly that is another thing that needs to be looked at more carefully because you know we continue to look at this in our own algorithms. We don't really see that I'm not in the way that it's described as sort of a truism in the field and again I think that if you're just perpetuating these myths based on stuff that was true maybe a while ago and this information is dated. I think we need to take more careful. Look at some of these things that are considered facts or dogma in in the field and again I told you ahead of time this might be a little bit more provocative for the things I've said but I think it's time to really take take a close look. I love you when you when you said predictive. Unfair that we we. We are at a point where we can do that and I suddenly. What came to me the vigilant visual for me was was kind of Joe Hari Window where we were able to. Maybe a post all of the different methodologies that are out there in one of several different windows and obviously we wanna move move the The distribution of those into that predictive in fair interesting absolutely. That's exactly right. That's exactly right and at the end of the day you know. I think there's a lot of legal folks that would be like. Oh but you know. Is it legal to do this at the end of the day you know? Legality is is an evolving field. Meaning reality is it reflects the ethics of the Times. It's kind of back to you know and I think you know. We have really embraced socio-economic inclusion diversity equity as a society and I think that if our legal framework is still sort of framing framed back in nineteen fifty nine hundred seventy s mentality. I think that's another thing that that needs to be thought about because again I. I don't think that we need to step up to the fact that what we're doing is not necessarily it. We going in a risk averse. Point of view does not help us a rewards of doing it well for every exactly and I think that again aisles. Make the case that we live in a society that I think has come to believe. At least certain large segments of that society have come to believe that you know more diverse organizations better performing right. I think most people think that however if you think about your traditional communist testing it's very problematic in terms of diversity you know. Blacks and Latinos are highly disadvantaged. You know so. For every ten Caucasians that will pass a cognitive assessment. It's like three African Americans and for Latinos. That's great then. If you are using a cognitive test I think you know you gotta wonder what's The impact of that on my diversity And so and you know the reason people use cognitive test is because again the field would would tell you that there are those predictive had however that's how can those two things be true. I mean if on the one hand there were the most predictive of success that we know that divers organizations are the best performing those two things are in contradiction so I think again beuys to look more closely at inner using the things we believe to be true because the world of work is extremely different than when some of these seminal studies were done back in the nineteen seventies and eighties. It's just it's like fifty years have gone by. And we live in a global world where it's highly complex and things are very diverse in a heterogeneous and maybe the things that we learned fifty years ago. Don't go home nearly as true as they as they once they want. State if you know so I think it's important to to revisit some of these ideas with the more critical I was. I think that's a great point at which weekend I think. Stop but I really appreciate the opportunity to have to have a conversation with you. So that's great. Thank you so much. Yeah Jerry thanks so much for for having me. I really appreciate it. Thanks for listening to this. Our channel. Please subscribe to see Xsara on your favorite against resource and leave us a review on your at it. Learn more about our at our website. See Exxon dot works facebook.com and twitter dot com slash career crossroads and on Instagram at career. X Roads. We'll catch you next time..

Kerr crossroads twitter Sharma Exxon United States Xsara Joe Hari Jerry beuys
Longevity in Business

Therapy for Black Girls

08:26 min | 2 years ago

Longevity in Business

"As you can hear. Dr Frida is incredibly busy. She and I chatted about the work. That she's done around health disparities. The fact that she believes have lit her success her tips for being a good tea house. She tends to her own mental health wellbeing so incredibly busy and she shared the four groups of people. She thinks we all need to have in our lives to continue to grow. If you hear something while listening that resonates with you please share with us on social media using the Hashtag. Tv In session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr Frito. Oh It is my pleasure. I am so happy to be able to chat with you. Someone who has had such an illustrious career really focused on working on health disparities really taking care of people who are struggling. So I want to hear from you. What's your career has been like. I WanNa hear what helped you to even focus on studying health disparities as your career. Well for starters started as a child interested in health disparities because my passion for Madison. My decision to become a doctor was when I six years old and I grew up in a home that included my uncle that came to live with us when I was born. My father's brother one year younger who had been paralyzed at the hands of polio infection. When she was years old and I had a lot of exposure to help issues and to the healthcare system it you would the people that took care of my uncle in both the primary care environment as well as surgical and rehabilitation and other environment and we had great experiences and so I wanted to be a part of that but as I grew and understood what we were facing as a family it was clear we were not necessarily getting access to or the benefit of things that others were getting the benefit of at least not without a fight and then when I went to medical school at Howard University in Washington DC. I had a chance from the other side see the ramifications that lead to disparities everything from the Economic Environment The physical neighborhood and environment education food all of the above and then I was really hooked in trying to find a way to address it wherever I could. Yeah I think is really interesting that you do some of your training at Howard because I think that that kind of primes you right to be focusing on these kinds of topics in our community. Well it primes me and forced me to action in large ways and small way literally. I would look at the data to figure out what medications I should get my patients and those and understand what would happen to them. One I did and the data was lacking the study had not been done in my patient. I would note. Is Well. Gee I gave her medication to my patient and it says here the likelihood of getting these facts was a but it seems to me that they're higher in the group that I'm serving and so I began to see that. Not only did we have work to do. In addressing the parity. We had a lot of work to do in understanding disparities and then understanding what we could do about it so having patients in clinical trials just as a small example so that we could really understand what medicines or procedures would be best applied to a patient population. Kinda the beginnings of individualized personalized health. And so that started a whole fourth. I'd eat for me and what I called Ethno psychopharmacology but looking at the medicine used to treat. Anxiety and depression is yeah and trying to get a better understanding of whether or not race and ethnicity had an effect on which medicines might work better with those might work better what to expect in terms of side effects and so it's really at that level that I think we have some understandings game in order to completely address health disparity issues and that's a great lead into my next question because I'm curious to hear from you. What kinds of things you think we do need to continue to be focused on in terms of health disparities so I think we have a few layers to focus on. We've got to do something about our policies and practices. That would help us address. Some of the factors that we talked about. I don't think we completely saw health disparity issue in our community until we address some of the economic challenges and so how to get equity or quality around our economic. We're not going to completely solve the problem until we address a physical or environmental issue safety. You know whether or not we're exposed to things that would lead to higher rate of illness. Asthma is a great example. You know kind of fixing the environment that we live in so that we can begin to reduce the impact of asthma community. But we've got a number of policy opportunities to put it into practice and to address. The societal issues and environmental issues contributed the disparity. But we also have an opportunity to address issues in our healthcare system. And I have a friend that laugh every time I say that. And she says what do you call it a healthcare system and I say why shouldn't I should say 'cause we ain't healthy. Nobody cares in the show notes and right so so I laugh. I said well I disagree with the Middle Part because I think a lot of people do care but we can't disagree with the fact that we ain't healthy and it ain't no system so I think we have a lot of opportunities to address bias in the system. We have a chance to address access to the system. We can make things easier. We don't have to get up and get on the bus or go to the car and go across. Town is seeing someone we can use. Virtual technology are medicines can be delivered. But we don't have to worry about you know access in that way so there are some things that we can do right now today. That improve accent that we should do and then my mother used to always say. There's some things you can do while you wait for them to do what they should do. So I think that air from things that we can do in our communities and as individual to reduce the burden of health issues in our community and that inclu- upping our game and health literacy like Willie learning things about our health individuals that live in the community and to spread the word about the importance of that. But what is my health history? When is my family helped history and my monitoring my blood pressure my Paul my heart rate do I get my sugar check and on and on and then the individual behaviors that we do what we eat whether or not we're active etcetera? So I think that there's a whole spectrum that we can do and then as a system I guess my passion but also my fantasy if you will like just pick a thing would be to actually take the model that we have that we know work in community. We demonstrated that we know how to get. After we haven't done is identify them as scalable model and then scale them taking what we already know we can do and that we demonstrated that we can do well and figure out a way to not make this happen in you know one community but to provide a platform to expand it to as many communities could get it too quickly as we can get here

Asthma Dr Frida Polio Dr Frito Howard University Howard Washington Dc Madison Willie Anxiety Paul
"frida" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"frida" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Yes Sir talking about greenhouses real quick give this greenhouse one or one well we get these calls from these teachers that always get these grants for a pretty high dollar nice greenhouses and then they basically say well what I do now well didn't you think this out and planned this out and honestly honestly most of all these greenhouses the product not all of them the most all the greenhouses that become a big headache down the line so you really need to set these things up correctly the biggest challenges the heat here in the summertime that means it's very expensive to replace the times if it gets a hell storm or they just get milky overtime or if its glass which are very expensive or the plastic which is a by Wall double plus the ply that needs to be replaced so you have this is a law it's kind of like having a boat billion all right so that's that's our greenhouses on I think they are unless you're a commercial grower you gotta said fans got to run the fans all the time if you don't want the fans there's a lot of inputs and work on it and maintenance and for most people they're not gonna do that so they become a disaster unfortunately down the line the phones got time for a couple of calls Frida good morning how can we help you good morning I was interested in buying a variegated shell ginger plant and was wondering how much sun it needs significant take like westerns son or what is the best way to plant it and those are very good sensors are beautiful plants the fall is just cool again and those shell tops usually take two years of not freezing back or damaging the lease for them to bloom so just FYI on that they really really do best in containers but you can grow in the ground in a well protected area they need a shade or filtered.

Frida
Obama-backed documentary on Ohio factory wins Academy Award

The Sunday Show

12:10 min | 2 years ago

Obama-backed documentary on Ohio factory wins Academy Award

"The documentary American factory which is nominated for an Oscar for best feature length documentary was produced and directed by my guests Julia Reichardt and Stephen bogan are it was the first film acquired by the Obamas new production company higher ground which is distributing it in partnership with Netflix last year American factory when the Sundance directing award in the documentary category the movie is about what happened when a Chinese company opened a new automotive glass factory in Dayton Ohio in the same spot where a GM company close just a few years earlier the new Chinese factory foo yell glass America was greeted is great news by Dayton and by men and women in need of jobs but as time went on it became apparent there was a considerable culture clash between how the Chinese treat workers and have the American workers expected to be treated especially those workers who are used to having the United auto workers union behind them and no longer did some of the workers are making half as much in our IT Fujio than they did at GM by focusing on this one factory the film is a case study of what the global economy means for some American workers and how hard it's become to find work that pays enough to have a home and support children right guard and bogan are with the perfect people to make American factory they live twenty five minutes away from the factory and their previous film the last track documented the closing of Dayton's GM factory the last track was also nominated for an Oscar your record Steve Bognor welcome to fresh air congradulations on your Oscar nomination and on the film thank you Terry so what were the expectations in your hometown Dayton won a Chinese billionaire announced that he would open a new automotive glass factory there on the site of the GM plant that close you know people were very hopeful we had lost the GM plant almost eight years before when chairman Chow who's the you know Chinese billionaire who bought that old rusting General Motors plant when he came to town it just everybody was really very excited yeah after that GM plant closed things were so hard for so long I mean people lost their homes the job you could get were like at the Cole's distribution center or payless shoes warehouse distribution center or fast food people making nine Bucks an hour and and imagine your middle aged you gotta cater to your mortgage and you're making nine dollars an hour it's just like it was so hard and there was such hope went went through yeah now yeah so what were the incentives for the billionaire the Chinese billionaire the chairman who opened this factory in Dayton well one thing is if you make glass in the Midwest right on interstate seventy five right if you think about it goes from Detroit all the way down through the south all the auto makers are all along there so heavy glass no longer has to be shipped from China to reach the big three and all the other automakers and you know labor costs and China have been going up over many years and labor costs you know what people make per hour in the US have been going down and so the chairman and his team the free out team we're doing a lot of calculations about the cost of shipping the cost of energy labor costs and at some point it made sense for them to come to the US and and actually chairman shall told us he was also asked by General Motors by some of the other automakers to set up shop in the Midwest because they needed more Cassidy more more reliable glass delivery you know the chairman is seventy three years old now he's exactly my age as it happens he I think wanted a kind of capstone project to his life and he wanted to create a big huge plant in the United States this was a huge challenge his family was against him a lot of the Chinese other businessmen were against him it was kind of a personal decision on his part to go ahead and do it despite the opposition from people close to him it's such an interesting clash of cultures that we see in American factory expectations regarding everything about work from pay and benefits to what workers are expected to sacrifice for the privilege of working for the corporation let's start by comparing what automakers made at the GM plant when they were unionized and they were in the United auto workers to what they were making at Fujio which is not unionized well in in the film shown a Rosser who worked at the old GM plant and now works of Frida she says it varies directly she says that GM she was making twenty nine dollars and some cents per hour and if we out she makes twelve eighty four so that's less than half of what she used to make and you know she has several children she's got she has a house that they actually lost they lost their houses they couldn't they couldn't make the mortgage payments after GM closed it's a very different world and you know here here's the crazy thing it's like in China it's been a remarkable trajectory like China is on the rise and people in the film like Wong he once he is the furnace engineer who has been sent from China to the U. S. he's here for at least two years is not going to see his children for two years but he's been working a full house and she was like nineteen years old she is so dedicated to food out and it's offering him a path to the middle class he told us he's going to be able to build a build a house for his for his family for his kids back in China because he's making such good money meanwhile in the states people like Shimei who once had a blue collar middle class life modest but but secure they they have no security anymore and it's it's just very different landscape I want to get back to the culture clash between the Chinese and the Americans at the Chinese on factory in Dayton the American workers there thought they were working just like too hard for too little pay and the Chinese supervisors and the chairman that is the CEO of the company thought American workers that they're they're just lazy they don't appreciate what we're giving them and they want to much praise they need to be praised all the time where is the American workers felt like they were not being respected you know you're really putting your finger on something that I wish the management had recognized way earlier in that plant and I will I hope all foreign companies coming here begin to recognize that in our work culture workers expect to be respected expect to be not told do you just do this American worker will respond well why and maybe I have a better idea we'll look them look the supervisor right in the eye and question them this is not really happen in China very much it's just a different work culture where people do what the boss says boss says you have to work six days a week or seven days a week you just do it but in the United States we are we are expected we've what fought to have an eight hour day and the have weekends off that's pretty much unheard of in industrial work in China people expect to work twelve hour days six days a week the Chinese workers we spoke with we spoke with a lot of them they're not happy about it they don't like being away from their kids for most of the year or only seeing them on Sunday partly it's because that's what the culture has brought them to you know they've they've lifted millions and millions of people out of poverty in one and a half more last generations right but that has resulted in this really intense work life and people are proud you know Chinese workers are proud of their country they're proud of their company they're really proud how China is flourishing in the world I would say the American workers we now I can't say that they're proud of their company or they feel like really behind America like Americans really helping them rice in the world I think we're on a trajectory of less hope less possibilities we here in the US as far as working class people where is in China I think there's tremendous hope a tremendous sense that what our country is really has a huge place in the world to play there's a sequence that I I find so fascinating where the Chinese company bring some of the American supervisors to China to to see how this plan this kind of plan operates in China because the CEO of this company you know has one or more glass factories in in China so they bring them there and you see what it's like in China for the workers there first of all all the workers are in the union it's the communist union and seems like the branch of this union is headed by the CEOs brother in law true true yeah so what is the what I know strike one what is the union do for the workers there what is what is the meaning of the union well it's more like a social club either the union there because the the the Chinese Communist Party is so integrated and aligned with the management of food yeah now the traditional concept of the union that we would have here as an advocate for the workers in opposition to the company or to take on the company that that really doesn't exist the union that we saw and at Foochow in China is more like an HR department that helps build camaraderie esprit de corps you know that the kind of team building stuff and it's it's yeah it just felt different something else that really struck me and the Chinese segment of the film is that the supervisors talk to the workers in an almost military kind of way like to learn the workers would like line up information and the supervisor would kind of give them commands and then they'd have to like chance things at the end and they're chanting slogans like long as long as it's in praise of the company slogans they probably know really really well and don't really need to chance yeah it's this is just about their cultural difference it's funny because when one of the American supervisors when he got home he tried to get the Americans to line up in that kind of military formation and it just did not go that well you know it's like the people who signed up to work in this hot intense glass factory and the United States they're making twelve eighty four an hour and they're not getting paid enough to line up and be regimented like that there's a slogan that is said which I think so in kind of in capsules capitalism which is to stand still is to fall back wasn't that it's Steve yeah that's one of things a chance the morning on a day to stand still is to fall back and that's that's true of capitalism it is weird that the this communist country seems like the best capitalists in the world right now you know that they're sold they've been so driven my guess Sir Julia Reichardt and Stephen bogan are they produced and directed the documentary American factory which is nominated for an Oscar for best feature length

Oscar Julia Reichardt Netflix Stephen Bogan Sundance
Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:27 min | 2 years ago

Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

"Okay for music to art. How many feet famous female artists can you name? No not beyond say or Riana artists like Frida Kahlo and Mary Cassatt. If you're having trouble thinking of more than a handful you may be onto a major problem in the art world. We've been artists are routinely left out of museum exhibits and the work is on average valued much less less than that of their meal. Peers Selley herships and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics. podcast the indicator from planet money. How that story there was this? This artist named Joan Mitchell. She was an abstract expressionist. She died in the nineteen nineties but she painted a lot. Joan Mitchell was hugely successful and to our world insiders. She's a big deal. But if you're thinking I've never heard of her you would not be alone. KRISTA LATCHFORD IS CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. She's doing remarkably well at auction. The prices are very high but are they. High in relative to Jackson pollock no way are they high relative to Kooning nope paintings by the KOONING and pollock have gone for sixty to one hundred sixty million dollars. KRISTA says there is no record of Joan Mitchell getting. We're close to that kind of money for her work. which brings us to a big part of the reason that people have trouble naming famous women? Artists Artwork by women and men is just valued differently. Rene teaches finance at Oxford and she and some of her colleagues did an experiment. They picked paintings at random and they showed them to viewers. There's and ask them to guess if the artist was a man or a woman on average the Experiment subjects couldn't guess it was painted by man or woman. Renee says it is practically impossible to look at painting and figure out the gender of the artist but she says if the subjects guessed that the painting was painted by a woman they like the painting less renee looked millions of records from auction sales and she found out that on average work by women. Artists sells for forty percent less than work by male artists and because art by women is valued for less museums by less of it and that is how less artwork by women ends up on display in museums. Ziems at the Baltimore Museum of art only four percent of the collection is women artists. The problem is the same major museums around the country. Christopher Bedford heard the museum's director he says that's why next year any new artwork. The museum buys will be by women the various different filters that we put in place to consider acquisitions nations and have always had them. Placed considerable additions and that system comes together in various different forms specific to the museum to filter the history of art and to include or exclude. Unfortunately in the case of women artists often museums have been excluding. KRISTA says anyone who's buying art museums included has to be careful of what's called the superstar effect sales of female artists represent just the tiniest slice just two percent of the market but of the two percent. Forty forty percent is five women. That's what can happen with the superstar. Effect a tiny number of artists. Become like Tokens or symbols and art buyers or museums ziems or individuals. Feel like they've bought something by a lady and so they feel like they don't have to do anything else but then museums can essentially say okay. I've done my female show will move back to our normal Sally herships Cardiff Garcia N._p._R..

Joan Mitchell Krista Latchford Baltimore Museum Of Art Joan Mitchell Foundation Selley Herships Frida Kahlo Mary Cassatt Jackson Pollock Kooning Cardiff Garcia Renee Rene Christopher Bedford CEO Oxford Director
"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sets about licensing a pile of match free to call it to Keila Frida Kahlo tweezers which was kind of weird given her iconic unibrow I'm the Frida Kahlo Barbie dolls well the Frida Kahlo corporation was making make it deals with the likes of Mattel they will also trying to get individual artists to pay them for the right to sell the caller inspired also online they did this by entering into licensing partnerships with online market places like Zazzle and at sea this didn't sit well with Chris Miller we have been selling food of all these years with no problem and now they want us to pay them to sell fritos these are our work we don't have to so she ignored those requests but there were other messages she couldn't ignore like the one she received in October twenty eleven from Zazzle it concerned one of her portrays titled tiny Frida Kahlo they sent me an email saying that I was violating trade marks at the time and they're gonna take it down this was the first of many take down notices mail I received she says not all her work was affected it seems maddening we random I stopped painting Frida for awhile because if this is going to be happening why am I going to paint more Frida Kahlo corporation representative Beatrice alterado Russian an email that her company's mission is to quote protects the Frida Kahlo legacy and she denied to taking artists work down okay so they don't do it directly the corporation uses a bronze protection agency to scour the web looking for potential trademark violations it then and that's on my market places like Zazzle in red bubble and then those sites take the what down we're not in a position to be the legal arbiter on the platform red apple C. E. O. Barry Newstead says he trusts rights holders like the Frida Kahlo corporation to do that you diligence as their responsibility to ensure that they are they're actually you know requesting stuff to be taken down that is he is actually infringing but sometimes the price as targets up what fits not infringing this is what happens to Chris mellow and that's why she suing the corporation in federal court in San Francisco these are my images from my imagination I'm planning a public figure I I don't know what I'm doing wrong and in fact the Frida Kahlo corporation agrees sold twelve in legal documents the company initially said the takedowns of mellows what were a mistake then it said some may be legally justifiable regardless the take down notices keep coming I'm Corey Feldman KQED news and I'm Brian what you're listening to morning edition on KQED let's listen to John McConnell with a look at six eighty in Pleasanton a new problem six city south on it's a noble of our Castlewood reporter crash there in the middle lane the other big crash we had on six in the south and pleasant in rural Costa has been cleared and traffic is almost recover as a huge jam in Marin county the non commute direction through central center a felon all been down the hill old past the Civic Center to freighters parkway with is a crash still blocking at least two it's been blocking sometimes three lanes on one on one north bound the southbound side rubber Necker Sir backed up the thirty seven but nothing's blocked on that side Joe McConnell for KQED support for KQ we do comes from geico protecting people in their vehicles for over seventy five years geico proud to offer emergency roadside service more geico.

Keila Frida Kahlo
"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Barbie dolls well the Frida Kahlo corporation was making mega deals with the likes of Mattel they will also trying to get individual artists to pay them for the right to sell the caller inspired office online they did this by entering into licensing partnerships with online market places like Zazzle and at sea this didn't sit well with Chris Miller we have been selling food of all these years with no problem and now they want us to pay them to sell Freda's these are our work we don't have to so she ignored those requests but there were other messages she couldn't ignore like the one she received in October twenty eleven from Zazzle it concerned one of her port traits titled tiny Frida Kahlo they sent me an email saying that I was violating trade marks at the time and they're gonna take it down this was the first of many take down notices mail I received she says not all her work was affected it seems maddening we random I stopped painting Frida for awhile because if this is gonna be happening why am I going to paint more Frida Kahlo corporation representative Beatrice Alfa Roger I wrote in an email that her company's mission is to quote protects the Frida Kahlo legacy and she denied taking artists work down okay so they don't do it directly the corporation uses a bronze protection agency to scour the web looking for potential trademark violations it then and that's on my market places like Zazzle and red bubble and then those sites take the what down we're not in a position to be the legal arbiter on the platform red bubble CEO Barry Newstead says he trusts rights holders like the Frida Kahlo corporation to do that you diligence as their responsibility to ensure that they are they're actually help requesting stuff to be taken down that is he's he's actually infringing but sometimes the price as targets up what fits not infringing this is what happens to Chris Miller and that's why she suing the corporation in federal court in San Francisco these are my images from my imagination I'm planning a public figure all right I don't know what I'm doing wrong and in fact the Frida Kahlo corporation agrees sold twelve in legal documents the company initially said the takedowns of mellows work were a mistake then it said some may be legally justifiable regardless the take down notices keep coming I'm Corey Feldman KQED news and I'm Brian what you're listening to morning edition on KQED now Joe McConnell with a look at the area traffic it's six twenty nine more specifically the you sure freeway eighty westbound in Richmond before Central Avenue it's a report of traffic obstruction looks like it might be a stalled car otherwise usual heavy traffic in pockets developing from an old in Richmond but not solid yet bay bridge back up to the maze the most unusual Janice highway one oh one north bound Santa tailored Burlingame because the closure of the peninsula Avenue exit an accident investigation of the bottom of that rant what a one north is now packed through the ninety two interchange and.

Frida Kahlo corporation Mattel
"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"frida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A the owners who have a piece of Frida Kahlo don't want our you'll day today that's Frida Kahlo corporation representative Beatrice Eldorado speaking with NPR in twenty eighteen about the freedom Bobby she declined an audio interview for this story but I reached out to her because why would this company was making mega deals with the likes of Mattel they will also trying to get individual artists to pay them for the right to sell their aunts they did this by entering into licensing partnerships with the online market places where artists were sending that Frida Kahlo centric work this did not sit well with Chris Miller we have been selling food of all these years with no problem and now they want us to pay them to sell Freda's these are our work we don't have to say she ignored those messages but there were others she couldn't signal hold on a second Chris scroll through her messages until she finds the relevant one there we go this is October the tenth two thousand eleven I believe this was my first notice it concerns a greeting card design Chris head up loaded to Zazzle one of the online market places where she sells her work it features one of her child like colorful Frida portrays titled tiny Frida Kahlo they sent me an email saying that I was violating trade marks at the time and they're gonna take it down this was the first of many such emails promptly followed by take downs what was weird was that the sites once removing all of Chriss Frida inspired creations just some of them Chris says the decision seem frustratingly random so I was mad from the get go it wasn't just Chriss finances that took a hit health did too she felt depressed and helpless I stopped painting Frida for awhile because if this is going to be happening why am I going to paint more Chris is situation was far from unique when she went looking on social media she discovered many other makers dealing with similar frustrations like New Jersey artist when Cemal vented her feelings in a video on Instagram redbubble is taking down designs a left and right and all without giving creators a full explanation of what is going on in an email Frida Kahlo corporation wrapped their trees all around I rent tech companies mission is to quote protects the Frida Kahlo legacy and she denied taking artists work down technically that's true they don't do it directly the corporation uses a brand protection agency to troll the web looking for potential trademark violations the agency's technology alerts Zazzle red bubble and other web sites when it finds a red flag and then those sites take the work down we're not in a position to be the legal arbiter on the platform instead red bubble C. E. O. Barry Newstead says he trusts rights holders like the Frida Kahlo corporation to do they do diligence as their responsibility to ensure that they are they're actually you know requesting stuff to be taken down that is he is actually infringing but sometimes the technology takes stuff down that's not infringing because his the thing trademarks protect words and images that help to find a company brand for certain types of products and services not all things and the Frida Kahlo corporation does not own all things Frida Kahlo just the stuff in the product lines they've trademarks including in some cases the use of her name that doesn't necessarily include artist Chris Miller's work so that's why she's suing the corporation in federal court in San Francisco these are my images from my imagination I'm planning a public figure I I don't know what I'm doing wrong and in fact the Frida Kahlo corporation agrees sort of in legal documents it acknowledged Chriss work was removed from the website in era and promptly reinstated then it changed its position and said some of the takedowns may be legally justifiable and some may not but what ever they say the take down notices keep coming.

Frida Kahlo representative Frida Kahlo corporation
Frida Kahlo's Bus Accident

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 2 years ago

Frida Kahlo's Bus Accident

"Was September Seventeenth Nineteen Twenty five Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Hello was involved in a bus accident that she survived with major injuries. The accident changed the course of her life and deeply affected her artwork. Mark Free Board Goya on Mexico in Nineteen O seven. Her mother was relatively conventional in her worldview while while her father supported her curiosity Freda was super close to her father but she was more distant from her mother who dealt with depression and when she was young she had polio which affected her right leg and gave her a limp she also developed an interest in art and began. Dan Sketching in nineteen twenty two free to begin attending the National Preparatory School in Mexico City. Her goal was to study medicine at a university there she encountered progressive thought and people in the literary community she became known as a Prankster and she wore indigenous jewelry including it was at this school where she met artist Diego Rivera but on September Seventeenth nineteen twenty five she was headed back back home from school on a bus with her boyfriend Alejandro Gomez audience when the bus ran into a trolley car. Several people were killed immediately. The accident and more died later from their injuries obvious only had minor injuries but a piece of iron went through fritos pelvis and back that had to be pulled out of her body. Her shoulder was dislocated. Her collarbone was broken. Her right leg was broken in eleven places and her spine was also broken in several places she had surgery and stayed in the hospital for a month then spent several months at home in bed over the course of her life. She underwent as many as thirty five operations. Though she aimed to become a medical illustrator she was in a lot of pain and decided to drop out of school while she was in recovery. She spent a lot of time painting. Her mother even bought her easel that helped her paint in bed. She used an overhead mirror to paint self-portraits. During this time her relationship with audience ended but photographer Tina Mobility introduced her to a community of people involved in art in leftist politics. She soon became reacquainted with Diego. Rivera NC joined the young Communist League which Rivera founded in nineteen twenty nine Carlo Married Rivera when she was twenty two years old and he was forty two but their marriage was rocky. They both had affairs many of Carlos with other women free to diego separated divorced and remarried carried. She also had a miscarriage and several pregnancies that were medically terminated but throughout their turbulent relationship they continued their artistic mystic practice and continued to express their political views. Fritos self-portraits viscerally depict her pain. Her Art is known for being dark emotional national and symbolic she made most of her artwork in the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties but she didn't get her first solo show and Mexico until nineteen fifty three that was years after her first ever Solo Exhibition in New York City in nineteen thirty eight she had to be in bed on the opening night of her exhibition in Mexico City so she went to the show in an ambulance in state. They're in a bed that was set up for her. A few months. After after this fritos right leg had to be amputated because it was infected with gangrene she died on July thirteenth nineteen fifty four officially Ashley of Pulmonary embolism though there has been speculation that she died by suicide there is now a museum and Custos Tool Rita's home goal kind.

Diego Rivera National Preparatory School Tina Mobility Mexico City Mexico Frida Kahlo Carlo Married Rivera Rivera Pulmonary Embolism Freda Custos Tool Rita Dan Sketching Goya New York City Alejandro Gomez Fritos Carlos NC Communist League Twenty Two Years
Apple Podcasts now available on the web

podnews

03:22 min | 3 years ago

Apple Podcasts now available on the web

"Is now. Available on the web with a brand new web interface pages are responsive and work on desktop and on Android phones. All these new pages are already indexed within Google search, including specific episode pages. First time, I think that podcast episode pages have surfaced in search Google podcasts are also working on a web interface, but yet to probably launch their products and these pages don't appear in ordinary search results both apple and Google products. Still lack of front page or a method of subscribing all access reports on podcasting presence here at the show in Las Vegas in Nevada. It covers many of the sessions, including one that our editor spoke at me, Edison. Research released the podcast consumer two thousand nineteen later today. You can watch the webinar today at two o'clock eastern time. Good news for CBC podcast fan. So use overcast. Everything is apparently working again the athletic a subscription. Sports website has added podcasting to their offer. We've introduced a premier audio experience as part of our subscription, featuring more than twenty exclusive podcast shows with more succumb hosted by the lettuce world class talent says that's from Email sent to subscribers podcasts are available on their website and app, you research from the future media university of Florida and NABC two hundred nineteen national podcast listeners study, which studies podcast listeners contains much data and statistics about you as podcast listeners catching our eye today. Sixteen percent of podcast listeners. Don't subscribe to any podcasts. Thirty three percent of listeners you Spotify. Listen, thirty two percent news. Apple podcasts. Surprisingly seventy percent plan to use YouTube possibly related to the above streaming podcast is more popular than downloading and two thirds of listeners say. Prefer host read advertising than creep reduced spots. Audio crops podcast festival have announced new speakers to their event in Sydney New, South Wales. Stray Leah from the end of may to the beginning of June speakers from Spotify Radio New Zealand and everything is alive. Ian Chile have been announced the third annual pop con podcast awards will take place at popcorn in Indianapolis. In indiana. The awards are open to anyone who has had a podcast with five episodes or more. And this no cost to submit the event also has a life podcast stage open to everybody as well. As a podcast marathon, it's between June the seventh and ninth and U s podcast app is being announced podcasts might Yuna is a free and fully featured app including support for car play. An apple TV particularly it allows filtering podcasts by country language or category. It's from a team based in Portugal. Meanwhile, since a short form audio platform has released a number of enhancements, including automated podcast imports. And jessica. Sherman is returning to at large media as vice president of affiliate sales and content to you podcast to tell you about today. A little bit me with Ted Sandra is from the standard comedian and wonder is one plus one back for a new season this time focusing on Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego. Rivera the podcast explores history's most notable partnerships. And that's the very

Google Apple Sherman Frida Kahlo Spotify Radio New Zealand Youtube Leah Las Vegas Portugal CBC Indiana Rivera Jessica Editor University Of Florida Vice President Ian Chile Edison Indianapolis
Measles, Tom Foty And Martin Frida discussed on WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

Measles, Tom Foty And Martin Frida discussed on WBZ Morning News

"I'm Tom Foty measles cases are on the rise in some parts of the world, especially Europe and Latin America, Martin Frida is acting director of the World Health organizations, immunization and vaccines division. A lot of people have forgotten. How dangerous measles can be. While most children will just suffer from fever and some spots in the body a significant percentage of these who undergo serious neurological problems longer countries, not had major measles outbreaks last year, Germany, Russia Venezuela. Tom Foty,

Measles Tom Foty Martin Frida World Health Organizations Acting Director Fever Latin America Europe Venezuela Germany Russia
Predicting This Year's 10 Most Popular Halloween Costumes

Steve Cochran

02:33 min | 3 years ago

Predicting This Year's 10 Most Popular Halloween Costumes

"Hey, I have in front of me dean from mental floss a website that you can spend hours on getting useless trivia and things in your brain. I love useless things. Yeah. Mental. Plus, you'll love that mental floss dot com. I was actually a great website the top ten list of most likely most popular Halloween, costumes number ten a cow. Cows are solid every year. Nothing more fun at a Halloween party than someone in a costume. That has utters numbered. Number nine. And I gotta say I didn't see this coming Frida Kahlo. Really? Yeah. Frida Kahlo V one eyebrow famous artist from. I never ate a cosmic ferry. Call names what what's that? What a cosmic ferry. I don't know. What a cosmic is. It's 'cause CO as Mick ferry. It's very often. Still don't get here on number seven and Abba inspired dancing Queen. Whereas here they did number six. I don't know what this is EDNA mode. ADD N A M O D E what's EDNA mode? Is it the one from incredible 's is it the little the little lady with John knows his cartoons. Or whatever that you've got to have two kids movies alone. JFK Rowling get this number five of Flamingo number four a warrior from what conduct and not that. What kind of you know, what Kanda from the Black Panther? I wouldn't as Flamingo one year. It's really hard to stand at a Halloween party. Forever. In their front in their front lawn days. Yeah. Right. You're trying to jerk a drink and eat some chicken wings, balancing on one leg. It's hard. Number three is any icon from the nineties depresses me that that's the stalls. You seem like ten minutes ago who would be for the nineties. I don't know. Huey Lewis Benny eighties. Somebody from like full house like a character. I think so the full house characters number three Riverdale character. Number two, the number one most likely most popular Halloween costume this year. Tonya harding. Really? Mental floss don't yell at me. Because of that movie. That was I think benefit the producer of the business shows. He's going as a character from Riverdale? Yeah. Yeah. It is it that that list is data on those crazy kids. I'm going her. Tire website. Now, the entire website Justice, Twitter, the entire social media

Frida Kahlo Tonya Harding Mick Ferry Riverdale Edna Huey Lewis Twitter Jfk Rowling Kanda Abba John Producer Ten Minutes One Year
Relatives win injunction stopping sales of Frida Kahlo Barbie doll

Sean Hannitty

01:56 min | 4 years ago

Relatives win injunction stopping sales of Frida Kahlo Barbie doll

"West virginia battling over that state's growing drug problem republicans competing in west virginia's senate primary or fighting about who is best positioned to fight the opioid epidemic patrick morrissey the state's attorney general is taking credit for a court victory that just inspired a freshly proposed da rule which could cut down on opioid production but in washington congress cuts the checks for opioid prevention and treatment and the only candidate currently serving there is congressman evan jenkins now a fresh set of eyes on the epidemic comes from the contender fresh out of prison former coal baron don blankenship served a year on misdemeanor charges tied to the upper big branch mine disaster his ideas mirror the president's and blankenship believes jenkins and morrissey each had a chance to address opioids went elected and blewett fox's peter doocy in charleston west virginia a holocaust survivor telling antifascist rally in poland today the current polish leaders tolerate groups would not see inspired ideologies about fifteen hundred people gathering in gdansk protesting a march that far right organisations held in that city last week a win in court for the family but renowned artists over the rights to her image mexican john has blocked a company associated with us toymaker mattel from commercializing the image of artists free to kalo as it seeks to halt sales of barbie doll styled after her the dolls featuring delayed painter were launched in march the company said at the time it reached an agreement with the frida kalo corporation to make the dolls but her grand niece argues the right to belong to her and her family opposed on the family's official twitter account reads the mexico city judge has ordered the frida kahlo corporation to stop using the brand image and work of kalo without permission from the owner of the rights lisa lacerra fox news officials telling us consumers and restaurants to throw out and he's storebought romaine lettuce amid an e coli outbreak that sickened more than fifty people in several states i'm paul stevens fox news radio.

Mattel Mexico Twitter Official Washington Attorney Patrick Morrissey Paul Stevens Frida Kahlo Corporation Frida Kalo Corporation West Virginia Gdansk Poland Charleston West Peter Doocy Blewett Fox President Trump Don Blankenship Congressman Evan Jenkins
Frida Kahlo Family Sues To Block Barbie – The Forward

Colleen and Bradley

01:04 min | 4 years ago

Frida Kahlo Family Sues To Block Barbie – The Forward

"At the age of twenty eight no details are known about his death at this time also trending online this afternoon rachel vice daniel craig the couple are expecting their first child together also natalie portman trending natalie portman has backed out of an israel award due to quote distressing events portman said she cannot in good conscious attend the two thousand eighteen genesis prize in jerusalem as a result genesis prize announced it was calling off this year's ceremony also trending online is priyanka chopra in the time one hundred issue the actress describes megan markle as a princess for the people a little riff on the people's princess got of course was prince harry's mom princess diana and also trending today it is four twenty four twenty that's his turning here at mytalk now it's time for your five eyewitness weather forecast today partly cloudy skies with a high of fifty two tonight mostly cloudy with a low of thirty two and tomorrow partly cloudy with a high fifty seven currently the mytalk studios it's sunny and it's fifty.

Natalie Portman Jerusalem Priyanka Chopra Megan Markle Mytalk Rachel Israel Prince Harry