18 Burst results for "Friburg"

"friburg" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

06:02 min | 11 months ago

"friburg" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Like they say you're never going to be anything. Your kid from brooklyn. You got a seventy one three or average at severe and high school. You're going to become a cop and you know. And i said well no. I'm gonna go to fordham. And i'll just go at night will take five years and i'll try to make it work by being a waiter and fixing laser printers I took that lack of relief. People had and i said you know what instead of internalizing it and saying I'm not good enough or whatever or they're right. I said i'll prove them wrong. So i think that's where therapy and talking to somebody who's in therapist and a professional setting and say listen. I have i'm lazy. why lazy and then the other approaches to talk to a coach about it and find a coaching service. And i think if you are motivated to do either or both of those you might have a breakthrough and then very simple thing. I think is habits and You know everybody has lays laziness in different places you know. I was lazy about my health habits. And you know now that. I've got the wealth checked off and i've got happiness checked off. I'm really trying to hold myself accountable on the weight front. I'm down from two thirteen down today. I was one ninety two so twenty one pounds off the peak. And i'm gonna be in the eighties soon so i i feel. Sometimes i'm lazy. I got this really cool app. I know this is silly. you know But it's been helpful for me so maybe helpful for you. It's called streets. My friend mark's sister who lost a lot of weight put me onto it. And i've been talking to the founder of the company He's in australia. And it's a nice lifestyle business. I don't know if this could become a bigger business But you set goals for yourself. So i have in my goals like standing a certain number of hours drinking water doing pushups climbing stairs burning calories eating a salad which i haven't done eating the smoothie Which i've been drinking munich. My friend Friburg smoothie Working out lossing taking my vitamins actually recording my way which is something. I wasn't doing a doing weight training. And i'm just trying to like set modest goals myself and which streak does is it will lower the goal's if you're not hitting them so it's like oh you're not hitting six day choice said it to five for next week and see if you had that so it's kind of really smart question from the demo nights. Seven eight nine says i like these. I like the ones that are like really personal and about your fears and About you know the stuff that may be as less tactical and business. I mean i do love tactical business questions as tactician but i do like these ones. That are more emotional in nature. How influential is social class and breaking into the corporate world consulting finance coming from lower working class background put one at a disadvantage certainly desperate. You ended disadvantage. I think I didn't know anybody at stanford. I didn't know anybody at mit. And i felt like i wasn't worthy or you know maybe that's the word i say now it's worthy but i just i did have to go build connections and you know the what was interesting. Is i found that people. Some group of people thought of me in my twenty s when i was in new york making silicon reporter jobs my first magazine. Some people kind of resented me that was. Nobody and i became powerful with the magazine. And then once. I realized that that those powerful people resenting me i leaned into it leaned into it so i would host events for one hundred people and i would specifically cap it at one hundred ad specifically leave people out and i would invite other people to come and then some famous person. But i'll definitely come to your hundred person dinner. I'm going to bring this person. And i'm like yeah. I'm sorry there's no plus ones. And i would say that just somebody who's worth a hundred million dollars and like oh okay well. Can i bring something like. I'm really sorry. Maybe next time. I'd love to meet them but for now the only one hundred people coming to my dinner people i know and i've got fifty on the waiting list already but certainly next time and i'd love to meet them. You should introduce me to my email a cup of coffee with them. So i kind of was like once i realized that people look down on me a little bit or maybe dismissed me. I was like oh well. How can i change that. I know i'll do the silicon alley. One hundred silicon valley was the name for. New york's texting and the nineties so i ranked amid a ranked list as a nobody of the hundred most important people in business and technology in new york. When i was twenty seven years old that i was you know taking people my age now. Fifty year olds and i was saying seventeen. They're seventeen the most important. I mean i was deranged So i'm glad exactly tell you to do this. But i realized early on. I owned a magazine and i picked on the cover man that would be powerful lord that over people and then people would respect me so i took like a little bit of an niagara approach to to getting power. Because i didn't have it. And i think it was a little dysfunctional because i didn't have power say didn't have status. I was like. I'm going to create and manufacturer my own. I will show everybody so back to the motivation question. We started with. It was just a driver for me. You know i see clearly now. At the time. I just thought i was fighting for my life to survive and be important in the world and i think you should think about it that way as well if it's less so today people don't care about your diploma as much as your skills and especially in this work from home post-code world you know It used to be like well. You know who went to journalism school. Okay they're going to be a broadcaster and then you look at youtube and podcasting well who gets to be a broadcaster. The person who broadcast every day like my friends. Cpi who's doing knicks fan tv. Like he didn't to the best of my knowledge. She can tell me. I don't think. Cpi the franchise went to like get a master's degree in communications and then was an intern at you. Know espn or something. I don't think that's how he built his channel. And i don't think that's how red scare built their channel or whoever else's killing joe rogan podcast. It's not like somebody. Nbc said only. Put the joe rogan. Show on at eleven pm right. He didn't ask any gatekeeper to do it. You just do it right. And it's about skill and showing up everyday. Really and i hate to be like a motivational speaker.

Friburg smoothie fordham brooklyn munich mit stanford australia mark new york niagara knicks joe rogan youtube espn Nbc
"friburg" Discussed on Starting9

Starting9

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"friburg" Discussed on Starting9

"Code starting in free bird. Dogs friburg dog whistle vortex ball. Get it in your life. You will not have that you will did you have. It's awesome. I was playing with my nephew's yesterday. Phenomenal what's sad. I don't have anyone to play with. But i do have the football. That is sad because you should go to the local local football field. Just throw that thing from indonesian zone. Heave it hey. Did you watch jake. Paul fight i did. You can't call it. The toronto woodley fight because he didn't win because he lost he did lose. like what. Were your thoughts going into that fight. What were you thinking as a are you a combat sport fan. Yeah i i'm a sucker for a a marquee fight. I'm definitely not going to tune into every ufc pay-per-view or every major boxing pay-per-view. But if you get some big names in there. I i will pay the money to watch the fight I remember i pay. When i didn't have the money to do it. I bought like mcgregor versus mayweather. The first one was allie twenty seventeen. I was broke his shit back then. And i was like what sixty five bucks i can. I can scratch together some for that and then the ufc ones like I obviously by any mcgregor fai punk. Who i'm where. I'm actually wearing a ufc right now. Yeah when and punk went to the obviously that didn't go too well but it. It got my attention to pay attention to the sport and when i think batista was doing like delatour he got absolutely fucking mauled by mickey gall. Yeah he did see punked it. Yes yeah yeah no. I'll pay for one of those fights if it's if it's a big name and what did you woodley talking shit afterwards. Like yo fucking won that fight. Feel like i wasn't that fight. We need to run this shit back like he said he said like held to the rematch. If he gets a. I love jake paul tattoo. Don't get the tattoo. Jake paul do that. What did he say after the fight that it was like the second biggest pay per view of the year and the first one was logan. Paul so yeah. I mean i i know how there there's two camps there's the jacob. I think jake paul because i saw like one little like promo where we're like. Woodley was talking shit to jake and jake just like. He's he's dumb but he's not like jake. Paul is fucking stupid like he was trying to talk shit back and his brain was just sputtering and he couldn't say anything witty or creative. He's kinda just like yeah like we'll you are. Those are his comeback. So he's not smart enough to like verbally joust with you but he can actually fight you. And he's business savvy enough to monetize being douchebag and i love that like i just own it. If you're going to like wear all those chains and like he was asking all like where are you from like. What are the people where you're from. Where stuff like that. And he had no comeback for like. It's very easy to just kinda like get into a verbal spar there. But i think he's dumb as fuck but i think he's a really good fighter and i think that his business model of getting people to pay attention to the boxing for the first time in decades. Like what more can you ask for. Well it's not boxing that they're paying attention to these are just one offs and as he continues to train through the sport like don't know that he'll ever actually make a run for like a division title in a sanctioned body like i don't see that happening i don't really care i'd rather just see him annoy people and knock people out and like he's been you know what he's doing in w. w. e. sense. He is building himself up fighting. These people that are non traditional boxers and he knows that eventually at some point someone is going to knock his ass out and people will pay a lot of money to see that. So he's almost like in real life scripting. It's like the bad guy keeps winning. And you hate when the bad guy wins and you hate when the bad guy with he knows eventually he'll meet his match and he'll get knocked out and he'll appease the audience that keeps paying sixty five dollars to see him fight and hopefully he'll get knocked out eventually. That will happen and until it does. He's gonna keep making money off of you waiting to see for that happen. But that's the retirement right that's like that's the retirement fight like where he steps up and it was like all right. We're entering the realm of for real bad. Assery like this dude. Got a hundred fights under his belt as a fucking boxer. You know what. I mean like fighting that dude. That's when he knows like. I'm only doing this once the boys out because i don't see him signing up to get fucking melted multiple times. No well if he gets knocked out you know that they're going to do a rematch. I don't. I don't know that that's my thing i it. Does he get knocked out in like the seventh round or does he get knocked out in the for if he gets knocked out. In the first round. I can see him saying that. That was a fluke and doing the rematch more if he gets knocked out in the seventh round then. It's like well that earlier. He'd go both ways because the early kale pieces like look. I fucking told you what.

jake mcgregor versus mayweather delatour mickey gall boxing jake paul tattoo Jake paul Paul jake paul football allie batista woodley ufc Woodley toronto logan
"friburg" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"friburg" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Cut yourself some slack practice. Good self care love on yourself. It doesn't necessarily have to take as many of us have experienced during kobe. Death of our loved one to to take a moment to remember that we have to keep ourselves healthy to be there for others and to look back into your your self care book. We all have our own process but we rarely practice it so give getting getting leaning back into practice of good self care. Don was was one of those people. I told this to somebody today. You know that you know the people that are that are that that were vegans right. Obviously and the people that animals that are like the ones that he'd animals that are really like funny in kind to begins and then there's the ones that are just downright mean annoying nasty. He was the hilarious kind and the way he would. Tease me about. Veganism was it was. It was some of the hardest laughs i've ever had in some of the. Most heartwarming probably truisms about the bizarreness of with his life style. That i've chosen but so kind. And so loving. And every time he came out for dinner he and my mother in law you know. It was beyond sausages. Because that's about. All i knew he liked enough in the begin space but he was so kind and so appreciative. And so i love it so delicious. This is so wonderful just you can feed them anything really but he would act like he liked and i could see by his is that is just beyond sausages that i started really just doing nazi. Lubbock yeah extraordinary human. I always appreciated the just the gentleness and beloved the humor with she approached My weird lifestyle look what he would really call right he you know he was he was he was born then in the top. Yeah this is not a thing back then. Well thank you. So much dot c. We're going to transition to our guest today. Who is going to be talking about someone board in eighteen eighteen twenties. Actually i think Maybe eighteen tens Our guest is ernest friburg. And he is the head of the history department at the university of tennessee in knoxville He's a respected author with a niche in american history in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries..

knoxville today university of tennessee ernest friburg one nineteenth and early twentieth Don eighteen eighteen twenties american eighteen tens
"friburg" Discussed on Moviac on Crack

Moviac on Crack

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"friburg" Discussed on Moviac on Crack

"Check was like the last day to yes so we went to previous week and union square. We got free burger of friburg. A coupon in the free on rate record refused to use it to pay for his own at that time. And i was so pissed. I don't remember if i remember. That are free burger thing. I paid seventy five dollars. That's why i felt bad. Because like i said i don't really want to have my own true but then you ended up getting out of the trade. Your made me i. You also took my bag on our eight. I mean i could do with a bag. I'd still be your s or being. Is us bag. You right to carry linked to bags. I was like bro. You didn't have to eat the train. that's i know. I beat it by one two minutes or something like that. Yeah can sick a great run though. I wasn't joe. It's whatever was after lunch. I was not linked to definitely some wild times winston prep must say than they got the other one preps gotta wonder how they're doing their nose partners new york. Yeah they're very nothing stopping it. They're not only full her to jimmy jersey in was already. Yeah it was. He was there. Like i shoulda i. Here's a was made or whatever that's crazy. Yeah she you say you're very much into sochi watched all the movies clone wars. What what are your thoughts on the main laurean mandalorian suit. You know what. I mean for right now but movies right rate. The movies are very great right. And i was always interested between returns. The jeddah and the force awakens thousand period. I weigh the most actually about how much happens. Mandalorian kind of fills some gaps very much. A- i don't do some people get into the new. I love watching saito prequels. I most favorable. I grew up watching them. And then after i had him for the originally because i understood time and accident what happened before it's swallowed benefit. I think we have any eighty starting in the middle. Yeah started right in the middle started writing meal three span there. Is these jeddah right. They were willing straight. He's the only one one from being this one kid. Nowhere desert planet right. He needs to find. This is all this jed. i also knows him. Yup those from half. Yeah he basically knows everything about him and tells him his life's gonna change. Yeah he has no idea for. Be as as you're sharing. I can understand that. It's a fairly confusing because you don't know anything about this kid. Then this one person just tells you everything like white pops out of nowhere. It's one of those moments where it's like. Your destiny is awaiting whatever gives you more of a hindsight of the world that yeah that expand the world by so much trent prequels but it kind of shows you the economy of the world from me politics to know everything because it's such an intense storyline so it brings me back to my original point. Yeah knowing what happens between the original lease rate was so like it was like amazing for me and at the end of the second season. I could tell you for for right. That's going in the right direction. do first off. It's going in the right direction right. They ended it so beautifully right bringing it within the cement mills washed made laureate. I'm sorry crackers. You watch that show. I have not. I don't have disney. Because i'm a poor s broadway but yet go ahead. We're gonna indirectly illicit activity. Shirt saying is going to watch the laurie. But he's not gonna pay. Plus i'm not gonna say directly stole wonder what you're gonna do those but i think it's worth it just for the star wars. Yeah and i've actually had solid knowledge on that world is just not the mandalorian not that show. I watched clovers loved clone wars. And that's about as much might. Gm back in the day used to watch it when he was on netflix. Twenty fifteen sixteen fourteen and was on their relief. Just watched it a lot but Yeah for a long time and fire show. I wasn't watching legs. Zeke and at the time. I was watching like the disney channel. Tv shows off watching and i appreciate the character so come more appreciate the. I always appreciate it because i always liked the villains to. Yeah the millions Like you actually got more about grievous do crew when you did some new ones like assad you venture darth maul reviving garth mall was a really good decision.

new york seventy five dollars second season netflix friburg eight first saito one two minutes star wars laurie one previous week disney channel union square Zeke jimmy three span eighty disney
"friburg" Discussed on RPM45

RPM45

03:07 min | 1 year ago

"friburg" Discussed on RPM45

"You know. And i didn't know i had met roger at that point so i didn't know him. But i was odd. Yeah booking agencies and you know legal stuff. I am in net went on for four years. I mean for me. I was ecstatic. I'm playing with lonesome. Dave and we tore it all over the country. I mean i was. It was exciting for me to be back on the national tour and playing bigger venues again. We did that for four years. And then roger dave's talk in nineteen ninety two. The fog at reforms. They was upset. Half the us go Dave foggy fan. You know and at that time bands like aerosmith were having second resurgences into the marketplace. And so i said you're my blessing. let's go back to the studio. Dave comes back to fog cat. There's two fog hats and then the original guys come back to get so what happened to me. I mean i actually. We had just finished a european tour with molly hatchet. One of the last shows we did before we broke up. They said we heard. You're losing your gig with fog at. I said yes. It's welcome on over. There wants to talk to you his bus so i went over there. They said well. When you're done you wanna play with us on. I was like yeah. Sure know absolutely so. I basically got off dave's bus and got onto the molly. Hatchet bus learned parts might parts all the way on the way up to maine was first show with funny enough. What might first molly hatchet. Show was with the reformed fog at all. My guy. So i walk off the molly hatchet bus and go into the arena and i go into the fog hat dressing room and rogers in there on his practice pads playing. I looked at him and he goes wrong roommate. I could hear him saying that the other band law so that was that's a funny story. We laugh about it all the time united. That's that's how i met roger. I got him. I don't know that much about molly hatchet. I know flirting with disaster molly hatchet but it's a southern rock band right. I mean it's got to be very different from what you've been doing nia southern rocky. I'm was definitely different. It was pretty hard on the southern rockies. Little bit more country oriented we were more rock oriented and the music was very challenging because it was a lot of harmony guitar which is sort of related to not so much because it with southern rock but from my days trying to learn kansas music and bands played allman brothers stuff in bands that were doing guitar harmonies was something i was interested in. And it's a big part of the mali hatchets music is that guitar harmony and not unlike us skinner friburg kind of and once again i got. Continue to stay on the national circuit molly. Hatchet was quite popular in europe. So we almost every year. Two or three months touring europe. So it was you know from maturing standpoint than playing. We did a lot of shows and traveled world mind. I was with them for seven years at that point but then at some point you're back back the fog hat. It was seven years. Dave audio for a while so and they took some time off and When he decided to come back to tour dave after his cancer treatments and he was feeling good enough to go back on the road..

roger dave molly hatchet europe aerosmith maine mali kansas
"friburg" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"friburg" Discussed on The Book Review

"Ernest. Friburg joins us. Now he is the head of the history department at the university of tennessee and his most recent book is called a traitor to his species. Henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement ernest. Thanks for being here my blizzard. Thank you all right. We have to start with the obvious question because this is not a household name for most people who was henry burgh will he was the founder of the aspca and brought the idea of an animal welfare movement animal rights laws to the united states. Right after the civil war in eighteen sixty six. Your area of expertise is nineteenth and twentieth century. Social and cultural history. It's easy to see why your last book. The age of edison looked at the effects of electricity on society. What got you from there to looking at henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement. Well in all my work. I think i've been interested in the way this time period. We sort of called the gilded age. The progressive era into world war one the way this shaped the modern world the world that we live in two books ago. I wrote about the origin of civil liberties civil <hes>. Free speech rights coming out of world war one. The edison book was looking at are both love and hatred of technology. In this case. I was interested in the way. If you look at a an image of nineteenth century city you see horses and of course. There are many many other animals very closely together with with people in the streets but by the nineteen twenty s. That's not the case anymore. In a sense this you know. Our urban environment has been stripped of animals. One historian described it. As as you know we live in a world where in urban environments at least we only have pets and pests and i thought that that captured that that pretty well so i was interested in that transition and i think the animal welfare movement and henry berg's career in particular kind of captures the beginning of some really profound changes in the relationship between humans and animals that started in that time period ended israeli. Still with us today. To what extent is that that change the decline of animals in urban environments. A consequence of the animal rights movement and to what extent is that. Really just about technology industrialisation. Oh it's certainly all those things. I'm not suggesting that the animal welfare movement itself was a driver in any of this but rather was a reflection of its changing sensibilities and in many cases they welcomed the technological changes if steam engines and electricity could replace the horse. That was good for the horse. As far as the animal welfare movement was concerned. so yes they. They're they're really just part of a much wider chains. It's a way to get at people's sensibilities in this time period. This was a time when people came to care much more about animals but at the same time very technology that you're talking about made like pretty grim for many animals as well. The american city was not a friendly place for animals. Describe what a typical city. And let's just use new york because that is where erg lived. What did near city look like at its peak in terms of the number of animals in the city will think about the horses the motive our for the entire city so everything just about relying on horsepower and that meant enormous traffic jams of carriages and wagons and these these railroads that were really the first mass transportation in the city's fundamental to the growth of cities in this time period but then of course there are huge packs of stray dogs roaming in the alleys idea of animal was really developed during this period animal welfare movement. Lots of people are moving into the city from rural areas. And they're bringing with them their own traditions of keeping a cow in the backyard and chickens and and so forth. Pigs are rooting in in the garbage. There really was not very good sanitation control in most neighbourhoods so scrape pigs were part of the scene so it was a it was an enormously rich complicated and dirty mix of humans and animals in this time period.

pamela paul ernest Henry bergh henry burgh edison Friburg Freberg henry berg christian robinson america alexander university of tennessee aspca united states the new york times
The Birth of the Animal Rights Movement

The Book Review

04:00 min | 1 year ago

The Birth of the Animal Rights Movement

"Ernest. Friburg joins us. Now he is the head of the history department at the university of tennessee and his most recent book is called a traitor to his species. Henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement ernest. Thanks for being here my blizzard. Thank you all right. We have to start with the obvious question because this is not a household name for most people who was henry burgh will he was the founder of the aspca and brought the idea of an animal welfare movement animal rights laws to the united states. Right after the civil war in eighteen sixty six. Your area of expertise is nineteenth and twentieth century. Social and cultural history. It's easy to see why your last book. The age of edison looked at the effects of electricity on society. What got you from there to looking at henry bergh and the birth of the animal rights movement. Well in all my work. I think i've been interested in the way this time period. We sort of called the gilded age. The progressive era into world war one the way this shaped the modern world the world that we live in two books ago. I wrote about the origin of civil liberties civil Free speech rights coming out of world war one. The edison book was looking at are both love and hatred of technology. In this case. I was interested in the way. If you look at a an image of nineteenth century city you see horses and of course. There are many many other animals very closely together with with people in the streets but by the nineteen twenty s. That's not the case anymore. In a sense this you know. Our urban environment has been stripped of animals. One historian described it. As as you know we live in a world where in urban environments at least we only have pets and pests and i thought that that captured that that pretty well so i was interested in that transition and i think the animal welfare movement and henry berg's career in particular kind of captures the beginning of some really profound changes in the relationship between humans and animals that started in that time period ended israeli. Still with us today. To what extent is that that change the decline of animals in urban environments. A consequence of the animal rights movement and to what extent is that. Really just about technology industrialisation. Oh it's certainly all those things. I'm not suggesting that the animal welfare movement itself was a driver in any of this but rather was a reflection of its changing sensibilities and in many cases they welcomed the technological changes if steam engines and electricity could replace the horse. That was good for the horse. As far as the animal welfare movement was concerned. so yes they. They're they're really just part of a much wider chains. It's a way to get at people's sensibilities in this time period. This was a time when people came to care much more about animals but at the same time very technology that you're talking about made like pretty grim for many animals as well. The american city was not a friendly place for animals. Describe what a typical city. And let's just use new york because that is where erg lived. What did near city look like at its peak in terms of the number of animals in the city will think about the horses the motive our for the entire city so everything just about relying on horsepower and that meant enormous traffic jams of carriages and wagons and these these railroads that were really the first mass transportation in the city's fundamental to the growth of cities in this time period but then of course there are huge packs of stray dogs roaming in the alleys idea of animal was really developed during this period animal welfare movement. Lots of people are moving into the city from rural areas. And they're bringing with them their own traditions of keeping a cow in the backyard and chickens and and so forth. Pigs are rooting in in the garbage. There really was not very good sanitation control in most neighbourhoods so scrape pigs were part of the scene so it was a it was an enormously rich complicated and dirty mix of humans and animals in this time period.

Henry Bergh Henry Burgh Henry Berg University Of Tennessee Aspca Ernest Edison United States New York
"friburg" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"So I was thinking we should just start without as a basic, which is every single cop car show three, hundred, sixty Gammerman. Every cop should be federal mandate and I don't exactly know federal mandates wirtz acts, but don't you think it should be a federal mandate for just cameras in car camera's. A good idea I think the cameras so good idea. I. Mean. Maybe not recording the police officers when they're sitting in their car but every time there's like up. A Call? No. Yeah, they pull some over sort of you know like fourth amendment type search and seizure seizure type situation. Yeah. I think it would make sense to have that on video. Why not? Every police will behave better, go ahead FRIBURG. There was a case the other day a young. Guy Think it was nineteen years old was shot in DC deante K I I. Don't know if you guys watch the body. Cam Footage. And so he's a nineteen year old black man shot died. But in the body cam footage, you can see the pulls out the gun and throws it. And when he pulls out the gun and flings his hand, he got gun in his hand. That's when the cop shot him and so there were about one hundred protesters it showed up but it's largely become a non story as a result of the fact associated with cancer but I just want to propose something else. It's a little bit more radical maybe might libertarian ideals Kinda Cross with my socialist ideals an forming this this concept perhaps. Your Socialist. Now I don't know that I've never been accused of that but. If we. If we trace back you know the systems are really caddick. Everything you're talking about is layers and layers of bureaucracy and ideas and shit. We should do to manage the problem, but there is kind of one common butterflies butterflies at the source of all of a lot of what we're talking about which is gone. If there weren't any guns in the United States, I would not feel threatened as a police officer. I would never have any reason to feel threatened that I would never have any reason to pull a gun the reason I, always make to pull a gun as a police officer is my life is threatened and in the absence of firearms I have no right to. pull a gun and that's the case in the UK for example, where there are like no police officer shootings of civilians because they're never under threat of being killed by a gun. So there's a simple answer which is get rid of the guns but little controversial and obviously many layers to that argument especially from kind of both sides but I I would say. Much much of what's going to go on now and in the future is just chaos theory it's going to be building more layers of complexity. It's more entropy it's more kind of associated complexity to try and resolve the underlying problem of all of this, which is that we've got guns on the streets. We've got done people's hands, and therefore you know there's always this threat against every individual that there might be taken by another. prediction right now, there's not gonNA be any new gun control legislation for generation because of the looting and writing that's going on. Gun sales are an all time high I mean every single gun store that initially to hold out you can't you can't guns you can't get ammo and they're more first time gun buyers in the United States for the last several months there's ever been I. Mean. The the ranks of the NRA must be swelling right now. And so so this idea that you're going to get gun reform I don't think it's going to happen. Support it and you know I think. got. US Word idealistic I mean I think it's like a little bit naive. To, assume that you're game be able to get rid of all the guns in the hands of bad actors There are a lot of people in this country who feel the need to have a gun to protect themselves. And know, the COPs can't always get there quickly enough analog. You'll feel that nita to have that for self defense. I also think the minimum amount of training for a police officer should not be six months I. Think they have to re I mean if we really want to have the society move forward. and. You know to solve our issue of race which is. The original said of America we're GONNA really need to start thinking about making. Police go back to school for eighteen months, twelve months and rethink how we how we address the situation because. It. It's just tragically unfair that one group of people's Children has to worry when they're driving in a car and other people on this call. Worry right and you know that is just crazy. Let let's take a hard shift to the economy and then go into The election. What do you think trump? You've been talking a little bit about the economy and the stock market ripping again and we seem to have hit a pause but we did have like a massive rip with Tesla Amazon Tesla Apple I guess doing stock split. and we hit all time records. Why are we hitting all time records timoth?.

officer United States wirtz NRA Tesla trump UK nita America
"friburg" Discussed on Redemption Podcast

Redemption Podcast

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on Redemption Podcast

"In that book prolonged. For the. See like armored stuff saw make the necessary to get that stuff. He probably look in the other book the stuff. One of. The. One of. One of them complete. Stuff. Order Hugh. Our. Rural. Will see them through the airlock and again kind of. On a pallet. In the cargo area, simply we had a small larger. Larger. But Took them. Credits. Through dirt report. As I get in the cockpit I will. I will switch our credentials over to our new credentials. What is the new ship name? Carell by the way, is the sitting at at the navigator's station with a slight smile on her face, but she's sitting on her hands. In her screen is powered off. It's obvious. It's an obvious joke. Wants to practice zd wrong A. Jump To. Turn notion. which I actually really suck at allergens. Side under my breath, lot of appear. Back Up. Once, actually wants to consequently. I have a basic. Popular German Tozzi. When recap usually no. Union. Dog got an excellent or good. Voice can. Before we left. I of I bought. Should. Are you. What are you wearing right now? What are you wearing my actual clothing? I wear basically a flight suit. the disc. That's kind of like it's it's two piece piece of clothing, but it's connected to each like snaps. I'm the bomb. So it's linked flight soon. From an armor perspective I have. These? Well. Heavy, clothing. And How do you? have. To. So at once so from my Brown, in one for Michael, heavy golden gives to doesn't it? Says one soap. Clothing is one. A liar moving on my day. We don't lie for this case insistent or. So we'll. depart. Click on the COMS. Posting messages. Over the trump. SEE NEXT FALL A. They were. We. Didn't look didn't look I I'm looking now. What does it say? We were going. To. Wait to. Bitch. Get bigger and. Flip this before I said. Oh. It's even worse like salt in the wound like Oh sorry guys I'm into ruin your day I actually going to stop that because that's the perfect end to an adventure to be fair. He's the guy who's wants to pay somebody forty thousand dollars for our ship. For fourteen thousand credits for Kenny. Crowds, fate, which we are right now. With our we right now I don't know what are we right now what what credentials would ship names crashes Oh No, no these credentials were provided to us. Angels. The belived in. Beloved The Free Beer Revere the runny eggs friburg Howie's. Look Golden Padres. Yes. Golden. How Would it be done? Ship, out of your imagination not by. Credit Spang. Hey. Crowds famous fine. The. Era. When you guess spaceship, you name it the Moody tweet like whatever you want. The lightning bugs. The Communists. Buffalo know. How the Human League. ATLANTA. The travelers endeavor how. Pedestrian district. sightsee this. Well. Hopefully. Survive dealing with the guy wants to crowd Spain. took. Over encumbered. The stumbling. Obese or what's the weird diary still spirit? The lifetime yeah. Because my skills to remove a black guy on my difficulty. You're right..

Golden Padres zd ATLANTA Carell Human League Moody Howie Spain. Kenny Michael Buffalo
"friburg" Discussed on Our Different Take

Our Different Take

06:00 min | 2 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on Our Different Take

"Sorry those bad. Joke. That's the first sesame street joke I ever told him. I'm going to rest right take make it the last. About that. Sure. They also cited US enough up against. Giant elephants giant. Elephant. Harry ells inciting yeah. That's even worse than it is worse. What, if snuffle up against called you and made threatening phone cost to you hey, man. That was. Case enough. What the. Fuck. Is that what stuff Olympic assembling? So from my childhood at least, that's sounds like. Amy Name. By some. I don't know that's cheaper. Chong that's. That's. Me Stumbling Not Jong. All right anyway. So. Another another spotting. was in Germany. Nineteen. Seventy eight. When a mine collapsed in Friburg Germany killing a bunch of minors. There were twenty miners that were supposed to work that day but were scared away. By the site of a moth man like creature who purchased at the entrance of the mind. And scared half of the people away or there would have been a lot more people dead. In Germany and they called it the Friburg Shrieker is what they called that creature. Did it make regular shrieking? Streak. With met, scared, a lot of people say. We happen to have a recording. Here we do. Let me grab it. Good stuff. Yeah it's horrible. Let's terrible. Well. Site ings and it's it's. Really. A cool mystery. I'd really like to go there and check out they have a museum. they have tours, you can take a bus tour. All about the month man. There's a giant statue in the middle of town. For the mathematical statute. Like a silver looking right Dana steelers. And it's pretty cool. But Greenwich is. Will they don't have a whole lot of influence either but there's been sightings in Chicago quite a bit from two thousand eleven to two thousand seventeen. That's crazy me yeah. I don't have that from the research idea. I don't have that specifically tied to some kind of I did hear it. But I didn't hear anything else about like it was kind of a blip. Yeah. Yeah. So I don't have much information on that but. Interesting stuff well. One of these days when we get rich. In Our new sponsor Tesla. decides to actually pass for. For. For putting them on the PODCAST We can go there and actually and get you know firsthand account of what's going to..

Friburg Shrieker Germany US Dana steelers Friburg Germany Harry ells Chong Amy Name Tesla. Greenwich Chicago
"friburg" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

08:09 min | 2 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

"It's the best description all right So anyway great. War Market Sweden and his uncle father had become the national hero. Okay he helped sink a Swedish ship and a little while later Jurgen and the king were in Copenhagen and they got they got really shit faced. Okay Great and they're walking and the king fell into the Copenhagen Al Play so the king is Hammer Hammer. Okay now. This is the time when the king would just walk around hammered like just some bar rat. Yeah that's great. I'm sure he can still do that. It's like what it's like. We we keep saying Boris Johnson. Does I was just roaming the streets. Like why is he out here. People just GonNa yell at him and jumped in to save the king. He did but soon after Gordon came down with pneumonia and died shit. Well that's dark. Well we already had a baby die so we got a lot of. When tico returned to Denmark? The rest of his family were very unfriendly to him. They hated his stargazing right. He's a dreamer. Yeah yeah right He got the inheritance. Is Mom got some stuff or anger. The MOM mant anger rocks the Mont.. In fifteen sixty six TICO went to study at the University of Rostock. He studied medicine. Okay okay now. He was into medical alchemy and botanical medicine. Oh Wow okay. So on December Tenth Fifteen Sixty six now twenty year old. TICO got into an argument with his third cousin Mandaric Parse Burke. Sure sometimes you just gotta get the normal name. Yeah no in any manner ups here where my mandir upset. So they every ship faced and they got into. This is at a professor's home at the school and it's like a party and their shit faced and they get into an argument over mathematical formula. We've all been there. I mean that's like me and you that's like well. We have this classic debate. About how many years between fifteen and nineteen and we we we do it all the time at the bar because we're a big one and we'll never know the answer so vexing that's just yes it. It's just math genius solves. Some guy comes along and goodwill's hunting this. We're not doing anything so ah the argument almost came to blows. They had to be separated and then a corrections. Oh my God don't get them into decimal points they'll fuck it lose. Lose their shit so then it happened again. A couple of weeks later to Christmas party can't with maybe they needed to stop going to the same events. Yep mother cousins Hazan's but still third cousins. Yeah so this time they agreed to settle it with the dual just makes total sense to to get it to this level so the drunk and they go outside or they're drunk so they're having a drool they get their swords and they get their swords. Yeah there's sort dueling sword doing drunk okay in the dark in the dark. Let's let's evaluate for a moment. Shall we so they. He got drunk. Now they're going to have a sword duel drunk in the dark on pure impulse. No planning over math. That's that's right okay. All right just wanted to time in. They fought in Tico lost a piece of his nose a large piece most of his nose. Okay so he goes knows lists and he was slashed on the foreheads big slash car slash. Let's not worry about that. Nobody's going to be looking at your slash. People are GonNa be like what happened. where's your nose and it's not that cute game your dad uncle plays with you? Got Your nose really have your no oh shit. That's not funny. Aw He was cared for at the university and after he healed began wearing a prosthetic nose. Okay it was a brass knows kept in place with paste or glue. Yeah I mean well definitely when you're replacing it gets something that will rust. Yeah okay. So now he's just glowing Lebron's knows goes to his face he would carry extra pace paste with him for the rest of his life in case it started to come off Yeah so that's the weird thing to be around when you're hanging we're just when you're talking or someone they're like. Oh hold on Tico you gotta go repaced. I'M GONNA go powder my nose put paste beneath that. I mean but he and his cousin made up after that's hard feelings. What many hard feelings ticket was known by those who knew him to quote not hold anger in offense but was is ever ready to forgive? That's okay okay. Also to someone cuts off my nose taking there is. Yeah I I will hold a grudge at least yeah I certainly won't. It's all good. Yeah it's just a knows whatever man I'm still pissed about the forehead slash that hurt but the nose is what it is barely tell what was such a big one so tico had red hair blue eyes. A Trim pointed beard a handlebar moustache and now a metal knows. Tell you what Dave now that I hear the look I like it. I would uh-huh and by if you're walking around pay that's a that's peacocking. That's a calling card signature. Look Yeah right and the ladies are into. Because you're dangerous. Yeah Hell Yeah Right. Yeah Hardy blow you will for sure but you could probably get away cocaine without a nose. I it's probably easier. You just take it down and just it's like poof like flicking wonder if you couldn't smell anymore if you can still smell wanna wear the probably not I don't know I I got no idea. That's pure speculation. We should look that up. Well tweet me. I'm going to get those the Christ Dave. I was doubting at my stereo in the car. Today you can still smell just not as well dumb ass he. He went home in fifteen sixty seven. His plan was to become an astrologer. Usually the men of the family went into politics and law but they were okay with him on the science route. K Okay to go travel. You went to Rostock Augsburg Basil Friburg in fifteen sixty-eight he was approached. That was a good day. Great people are not no. I don't even know what these places are in fifteen sixty eight. He was appointed a a Canon at the Cathedral of Rusk lied. He was appointed a canon rescued. Now that's not a thing. He just said literally not a word. He's appointed a Canon. Yeah it's a church a church guy. Okay otherwise I thought the wizard was back. And he's like your cannon I have appointed you know he's not a real cannon. No well he's got a nose like a game and basically allowed him to study scholarships. Okay Gotcha from a church Shinano who gives a shit so the Lord doth the Lord at ETA fifteen sixty seventy. His real father became ill so go return to castle. His his dad died in May the war with Sweden had ended and now a new uncle help tico build observatory in an alchemy laboratory. Right okay. That year he fell in love with Cureton Hanson but she.

TICO tico Tico tico build observatory Sweden Boris Johnson University of Rostock Copenhagen Al Play Hammer Hammer Jurgen Copenhagen Rostock Augsburg Basil Friburg professor pneumonia Mandaric Parse Burke Cureton Hanson Hazan Gordon
"friburg" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

OC Talk Radio

13:44 min | 2 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on OC Talk Radio

"Welcome if you will for the first time Karen Friburg thank you Karen. Thank you so much for having me so are you ready to impart wisdom to us. You've got some many wizards we've had on this show here so grew i. Don't see a point. He had on your head here so I don't know if you're ready for this now. It's in my other office all okay all right all right so did you bring along to impart wisdom with us today here. I am truly honored to have one the best individuals in crisis communications space. Melissa Agnes she is a consultant. Global recognize leading expert in the field. She's also so bestselling author and looking at the valuable skills as soon as need to have In order to be successful in the workplace in this field so in this session Melissa is going to be talking about out her work and crisis management her buck and how she really is helping the future generation in practicing effective and strategic crisis communication. So Oh great to have you on the Wvu podcast Melissa. Welcome welcome and I'm just. I'm just thrilled that the students professionals and community will be able to learn from from you and hear the great work you're doing in our field. Thank you so much for the honor of being here Karen L.. Let's get started the first question that I have for you is. How did you get started? Started in this field. What journey did you take to be a leading expert and crisis management started saying I get an entrepreneur Herod about life pretty much nearly ten years ago? Now I remember we were doing. I had a partner Kinda liver doing brand strategies for the digital space. So you know I'm Lynn Branding and social missile media and digital websites. And all that and I remember one morning I was reading just catching up on my morning reading and it just struck me. All the changes changes that were going on in with digital technology in general not just chlamydia and that just kind of all of it together and the impact that it was having on organizations wins or at least the impact that I thought having on organizations in a negative capacity and the realization that nobody at that point in time was was talking about it. Nobody was addressing. Nobody was asking questions about it. Just there was no dialogue happening on this important subjects and fuelled me because it's the way that my brain works. So the way that kind of the pattern that my brain tends to take is I see risk everywhere I quickly Kinda kept. Classified is is an issue versus the crisis in different contexts. What does that mean? And then I see mitigation strategies for those risks and then opportunity through mitigation so quickly my brain went to. There's so so much risk involved in this. Nobody's talking about it and yet all of this risk is so easy to mitigate if we do start talking about it and then if we get to that level then then be opportunities for Christ's communication for Crisis Management for emergency management just becomes unprecedented. But we have to have these conversations stations in order to get there and to kind of triggered something within me in that moment I remember the feeling in our member. The kind of a hall lightbulb. Oh my goodness no. Tom And I spent about a year. You kinda devouring everything that I pay the subject crisis management because up until that time. I didn't know that that was a thing and and again for a year all of my you know couldn't put studies. I realized that nobody was addressing the way that society was moving in terms of technology and the digital landscape. It just didn't make any sense to me and I remember turning to my business partner with a crime and saying there's something here I just I not quite there yet. I didn't have my figure directly directly in it and neck patron when it looks like it can simply here at about that time we had just launched one of our clients. Websites are real estate. Investment Trust so public company that invests in real estate with their primary stakeholders being investors. We just launched their website and early one morning. Vp of the company calls me and says says Oh my goodness I. President in the past active investor radio is reporting basic not every channel that one of our buildings is about to explode. It's not true. Apparently apparently the rumors started on twitter. We've new would put her is but we hear the digital thing since he just wants to our website. We are desperately hoping that you could help us right person right place right time right kind of instinct upon me within half an hour. I had the entire situation reversed and the next day. The President of the company they call to say not only had their unit price which is their stock price gone had not only had it not been down since the day before but had actually gone up so they had actually increase free stakeholder traction in the market and they're not get and so he he takes me and it was that moment that I went. Oh my goodness I could be of service like like Mrs something that is needed and is going to increasingly be needed and this is what I WANNA do and turned to my partner and I said this is what I do and he said Okay and when I did was I was young entrepreneur. I didn't have any marketing budget. At the time. I just decided you know what there's conversations that need to be had around this and and nobody's having them so I'm GonNa Start having them and launched a blog and I dedicated at myself to blogging five days a week for several years and posed those questions and provided answers and started those dialogues. And right place right time right aptitude and here. I am say that is quite the journey. Melissa thank you you so much for sharing that with us than one thing you've really promoted across search channels and in your work is about being crisis ready. So what does that actually mean. And why's it important for. It's still a great question. There's a difference between crisis ready finance and crisis prevention or the typical kind of status quo of crisis management typical status quo. Unfortunately to this day remains remains to be leadership kind of says we need a practice management plan and somehow they invested in a plan of some sort and they put up on a shelf or to file and and they think that you know what if a crisis happens. We're ready we have. That plan will grab that plan. Guide US through. The success will know what to do but the reality today. Is that by the time when you reach for that plan in whether it's viral issue or a crisis the incident is already. It's already taking off. They call their demand and expectations are already surging in. It's already going on violent at. You're already behind so the whole concept. The whole premise of being crisis ready is that you're not dependent on a stagnant planet sitting on a shelf more or that does a disturbance to you and your organization at stake holders instead you're looking at crisis readiness as a cultural component whereby one you are whole true me proactively every day preventing the preventable risks. Because if they're preventable why are they. Why would they not be prevented? And then to uh-huh every rescue is preventable so in the event that an incident happened bitterness. You're crisis crisis. It doesn't matter you have an entire team that is instinctively. Stink deeply and intuitively able to detect it in real time which gives you head start on managing respond to it effectively. They're able to assess as material real impact on the organization so they can look at an incident say is this an issue versus is the classes and wasn't that mean and as a result what we need to do with it internally and externally. They're they're able to manage the incident not just in a way where it mitigates further escalation and further mantra material impact but it actually it it builds upon the brand equity. So you're just like my client back in on nearly a decade ago when you're not just managing it to put it to bed. You're managing to come out of it increase trust and credibility in your brand and so that's the whole premise of being crisis. Ready what it means. And the fact that it's a cultural component I and Dan a deliverable that sitting on a shelf somewhere. That's a really great definition of crisis ready and so a big part of your mission practices helping today's professionals understand the best practice of the crisis readiness and you talked a little bit about how it's not simply about just having a plan in place and that's basically sitting on the shelf for us to have never really use. Could you elaborate. Great how crisis readiness is more than just a plan. Could you provide some examples of how you were able to implement this for clients. The foundation it starts with knowledge starts with education so bring everybody speed on the difference between the issue of crisis for example and the impacts of crisis today and the effects of something called a crisis response penalties. The crisis response penalty is completely avoidable. It's completely preventable. But what it is is crisis penalty. CRP is the material impact as a crisis on an organization as a direct result of mismanage kind of setting the stage as a baseline education across the board. That list of things to get this really really truly understood understood because it's very abstract and not easy to understand or not easily understood and we made real unless you take the time to do even though it may seem so kind of at the onset from there. You're building programs. You're taking you deep dive into identifying your organizations that I call the higher scenario ah every business I don't it doesn't matter what industries field size has no bearing everything. Business has a series of most likely high impact scenario. I call this a high risk scenarios understanding what you were. Hydra scenarios are where the threshold lies from taking a scenario from an issue crisis and then back down again being entirely prepared for taking the time to do a deep dive into each one of these scenarios again preventing the preventable and then the -veloping ground that looks at everything from your governance structure to your escalation processes to your dissemination Cascading Prophecies Protocols Party calls to get involved with having every single member of a team because crisis management is cross organizational. It doesn't happen happened in axiom so making sure that everybody across your organization is very familiar and very comfortable with all of these aspects all of these processes and and try to hold and just the things that need to happen in order to tap assassin respond and then going through regular training to really ingrain that into the culture are into the kind of muscle memory of your different teams so that in the event of something kind of coming out of left field you quickly instinctively. I know how to say. Oh my goodness visit potential crisis. Here's what we have to do. Everybody does it be escalated down to issue and then from there down to issue will. Yeah absolutely that is absolutely on point. I really am glad that you made that clarification and I actually wanted to jump ahead to another question related into you talked a lot about issue. Christ our audience about the difference between an issue and a crisis. And why it's important. I'll start with why it's important today. Hey in this day and age with biology old these affect and sensationalization and just a notional hiding the motions and just all of these aspects up. Today it's very easy for an issue that goes by rain to feel like crisis but by Valley is not a Christ is not the indicating criteria of what a crisis is just because an issue goes. Viral doesn't necessarily make it a crisis or if you miss kind of classify an incident you risk either either overreacting or under reacting or just reacting responding inappropriately so as to not be escalated a best you can and then of course after needless. CRP that's kind of the reason. I had so important and as well as making sure that you have the right hands on that for depending on the situation depending on the level of the situation looking at issuing price they places I'm going to be a definition. Crisis is a negative inventor. Situation that stopped business as usual ossified extent because it requires immediate escalation straight to leadership requires taking leadership out of their busy days and other meetings to look at this situation choice. Because it's threatened long-term material and Bob on one to four and five so people the environment the business's operation gratien its reputation and or its bottom-line long term material impact on one to all of those five things means that this is a serious incident fidanza threaten long-term material and we need to get leadership out of whatever they're doing because we need. There is their decision making their directives whereas an issue is also also a negative inventor situation but the difference is that it doesn't stop business as usual because it doesn't threaten that long-term Mitchell improper any one of those type thing and as a result is yes an issue is very unpleasant to have to go through and to manage but because it doesn't the escalation straight to the top of leadership it is. I see it at. It's Kinda business as usual on hyper drive so if you are in your department or your Faced with it. It's not a prices so it's something that you and your team have to manage. It's the unpleasant side of your job. Important side of your job but it doesn't have that long. Longterm material impact threats. That doesn't require anybody else's stuff with their way to come and help you manage it.

Crisis Management Melissa Agnes CRP Wvu Karen Friburg twitter US chlamydia Karen L Herod Lynn Branding Karen Tom Investment Trust
"friburg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"He's always yelling free bird Miklos is I could give him his Friburg down in Saint Clair county, population shy five thousand sponsored by country. Your farm, is your family's legacy part of your hometown. Heritage while you work up sundown to get the job done. We're here. Protecting the things you love every step of the way country financial. Learn more at country crop dot com for Jim Taylor. I'm Rita Frazier. I'm Dolores Yongki. Have a great day. I came a products important part of your toolbox. This planting season state of has revised the cutoff date for their use. In an emergency radio can be your lifeline when the power is out and cellular networks are down. Next radio is the free FM radio app that still works on your Android smartphone. Download next radio now with the Google play store. Stay tuned, this station and stay safe. Service newscast for Tuesday to the twenty fifth two thousand nineteen by Clifford conditions reported to be so bad three hundred by grid children moved from a Texas detention center. Also on our Tuesday rundown, Senator Susan Collins gets a challenge from the main house speaker, plus a Bill in congress points to the need for summer meals now, our top story, NBC news reports almost three hundred by good children have been removed for border patrol facility in Texas, that after media reports of lawyers, describing appalling and potentially dangerous conditions. Those lawyers who visited to Texas facilities holding by GRA. Children described seeing young kids teenagers not being able to shower for days, raven weeks inadequate food, flu outbreaks and prolonged, periods of detention. The department of homeland security told NBC news, the children who worry move being held at a border station in class. Texas advocates say some of those kids were worried dirty clothes covered in mucus, and even urine. None of the children had access to soap or toothpaste after twenty two years in office, Republican Senator Susan Collins, the logger representing the interests of main residence. At least that's according to her newest challenger, Kevin. Bo has the story in announcing her campaign to unseat Collins, twenty twenty main house speaker, Sarah Gideon sites Collins controversial vote supreme court Justice Brett cavenaugh in her support for Donald Trump's two thousand seventeen tax cuts as examples of being out of touch. Hospital where one and a half two dollar tax cut would given mostly the corporations and the wealthiest families in America meters were totally left behind by that. That was a Bill that benefited people who don't live in the state also pointed out, that is tax cut vote paved the

Senator Susan Collins Texas NBC Miklos Saint Clair county Rita Frazier Dolores Yongki Google Donald Trump Jim Taylor Justice Brett cavenaugh Kevin America Clifford department of homeland Bo
"friburg" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

07:32 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Himself in my problem. This is not something that you could solve online. There's got to be somebody there that can help you find that fit you put in the arch supports and your day becomes better and the clouds go away and to good life. Good feet has saved the day. Call now to one zero five nine eight eight eight five nine or visit us across four ten from the north star mall between men's warehouse and Friburg. Words, goodfeet, helping San Antonio walk better for seven years. Individual results may consult your physician for medical conditions. Go to our website goodfeet. San Antonio dot com. Come in, and try the good feet feeling today comfort energy performance and pain relief at the good feet store. Your smart speaker, never will play twelve hundred W O AI on iheartradio. We're halfway there. Welcome to Wednesday. The twelfth day of June. Three days. Charities birthday, four days and kill Father's Day tomorrow. The third of the four golf majors, your US open begins tomorrow at Pebble Beach and the NBA draft is one week from tomorrow next Thursday. The twentieth. This morning. Point, if you're going to have an eighteen Wheeler slowdown Mayes, well habits southbound thirty five right at the upper level, add, Laredo, it's pretty much off to the shoulder, but it isn't eighteen Wheeler. So it's blocking a bit of that, right? Lane news caution downtown. Megan Bishop NewsRadio twelve hundred w ally, partly cloudy skies today. Some sunshine and a high around ninety degrees. We'll begin the morning back in the day on the day this day the twelfth day of June. Eight years ago nineteen thirty nine the baseball hall of fame opened in Cooperstown. New york. The actual first inductions into the baseball hall of fame took place, three years earlier in nineteen thirty six fifty six years ago nineteen sixty three civil rights leader. Medgar Evers, the fascinated by a white supremacists in the driveway of his home, nineteen seventy eight serial killer. David Berkowitz sentenced at twenty five years to life for the sixth son of Sam murders in New York. He gives parole hearing, every two years, he doesn't show up because he doesn't think that he should be released twenty eight years ago. Nineteen ninety-one. Michael Jordan's Chicago Bulls won their first NBA championship meaning the Lakers four games to one they would win the next year in ninety two beating Portland. They would win the year after that in nineteen Ninety-three beating the sons, and then they take a little bit of a break, and then come back in ninety six ninety seven and ninety eight winning three more titles over the VIN Seattle SuperSonics now the Oklahoma City thunder and two years. Ninety seven ninety eight both years beating Utah. Twenty five years ago today in nineteen. Ninety-four OJ Simpson killed Nicole Brown Simpson. And Ronald Goldman outside her LA condo, as you'll remember. OJ was he quitted of the killings in a criminal trial twenty two years ago? Not as bad as the designated hitter. But almost nineteen Ninety-seven major league baseball began inter league play ending a one hundred twenty six year tradition of keeping the American League and the National League separate until the World Series. And it was three years ago this morning. Two thousand sixteen forty nine people killed fifty three injured. Nineteen o to south orange Parkway in Orlando, the pulse nightclub. American, Omar Mateen, a twenty nine year old security guard opened fire with a semiautomatic assault rifle and a Glock at the time it was the deadliest mass shooting in American history. Birthdays today include one Kenny, Wayne shepherd. Guitar master now, playing in a band called the rides alongside another guitar master one, Stephen stills, Kenny, Wayne shepherd is forty two. He by the way, is married to Mel Gibson's daughter boil bet. Those are fun. Thanksgiving's Jason mewes everybody's favourite Jay from Jay and silent Bob peers and almost all of Kevin Smith movies. Jason a day is Forty-five generally Harrison. She would be the second defeat blonde roommate on three's company stepped in after Suzanne Somers was fired. And after one year, she was fired, and they brought in a smart, blonde roommate. She sixty one happy birthday rock and Roll Hall of Famer bun, e Carlos. Keep tricks Chevy glasses wearing goateed, former drummer turning sixty nine day is the birth date of George Bush, the elder Bush forty one would have been ninety-five today, that in November of last year birthdate bread. Dell. Austin's former lead singer Brad dealt. More news day nineteen fifty one died two thousand seven suicide in an Frank. Hopefully you read her diary, Jewish teenager by hid from the Nazis her father's business in German-occupied, Amsterdam after two years, Franks were discovered and sent to a concentration camp in northern Germany and Frank died sometime in March of nineteen Forty-five from typhus just a few weeks before British soldiers liberated the concentration camp where she was a prisoner. Those were the days. Rush Limbaugh morning commentary, and more before seven o'clock. Information you can use Senate Tonio first news, with Charlie Parker. Featuring Charlie Parker. Ciardi McCurdy, making Bisham him. Berryman Schimdt, foresight, it sat in Tonio, first news on NewsRadio twelve hundred. W O AI. Hey, good morning. It's charity, McCurdy a remodeling project can be downright exhausting. Even if you're not the one doing all the work. But if you go with the right company, the process, does not have to be a nightmare and the end result is so worth it. OMG kitchen and bath remodeling. They took care of my master bathroom makeover, and.

San Antonio New york Ciardi McCurdy NBA Charlie Parker Jason mewes Wayne shepherd Frank George Bush Kenny Medgar Evers OJ Simpson Friburg Cooperstown Utah Ronald Goldman David Berkowitz Suzanne Somers Mel Gibson
"friburg" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:59 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Don't have the fame song deploying we redo cut that right off. More important Schaumburg. Radio theater. Tickling the ivy's here Roger. Yeah. They slapped you back food. All right. Well, what do you think of is herald Perry show? You like it. Yeah. I'm not so crazy about it. Well, I mean, it's it's it's the same character. Well, the great Gildersleeve he's still doing the same bitch. It it kinda has that same feel. But you know, I did not know that he had gone onto this series. Why you need to listen to the show all about classic. Learn more about it. If you get right back. You know what? I'll learn. I'll learn you. Got a plane to catch. Actually there with you. Lisa had a very good off the air. She said to me, but it's good that we play, you know, everything I mean. Well, right. The great stuff the not so great stuff because that lets our listeners get a better perspective of what the golden age of radio was always phenomenal. There were there were things that were kind of clunkers teaches a little bit about what you like what you don't appreciate. And you learn a little bit along the way television. There's some shows that only last year two years, and then there's shows the last fifteen twenty years, and they're more talked about the golden age of radio it has been lost to time with the exception of your show. And so people who remember that time one who re-experience the entire thing naturally one or two shows as you say, not the more popular ones. Yeah. You understand? Understand what you're. This is interesting. We'll get back into the show just wanna make one comment growing up and listening to the show, you know, 'cause I was acting obviously started listening to these nine nineteen seventy five. So they were already weighed going year collecting these shows over the years. I was listening to some of these programs like gonna give you the title of one Vic and Sade say when I first started listening to thought it was the stupidest thing I've ever heard in my life. I was like I don't even have on a collective show. Well, I now listen to Vic and say, it's one of the most brilliant shows ever written. And it's just I guess when in time in your life, and you're hearing these shows I was much younger than now. I can appreciate the writing the same thing with the Stanford show when I first heard the stand Freberg show before even new Stanford Berg, I was kind of like this is silly. I don't get kinda then as I got older. I appreciate it. In fact, I liked it so much that when art Fleming who was the host of my show at the time he unfortunately passed away. And I was like why have to hire another name. And STAN was STAN was available. And I was like oh my gosh. They're going to get the now work with this genius Friburg. For years. He was the host of my show my syndicated show. And so you just I guess it's when you listen to them what the time in history in other words Vic and Sade when it first came out everyone who listened to that could relate to it. Because that was the time that if it aired they grew up you at first you weren't growing up in that time when you were younger, and like you said it wasn't until you got older and could understand the situation back. Exact Vic say, yeah, really is one of the most brilliant shows of all time is so laid back. It's very naturally. Yeah. All right. Well, thanks, Roger, let's get back. Now to the herald Perry show..

Vic Roger Perry Sade Schaumburg art Fleming Lisa Stanford STAN Stanford Berg fifteen twenty years two years
"friburg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:12 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Was put to bed when William bar made his announcement. When Muller said that the whole which was dead. Everything's dead. And I won't get into the political back and forth over who was wrong. Who is right and whether or not we're still at it. Yeah. It's still going to go on we said Friday eight this is going to be. So let's just wait for it to fall as it is because everything that we said Friday. So you know, that's how it is ground zero. Usually give you the story before it becomes the main story, and it was easy. Call really was. But what's not easy to call? Here's what I'm talking about tonight. And I, you know, number of things that just don't seem like they gel together. Really? Well, okay. Like. The idea that AVI Loeb, who harbored Astro biologist? Talking about a more and more. He's been doing this now from hellos how long we've been in touch with him saying, hey, got to come on the show got to come on the show 'cause we're very busy. Of course, it's been doing speaking engagements. And finally, we're clearing the calendar for him next month. Thanksgiving closer than we think it's going to two weeks way three weeks. Maybe I don't know. So obvious said you'll do the show, but. It just really sucks. Trying to get your message out. You get your information pulled because it is uncomfortable. So you know, he's been saying that could be a spacecraft of some kind and the Chicago Tribune reported that the Washington Post news service syndicate asked that this their news organizations and affiliates. Remove the story discussing the possibility that alien ship may be among us, basically, AVI Loeb, saying, yeah. A more and more. And there was also a problem because the Washington Post story featured a I guess you could call it a statement. And they say they miss Kau characterized it. They mischaracterize the statement from North Carolina State university astrophysicist, Katie MAC. Apparently, she said something about how. Well, sometimes you write papers about something. You don't believe to be true at all? And so that's why you put him out there. I guess they didn't like that. And I wouldn't like it either. I wouldn't say there's nothing more irritating. Having somebody say CLYDE doesn't actually believe what he talks about. He's just doing it for the ratings. When I hear that. I'm thinking ratings don't matter either way, it's consistency. Okay. If shows are consistent either consistently good or they're consistently bad. If they're consistently bad. You get a downturn. You go go to low que there's a lo- visit glut glitch, sometimes used something called flagging flattening this flat line of your ratings. And they go down some time to go up. Sometimes it's all about consistency. As nothing to do with him. I went on the air tomorrow and said, I have an interview with an alien, and I it sounded convincing enough. It wouldn't matter. It wouldn't change wouldn't change anything. Sure. Get a lot of a lot of people talking about it on god-like productions or some other place, but it certainly wouldn't matter at all. I just did it one night the people don't get that and same with. This situation with with Abby and with the newspapers and all this just does not. It doesn't make people feel good when they're told that they don't really believe what they're saying. They're just saying. I've always said, yeah. I could be kidding. But I'm very serious about what I'm kidding about. Okay. Yeah. I bring up a topic. They don't necessarily believe. But I certainly want to know more about it. So I'll bring on guests to talk about. It's not about belief. It's about reporting. Hey, why don't consider myself a conspiracy theorist, I consider myself a conspiracy analyst I analyze conspiracy, and I analyzed cover up. So I analyse para political moves in and all this stuff. It has nothing to do with political leanings, or what have you, but you know, after twenty months of nonsense about Russian collusion, and you just see there was all from a script. You say to yourself, man. That's certainly makes you sound like an apologist for Donald Trump. So why go on and on when it's already been settled and take a look at this. Now, why are they doing this? Why are they covering this up at another thing? There was something else that came out. There was a paper that was produced by the journal of Astro biology and space sciences space, scientists reviews the journal of Astro biology and space, scientists reviews researchers believed that they may have found evidence of light currently living on Mars. So this is what they this is what? It's based on okay? The researchers believe that some fungus funky like growth is on Mars because what happened. Well, they're say that could be microbial life in existence again. Rub this road again. Because like I said Gilbert Levin talked about this before. These Fundus gross of were observed in pictures taken by the opportunity Rover. And it showed lobes that maybe lichen growing on Mars lichen moss stuff for the fungus like mossy stopped growing on the planet. So you know, we may be hearing about this. It's actually if you want to look at it. I think it's SOL three seven. That's the thirty seventh Martian day when opportunity was taking pictures. So you look at the thirty seventh day, and then you'll see what appears to be this bluish color. And these little what looked like fungus, mold spores on the ground. So you know, who knows what see there you have that story that got buried and all that stuff. You know? Everybody wants to talk about Russian collusion. But we got this story. So it hasn't made the mainstream yet it'd probably won't because what they're doing with our beloved. They're pulling his story. So they're pulling those then. National Geographic, of course, comes out with their new are we actually we're not alone. It says it used to say are we alone. Now, it's his we're not alone. That's on the front cover of this month, National Geographic, and then another article showed up. About the testing of Hitler, stealth fighters and a team of engineers back in two thousand eight two thousand nine for National Geographic decided that they were going to test. These mockup aircraft of what would be called beat Nazi saucers or the the the Horta craft the H O two twenty nine is what they were called. In fact, we talked about with Justin. Fall about this couple of days ago. We were talking about the underground the under the underground care creatures the the tool, and of course, the real, and they were of course, giving the technical assistance of the SS technical branch, creating whatever these things were reverse engineering, a non terrestrial spacecraft based upon persistent reports of a crash deaths that happened sometime in one thousand nine hundred thirty six Black Forest Freberg Freberg, I think it's either Freiburg or Friburg nineteen thirty six tool society finance the effort real guiding the direction of development in the SS technical branch built the machine somewhere in northwest, Germany under the highest security once again, it goes back to is an interesting that here we are today with the new horizon spacecraft circling a asteroid and asteroid that we call fool ultima Thule. It's it's interesting. Isn't it that we continue this? The same words the same ideas, never ending, especially after operation paper clip, where we were snatching up Nazi weapons technology, including the H O two twenty nine to prevent it from making it into the hands of the Soviet Soviet science about one year after the H O two Twenty-nine programs designs made it into the hands of the US engineers Northrop corporation unveiled the why be thirty-five which is a flying wing. Bomber was designed actually it was fitted out of the turboprop engines, and it looked just like the German plane like many aviation powers of the time. It was Northrop that had been experimenting with flying wing design since the early nineteen forties. And what's interesting about this little tidbit of information, which I could just jump from. Anne, tell you about when you have companies like Northrop Grumman when you have Boeing when you have Martin Marietta, all of these programs all of these companies. We're actually situated in the north west the Pacific northwest Seattle area. And it is it also interesting that it was around nineteen forty seven to be exact. Kenneth Arnold was flying an aircraft over mount rainier towards bound atoms. Where of course, he said he used today, we're all the UFO activity happening there with James Gilman and his group, but isn't interesting that they moved all of that operation from paper clip to these organizations, and they were developing aircraft based on the real saucer craft and the Kenneth Arnold in nineteen forty seven said he saw something in the sky about nine nine craft in formation. He said they had no tales. They looked like flying Chevron's. They skipped along the water like saucers and the media goes. Oh, so they're flying saucers Kenneth. Yeah. Print that went up. So that's where we got idea for flying saucers, they weren't necessarily saucers. They look kind of like flying wedges. Okay. So when you talk about the HBO to twenty nine. Serving as a proto, stealth aircraft. The thing about Reimar Horton is that it is believed that rhymer Horton fled to Argentina. And then went to Artika to work on a project there, and then claimed in one thousand nine hundred eighty three that it's flying wing design was meant to feature a kind of proto stealth capability via the use of radar absorbing materials, including charcoal to reduce the chances of detection, just like our stealth bombers eventually had okay? So. This is some interesting stuff, especially in light of what we were talking about the other night with Justin Justin falls. So the big question is whether or not the Germans back engineer, the aircraft, and it was the prototype left for the left to the rail and the fool society. Okay. That's the question is that this is now news, and if we are finding out that they did have this type of technology to kind of cloak in a us something like charcoal some fibers material made of charcoal then we're getting the secrets of the Thule in the secrets of the real craft. There were allegedly given to us by aliens. We're back engineered from crafted crash sometime sometime in the nineteen thirties. But by nineteen forty seven we had companies like Northrop corporation and Boeing and Martin Marietta, working on the same projects using the same.

Kenneth Arnold AVI Loeb Northrop corporation Justin Justin National Geographic engineer Martin Marietta Washington Post journal of Astro biology Boeing Reimar Horton Muller William bar SS technical branch North Carolina State universit Donald Trump Gilbert Levin Chicago Tribune H O
"friburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:46 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For letting me. Join you today, we begin with the World Bank. Once President Trump gets his big speech out of the way this evening. He is expected to nominate David mopus under secretary of the treasury for international affairs to lead the organization mall past has been critical of the international lending body. Marketplace's Kimberly Adams has a primer on the World Bank. And how it might change with new leadership the World Bank got its start in the aftermath of World War Two delegates from forty four allied and associated countries arrived for the opening up. The United Nations monetary on financial. Those forty four delegates laid the groundwork for what would become the Bank its initial mission to provide loans to help Europe rebuild after the war. But that mission changed says Erica Gould, a lecturer in international relations at Stanford now, it's focused mainly on development and infrastructure loans and other parts of the world largely to low income countries. World Bank loans are very low interest, but come with strings attached, meeting certain environmental or labor standards, for example. But the loans also come with experts Sheherazade Remond teaches international finance at George Washington University, the professional staff of the World Bank, you know, range from issues of the impact of having large dams on the environment to how tiny insects affects rice crops. The US traditionally picks, the president of the Bank who has to be confirmed by sport and says Leonardo Martinez Diaz of the world Resources Institute. The president can do a lot of nudging in terms of promoting certain kinds of projects certain kinds of expertise and discouraging others, some member countries are questioning just what kind of nudging Trump nominee might do. And whether the tradition of the US picking the president should continue in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. One of the most contentious parts of the two thousand seventeen tax overhaul something known as salt. That's the provision the caps deductions on state and local taxes, including property taxes to ten thousand dollars. It is such a big financial hit in high tax states with high property values that people are actually moving away from New York or California for lower tax states that means lower tax revenue in New York. Governor Andrew Cuomo said the policy was setting off, quote, an economic civil war from Katie in Austin marketplaces and Euler reports up in Verona, New Jersey, Laura Ford, gang and her husband own a small business. It's. Hi tax part of the country. So when the government put the individual camp for their state and local taxes at ten thousand dollars. We lose an eleven thousand dollar deduction on our taxes. This cap predominantly affects high income taxpayers in high tax states, New Jersey reported at thirty five percent drop in income tax revenue for December compared to last year and New York governor Andrew Cuomo blames the tax Cam for that state's two point three billion dollar budget shortfall how come more people are moving out than moving into those states. LD Ray is a partner with Ernst and young private client services. She says an outflow of population from states, like New York and New Jersey to places like Texas and Florida was happening before tax reform, but this will accelerate the move of individuals who have assets or earned income to move down to those lower cost lower tax. And it's not just people physically moving some wealthy. Individuals are simply changing their official residence on their tax forms. To get around the salt cap. Well, the new tax law cut federal income taxes for most Americans Jonathan McCollum at the DC law firm, David off Hudson Citron says the salt cap doesn't help high tax local governments pass tax bonds to pay for things like infrastructure with the elimination of the salt deduction. People are are way less inclined to support any new local or state taxes. Some taxpayers remain hopeful as they're still a Bill in congress that seeks to get around the salt camp for those high tax states. I mean Euler for marketplace. During the state of the union address tonight. President Trump is expected to call for an end to the spread of HIV in the US by twenty thirty. There's a drug already on the market that could help make that a reality. It's called Trovoada otherwise known as prep, and when it's taken preventatively. It drastically reduces transmission of HIV, the downside, it can cost upwards of sixteen hundred dollars a month. Marketplace's debris Benesch has more. New hiv? Infections are falling in New York City. Dmitri Daskalakis is deputy Commissioner for disease control at the New York City department of health. He believes much of that is due to prep. We have a lot of evidence that demonstrates have prep is had a significant impact your about an eighteen percent decrease. That's been caused entirely we think by product. That's New York though. Experts say research is only starting to trickle in on whether prep is affecting HIV transmission everywhere Travolta, is an expensive hill. It can cost as much as two thousand dollars per month, though, many people get it for less. Or even for free through a combination of insurance and coupons. Kenneth Friedberg is professor of medicine at Harvard. He says one reason it is so expensive that drug is priced really for HIV treatment true is a mixture of drugs that are also used to treat people who already have HIV Friburg says in that case, it is cost effective. And that's what's setting the price for Travolta. Even though it is used as prevention for prevention. It's really not terribly cost effective again because you have to treat a lot of people in order to prevent a single case of HIV the calculation changes when it's applied to high risk groups in which case some studies suggest it is cost effective. The drug would be even more cost effective if the price were lower it should be cheaper Mitchell. Warren is executive director of avec a global HIV prevention organization, we know that that very same pill in its generic formulation is available for under a hundred dollars a year. That's only outside of the US in New York. Sabrina sure for marketplace. If you're going to watch the state of the union tonight, follow along with marketplace on Twitter, I reporters will be offering context updates as the speech goes on find us at marketplace. And tune into the marketplace morning report for the global reaction on trade policy and everything else economics on Wall Street today. Everything economic is looking pretty good. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. If you're on one of those neighborhood.

New York HIV US World Bank President Trump president New Jersey Kimberly Adams David mopus Governor Andrew Cuomo Travolta New York City department of he United Nations
"friburg" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"friburg" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"It was there were no line. There was no character except the MC this second rate comedian, you know, master of ceremonies, and I had no scenes with anybody was five great songs, and I needed to find the man the. You know that bad that bad guy. So you took some of the low comics that particular that comic and say Louis, do I have this right, go boy. And I thought he was the cheapest shot of a MC that anybody could ever want not want to see. So this guy that you saw on the road from your nightclub days, you retain this and you decided to to infuse this character, right? Fascinating. So this this like third grade comic became immortal. He he never knew. Yeah. You never said his name publicly. I would I sure he's gone. Yes. He is now. Yeah. I just saw an interview with the you'll never told they never told anybody who was now. Interesting. And and here's here's an. Today's today. No. But he might have heirs relatives. Here's here's another song. I once heard on the radio that killed me that your father saying, so I'm pushing you again how much is that pickle in the window. The one that's untapped at the pale. Yeah. Right. How much is that Piccola window? Yes. I do hope that pickles for sale. I say to our listeners that people can pick him confined these on YouTube. We haven't both queued up. We have David Crockett which Jennifer did so well on the Conan show and pickle in the window queued up there on YouTube and well worth seeing and your father was kind of a head of his time. I mean, stand Friburg. Yes, sir. You know? There was no Allan Sherman. Nobody was doing parody followed him kind of a trailblazer in that John. Yeah. Certainly there was no weird. Al. But I, you know, I think they respected him as a as a as a as. Yes. As a runner, exactly. That's what I said for runner..

Allan Sherman YouTube MC John Louis David Crockett Friburg Conan Jennifer