34 Burst results for "Freud"

This Practice Changed My Business - with Lisa Bilyeu

RISE Podcast

07:59 min | 1 d ago

This Practice Changed My Business - with Lisa Bilyeu

"My friend Lisa. Who is an entrepreneur just like I am. In this season. Absolutely everything's Differen- and you've got a pivot and you got to figure things out we've been sharing information. Lisa reached out and was like we're doing the greatest thing. You guys have to do this thing. So we had made an appointment to talk about it and then I was like. Dang we should just record this If you love it, I'm GonNa love it, and if we love be entrepreneurs listening to this, we'll get something out of it as well. So that was where it started we jumped into. The exciting Marion tell me about tell me how what's business for you guys today how have you pivoted in side of Corinthian? Can We? Start I guess I'm going too fast because I also am getting that everyone like might. I. Didn't even say Your Lisa. Built quest nutrition alongside your husband Tom, I haven't done a very good job excited to see you and talk to you. So tell me what life looks like right? So some speaking to you go and them Yes oh, right now we have impact theory, which of course you on share and continues just change. It's a different fricken world and what we'd is changing every week and used to that rockets over tanner rights. Just when you think you want the standard audience just when you think you understand your metrics and how to deliver impact. Everything has changed and a campus carry social, and my instinct is to go into the family Gaza. Mode of all, my ball, what is happening, but I always remind myself in the West situations the best things can come from like an it doesn't ever feel well right in in that moment it doesn't feel so i. look all considered okay. Like when we went into quarantine at first few weeks, everyone was like a wanted to be empowered was doing great. And then it's just you know dwelled started to change oversleep with the medal of to Freud like this. So many things that changed week after week and I'm just trying to navigate me unhedged. Forty one, rich and. Just, anything that you can get comfortable. It's like Yukon and I try to find the beauty in I tried to find a beauty in the challenge versus the frustration in it because I into magically go to the frustration. So just from a company standpoint yet every week trying to assess how is content doing all we resonating with people what are people looking for how people's behaviors changed a what is impact look like today? But then who's on the other side I always also myself what he actually one use are you happy? When you build a business news especially in Bill Gates for so long and if so much time in F I, never want to be that person. It's like well I. Guess I'm Lynn. So I gotTa keep going. It's like no even if you gave five years of your life, even if you gave up your sacrifice, you have to keep reassessing are actually doing what you still love does the old you know the way the world is now used to enjoying it use to wake up every day energized pollute to ask yourself I shouldn't you know some kind of going through a better assessment now? Love it. What does impact look like now an how much time energy am I willing to dedicate and I'm coming back to the also yes I do want to impact yet willing to give it my older have to ask myself. Am Do not more worry I think. I. Honestly I'm sure you guys have been having these conversations to, but I feel like that's all of my friends who are in the content space everything is shifting. So quickly and everything in everything feels very polarizing right now and it you know people are scared people out of work. Everything is uncertain and I was asking myself recently I'm right I've been through this. Before this is not the first time that social has felt like this for me, and so I was asking like what is winner? Am I felt like this before I realized it was before the last election so I do think that there is something historically about an end will continue to be. So every single time that we have an election and how that affects social and I do think that there's something. The conspiracy theory person in me feels like since gets drummed up on both sides to distract us from the real issues to distract us from the change that needs to happen to distract on many levels on both sides not just one side. So I do remember feeling like this before like what the Heck my supposed to do or how am I supposed to speak To people and it was the last time that we were coming up on election. So my feary four you for everybody listening is this will only get worse. This will only get worse leading up into until November it will only become more polarizing because there's something weird about social where people I was just talking about this with beans the other day that like people. Think that the point of social media is to have being. So it doesn't even matter what you say. You'll be like Oh what a beautiful day and someone will be like it's not beautiful where I am it's like what in the world? So I think that there's something than tastic about approaching it of like what are your core values you know you guys are so wrapped around this idea of impact in what does impact like to you and you're listening to this it doesn't have to be the same as Tom Research are the same as me but what are the core values that you wanNA show up for with your community because I do think. Lots of people who have been putting out into the world will hesitate to do that because they're going to get opposition no matter what they're posting and that scares me because if the people who have been creating content to make the world a better place start to be too afraid to post then I feel like evil wins right. Then I feel like the only thing available in news feeds is vitriol and hatred and division, and so if you. are a content creator you're listening to this conversation man I, just want to encourage you to double down on goodness triple down on positively even if you're going to get shit for it because better to show up as yourself in a world where so many people are afraid to create then to highway and like hope that it's going to go away because it's not not for a long time. So I to go ends, I've been trying to kind of. Put this into like a phrase, the item repeats myself it's not perfect yet but the thing I go with is a drawl the be a rejected to be true to myself than expected for being, of course, and I remind myself that every single day because every time you putting out console whether in the content was on not right. However, you is showing up at the end to the freaking day it is you at the end of the day that lies. Down Close Your eyes and how do you feel about this an I guess what I'm doing back to understand mind was a how do I will feel about myself when I am by myself period and if other people don't agree with my opinion is that Roy give everyone has the freedom not but I will not then who not act to please are the people because when I'm by myself do I say I'm proud of you Lisa I'm proud that use seductive. What we believed in. And I keep reminding myself that.

Lisa Tom Research Differen Gaza Content Creator Bill Gates Yukon Marion Tanner Freud ROY
Connecticut, New York, Washington DC file multi-state lawsuit against Trump administration on new international student visa rule

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:44 sec | Last month

Connecticut, New York, Washington DC file multi-state lawsuit against Trump administration on new international student visa rule

"Well, there is an influx out east families are settling down away from their former city residences and school district's out there are adjusting to the new comers. WCBS reporter Sophia Hall has a story three times more students than on an average year registered for school in the small Montag district, and the superintendent Jack Purna, tells me even more parents called After they heard Mayor de Blasio is plan to reopen schools calling for a combination of in school and online classes. People weren't happy with this plan, so they went there, hoping that we'll be open. Sometimes, he says, depending on the size of the school, If they can reopen safely, they should be able to do so. You know that Governor Like I said, he's changed it in time. But I'm hoping that partisans, recommendations or Regulations are taking boys schools upstate, who don't have from Freud's numbers of people will be able to open more than finish some of us, you know, it doesn't have to be statewide regulation, maybe to be based on local district, he says. Many of the class sizes are around 12 students. Sofia Hold to be CBS News Radio 8 80

Mayor De Blasio Jack Purna Sophia Hall Freud Superintendent CBS Reporter
Finding Mastery

Good Life Project

06:32 min | Last month

Finding Mastery

"Work that you do is fascinating to me on so many different levels, not the least of which is. That I came really close to following a really similar path. And then ended up backing away for reasons that still are not entirely clear to me. Lifelong fascination with sort of a not just the human condition, but for why people do what they do, and how they go to the extremes of their potential wondering, if if this touches down at an early age for you, if this was sort of like a a later fascination, cool The first exposure I had to this is. Was In high school and I realized that the thing that I wanted to do. It was a surfing experience, so I grew up surfing. and. I could do what I wanted to do. As a fifteen year old kid, you don't Infre- surfing, but then when it came time to compete. He was completely different for me and it wasn't that my physical skills went away. It wasn't that my technical skills went away. It was that my mind by mental skills like the way that I was thinking about things was choking off access. To buy abilities and I didn't know there was a discipline called psychology as the first person to go to school my family, so we didn't come from. Condition where was like sophistication in structure in theory? We're just trying to figure it out as we along. And, so I bumped into it at an early age and I, said Oh. My goodness thing inside me. It's my mind like what is this and so it started there at an early age and I didn't know until it was like my first year in college. That there was even a discipline in a study of psychology, really because in high is exposed to it at a class action. I had a class and. It didn't make any sense. It was like Freud skinner. All the kind of classics which I came to appreciate later. I didn't understand it, so then it was through a pain is how I came exposed to it in sent me down a path. It pain in the context of you seeing something that you to do, but somehow couldn't figure out how to get there does exactly right. Yeah, I had something inside may wanted to express is the way I think about it like I had a physical thing i. I wanted to do a wave, and every time that there's a competition with the people were judging, and there was people on the beach, watching I became a shell of myself, and I couldn't express. It wasn't so much about I couldn't do the thing I mean. That's part of it, but I couldn't express what I was wanting to be able to express I, mean changing their own lapping, but really two distinct things like one is really tapping into the fullness of what you perceive to be your potential, but. The other is sort of it. It's it's a stifled expression. It's it's like I have a sense for who I am on an identity level, and how I want that to be put out into the world and I can't get it. It's like when you hear when you play Guitar, and you hear the dream ref. In your head. But your fingers can actually make it happen on guitar. Yes, so that's close to what happened to me. Is that I knew I could do it? Though because I had done it in free surfing plenty of times, and so it was actually there, it was just stage. Friday was performance anxiety. So it wasn't, it wasn't the mechanical part of it was the psychological part, so you mentioned that you were the first to go to college your family. Curious about that also, what was the background in your family? That sort of said okay, world good without going the route of higher education. And then what was it that happen in your mind? That said that's actually not good enough for me. Co question is so set. The context here is that I grew up in on a farm in Virginia, and I should say I grew up with nature, not necessary on. It is a big distinction you know in that way, and so I grew up with it until the age of about. Ten. In my parents were very lazy fair, they had very little structure if I was out late, and it got dark, not eat until very late. You know like it was super. Figuring, out kid, you know, and they let me just kind of play with nature. And my parents pretty much dropped out so I'm forty eight ends. They were young parents and they this was during the Vietnam revolt. So they're like okay. We're dropping out some more of the hippie life, but it wasn't. It wasn't an angry approach. It was like hey, let's go find a little sanctuary that we could build you build a family, so it was very myopic in that sense. In My dad came from a large family, he was had his first job fourteen, supporting his family in some respects, so they came blue-collar hard-working. Christian valued family, and they instilled inside of me strong values, and then this kind of freedom to explore. But there was no formal structure to any of it. But saying well, my mom's side, you know, and so her father came over to America at the age of fifteen by himself from Italy and so it's just a blue-collar, hard-working approach life and I, it was I was. Surfing a lot as I mentioned, and then due north, the PSAT's are of course also. I got a zero on those and then on the sat. With those are I got zero on those. I went surfing on both of them. And My parents pulled me aside my senior year and they're like Hey Mike. We tried a lot of your friends are going to college. We didn't know really to help you, but at this point. Get a job and get out. Or Mrs my senior year in high school or you could go to community college and you can stay here. Thought I'm not moving out like I'm I'm not done surfing like. How can I go? How can I have a job? Nine to five and surf so still real young in my church life, and so I said okay. Let me. Do the school thing so? I knew that the school that I was going to go to. Was I. don't know two miles away from a close to world class surf break. It sounds like I know how to do this. So! I love the decision. Making criteria has like perfect perfect, and so I really thought that I was going to extend my high school experience for a couple more years I was not interested in academic academia or becoming an academician in any respect. So a second semester and there was three professors who are really good friends now. This is the junior college right? So this was this isn't. I didn't have to get in I just had to apply. I just had to show up.

Freud Skinner Virginia Psat Vietnam America Christian Italy
Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

The Wisdom Podcast

05:14 min | Last month

Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

"To the huge whether I'm traveling in an aeroplane among place, so cancel the airplanes cost, but I'm still doing the teaching artists three feet into the computer, so it's quite handy, and it's been very nice. It's been very good I mean pulled in Oregon some very kind of giving their apartment, not very much cheaper, and sometimes they're an I'm sitting here doing my job. This very good I'm quite content and how you finding teaching over the Internet. Yeah, I mean really released prized by. Having the people on the screen you know because you can get twenty five people so first of all. Because it's people, the welcome coming, he would never go to a teaching considering Timbuktu somewhere. They can join so it's been very moving against experienced. I was really surprised by that having people's faith and win of course, a President I mean twenty five people on the computer screen, and then you fix, patient pays and see who's there and those who don't won't faced on habits. Once you start asking questions. They come up strong, and it's been very moving and people to said that, but it's really quite preston quite direct and quite intense. Intense, so I, really really really enjoying it I have to say it's kind of a an odd thing to say straight. Curious. Yeah, do you think you'll do more of it? When you can travel you get back on the planes and travel around the world I think eventually when I'm very very old. When I'm very old now my probably do that, but I don't mind driving around and don't have a home right now, so I can't keep in the other. People's. I mean this is a flash. Some sleep around is okay very well. Traveling on airplanes, sweeping around seats means gave up running the prison. Project is based in California. State, sort of fully since ninety, four, ninety, five, ninety, five, ninety, four, then rush out of the prison. We started the prison project about ninety six, and then again that up. Two thousand nine so since I've been teaching full time. So I'll go knowle's cinches. You know people invite me not Dubai schedule go so the last ten years I haven't had a hundred. I had one small bag. One St of robes, companies, a shoes by a few things ultra. Six me really I must have been. What do you call one of those nine really suit. My nature I have to say that I really does and I always think. Lewis people that go your houses when I die. Nothing no to team. Up because. You've got an easy exit. One of the things one of the questions I. wanted to ask you is that you know you travel around? The World Teaching Dhamma around the world I'm wondering what it is that you find about the Dhamma that resonates with people. What is what are some of the things that you go to? You know no matter where you land was gonNA engage able. Well, you know this is where. I mean it just seems to me clearly, we want to summarize what Buddha is a bad. It's not a joke starting to be a clever, he has issued. Say you need to learn to be around Serapis? I think we're really do on pack. We get beyond the. Indian amazing culture for centuries enough and the frame welcome to mention framework of things and like. Really with it, you start to get to the essence, and clearly the essence has to be the mind, so you're not putting Greek for God's sake, but it is not a psychologist on anything. That's exactly I mean. Everything comes down to the mind, even the fuel. It's it's amazing. Sufficient. Brilliant worldview of the Buddha's is observed to be true. That is a law natural law that runs a unit us. And what does it run is law within which minds and lives of sentient beings run, so there's Buddhist psychology which is a how the mind works and that trump's from is genius. Indians are with. His Holiness. He says it was amazing Indians more than three thousand years ago. Who wants to begin the investigation tonight? Yourself I mean we clip Judeo Christian. European SORTA was Mr Freud didn't do. It was arrogance so physical Buddha commanders incredible system. What do they do? They met the mind they met. The mind to yield is four thousand distinct mental illnesses, which summarize into three is an incredibly sophisticated map of the mind I mean they only mapping them on now. You know the Brian. What does match the on the cognitive process? So it's not all about the mind, then. What else is Buddhism so you get right down to? The big sort of Llamas Alpacas issues, doors. Lama from the very beginning I could see ask entities teachings that he he was lucky his born Hippie, he just knew how to talk to in the sixties and seventies, so he it down to this fundamental way where Ron fine, because we're so full of resolve, his overwhelming lethal of dissatisfaction in culture and which. Could see were willing. These soap piteous hippies full of misery. He stopped trying to tell us about Amman. Potential so to me. This is the the bottom line almost like a fraud I was talking about the same thing. The Whitewater presents mind and this incredible potential. We've got this. Is everybody no matter whether the communist with people psychologist with university students meet outside the Buddhist Woods in super amazing way to see the mind understand, everybody recognizes everybody can recognize though I told you know want us his terminology. This distinction between delusions virtues. This is a radical idea for the wasting recognizes is just start moving to me. You can never tired of the more you can let your mind. This is what gives people. Courage is what gives us optimism, and we don't have that in our culture I mean. Where is there in? In any psychology on Euroscience, dare suggest that you can read the multiple. The rubbish grow the goodness, which is the meaning of the word Buddha only. Buddhas that's very stock terms. Is

President Trump Buddha Oregon Dubai Preston Serapis Donald Trump Buddhist Woods Mr Freud Lewis California Whitewater Fraud Amman Lama Ron Fine
Venerable Robina Courtin: Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

The Wisdom Podcast

03:43 min | Last month

Venerable Robina Courtin: Understanding the Buddhas Teachings for Ourselves

"Myself to the huge whether I'm traveling in an aeroplane among place, so cancel the airplanes cost, but I'm still doing the teaching artists three feet into the computer, so it's quite handy, and it's been very nice. It's been very good I mean pulled in Oregon some very kind of giving their apartment, not very much cheaper, and sometimes they're an I'm sitting here doing my job. This very good I'm quite content and how you finding teaching over the Internet. Yeah, I mean really released prized by. Having the people on the screen you know because you can get twenty five people so first of all. Because it's people, the welcome coming, he would never go to a teaching considering Timbuktu somewhere. They can join so it's been very moving against experienced. I was really surprised by that having people's faith and win of course, a President I mean twenty five people on the computer screen, and then you fix, patient pays and see who's there and those who don't won't faced on habits. Once you start asking questions. They come up strong, and it's been very moving and people to said that, but it's really quite preston quite direct and quite intense. Intense, so I, really really really enjoying it I have to say it's kind of a an odd thing to say straight. Curious. Yeah, do you think you'll do more of it? When you can travel you get back on the planes and travel around the world I think eventually when I'm very very old. When I'm very old now my probably do that, but I don't mind driving around and don't have a home right now, so I can't keep in the other. People's. I mean this is a flash. Some sleep around is okay very well. Traveling on airplanes, sweeping around seats means gave up running the prison. Project is based in California. State, sort of fully since ninety, four, ninety, five, ninety, five, ninety, four, then rush out of the prison. We started the prison project about ninety six, and then again that up. Two thousand nine so since I've been teaching full time. So I'll go knowle's cinches. You know people invite me not Dubai schedule go so the last ten years I haven't had a hundred. I had one small bag. One St of robes, companies, a shoes by a few things ultra. Six me really I must have been. What do you call one of those nine really suit. My nature I have to say that I really does and I always think. Lewis people that go your houses when I die. Nothing no to team. Up because. You've got an easy exit. One of the things one of the questions I. wanted to ask you is that you know you travel around? The World Teaching Dhamma around the world I'm wondering what it is that you find about the Dhamma that resonates with people. What is what are some of the things that you go to? You know no matter where you land was gonNA engage able. Well, you know this is where. I mean it just seems to me clearly, we want to summarize what Buddha is a bad. It's not a joke starting to be a clever, he has issued. Say you need to learn to be around Serapis? I think we're really do on pack. We get beyond the. Indian amazing culture for centuries enough and the frame welcome to mention framework of things and like. Really with it, you start to get to the essence, and clearly the essence has to be the mind, so you're not putting Greek for God's sake, but it is not a psychologist on anything. That's exactly I mean. Everything comes down to the mind, even the fuel. It's it's amazing. Sufficient. Brilliant worldview of the Buddha's is observed to be true. That is a law natural law that runs a unit us. And what does it run is law within which minds and lives of sentient beings run, so there's Buddhist psychology which is a how the mind works and that trump's from is genius. Indians are with. His Holiness. He says it was amazing Indians more than three thousand years ago. Who wants to begin the investigation tonight? Yourself I mean we clip Judeo Christian. European SORTA was Mr Freud didn't do. It was arrogance so physical Buddha commanders incredible system. What do they do? They met the mind they met. The mind to yield is four thousand distinct mental illnesses, which summarize into three is an incredibly sophisticated map of the mind I mean

Mr Freud Buddha Oregon Dubai President Trump Preston Serapis Donald Trump Lewis California
"freud" Discussed on Dog Tales

Dog Tales

02:44 min | 2 months ago

"freud" Discussed on Dog Tales

"But, if joe fees place in therapeutic, history is noteworthy, perhaps even more so is the effect. She and her fairy associates had on Sigmund Freud himself. Remember, Freud's relationship with dogs didn't begin until his twilight is before that Freud's colleagues often described him as blank-faced. He was a man who plumbed the psyches of others, but was a bit removed himself. But Joe fee wolf learn nook and Loon York to seem to anoc something in him. And as Freud grappled with his failing health toward the end of his life, he yearned to explain why they'd had such an effect on him. Dogs provide defection without ambivalence, the simplicity of a life free from the almost unbearable conflicts of civilization. It was a psychiatrist description of a connection. Any dog new would recognize. Unconditional love. Thanks for listening to dog tales for more information about Freud, his dogs. We found the article. Freud scientists his dogs by Oriole Grissom Kofsky, and how therapy dogs almost never came to exist by Dr Stanley Coren especially helpful to our research. Every dog has his day and all day is Mondays will back then with a new episode you can find more episodes of dog tails, and all other parkas originals for free on spotify not only does spotify already have all of favorite music, but now spotify making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like Doug Tales for free from your phone, desktop or speaker. To string tails on spotify just open the APP and type dog tales in the search bar. Several of you have asked how to help us. If you enjoy the show, the best way to help us is to leave a five star review and don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network. Join US next week for another good story about good dog. Dough tells was created by Max Cutler and is a podcast studios original. It is executive produced by Max Cutler sound design by Trent. With production assistance by ranch bureau, Carly, madden and Aaron Lawson. This episode of Dog was written by Matt Flanagan with writing assistance by Maggie Admire. I'm I'm murden..

Sigmund Freud Max Cutler Dr Stanley Coren spotify Joe fee Oriole Grissom Kofsky US Doug Tales Loon York Matt Flanagan Maggie Admire executive facebook madden Aaron Lawson Dough Instagram
Moments of hope and solidarity from the George Floyd protests

Perspective

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Moments of hope and solidarity from the George Floyd protests

"Week. The world stopped marching for a few hours to honor the memory of George Floyd among those speaking at his memorial service in Minneapolis where his family's attorney Benjamin crump. What we are doing. Is Happened America Be America for all Americans and the Reverend Al Sharpton George. Freud's story has been the story of black folks because Ebola since four hundred and one years ago. The reason we could never be who we wanted and dreamed being his. You kept. You'll need a on our net. Throughout the week, the marches and protests spread across the country, and around the world in Berlin in Sydney and Paris in London. They marched. We literally feel you we understands. Withstanding the we understand and we feel your pain at times typically late at night, there were handfuls of looters and rioters crashing the protests. The peaceful marches carried on each day. People calling for police reform and calling out systemic racism in America. By mid week, those four police officers at the scene of George Floyd staff had been criminally charged. ABC's Ryan Burrow went to the shrine set up to honor George Floyd in Minneapolis. This is where we should be today or else wearing or sitting. to remember him. And to fight for the justice, he deserves all week long at this growing memorial that includes flowers, candles, signs murals, people have been handing out free food, free water, free baby supplies and free hugs. Traffic has been blocked replaced by hourly group. Prayer circles the gas station lot now a space for music and grilled hotdogs graffiti sprayed against cops is now being replaced with words of kindness. Hope an honor for George, floyd the exact spot in South Minneapolis that fueled pain and anger of a life cut short, may the spot that breathes new life into the. The twin

George Floyd Freud Al Sharpton George Minneapolis America Benjamin Crump Ebola Attorney Ryan Burrow ABC Berlin London Paris Sydney
George Floyd honored at Minneapolis memorial service

Erin Burnett OutFront

02:23 min | 2 months ago

George Floyd honored at Minneapolis memorial service

"In Minneapolis Friends family community leaders civil rights leaders from our across the country gathered to mourn George Floyd Sarah Cider is out front. He. The Gray. At the memorial in Minneapolis. George flights family took time to mourn this amazing to me that he touched so many people hearts. You because he'd been touching our hearts, you know everybody won't justice. We Want Justice George. He's going to get it. He's GonNa get it. Historic national demonstrations in Floyd's name are now well into their tenth day. What happened to Freud happens adequate bay in this country and then every. Of American life is time for us to stand up in charges, name and Saket show me off. ow Next Knicks less than a mile from the family memorial National Guard troops stood watch three former police officers charged with aiding and abetting and Floyd's death made their first court appearance, all three granted one million dollar bail, or seven hundred fifty thousand dollars with conditions of potential key witness, the passenger and Floyd car. That fatal afternoon says. His friend did not resist arrest telling the new. York Times Floyd was from the beginning, trying in his humblest formed show, he was not resisting. I could hear him pleading. Please officer. What's it all four? Minneapolis police have released two hundred thirty. Thirty five pages of highly redacted personnel records for the four officers involved in Floyd's arrest, they show Derek Shaaban the officer now charged with second degree murder had at least seventeen previous misconduct complaints with the department. He was given a notice of suspension, and was also reprimanded for removing a woman from her car. In Two thousand seven Alexander Kyung had been an officer less than six months at the time of Floyd's death prior to joining law enforcement enforcement, the four men held a variety of jobs including working at McDonald's target. Home Depot and service in the United. States army. They now face between ten and forty years in prison. If convicted and Floyd's killing psalms, one is seven. The. Lord is my light and my salvation following the memorial service Reverend Jesse. Jackson paid a visit to the site. We're floyd died

George Floyd Sarah Cider Justice George Minneapolis Officer Family Memorial National Guard Home Depot Derek Shaaban Knicks Alexander Kyung Saket York Abetting Jackson Second Degree Murder Mcdonald
Mental health care in a time of social isolation probably involves an app

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:22 min | 2 months ago

Mental health care in a time of social isolation probably involves an app

"Mental health in a time of social isolation probably involves an APP from American public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm Ali would cova. Nineteen has opened up a conversation about remote therapy but online mental health care goes way beyond talking to a therapist over video conference APP analytics companies. They downloads of mental health and wellness. Apps are up almost thirty percent since the pandemic began. These include therapy services. Yes but also meditation APPs like calm or head space so first of all do they work and second. What are the privacy regulation concerns American public media's mental health reporter Lisa? Roth took this might make Freud turnover in his grave. There's an APP where you therapy with a robot. They're also APPs to monitor the side effects of medications APPs to help with PTSD and the list goes on and on. Now that doesn't mean technology is going to put your therapist out of Business John. Taurus is a psychiatrist who runs the Division of Digital Psychiatry at Real deaconess hospital in Boston. Algorithms not gonNA decide your care but he does use technology to help. Patients keep track of things that affect their mental health. Danielson is a freelance writer in Missoula Montana who has clinical depression an APP. He's using now. Tim Rate His mood with one being the worst and ten being the best. That kind of gives me a moment to realize that. This motion isn't me. I some counts there as many as ten thousand mental health APPS. So maybe it's no surprise that the prices are all over the map from free downloads to four hundred dollars for a lifetime membership at a popular meditation APP. Adam Powell is a healthcare consultant. Who says this means? It's hard to know how much the mental health APP business is. Actually worth some of the variation has to do with how that markets defined does it include wellness APPs or just strictly mental health APPs. Can they bill to insurance or not and so on? Stephanie's was is a therapist in North Carolina who got a grant a design and out for people with eating disorders but eventually gave up because a startup was doing it faster. That got her wondering how these should be regulated. Do we think of APPS as being like FDA approved drugs and we need to make sure that they're effective before the watch them to the market and because a lot of these APPs are being developed by companies. John Taurus. The psychiatrist says he's worried about what those companies do with people's data. What have you also gave access to your. Gps So knows where you sleep at night and you gave this access to your call and text records so it knows who your friends and contacts in. Romantic relationships are drug. Companies Marketing companies and insurance companies. Might all be interested in the data. You're sharing as of your mental health. Care though maybe not in your well being. That's American public media's mental health reporter Lisa Roth the. Us Census Bureau released data this week showing that roughly a third of Americans are showing signs of clinical depression or

Lisa Roth Danielson Companies Marketing Companies Reporter Social Isolation ALI Ptsd John Taurus United States Census Bureau Real Deaconess Hospital Division Of Digital Psychiatry Adam Powell Missoula TIM Montana North Carolina Stephanie
The Marlboro Woman

Household Name

08:44 min | 6 months ago

The Marlboro Woman

"Before the Marlboro Man. Before the Marlboro woman. Even women didn't really smoke. In fact in some places. It was even illegal to help me tell that story. I wrote Aria Bendix into the studio with me. I'm already so on. It gets toasted here as well too. So cool cool. So why don't we start? Warriors a reporter at business insider. Who's covered the history of smoking and Marlborough? Why don't we start at the turn of the century? What was the association between women and smoking so there was a strong negative association between women and smoking. It was not something that polite woman did. There was a lot of societal disapproval. That was definitely the big thing but there was also a few legal attempts to sort of prohibit women from smoking in public in nineteen. Oh four there was a woman who was actually turned in by her husband for smoking in the presence of her children and she faced thirty days of jail. Time for that and then a few years later There's actually a short-lived ban in New York City that prohibited women from smoking in public. So it really was. Smoking was really seen as not a thing. That a lady. Oh well raised woman would do woman of good moral standing. So then what changed? So what changed was World War One inside the White House. President Woodrow Wilson compared with advisors then signed the proclamation of war against Germany and that was really when women started to take on up. Actually enter the workforce for the first time and take on jobs that were traditionally says he'd with men behind every man or the woman at American women were daintily mightily and they also changed their appearance to reflect that so women started to have shorter hair started to wear pants and then they also started to pick up cigarettes by one thousand. Nine hundred thousand American women had won the right to vote but even within the Feminist Movement for some smoking was taboo. Some of the activists for women's rights actually went to great lengths to distance themselves from women who smoked Lucy. Page Gaston for example was a vocal opponent of smoking and drinking alcohol. She wasn't trying to ally herself with women who were redefining femininity. Instead she wanted to empower women who embodied the old Victorian ideals of womanhood who would use their vote to advocate for temperance and respectability and enforce their high moral standards on the broader population. So where does the story of Marlboro Start? So it starts with Philip Morris which used to be British Tobacco Company in the One thousand nine hundred twenty s they really wanted to get a stronger foothold in the US market so they came up with the idea of the Marlboro Brand and in nineteen twenty four. The introduced it as a cigarette brand for women. Nineteen twenty four was a really tough time for a newcomer to be making a play for the US cigarette market at all. Never Mind Marketing to women. That's because it was already pretty locked down by four big tobacco companies. Actually there used to be one gigantic company a monopoly until the US Supreme Court and a bunch of trust. Busting Congressman. Put a stop to that in the nineteen teens. Anyway by the Nineteen Twenties Marlboro. Was this small fish making its debut and upon full of. I'm just GONNA go with this great white sharks so it set its sights on the other. Small fish in the cigarette pond women and since suffragettes Lucy Page Gaston. Were not going to light up anytime soon. Marlboro had to find a way to make smoking socially acceptable for women. It had to make cigarettes. Which many saw as symbols of vulgarity and promiscuity actually feminine by Victorian Standards So one of the first advertisements that they came out with was this quote unquote mild as May campaign may like the month of May delicate breezy dainty elegant for find polite. And there's something amazing about how Marlboro. Sins that message through these ads. Like if you look at them. The women picture aren't even smoking but it almost doesn't because they look so glamorous every one of them sort of had like this dark lib this perfectly quaffed hair. The secret was sort of daintily hanging off their fingertips looking a little bit seductive but it was also somewhat reminiscent of the Victorian ideals of Amenity. That sort of caring us into the nineteen twenties. You see this sort of stereotype of a lady. A very elegant woman that marble woman is basically like the Modern Day Portland of instagram influence. Our I mean everything that women sort of wanted and aspire to be mild is may was everything. A woman could want in a cigarette. The ads made it look like an essential accessory as natural a woman's hand as the lipstick on her lips. There was a lot of concern that women's lipstick would actually get at the end of their cigarette. So what they did was actually create a grease proof tip that would prevent that and it would keep your lipstick looking nice while you were smoking after that. They also introduced a red rim around the cigarette and that was meant to disguise the lipstick itself. We are miles away from the Marlboro Man. Here that even his Marlboro and its parent company. Philip Morris continued to work on making it cigarette look appealing to women. It had a bigger obstacle to tackle. Most women did not know how to smoke. So Philip Morris sponsored. A lecture series that toured the country and taught women the basics. It hit ladies clubs charm. School's department stores and nurses lounges covering etiquette had opened the packages avoid lipstick smears and prevent fires. Oh my God and slowly but surely marbles efforts started to make inroads so the advertisements are resonating with women Marlboros. Getting letters from women thanking them for the ADS. More women are starting to pick up smoking. But it's actually not doing much for the brand itself. It was pretty much failing as a business they were capturing a miniscule portion of the cigarette market at that time turns out. Marlboro. Wasn't the only cigarette company on the block with the bright idea of advertising to women in fact the American Tobacco Company one of the four giants which used to have a monopoly on cigarettes. It wanted to get women to smoke. Just as badly as Marlboro did and its main brand. Lucky strike was a much bigger name than Marlboro. The president of the American Tobacco Company poured about one point five billion dollars in today's dollars into advertisements in the first decade of the lucky advertisements. So they were funneling money into the brand and that sort of reflected in that sales they were sort of catering to everyone and they saw the same opportunity. Marble did that. They weren't actually targeted advertisements to half of the population which was women so they put out a lot of the same messaging. That Marlboro did a lot of that. Same like feminine ideals of Beauty. They weren't a woman's cigarette brand but they certainly began catering their advertisements to women but nineteen twenty nine both companies had been running ads featuring women for years. Marlboro had even gone so far as to show a woman in one of the advertisements. Actually smoking a cigarette. Just holding it seductively. But even that wasn't enough so to break through the negative by surrounding women in cigarettes once and for all the American Tobacco Company launched another offensive. And this one would below the politics of women's smoking wide. Open the president of the American Tobacco Company calls up this Guy Edward Brenes and he's now known as the father of Public Relations and he was actually fun fact. The nephew Sigmund Freud and so- Bernez comes up with this idea to stage a protest in New York City he recruits all. These debutantes who sort of look like the everyday woman but they're also super elegant and he gets them to basically marched through the streets of New York on the Easter Day parade carrying lit cigarettes in their hand and he called the the torches of freedom so cigarettes were known as the torches of freedom the Easter parade. One of the most important events on New York City's social calendar. Women were there to be seen. They were the newest fashions. Their boldest hats and stranded down Fifth Avenue. Like it was a runway. It was such a cultural touchstone. The American composer Irving Berlin even wrote a song about it and it became the basis for a nineteen thirty three. Judy Garland Fred astaire movie new the grandest Bala Anyway crashing. This event was a big deal and the torches of freedom the woman marching down Fifth Avenue in their finery carrying lit cigarettes. That image caught fire. It was a huge news story and it sort of kicked off the idea of women smoking in public really. Yeah I mean I see it as sort of the fulcrum to change the social tied women in other cities as well not just New York City but now San Francisco and Detroit. Were now taking the streets and smoking their cigarettes or torches a free. They had their own torches. Afraid of

Marlboro New York City American Tobacco Company Philip Morris Lucy Page Gaston President Trump Aria Bendix United States Marlborough President Woodrow Wilson Us Supreme Court Reporter Lucy Irving Berlin British Tobacco Company Instagram Judy Garland Fred Astaire
"freud" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

14:20 min | 7 months ago

"freud" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"Tested the effects of nerve stimulation and by the early eighteen eighties. Even performed the first surgeries to remove brain and spinal tumors in the eighteen eighty s hypnotism was also gaining traction in the Medical World Sharko in particular believed that hypnotism could be used to cure hysteria or an excess Outpouring of emotion Freud who had spent much of his time in Vienna General Hospital working with Theodore minor in his psychiatric clinic. In addition to filling in occasionally occasionally at a local asylum in Vienna was keenly interested in this new form of treatment as such. This became one of the primary factors that turned freud away okay from a career in neurology and towards a career in medical psycho pathology. That's a mouthful human breaking that down. Of course psycho psycho pathology is the scientific study of mental disorders. It seeks to find the root genetic biological social and psychological causes of the disorders orders as well as discovered treatments for them. Let's actually pretty straightforward to say sure but studying it that was a whole other challenge especially in the late nineteenth century. The earliest ideas on what would become psycho. Pathology came from the Greek philosopher. Hippocrates in the three to four hundred B C e hippocrates was among the first to suggest mental disorders were not caused by demonic possession but instead resulted from diseases in the brain after that there wasn't much prominent discourse on the subject until the seventeen hundreds when Geneva philosopher John Jacques Rousseau wrote about how economic pressures would cause causes psychological transformation in both societies and individuals as a reminder. This was nearly two centuries before Freud began studying the subject it was also one of Freud's inspirations he borrowed from Rousseau's ideas and philosophy to form a clinical method of approaching psycho Pathology Ritchie. But Freud couldn't do that with his job at the hospital taking up all his time upon returning from his fellowship in eighteen eighty. Six Ford left his job at Vienna the enemy general hospital and set up his own private practice where he specialized in nervous disorders to clear a nervous disorder simply refers to a neurological disorder. That stems from the nervous system. I E anything from paralysis and seizures to confusion and speech problems Freud combined his is knowledge of medicine with his newfound interest in alternative treatment methods like his mentor. Sharko Freud used hypnosis as a method of treating his patients he he put his patients in a trance to help them recall traumatic experiences. They had forgotten about returned to our story in just a moment and now back to the story. Eighteen eighty six was a big year of changes for Sigmund Freud and not just because of his new new practice nuts right not only was freud's professional life flourishing but so was his romantic one the same year that Freud opened up his clinic when he was thirty he. He married his wife Martha Byrne as they had six children. Matilda Jean Martin. Oliver Ernst Sophie and Anna Freud was especially close to his youngest daughter and she deeply admires her father and felt that she learned more from him than school. Anna would eventually follow although in her father's footsteps and grow up to be a renowned psychologist just like her father. Anna was a troubled child and frequently quarreled with their siblings. Freud believed young young. Anna was especially jealous of her pretty sister Sophie for Diverting Freud's attention away from Anna Herself Anna frequently wrote to her father about her mental health struggles goals and Freud attempted to treat her by having nightly analysis sessions. Six Times a week over the course of four years when Anna was in her mid twenty s he. He analyzed her dreams emotions relationships and memories the to we even talked about her sexual fantasies and masturbation habits to an outsider. This this could be seen as a strange practice but for fraud and Anna. It was a strengthening of their relationship and an affirmation of their individual passion for Psychology Collagen in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven about a year after establishing his clinic. Freud Meta doctor that would become one of his closest friends and intellectual collaborators as as well as providing for a rather interesting side story in the life of Sigmund Freud Wilhelm Fleece was an ear nose and throat specialist. who like Freud was a maverick when it came to medical theories both were outside the mainstream medical bubble and had a keen interest in developing radical new theories on sexuality both also believed in the importance of masturbation the use of condoms? And Coitus interruptus. which were not all widely accepted at the time while Freud White was on track to developing theories on what would become psychoanalysis? Fleece was working on his own theories on human biorhythms which analyzes the physical emotional national and intellectual cycles of man that were bestowed by nature at the time of birth into many of today's psychologists. The theories are nothing more than pseudoscientific ramblings but to Freud. Did they were brilliant. In fact Freud's obsession with fleas surpass that of mere intellectual respect. He himself noted that he added a deep attachment to fleece but flees was not important to Freud. Just as a friend WHO's intellect match Freud's fleeces theories were also pivotal to the Development Freud's own theories on infantile sexuality and bisexuality in fact Freud's first publication of theory of the mind project for a scientific psychology was developed in part through the many conversations Freud and fleece had together on the subject the publication talks about a variety of subjects including how neurons affect human survival drives the psychological origin of hysteria in terms of psychopathology. and how people may repress certain sexual memories yes it became the foundation of Freud's future theories and it wouldn't have been completed without fleece of course all good things must come to an end and for Freud Wade in fleece it was a bitter parting and and characteristic Freud fashion. The story behind their severed relationship was just as interesting as the relationship itself in the early eighteen. Ninety S Freud referred one of his early psychoanalysis patients. Emma Eckstein to fleas used to treat her painful and irregular menstruation. Why did Freud refer a patient with menstruation problems? Too in ear-nose-and-throat doctor you may ask well. Fleece he's had an interesting theory. Believe that the nose and genitals were connected. It was called the nasal genital theory and Freud trusting trusting fleece wholeheartedly sent Eckstein straight to fleeces operating table. The surgery was a disaster. The operation him to remove the middle turban it in her nose which was supposed to help cure her painful ministrations left Eckstein bleeding and permanently disfigured. At first I Freud defended his dear friend stating that fleece was completely without blame. He backed up statement by noting that Eckstein herself was culpable bowl in the disfigurement as her history of self cutting irregular nasal bleeding and irregular menstrual bleeding. Were the primary factors in the surgery. Going Wrong Tom. In fact Freud went as far as to state that X.. Stein's new ailments were so-called wish bleeding. He noted in a letter as far as I know she. The only bought out of longing she has always been Ab- leader cutting herself nosebleeds. She joyously welcomed her severe menstrual bleeding as proof that tillis was genuine when she saw how effective I was by her first hemorrhage she experienced this as the realization to be loved in her illness but That was just his public opinion. Freud himself knew exactly the disaster he and his dear friend flees had created in a letter to Fleece Freud wrote route. We got done her an injustice. She was not at all abnormal. Rather a piece of iota form ause had gotten torn off as you are removing it and stayed in for fourteen days preventing healing at the end tore off and provoked the bleeding by intention to do best for this poor girl was insidiously piteously thwarted and resulted endangering her life. Freud clearly felt guilty over the ordeal Eckstein however was not about to let this tragedy. Tear are her down when I returned to the room. She greeted me with the condescending remark. And I quote so this is the strong sex shockingly the debacle didn't deter Eckstein. Who after the bought surgery continued her psychological treatment with Freud and even went on to practice? Psychoanalysis for self fleece is and Freud's relationship however was not so successful after the incident. Freud would admit that he may have overestimated fleeces medical and theoretical the prowess. Ironically though this was not the incident that severed their relationship for good. It actually came to an end several years later in nineteen. Oh six when Freud refused to endorse one of leases new theories and flees claimed that Freud helped people plagiarized some of his work. However in the years following the mishap tap of Emma Eckstein Freud matured not only in relationships but in medical practice? In fact Freud would grow increasingly selective with his friends as as the years wore on perhaps having learned a lesson from his work with fleas in eighteen ninety six almost a decade after establishing his own practice Freud. Freud began to move away from hypnosis as a method of treatment instead. He came to the conclusion that his patients could be treated and cured by having them talking freely without censorship. This method became what he called Free Association. I feel like I might have read about that. In My high school's Psychology Textbook. That's not not a surprise free association as Freud defined. It was a mental process where a word or image would spur another often unrelated word or image. It was also around this time that he began to analyze his patient's dreams that's right. He looked at his patient's dreams as a way of showing how the unconscious mind worked worked and he was particularly interested in repressed memories Here's with a really interesting stuff starts to pick up in eighteen ninety six when Freud Loyd was forty. His father passed away this induced in Freud a series of disturbing dreams in addition to starting his long lasting bouts of depression of of course in Freudian fashion. He did not let those emotions sit idle instead. He began to analyze both his childhood memories and his new dreams. What he concluded was that he had an unaddressed hostility towards his father that resulted from his jealousy of the affection his mother gave to his now? Deceased father bother if this sounds familiar. It's because this hostility. Towards his father and lust for his mother became the foundation of his infamous theory of the oedipus complex. The oedipus complex was named for the Greek tragedy oedipus where prince by the name of oedipus accidentally fulfills a prophecy. That said he he would kill his father and Mary. His mother bringing calamity in his wake. Freud's oedipus complex though not as dramatic takes its name from the idea. Yeah that children inherently lost after their parent of the opposite sex and as a result hate the other parent for dominating all the attention a remember how. I mentioned the little boy whose fear of horses held a sadistic sexual origin. How could I forget in nineteen o five Max groff a friend of Sigmund Freud informed Freud of concern over what he felt was his son? Herbert unfounded fear in horses. You see Herbert or little Hans. As Freud referred to him in his writings lived near a coach in where horses were passing through constantly. It was common for accidents to occur and Herbert. Even saw one of the horses collapsed and died right in front of him. In modern psychology. It would be common to assume that Herbert's fear had something to do with witnessing the traumatic event of a horse's forces brutal death but of course neither Freud nor Herbert's father. Max believed witnessing such a tragedy. Was the cause of Herbert's fear instead Freud. It gave Mac's guidance on how to analyze and treat his son. Max Eventually concluded that his son had an oedipus complex. The horse represented Max in part because many horses had black muzzles like Max's mustache and in part because horses were well endowed Freud on the other hand believed. Herbert Vert was experiencing anxiety because he was unhappy that his mother was about to give birth to his new little sister. Freud assisted Max intriguing. What he believed saved were the boys natural anxieties about childbirth? Whether or not those treatments actually worked is unknown but when Freud followed up with him at age nineteen little title. Hans was a completely normal adult. Herbert also didn't remember believing horses. Were scary in the first place by this time. Freud had had completely abandoned hypnosis as a curative method and was all in on his new psychological treatment which he now called psycho analysis or another term from the a psychology textbooks he certainly coined a lot of terms didn't he. He certainly did. And for those who need a quick refresher psycho analysis is a method of diagnosing and treating leading mental disorders by investigating the relationship between the conscious and unconscious mind. It relied heavily on Freud's theories of dream interpretation and free the association as we mentioned before it was also around the time of Freud's father's death that Freud began to invest more time into dream analysis in eighteen ninety nine..

Emma Eckstein Freud Freud Sigmund Freud Wilhelm Freud White Freud Loyd Freud Wade Emma Eckstein Vienna Herbert Vert John Jacques Rousseau Max groff Geneva Vienna General Hospital Oliver Ernst Sophie Medical World Sharko Anna Matilda Jean Martin Martha Byrne irregular menstruation
"freud" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

14:20 min | 7 months ago

"freud" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"Tested the effects of nerve stimulation and by the early eighteen eighties. Even performed the first surgeries to remove brain and spinal tumors in the eighteen eighty s hypnotism was also gaining traction in the Medical World Sharko in particular believed that hypnotism could be used to cure hysteria or an excess Outpouring of emotion Freud who had spent much of his time in Vienna General Hospital working with Theodore minor in his psychiatric clinic. In addition to filling in occasionally occasionally at a local asylum in Vienna was keenly interested in this new form of treatment as such. This became one of the primary factors that turned freud away okay from a career in neurology and towards a career in medical psycho pathology. That's a mouthful human breaking that down. Of course psycho psycho pathology is the scientific study of mental disorders. It seeks to find the root genetic biological social and psychological causes of the disorders orders as well as discovered treatments for them. Let's actually pretty straightforward to say sure but studying it that was a whole other challenge especially in the late nineteenth century. The earliest ideas on what would become psycho. Pathology came from the Greek philosopher. Hippocrates in the three to four hundred B C e hippocrates was among the first to suggest mental disorders were not caused by demonic possession but instead resulted from diseases in the brain after that there wasn't much prominent discourse on the subject until the seventeen hundreds when Geneva philosopher John Jacques Rousseau wrote about how economic pressures would cause causes psychological transformation in both societies and individuals as a reminder. This was nearly two centuries before Freud began studying the subject it was also one of Freud's inspirations he borrowed from Rousseau's ideas and philosophy to form a clinical method of approaching psycho Pathology Ritchie. But Freud couldn't do that with his job at the hospital taking up all his time upon returning from his fellowship in eighteen eighty. Six Ford left his job at Vienna the enemy general hospital and set up his own private practice where he specialized in nervous disorders to clear a nervous disorder simply refers to a neurological disorder. That stems from the nervous system. I E anything from paralysis and seizures to confusion and speech problems Freud combined his is knowledge of medicine with his newfound interest in alternative treatment methods like his mentor. Sharko Freud used hypnosis as a method of treating his patients he he put his patients in a trance to help them recall traumatic experiences. They had forgotten about returned to our story in just a moment and now back to the story. Eighteen eighty six was a big year of changes for Sigmund Freud and not just because of his new new practice nuts right not only was freud's professional life flourishing but so was his romantic one the same year that Freud opened up his clinic when he was thirty he. He married his wife Martha Byrne as they had six children. Matilda Jean Martin. Oliver Ernst Sophie and Anna Freud was especially close to his youngest daughter and she deeply admires her father and felt that she learned more from him than school. Anna would eventually follow although in her father's footsteps and grow up to be a renowned psychologist just like her father. Anna was a troubled child and frequently quarreled with their siblings. Freud believed young young. Anna was especially jealous of her pretty sister Sophie for Diverting Freud's attention away from Anna Herself Anna frequently wrote to her father about her mental health struggles goals and Freud attempted to treat her by having nightly analysis sessions. Six Times a week over the course of four years when Anna was in her mid twenty s he. He analyzed her dreams emotions relationships and memories the to we even talked about her sexual fantasies and masturbation habits to an outsider. This this could be seen as a strange practice but for fraud and Anna. It was a strengthening of their relationship and an affirmation of their individual passion for Psychology Collagen in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven about a year after establishing his clinic. Freud Meta doctor that would become one of his closest friends and intellectual collaborators as as well as providing for a rather interesting side story in the life of Sigmund Freud Wilhelm Fleece was an ear nose and throat specialist. who like Freud was a maverick when it came to medical theories both were outside the mainstream medical bubble and had a keen interest in developing radical new theories on sexuality both also believed in the importance of masturbation the use of condoms? And Coitus interruptus. which were not all widely accepted at the time while Freud White was on track to developing theories on what would become psychoanalysis? Fleece was working on his own theories on human biorhythms which analyzes the physical emotional national and intellectual cycles of man that were bestowed by nature at the time of birth into many of today's psychologists. The theories are nothing more than pseudoscientific ramblings but to Freud. Did they were brilliant. In fact Freud's obsession with fleas surpass that of mere intellectual respect. He himself noted that he added a deep attachment to fleece but flees was not important to Freud. Just as a friend WHO's intellect match Freud's fleeces theories were also pivotal to the Development Freud's own theories on infantile sexuality and bisexuality in fact Freud's first publication of theory of the mind project for a scientific psychology was developed in part through the many conversations Freud and fleece had together on the subject the publication talks about a variety of subjects including how neurons affect human survival drives the psychological origin of hysteria in terms of psychopathology. and how people may repress certain sexual memories yes it became the foundation of Freud's future theories and it wouldn't have been completed without fleece of course all good things must come to an end and for Freud Wade in fleece it was a bitter parting and and characteristic Freud fashion. The story behind their severed relationship was just as interesting as the relationship itself in the early eighteen. Ninety S Freud referred one of his early psychoanalysis patients. Emma Eckstein to fleas used to treat her painful and irregular menstruation. Why did Freud refer a patient with menstruation problems? Too in ear-nose-and-throat doctor you may ask well. Fleece he's had an interesting theory. Believe that the nose and genitals were connected. It was called the nasal genital theory and Freud trusting trusting fleece wholeheartedly sent Eckstein straight to fleeces operating table. The surgery was a disaster. The operation him to remove the middle turban it in her nose which was supposed to help cure her painful ministrations left Eckstein bleeding and permanently disfigured. At first I Freud defended his dear friend stating that fleece was completely without blame. He backed up statement by noting that Eckstein herself was culpable bowl in the disfigurement as her history of self cutting irregular nasal bleeding and irregular menstrual bleeding. Were the primary factors in the surgery. Going Wrong Tom. In fact Freud went as far as to state that X.. Stein's new ailments were so-called wish bleeding. He noted in a letter as far as I know she. The only bought out of longing she has always been Ab- leader cutting herself nosebleeds. She joyously welcomed her severe menstrual bleeding as proof that tillis was genuine when she saw how effective I was by her first hemorrhage she experienced this as the realization to be loved in her illness but That was just his public opinion. Freud himself knew exactly the disaster he and his dear friend flees had created in a letter to Fleece Freud wrote route. We got done her an injustice. She was not at all abnormal. Rather a piece of iota form ause had gotten torn off as you are removing it and stayed in for fourteen days preventing healing at the end tore off and provoked the bleeding by intention to do best for this poor girl was insidiously piteously thwarted and resulted endangering her life. Freud clearly felt guilty over the ordeal Eckstein however was not about to let this tragedy. Tear are her down when I returned to the room. She greeted me with the condescending remark. And I quote so this is the strong sex shockingly the debacle didn't deter Eckstein. Who after the bought surgery continued her psychological treatment with Freud and even went on to practice? Psychoanalysis for self fleece is and Freud's relationship however was not so successful after the incident. Freud would admit that he may have overestimated fleeces medical and theoretical the prowess. Ironically though this was not the incident that severed their relationship for good. It actually came to an end several years later in nineteen. Oh six when Freud refused to endorse one of leases new theories and flees claimed that Freud helped people plagiarized some of his work. However in the years following the mishap tap of Emma Eckstein Freud matured not only in relationships but in medical practice? In fact Freud would grow increasingly selective with his friends as as the years wore on perhaps having learned a lesson from his work with fleas in eighteen ninety six almost a decade after establishing his own practice Freud. Freud began to move away from hypnosis as a method of treatment instead. He came to the conclusion that his patients could be treated and cured by having them talking freely without censorship. This method became what he called Free Association. I feel like I might have read about that. In My high school's Psychology Textbook. That's not not a surprise free association as Freud defined. It was a mental process where a word or image would spur another often unrelated word or image. It was also around this time that he began to analyze his patient's dreams that's right. He looked at his patient's dreams as a way of showing how the unconscious mind worked worked and he was particularly interested in repressed memories Here's with a really interesting stuff starts to pick up in eighteen ninety six when Freud Loyd was forty. His father passed away this induced in Freud a series of disturbing dreams in addition to starting his long lasting bouts of depression of of course in Freudian fashion. He did not let those emotions sit idle instead. He began to analyze both his childhood memories and his new dreams. What he concluded was that he had an unaddressed hostility towards his father that resulted from his jealousy of the affection his mother gave to his now? Deceased father bother if this sounds familiar. It's because this hostility. Towards his father and lust for his mother became the foundation of his infamous theory of the oedipus complex. The oedipus complex was named for the Greek tragedy oedipus where prince by the name of oedipus accidentally fulfills a prophecy. That said he he would kill his father and Mary. His mother bringing calamity in his wake. Freud's oedipus complex though not as dramatic takes its name from the idea. Yeah that children inherently lost after their parent of the opposite sex and as a result hate the other parent for dominating all the attention a remember how. I mentioned the little boy whose fear of horses held a sadistic sexual origin. How could I forget in nineteen o five Max groff a friend of Sigmund Freud informed Freud of concern over what he felt was his son? Herbert unfounded fear in horses. You see Herbert or little Hans. As Freud referred to him in his writings lived near a coach in where horses were passing through constantly. It was common for accidents to occur and Herbert. Even saw one of the horses collapsed and died right in front of him. In modern psychology. It would be common to assume that Herbert's fear had something to do with witnessing the traumatic event of a horse's forces brutal death but of course neither Freud nor Herbert's father. Max believed witnessing such a tragedy. Was the cause of Herbert's fear instead Freud. It gave Mac's guidance on how to analyze and treat his son. Max Eventually concluded that his son had an oedipus complex. The horse represented Max in part because many horses had black muzzles like Max's mustache and in part because horses were well endowed Freud on the other hand believed. Herbert Vert was experiencing anxiety because he was unhappy that his mother was about to give birth to his new little sister. Freud assisted Max intriguing. What he believed saved were the boys natural anxieties about childbirth? Whether or not those treatments actually worked is unknown but when Freud followed up with him at age nineteen little title. Hans was a completely normal adult. Herbert also didn't remember believing horses. Were scary in the first place by this time. Freud had had completely abandoned hypnosis as a curative method and was all in on his new psychological treatment which he now called psycho analysis or another term from the a psychology textbooks he certainly coined a lot of terms didn't he. He certainly did. And for those who need a quick refresher psycho analysis is a method of diagnosing and treating leading mental disorders by investigating the relationship between the conscious and unconscious mind. It relied heavily on Freud's theories of dream interpretation and free the association as we mentioned before it was also around the time of Freud's father's death that Freud began to invest more time into dream analysis in eighteen ninety nine..

Emma Eckstein Freud Freud Sigmund Freud Wilhelm Freud White Freud Loyd Freud Wade Emma Eckstein Vienna Herbert Vert John Jacques Rousseau Max groff Geneva Vienna General Hospital Oliver Ernst Sophie Medical World Sharko Anna Matilda Jean Martin Martha Byrne irregular menstruation
"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

09:33 min | 11 months ago

"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Psychiatry's arguably the least science based of the medical specialties and forty and psychoanalysis arguably the least science science-based of those the father of psycho analysis for its impact on twentieth century thought is undeniable even though he got almost everything everything wrong my name's Moxy and this is your brain known fact. Let's start from the beginning which is a very good place to start for some background on the man himself. Please welcome our first guest presenter. Hi this is emily procup from the podcast the story behind the extraordinary history of the ordinary and this is the story behind Sigmund Freud on May six eighteen fifty six seek. He's Munn Freud was born. He was one of Eight children to Jacob Fried who was a wool merchant and Amalia Nathanson who is Jacob's third wife. Although his family were Hasidic choose sigismund or Siegmund as he became known didn't practice when Sigmund was four his family moved from what is now known as the Czech Republic to Vienna Austria Austria where he ended up staying study medicine at the University of Vienna. He began studying the anatomy of the brain including the effects of cocaine before the dangerous were as widely widely known as they are today he moved away from that but still used it occasionally for his migraines and a self medication for depression. He began working as a clinical assistant then moved onto studying psychiatry. When he met physician and physiologist Joseph brewer he learned about hypnosis for use on patients suffering being from hysteria. He watched his patients would come into brewer get hypnotized and then we're able to talk through experiences. They wouldn't have been able to otherwise and at the end the patients would feel much better. Freud was fascinated with this and after traveling to study hypnosis more returned to Vienna to open his own practice in eighteen eighteen eighty six he soon realized that many of his patients didn't need hypnosis though but they just needed open space to talk it helped that they could lay on the couch and didn't have to see Freud taking notes next to them. The couch is a fairly well known trope for therapists in movies and television but Freud had originally used to help people into hypnosis and it had originated when a patient gifted him one he also coined the term psycho analysis for his way of allowing patients to talk about anything thing that entered their brains. He began developing theories. We still learn about today like the ID ego and Superego as well as the oedipus complex and and if you're still in the dark about whether you've heard Freud or not you might have heard of Freudian slips the situation when you mistakenly say something you didn't mean to but was actually an underlying underlying truth instead like when I say I'm just going to have thirty pieces of chocolate oops. I meant three. He was also known to study dreams believing that they held the key to people's deepest desires his most famous book. The interpretation of dreams wasn't a big seller when it was first released in eighteen ninety nine. It only sold three hundred hundred and fifty one copies in the first six years. He became a professor at the University of Vienna and began attracting others interested in learning about the complexities of the brain including Carl. Oh young his group was called. The psychoanalytic society and soon other chapters followed in other cities but as world war loomed. Freud kept Tim and his family in Austria as long as possible. Although by nineteen thirty three Nazi's began burning his books because even though he is said to have been an atheist he was still still of Jewish heritage by nineteen thirty eight he and his family had run into problems with the Gestapo in Austria and left for England he had married Martha Bernese back in eighteen eighty two and went onto father six children with her. He also began smoking in his twenties believing the habit increases productivity but it became a lifelong addiction. Even after doctors found a cancerous tumor inside his mouth when he was in his sixties his mouth cancer became inoperable and on September twenty first nineteen thirty nine he asked his colleague and fellow Dr Max sure to end the suffering he received three heavy doses of morphine slipped into a coma. Oh Mama and died thanks emily. If my listener enjoys hearing the surprising origins of everyday items you'll definitely want to check out of the story behind behind Sigmund for it was also a serious polyglot meeting. Someone who speaks multiple languages he had a strong knowledge of German Italian Polian Greek English Spanish Hebrew and Latin making those of us who got a C. in Highschool French. Look Pretty Shabby. It's also been said that he was already reading Shakespeare at the age of Eight. Whatever else is said today. No one will be impugning for intellectual capacity although he it didn't keep his Jewish faith Freud became a particular target of the Nazis when they rose to power his books were among those banned in nineteen thirty three which which caused him to snark what progress we are making in the Middle Ages. They would've Bernie nowadays. They are content with burning my books. After Germany annexed Austria the Nazis rated for its apartment and the Gestapo Detained and interrogated his daughter Anna with the assistance of his friend and patient patient Princess Marie Bonaparte a reluctant Freud fled to Paris and then to London with his wife and daughter sadly bonaparte could not obtain exit visas as for four or four sisters who would tragically die in the concentration camps their deaths were beyond their control but Freud's wasn't wasn't Freud smoked as many as twenty cigars a day every day. He was quoted as saying that the cigars were essential to his life that they improved just work this popular story that WanNa Freud students suggested that perhaps this constant need to have a cigar in his mouth meant that he had an oral fixation nation a disorder that he postulated which we'll get into shortly to this Freud famously replied. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar dr except he probably didn't this deflected response was first documented in nineteen fifty thirty years after it was supposedly said Ed but there are no other references to it to be found in those three decades after the discovery of cancerous tumor inside for its mouth in nineteen twenty-three doctors removed a large part of his jaw although he underwent thirty three additional surgeries over the next sixteen years and had to have a prestigious inserted to two separate his sinus from his Jawf Freud never stopped smoking so maybe we will question his smarts just a little bit in addition into Tobacco Freud was a big fan and proponent of cocaine even bigger than Eric Clapton in the eighteen eighties for it grew interested in a drug being I used by a German military doctor to rejuvenate exhausted troops he distributed doses of cocaine to his friends and future wife and touted the drugs folks therapeutic benefits in eighteen eighty four paper on coca which he called a song of praise to this magical substance however when Freud gave cocaine to close friend Ernst von Fleischer mark sow to wean him from his morphine addiction and relieve pain his friend instead developed serious ISG cocaine addiction with news of other addictions and overdose deaths spreading for it stopped advocating cocaine's medicinal benefits but continued continued to use the drug for migraine depression and nasal inflammation for those who don't know snorting cocaine through a nose. That's inflamed by cocaine is a bad idea to the degree that it can cause tissue death or necrosis for a treated this tissue necrosis with more more cocaine. His writings on the benefits of cocaine have been called into serious question as he referenced successful outcomes of patients who don't seem to have existed assisted he published scientific study on the physiological effects of cocaine on reaction time and muscle strength his only experimental subject. It was himself in his right up. He tried to explain away his failure to test other subjects and then claimed he had confirmed his results by testing colleagues which also cannot be proved the study was riddled with methodological flaws and as one biographer commented may hey rank among the most careless research studies ever to see print. Freud was trained as a scientist but didn't live up to its principles in the article on on coca he demonstrated poor scholarship omitting crucial references citing references from another bibliography without reading them and making careless. Louis airs like misstating names dates and places of publication. There were numerous instances where he also appeared that his own drug use this was affecting his judgement he even prescribed cocaine to a patient with diptheria and often fatal bacterial infection of the mouth and throat which most most of US thankfully. I've never encountered owing to the D. T. A. P. Vaccine.

Sigmund Freud cocaine Freud WanNa Freud University of Vienna Austria Vienna Austria Austria emily procup morphine Joseph brewer Gestapo Jacob Fried Vienna Czech Republic Highschool French Siegmund drugs Middle Ages D. T. A. P. Vaccine
"freud" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 11 months ago

"freud" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels the rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture card and Redeemer Miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your Wallet Credit Approval Required Capital One bank. USA NA welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio. Hey rain stuff lauren. Bogle bomb here history has not been kind to Sigmund Freud were once believed to be among the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century but if old Sigmund were somehow around today it's I'm likely he died in nineteen thirty nine. Everyone in the room would probably be trying to act as if he wasn't. They're treating him like that. Crazy old uncle rolling their eyes at his embarrassingly politically incorrect insistences Sigmund Freud the father of psychoanalysis the man who introduced us to the EGO and the superego into offered up ideas like repression in defense mechanisms and penis envy and the oedipus complex is not the towering figure. He wants was still as much as some might try. We can't seem to shake entirely clear him or his ideas. Let's start with oedipus complex. When a Freud's most well-known theories remember the story of oedipus pissed from Greek mythology abandoned at birth at a pissed fulfilled a prophecy by unknowingly killing his real father king and marrying the king's widow at his mother. Her oedipus then fathered four children with her after finding out. What was what mom hung herself? oedipus gouged his eyes out and it was a legit Greek tragedy. Freud's oedipus complex plays off of that his theory goes that there's a totally normal stage of development between the ages of three and six years during which children experience unconscious sexual desire for the parent of the opposite sex and simultaneous jealousy and rivalry with their parents of the same sex along with couches in a doctor's office these symbolism that lies in dreams empty power of the unconscious the oedipus complex one of Freud's main contributions to the field a a theory that little boys want their mothers and hate their fathers and that little girls desire their dads and despise their MOMS. It's a theory with all sorts of psycho-sexual the sexual correlates that is widely discounted these days because we simply it has no scientific basis in fact Freud was in effect just theorizing throwing throwing things out there and today that's not nearly enough a we spoke with psychiatrists Joel Perez Professor at McGill University in Montreal and a research associate the Department of Psychiatry at Jewish General Hospital there he said I just think that people quietly buried. It stopped talking about it. If you speak to an intelligent psychoanalyst psychoanalyst bid say that isn't really the main thing we don't believe that anymore as fields like neuroscience have grown in importance as scientists have concocted ways to look more closely at the brain and how it works the oedipus complex and many of Freud's theories just haven't held up a pair said I wrote a short book looking at what the evidence shows both in theory and in practice there are some things that should be kept and that are supported by evidence but there's a lot that shouldn't be in particular. Giller psychoanalysis as a therapy doesn't have support except in a very brief four where you see people maybe for a few months and that's called brief psycho dynamic therapy that has scientific evidence for it early in two thousand nineteen the book Paris mentioned an evidence based Critique of Contemporary Psychoanalysis Research Theory end clinical practice was published in it. He calls for psychoanalysis to tie itself more closely to a scientific and clinical base the fields very existence. He argues depends upon it. He wrote in a two thousand seventeen paper on the subject. Quote Psychoanalysis claimed to be a science but did not function like one it it failed to operationalize its hypotheses to test them with empirical methods or to remove constructs that failed to gain scientific support the field may only survive if it's prepared prepared to dismantle its structure as separate discipline and rejoined academia and clinical science and this isn't a new point of view Frederick crews. One of the world's foremost Freud critics wrote more than twenty years ago. Independent studies have begun to converge toward a verdict that was once considered a sign of extremism stream. ISM are even neurosis that there is literally nothing to be said scientifically or therapeutically to the advantage of the entire Freudian system or any of its component component dogmas. Who've analyzed that another of Freud's ideas was that every memory we have is stored in our minds but that some are repressed because because of childhood trauma or other reasons those repressed memories he said could only be mind through psychoanalysis that premise has also taken a beating as science has discovered discover more about the intricacies and capabilities of the brain still even time can't take away the fact that Freud was in arguably one of the most famous thinkers of his era and has remained somewhat influential far beyond it even today a few of Freud's ideas survive and in some instances may be better better than what's offered by modern science. Peres said a lot of people in my profession today just write prescriptions. That's all they do all day and I think they do. Patients patients great disservice because they don't know how to listen to them or understand their life stories. I think the problem with Freud was he had been trained as a neuroscientist in the late nineteenth century entry but there were no tools to apply scientific methods to what he was doing so he just speculated he actually thought that you could sort of x Ray People's minds by having them lie on couch and free associate. It's not true but I think that the whole idea of understanding people's life story is something we should not get rid of. We need to listen listen to people. Let's not take all of psychology out of psychiatry but let's try to stick to theories where the science is really good..

Sigmund Freud Critique of Contemporary Psych USA clinical science Bogle Ray People Jewish General Hospital McGill University Montreal Department of Psychiatry Peres Paris research associate Joel Perez Professor twenty years six years
Weekend Racing Preview | Randwick and Moonee Valley | Aug 24

Three Wide No Cover

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Weekend Racing Preview | Randwick and Moonee Valley | Aug 24

"Hello and welcome to everybody three wide no cover. I'm your host. Nathan branco white to get into some racing action on the weekend is welcoming to esteemed colleagues in one of us has a new job title. One of us has a very new job title. He's become a brand ambassador. Lock myself lock salmon julian the real worries the new tunnel the brand ambassador because you have billion form analyst up until nabet net not beat around brand ambassadors and there's a lot of work and day talia yesterday. It's not good. It's i'm not going to be probably up to the lead up to the lofty expectations. Are you guys have but we'll see how we got but i'll be still doing have you changed your email student to say brandon better than i have actually had an email l. signature so now that will and thirteenth group one winning jockey solomon muscial. He's getting fuel. Oh boy the the show punk it up a little bit but that's all the i ten weeks of best as well and josie that you've understand that you've stepped up and congratulations on the new title stepped up from the trading floor. You've all your trading jacket in us selling and watches and things on the wii ideal fleischer jacket and that we can apple brother add on the show larry go. Let's get into the report jus. You're gonna look at turkey because obviously you got. The wing stikes group on rising up in sydney. I grew one of the rising season ran week. We <hes> on i four at four mehta's the entire but expecting beautiful conditions not much wind around estee. We expect that the track to rice really fairly. It'll big tampa relied. It's obviously it's up on spayed going slowly. They're gonna be hard to run dan but i think every host chains but then also in melbourne we go oh to mooney valley rile at full mehta's entire circuit brownie software have at the moment was expecting no ryan today no ryan freud i but ryan on saturday but it might become lighter in the diana from rice's four onwards but on air analysis on al stuff <hes> back in the office inside hugely advantage latest are going to be in the box the hallway around so we've put alexan- basket of bang on spayed. There's a bit of a northerly wind which we in their faces in twelve hundred mehta shoot and coming round the hometown. We'll the home turn it'll be behind them completely but inside and late as big advantage at four maters peseta tom of the with the wind and the weather and the rhine and things changing. How did we get it right at caulfield last week. They want from everywhere yeah. Oh absolutely and i think i think you'll see with your selection. In the first rice the big prize gong wrong to his two forty two three dollars fifty now the reason what peavy was two to forty eight to thirty dollars fifty was the big prize that moved the market. They had similar analysis assist to us. They have probably better analysis with us and i were partying gate one gate to gate throughout the whole day and that's why people was being drifts especially a rice one. They got it wrong. The night tried to change their algorithms which they do because they've got great budget for it but <hes> that were on the train and the train was going the wrong direction gypped <hes> i bet boy that's very very well. When you do get new role sometimes it. It was a few feathers. The fellow tried is handling the affected. You have become a brain best well. They're just pointing at namm side. That's about where i sit with them at the moment now they they're. You got a target on your back too long to get on your

Brand Ambassador Brandon Ryan Freud Nathan Branco White Namm Side Peavy Tampa Josie Rice Solomon Muscial Talia Apple Sydney Caulfield Analyst Mooney Valley Larry Melbourne Alexan Two Forty Two Three Dollars
Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

The Big Story

19:23 min | 1 year ago

Stephen Brunt on Tiger Woods: What kind of heroes do we want?

"Hey, it's Jordan, and I've podcast for you. Commons is Canada's most popular podcast about politics last season. They tried to answer the question how corrupt is Canada this time around. They're investigating our national addiction oil the currency's featuring host Arshi man is called crude. And it's about Canada's relationship with the oil industry. The good the bad the ugly and the weird you'll find Commons wherever you get your podcasts. So go check it out. I'm going to try to tell you today's story the way all probably tell it to grandkids someday. There was this guy a golfer named tiger. He was the best golfer in the world probably ever, you could argue if you wanted to, but nobody who'd watched him play would listen to you. And if that was our story, it would be a boring one, but it's not anyway, tiger was the greatest he had it all the fame money commercials endorsements beautiful wife and adorable children. But he was also a jerk. There were a lot of stories about this. He was rude to fans who wouldn't give kids high fives or sign autographs. He had his caddy yell at people who was a notoriously bad Tipper. He was a sullen guide to play with. He was robotic with the media, and none of those things mattered because he was the greatest until he wasn't just after two on Friday morning. Thirty three year old Tiger Woods. Drove out of his house alone. His car I hit a fire hydrant then a tree police after that crash. His wife left him. It turned out he'd been cheating on her with dozens of women across the country. His sponsors dropped him. Almost as fast as she. Did Ben details of his affairs came out, and they were humiliating. I want to say to each of you simply and directly. I am deeply sorry for my irresponsible and selfish behavior. I engaged in his knee gave out and then his back and even when he felt good enough to play golf. He was bad at it. And then despite surgeries his backup worse and worse until he could barely sit down without pain. He needed a spinal fusion surgery he had it just so he would be able to play with his children in his old age. He said but afterwards he felt better. So about two years ago, he picked up a club and tried to play again, and he could and he started getting better at it on the rest. Well, we'll tell you the rest, but you probably know how this ends. Then he doubted we'd ever see it. But here it is. Turn to glory. So it's Tiger Woods. Now. Redeemed? What is it about him that compels so many of us to root for him despite his flaws? What does the way we cheer for tiger tell us, but the kind of stories that were drawn to and about the kind of heroes. We prefer. I'm jordan. He's rawlings. And this is the big story. Stephen Brent from sports net is one of our favorite guests to talk to you. Whenever sports gets bigger than the games on the field. Why did everybody I know even with people on my production team who don't care about sports watch golf on Sunday? Well, let's see because the greatest golfer of all time came back under what seemed like impossible circumstances in rows right to the top of the sport in a after being written off for really good reasons over the last several years, especially over the last five or six years because he because Tiger Woods is a ground-breaking figure culturally. The people who don't know the wouldn't know Jordan Spieth of walked up their driveway know, who he is the he's he's an icon and a groundbreaker. So we has significance beyond the game. He plays. And because we all love a good redemption story, whether it's true or not we all want to believe that if you turn your life around if you do the right things instead of the wrong things if you follow the rules. You will be rewarded somehow in the cosmic sense. And for a lot of people. I think that's what it felt like I I'm not sure if the greatest I'm trying to think is this. Latest comeback story in sports history. That's a big one. Right. And I have a personal bias on that. Because I saw George Foreman. When the heavyweight championship at age forty six having been away for eleven years, and then come back as a big fat guy had people laugh Ataman lose nine rounds of a fight Nakagawa the tenth. So that was pretty good. But this that probably just me, but otherwise yet may potentially the greatest comeback story in the history of sport, a nostalgia moment for some people. I yeah, I get creeped out thinking of nineties style. Just somebody my age at doesn't nineties is like yesterday. But there's it's an established a moment, you know, this kind of the big three right there. Right. So within the sport historical greatest of all time, and the redemption narrative, and the and the style jet for a certain generation who remember remember when way way back in those nineteen nineties tell me about that. Because that was something that everybody was talking about right after he won is that moment twenty something years ago. Now when the world saw Tiger Woods for the first time. Do you? Remember the first time you saw Tiger Woods. That's good. I know not specifically. I certainly remember the first master's I remember talking about him in the US amateur. I remember him being out. You know, what I know? I take that back. You know, when I saw him the first time, I was at home as a teenager, a young teenager. Maybe not even a teenager yet. And after school. My parents watched the Mike Douglas show, which was a talk show that was on every day like five o'clock in the afternoon, and that's the famous show where they were L. Whereas whereas all man brought him out as a six year old and he had calls. I saw that show. Do you remember when Tiger Woods became I guess the Tiger Woods that we talk about? When we talk about the beginning of this story. When is lapping the field at the masters. I'm one of those moments when he just did something that when he seemed on another planet when he seemed different from all of the rest when he separated himself and that puts him on a very short list with Jordan and alley and what was it like watching him in the late nineties and early two thousands. Well, the guy so I'm not a golf guy. I have to. So is this I read like, I quit playing golf is fourteen. I walked off the course on the second hole. I hated hated the people here that the clothing, I did everything. So I just laughed. I literally just walked off in the middle of the game. And that's why we're talking you. Because this story is golf, so I hate golf and everything about it. But no, he was he was like a he was a superman, right? He was this. And and again, the nontraditional nature in terms of golf the whitest of sports. Yeah. Those days more so than now. But the idea that you could be, you know, someone other than a rich white kid, and and take on the sports or the way they're with Williams sisters and tennis the same that you could you could kind of just going to throw this back through all of that back in people's faces planned courses that were segregated up. You know within my lifetime. Yeah. There were courses that I remember remember the commercial? I think that Nike did about that. He was the first black person to ever play on some of these courses that he'd been playing. Yeah. I do remember that. And that was you know, again, that's a very so you felt like this was righteous to that that he was kicking down those doors and breaking those barriers and thumbing. Knows that the racist and the racist traditions and golf news, you know, total package now that that said the other side of them was completely unknowable. You know, we saw him. He was again public use a public figure, and he's a six year old to a degree. And he was kind of a brand Ike on it was like, Jordan. He was universal. Right. You could you could show that picture in any continent on earth and people say, oh, that's him. But he was impenetrable. He still is I have no idea who that guy is I really don't you know, has left people try to figure it out. And a lot of very fine writers have taken a crack at it. But I have no idea who what's inside them. Do you think we know him better now than we did ten twelve years ago? I think we would like to think we do again, I think under pretending that we know these people is important to us because it gives meaning to something that's otherwise meaningless which guy just put myself out of out of a job here. But you know, it doesn't really matter this stuff. Right. It doesn't. It's funny. You're like putting a little white ball and a hauler Gorna touchdown or scoring a winning goal and overtime and hockey game. Then add up a whole lot. You know, it doesn't even add up to what your doesn't add up art adds up to you know, with art. You can say the the art is the is what's important. So we will forgive people when number one you don't need to know the personality of the person producing yard you. Appreciate the art as a separate thing from them. And number two, you forgive them their sins. Right. Doesn't matter miles Davis horrible person. Right. Like one of the worst people ever, but produced sublime transcendent, revolutionary, art. And that's enough. You don't have to care about him. But but fleet was that's the thing. It's different. Because this no one's I. Yeah. I know it's you can argue make the argument that it's art, but you know, games come and goes Gore's, come and go somebody wins somebody loses. Like I've been doing. I've been writing about this stuff for a long time. It it. It doesn't add up to a la- beans, but if we can give it meaning, you know, if you can kind of imbue it with meeting and say, there's a human lesson here. And there's a human involved in this. Then I think it kinda justifies it. So I think that's part of we want to turn this into a parable. We wanna turn sports into a parable. That's how we understand the world is, you know, through parable as someone who. Who tries to do that and turn sports into those lessons for us. What did you think when I guess when Tigers false started when the news broke of the car crash and the details of that came out any stepped away? I you know, I felt like Klay like the rest of us. You know, it was it was interesting because it was kind of a flash of humanity in there he'd been so packaged and so protected in so manufactured, and, you know, both as a player, you know, by his father, and then certainly by Nike and everybody else who were in the image business image management business to to to be around tiger. I was a couple of times golf tournaments. And you know, there's no, you know, sense of what was behind this thing. And so, you know, I think that there is well, it's what the gossip industries built on right that they're kind of the Makarius thrill of oh, they're like us, aren't they? They're just like us. As a real under the Nike. Yeah. But especially on a flawed Cuban, right? So yeah, he may be rich, and he may be handsome, and he may be may have this beautiful wife. And but really he's like, you know, the the bad guy down the block, you not like you because you would never know that he was like the bad guy down the block. He has flaws. He's he's he's human in a so, but I I think there's a little bit of glee that goes without sometimes kinda, you know, the the whole shot and Freud thing, right? That you're you're you. I think a lot of people kind of were excited about it. You know, in some ways and said there, you go, you know, you may have thought you were something else. But here's what you really are. But I think it would it mostly revealed was a guy who I again, I'm not going to I wouldn't try and put a framework aunt and say, he was you know, all about golf and then never developed the other dimensions of his humanity. I have no idea. Like, I I don't know who the guy is. I don't pretend. But I think the impulse there is to say, yeah, he's he's a he's he's a flawed human being like the rest of us. And again weirdly to take some satisfaction from it. Well, there is that narrative that we probably like to put on. Sports stars because they're bigger and faster and better and richer than us that they are missing out on an essential part of humanity because they had to focus on this game since they were three years old. And they missed the whole rich tapestry of life that we got. Yes. No. And that's a great point. Right. That is a great point that, you know, the those character lessons you learned by being a really crappy little league player, right? For instance, or how to sit on a bench or being dumped by various girlfriends or ignored by others or just understanding failure that these guys were believed they were impervious to it. But in fact, you know, everybody gets their come up at some point. But again, that's that's kind of a religious theme. Isn't it? It really is. Yeah. Well, it's the it's the new idea of the human experience. Right. And that we all kind of go through the worst valleys in our lives. And it's what comes after that makes it worthwhile. Theoretically, you're radically. Yeah. Theoretically, or you know, it could be just all pointless, which would be another another more bleak way to look at it. We'll how unlikely was the next peak after that Val. Because it wasn't just the personal life scandal. It was like I mean you cover lots of athletes who try to come back from Steph. If I asked you five years ago, Steven what's the chance that I see? Tiger Woods win another green jacket snow slim two years ago. Right. Look, it's not about and it's not about the personal life stuff in this sense. Because look he was quite capable of winning golf tournaments while his personal life was apparently you're Radyr chaotic he managed to keep those things separate as when it was the physical stuff. It's one is back when you know, this guy who could barely bender bent over to pick something up off the floor two years ago the back. You can't swing a golf club with with that. You know, I think physically that idea that no matter how hard he worked his body at broken. And that's you know, way that it was not it did not appear to be able. So he could try as hard as he wanted to and he can live as clean life as you want to do and all of those things, but it didn't matter because this machine was broken. So I I don't think anybody hearing those stories from twenty sixteen twenty seventeen about his back kind of whispers because. It wasn't very public thought. You know this. No, there's no chance right? He can't go out there and compete. We can week out. And then he kind of comes back, I guess about a little over a year ago now and starts playing golf and laying. All right. And even then I don't know about you. But it was like watching an older athlete play out his years with some semblance of what he used to be. But not the same person, certainly the British the British Open right in the open championship. Right. Where you come thought. You know, he's he's not that far off and it's not like, but it's a different year. Right. It's a different vibe was a different vibe in at the masters because you know, the the old vibe is the, you know, I'm going to I'm going to destroy you. I'm going to destroy the golf course, which is what really I'm going to destroy the rest of you in this tournament. And that kind of Uber confidence that he had. I thought the most interesting thing watching that last round was watching him play the eighteenth hole, so carefully so super carefully. Right. Because you know, again, I would have been it would have been just insane you up there and hit a driver at that point, you know, because God knows and and but just. Kind of watching him play a really safe bogey to win that tournament. That's that's not in some ways. That's the anti-tiger. Right. It's just but it was it was smart. It was the right thing to do. And really the way he won that the way you try in that last round was by being kind of dog it and watching and consistent and then watching other people fail around him. It wasn't like he just sees them by the throat they had to fail. So that's a little different. If we're going to do the metaphor thing. Again, he humbled himself in front of the eighteenth hole. And is that can we read into that anything about his new life? I mean, a lot of people talked even before this tournament about how he just wanted to win for his children. Right. And he wanted his kids to see daddy win. And that's not the old tiger. Yeah. And who knows who knows who knows this guy enough to actually say that. I have no idea. I think he probably likes being tiger. Yeah. And I thought the and the chance to be tiger one more time at forty-three. That'd be pretty cool. Right. That'd that'd be an yes, it'd be great to have it. Do it in front of your children? Who'd never really got to experience it in to shut up the nose of everybody who ever said anything about you, there'd be a lot of things that you would take satisfaction from. But again, this is a guy who has programmed to be that that thing that character that kind of golf playing robot from the time he was a toddler, and you know to have that. It's right Thompsons got a new book about kind of greatest the kind of the the nature of some of the greatest of all time athletes him Jordan criminal for the other two are, but is his take on tiger is among his takes on tiger. Now, he's a great writer of golf and a Greg. I was around the sport is you know, that he thinks tiger hated the sport that whole first phase that he he was incredibly good at it and hated every minute of it because it had been forced and imposed upon him. So again, if I'm going to play amateur shrink here, I could talk about them being liberated in this second half and doing it for himself and for his own reasons rather than someone else's reasons and not having the daddy figure hovering over in them and being the daddy himself. And but like now, I'm a sports I'm being a sports writer here. Just extrapol-. I saw that column come into view. I just don't know if it's true, right? I honestly don't I have no idea. I I've no idea we know what lies in his soul. But I don't have any idea. What lies in most people souls? Right. It's we, but we go seeking it. We go seeking that story. Yeah. We're trying to find the meaning we're trying to find the meaning. Yeah. It's and you know, and then tomorrow, we'll try and find the meaning and something else. But this one looked the one thing as a sports writer sports writers people. I was asked to do cheer. We cheer for stories. Yeah. I've been lots of press boxes. Lots of press rooms everybody. Cheers for the story. Everybody got what they were cheering for and you'll end fan through the really that's what fans want you wanna. Yeah. You support your team and you support the uniform. But man, there's nothing like a story is there. Well, here's the question. Then how come I was and probably you were certainly millions and millions of people were cheering so hard for a guy who objectively from the little that we do know about him, isn't that great guy at least hasn't been and cheering form as a huge underdog went objectively. He's one more majors than anybody. But one person and he's one hundreds of millions of dollars because we're flexible. We as a species are very flexible, I wanna feel like we shoot for a real underdog. But we can you know, you can turn it. You know, think about watching the March madness if you have no real rooting interest. And so there's two schools on there. You have no idea who they are. You have no idea who those players are. But you can construct something around that game where when you know, east west North Dakota state beat somebody you go. That's the greatest thing I've ever seen your route informant that basket goes in. And then you go onto the next thing we we do construct stuff like that. And you know, he's like that the idea of the fightback that's really fight back from adversity fight back against the impossible. And the character stuff as I said, it's tricky we could because sport has been a place where we've confused being good at something having great motor skills or winning the genetic lottery, or, you know, working hard or all this up at everybody works hard. Right. We we do confuse I with character. Sometimes those things are blurred might that. You know that he's a character guy. You know? That's that's why that's why he succeeded. Not because you know, he was born this way. A or had some advantages or because there's something else inside. We got we go for that. And a lot of time and the flip side of his we're we're quite willing to ignore the opposite with where somebody could be like Michael Jordan's. Not a nice guy. Right. There's not really any suggestion. That Michael Jordan's a nice go. No there's like with tiger. There's plenty of stories to the contract. And you know, Allie was a terrible husband and a crappy fodder by and large. Now, there's also a political social components rally. So that's you know, it's a little bit different. But as I was saying before about, you know, the separating the art from the artist you can do that with our, you know, Pablo Picasso is bad guy. Right. Really bad guy. But it didn't stop anyone from treating him as Picasso during his work that way. Well, you don't have to cheer for Picasso. You don't and you can see you know, it. It gets tricky with the, you know, the Woody Allens of the world, you know, it gets it gets into some dicey territory there. Maybe I'm not sure anybody's going to listen to a Bill Cosby monologue the same way anymore. But but sport, the two things are connected. The two things are connected, and we'd like to you know, we want to kind of link those two things. Say this guy triumphed or this woman triumphed. Because a yes, they were very compact because they worked harder because they had more of that grit and character in, you know, Royal jelly, we we really we seek that. And I'm not saying, it's not true. But I think it's more that we needed to be true. Or we want it to be true sometime like it's a chicken or the egg did tiger win again because he became a better person or because he's winning again. Do we just think he became a better person Ingo? Yeah. And his backup better. Yeah. That to actually could swing a golf club dad like he may he may be a great guy now and totally, you know, Saint Paul on the road to Damascus had a moment where hang on when everything's clear down. And I'm not going to do all those terrible things anymore or maybe just got healthy. I don't know. We'll never know. But the, but the, but the former is way more compelling than the lab. Thanks, Steven bye. Stephen Brennan from sports net hates golf, but loves narrative that was the big story for more from us. You can find us at the big story, podcast dot CA or at frequency podcast network dot com. We are also up in your social media at frequency pods on Twitter on Facebook and on Instagram, and you can always reach us at v big story. F P PIN on Twitter as well. We're in your favorite podcast app. No matter which one it is. And we'd love a rating or a review. We've us comments. We love comments, apple Google, Stitcher. Spotify you pick where there thanks for listening. I'm Jordan he throwing we'll talk tomorrow.

Golf Tigers Tiger Woods Michael Jordan Nike Canada Jordan Spieth Steven Pablo Picasso United States BEN George Foreman Tiger Mike Douglas Bill Cosby Hockey Spotify Twitter
DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

08:45 min | 1 year ago

DutchChains Odyssey On Its Blockchain and AI Hackathon

"The street has a crypto winter is finally Thorin most importantly, all blockchain projects remember, those that were all built on future promises and lies Leo culture. Well, the future is right here. We're beginning to see the first fruits from those icy hose from Lowe's future promises. So the future is already here. We're not talking about real partnerships real use cases and stories of early adopter businesses leveraging emerging technologies, but this daily tech podcast. It's not about buzzwords or fuelling hype of anything but hearing right from the heart of the tech world and how it's actually transforming multiple industries. So today, we have Rooker van Zuid dam on the show, and he's the founder and CEO of a company called Dutch chain, which is a leading ecosystem development agency for open. Public infrastructure and also odyssey an open innovation program, which provides a unique collaborative infrastructure for governmental corporate, a nonprofit partners to help them. Find breakthrough solutions to complex societal challenges all using blockchain and so many other emerging technologies. Exile installed Freud that Rooker also has more than fifteen years experience funding companies across communications digital media and tech sectors. And was also the co founder and commercial director of pay logic, which is a next generation ticketing and technology company based in Amsterdam. So buckle up and hold on tight. So I can be meal as all the way to the Netherlands. So we can speak with Ruka who's not only going to talk about everything I've just mentioned, but also ought to see hack twenty nine thousand nine which sounds incredibly exciting. So massive warm. Welcome to the show Rutger. Can you tell the listeners about who you are? And what you do. Thank you, Neil. So thanks for having me first of all, and yeah, I'm from from the Netherlands, and I'm the CEO of this chain and reorganized the one of the largest opening ovation programs in Europe called odyssey can can see everything about it on all the orc. And what we focus on is really the how how can all these new types of technologies like blockchain and a I serve our society in the best possible way. And what we found out is that there is a really interesting space to look at and we call it digital public infrastructure, and this is where we have managed to get corporates. Governments startups regulators. Scalable scientific institutes all on board in a in an open ecosystem that is focused on discovering the future by actually building it. And in this innovation program. We have a a highlights, which is the all the hacker Thon, and that one is taking place in in a week time and about fifteen hundred people from all over to will gather to to work with teams and experts on on solutions in the context of twenty complex challenges. So this is in a nutshell what what what we are working on with a with a team of of nine very very driven people from the deadlines. Tacitly so much to unpack this, I suppose we better start we do chain, which like you said you the founder and CEO of mine to stunning off. It's chinese. It's a leading ecosystem development agency for open digital public infrastructure. But can you begin by telling me a little bit more about that? And the kind of problems that you set out to solve a we'll put you on this path. Yeah. What's put me on this bath really is. And that goes way back to when I was a teenager and internet came into my life. So to say, right. The connection with the rest of the world, and all the creativity simply blew everything away in most positive sense of the word, and this was before Napster when there was no MP3. yet. You know, so but still this this new thing was was there. And then, of course, that evolve, and it was shaping our society more and more than a good way. But also in in ways, we we we don't really know how to cope with yet. I think and then off the social media came in mid and late two thousands. I came across a bitcoin and then. For me. Everything else was just kind of boring because all of a sudden, we we have this digital public infrastructure for a global payment network, and it is not owned by anyone, and it is absolutely independent and neutral, and this whole idea, I think we can take much further, and this is also whether it's basically at the core of what we're doing at other see, so that's that's basically how we came to it. Because what I was doing. When when when I came across bitcoin is both doing experiments with it like built all kinds of new chemical apps. Like, I was at a at a bitcoin conference one of the first ones in Europe organized by mode eleven I think it was in two thousand fourteen or so and then I couldn't pay my beers at the bar with bitcoin. And I was like what what is this? All right. So then we'd you Philip this point of sale system for for restaurants in boss where you could easily pay your base with with bitcoin. But we also. It was a time when when when Google gloss came out, and we connected to go glass to to a blockchain dot info wallet and Aucoin baseball, so then you could do hence free payments. So you could you could say okay glass. Make payments, and then scan QR code like RoboCop style, and then you could not wise, and it pays the actual Bill, and we had so much fun doing these things. But also we learned so much about how this. Bitcoin as an infrastructure system works. And it. It gave me the idea that you can actually discover the future by actually building. It's in a very good way. It takes you out of your comfort zone. It's not a fun. And I also have organized a couple of conferences, but it wasn't really satisfying enough for me because it's just talking. Right. So then I merged the two into this innovation program with the hacker Thon, and and turned it into a professional innovation and collaboration infrastructure. I'm so glad you mentioned you'll teenage years then the arrival lived in

Founder And Ceo Blockchain Netherlands Europe Lowe LEO Ruka Napster CEO Neil Co Founder Amsterdam Rooker Freud Google
Airline stocks jump after Delta raises first-quarter earnings guidance on strong demand

MarketFoolery

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Airline stocks jump after Delta raises first-quarter earnings guidance on strong demand

"Airlines are going to be reported next week, but this morning delta raised their guidance for the first quarter. Yeah. Shares of delta up seven percent and the ripple effect through all the airlines. I mean, they're not all up seven percent. But they're all up. We'll get the dealt in a second. Should they all be up because? It appears as though Delta's reasons for raising the guidance have to do with healthy demand. Yeah. Among passengers and fuel costs in line with what they had thought. And maybe even they're going to save a little bit more money on fuel costs should investors. Just be assuming. Oh, well, that's the case for delta. Therefore, it's the case for all of them. I think so I think that I it certainly it certainly the case that delta said that the revenues are going to be up seven percent. And they said that their fuel costs are are lower than expected. You can't just take the you can't just take the raw pricing for for fuel. And assume that that's what airlines are paying because they have forward forever. You know for everything. So it may be the case that Delta's forward pricing is better than other air than its competitor airlines, but they are all playing in the same market. And you're talking about a commodity in the fuel is definitely the largest expense for the airline. So. Yeah, good. News for them. And after the last couple of weeks with you know, wondering who flies seven thirty sevens. And who doesn't you know? It's it's it's it's good for the airlines to have a little bit of good news. Two point two. I'm glad you mentioned the seven thirty seven because. Every I shouldn't say every quarter. But frequently it is the case where there is some sort of event that happens and just around the office. Here will say, hey, how many times on conference calls this quarter? Do you think we're going to hear the word or phrase black with earnings coming up for the airlines? How many times do you think we're going to hear the word Boeing on conference calls because all of them? Yeah. Even the airlines even the airlines that only fly Airbus or other air or other air manufacturers planes. They're still going to mention Boeing if if nothing else just to say, by the way, we don't fly any Boeing planes. Right. So they're all going to mention it. Now, it is important to note that what it doesn't really help any airlines to put the bug into the back of people's heads that occasionally airplanes fall out of the sky at all. So I don't think that there will be much in the way of. Like and Freud, but there will be a lot of discussion about about the seven thirty seven max. And whether the airlines have you know, the the proper safety protocols and safety equipment installed. It will come up after going decades with not owning not only not owning airline stocks. But going out of his way to talk down the ministry. Warren Buffett is now invested in I believe at least four of Hamilton, including delta. So so

Delta Boeing Warren Buffett Airbus Freud Hamilton Seven Percent
Where Do Sandman Myths Come From?

BrainStuff

05:36 min | 1 year ago

Where Do Sandman Myths Come From?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here. You know, when you wake up in the morning, and you have all that crusty stuff in your eyes that's called room. And it's just the remnants of liquid coating that protects your is that you blink away when you're awake. But that collects end dries when you sleep, but if you were a child living in central or northern Europe, a couple of centuries ago grownups would have probably told you that when you woke up in the morning with crusty eyelashes, it was because the Sandman had been to your bedside sprinkling his magical sleepy Dustin, your is spinning the yarns of your dreams, this might have caused you some alarm because the figure of the Sandman isn't all magical benevolent snooze dust. It turns out as much as the Sandman is to sleep as Santa is to gift-giving San man's shadow side is at least as conspicuous as Santa's penchant for shady around the clock surveillance and distribution of switches and coal to naughty kids. We spoke about how the Sanmen myths got their start with Dr Maria. Tatar a professor of German studies folklore and children's literature at Harvard University. She said it's a bit difficult to trace his origins because stories about the Sandman are part of an oral tradition. I feel confident that there are similar figures and other cultures because so many of the jolly child-friendly creatures are shadowed by disciplinary evil person who invented the Sandman who knows the man's first Paret onto the page was an eighteenth century German dictionaries, which briefly described the German idiom zap man, kommt Sandman is coming which was used to tease children who were particularly sleepy. Looking. The first story about Sandman and his doings was published in eighteen eighteen by German writer, E T, a Huffman descent men begins with an exasperated nurse telling a story about a mythical creature who throws sand in the eyes of little children who won't go to sleep causing. There is to fall out of their sockets Sanmen. Then collects the eyeballs and a sack and carries them to his home on the dark side of the moon where he feeds them. Mm to his children to tar said present men became an important story in psychoanalytic circles because Freud made so much of it in his essay, the uncanny often story is a fairy tale for grownups really his Sandman is this dark predatory monster. It definitely wasn't written for children, but keep in mind. Many of the things we consider kids stories today. Snow White sleeping beauty were originally told by and to adults though, of course, not all fairy were for grownups in eighteen forty one Hans Christian Andersen. Published a fairytale meant for a young audience called all loci ole being a Danish first name and loci translating to shut your I the pomace character always dressed in silk pyjamas and carrying a colorful umbrella is never referred to by Anderson as the San man, but the man is the title most English translations assigned to the fairytale ole doesn't throw sand into children's is. He squirts milk into them. The story is a sequence of dream. Like Tableau and ole seems to be a benevolent figure in them. But he does introduce the main character a young boy to concepts of sexuality and death. And at the end of the story, the boy discovers that old loci has a brother who instead of coming night after night tour bedsides begin dreams only visits each person wants bringing death. His name is also all loci Tatar said what's interesting about the Sandman stories is they remind me a bit of the children's versus and lullabies. We seem to children which are soothing in gentle. But there's a stark violent side to them to somehow it seems to meet her are bits towards children. We adore them. And want to tell them gentle lovely stories, but they drive us crazy at times we and especially our ancestors resorted to cautionary and disciplinary tales like little red riding hood in which the wolf will eat you up. If you stray from the path in the Hoffman story, if you don't go to sleep the sand man's going to come and scratch out your eyes, and if strong arming children in to set. Alling down to sleep is not why the European parents have nurses of old told cautionary bedtime stories. Maybe it's because they wanted to prepare their little ones for life's hardships to tar said the unusual thing about the Sandman is he's a lot bigger than you. Are there's no defeating him. You can't face him down. Like, you can the villains fairy tales, there's no happily ever after except falling asleep giving in he can't be beheaded are trapped or tricked like other villains. It's hard to distinguish fairy tale myth legend and all of that. But in a way, he belongs more to the realm of myth and very towns. Episode was written by Justin shields and produced by Tyler claim for I heart media, and has duct works for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by the new Capital One saver card. Earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you can cash in what's in your wallet.

Kommt Sandman Capital One Tatar Santa Europe Hans Christian Andersen Lauren Bogle Harvard University Dr Maria Professor Of German Studies Freud SAN Dustin Justin Shields Anderson Hoffman Writer Tyler Four Percent One Percent
"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Freud YouTube murder
The origin of Sigmund Freud

Your Brain on Facts

09:07 min | 1 year ago

The origin of Sigmund Freud

"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Fusion of psychoanalysis and knows dock. Offering. Fleiss believed that changes inside the nose were directly related to the genitals. And that this was especially observable in menstruating women in whom he would sometimes cauterize the nasal passages or remove part of the nasal bones. The stop excessive menstruation since nasal passage changes were observable in both sexes. According to Fleiss that was consistent with our by sexual constitution. Freud and Fleiss eventually had a falling out. When Fleiss began to insist that Freud had stolen his ideas about innate bisexuality, which he had confided to Freud, but not yet published sometime after the relationship ended for explained in letters to a friend that Fleiss influence over him had been a manifestation of Freud's own latent homosexual longing, which he had managed to overcome. Unlike paranoid people interestingly for later encountered, a similar problem in his relationship with Carl young. It seems like Sigmund Freud never met a treatment. He didn't like he practiced electrotherapy for at least two years though. He claimed to have soon realized it was a placebo, and if promptly stopped using it he sent patients to spas for immobility and fattening regimens he prescribed hydrotherapy. He steered patients to a gynecologist who treated his Cyril women with surgical procedures like hysterectomies and could her addicted. He's he put patients in needless jeopardy acting on impulsive sometimes fatal misjudgements for its pattern of patient treatment showed that he interpreted transient symptomatic improvements as cures and failed to do any follow up. If you looked a little better you were on your own in the first two years of his practice. He was preoccupied with the rank and status of his patients, he came to specialize in one particular disease. As of the rich hysteria, which could never be cured, then which generated a continuous stream of income. When some of his historic patients were subsequently shown to have organic diseases. He still maintained that hysteria was part of the clinical picture. He never admitted being wrong in one case saying that while his diagnosis had not been correct. It had not been incorrect. Either a prime example of this behavior is the case of Anna o one of the foundational cases of psychoanalysis the prototype for the cathartic, cure Freud and colleague Joseph Breuer claimed that Anna o had recovered after treatment. When in fact, she had gotten worse to the point of needing to be hospitalized after leaving psychoanalytical treatment, Anna improved on her own and eventually led a successful life as an activist opposing the sex trade. Freud claimed that her activism was a manifestation of her unconsciously wanting to prevent her mother from having sex with her father, it's entirely possible. That Anna oh didn't even have a psychiatric illness, but rather a physical neurological one and many of her most troubling symptoms were caused by the morphine addiction that came along with her treatment..

Sigmund Freud Fleiss Anna o Carl young Cyril immobility morphine Joseph Breuer two years
"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

Your Brain on Facts

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"freud" Discussed on Your Brain on Facts

"Fusion of psychoanalysis and knows dock. Offering. Fleiss believed that changes inside the nose were directly related to the genitals. And that this was especially observable in menstruating women in whom he would sometimes cauterize the nasal passages or remove part of the nasal bones. The stop excessive menstruation since nasal passage changes were observable in both sexes. According to Fleiss that was consistent with our by sexual constitution. Freud and Fleiss eventually had a falling out. When Fleiss began to insist that Freud had stolen his ideas about innate bisexuality, which he had confided to Freud, but not yet published sometime after the relationship ended for explained in letters to a friend that Fleiss influence over him had been a manifestation of Freud's own latent homosexual longing, which he had managed to overcome. Unlike paranoid people interestingly for later encountered, a similar problem in his relationship with Carl young. It seems like Sigmund Freud never met a treatment. He didn't like he practiced electrotherapy for at least two years though. He claimed to have soon realized it was a placebo, and if promptly stopped using it he sent patients to spas for immobility and fattening regimens he prescribed hydrotherapy. He steered patients to a gynecologist who treated his Cyril women with surgical procedures like hysterectomies and could her addicted. He's he put patients in needless jeopardy acting on impulsive sometimes fatal misjudgements for its pattern of patient treatment showed that he interpreted transient symptomatic improvements as cures and failed to do any follow up. If you looked a little better you were on your own in the first two years of his practice. He was preoccupied with the rank and status of his patients, he came to specialize in one particular disease. As of the rich hysteria, which could never be cured, then which generated a continuous stream of income. When some of his historic patients were subsequently shown to have organic diseases. He still maintained that hysteria was part of the clinical picture. He never admitted being wrong in one case saying that while his diagnosis had not been correct. It had not been incorrect. Either a prime example of this behavior is the case of Anna o one of the foundational cases of psychoanalysis the prototype for the cathartic, cure Freud and colleague Joseph Breuer claimed that Anna o had recovered after treatment. When in fact, she had gotten worse to the point of needing to be hospitalized after leaving psychoanalytical treatment, Anna improved on her own and eventually led a successful life as an activist opposing the sex trade. Freud claimed that her activism was a manifestation of her unconsciously wanting to prevent her mother from having sex with her father, it's entirely possible. That Anna oh didn't even have a psychiatric illness, but rather a physical neurological one and many of her most troubling symptoms were caused by the morphine addiction that came along with her treatment..

Sigmund Freud Fleiss Anna o Carl young Cyril immobility morphine Joseph Breuer two years
Modularity Insights for Charisma and Creativity

Global Optimum

01:06 min | 2 years ago

Modularity Insights for Charisma and Creativity

"Yeah. Global optimum. The podcast dedicated to making you a more effective altruistic I'm Daniel gamma Korda. We're going to start off today with a Groner what's is affected altruistic favorite kind of soup. Their favorite soup is excess stencil bisque. Bam, soup humor right off the top. This episode will feature two segments apply psychology in which I will apply our understanding of modulator to identify some psychological pitfalls and how to address them. And the other segment will be checked. This wreck in which I provide you with a recommendation of a book article podcast that perhaps you are not familiar with, let's get into it. Last episode I talked about module Larry, the idea that the mind is made up of many specialized parts which are sometimes functionally encapsulated from one another. If you haven't listened to the previous episode, I do recommend that you listen to it first since in this segment, I'm going to talk about ideas that assume, you know the stuff in the first episode. This segment is going to be about applying modulator to do useful things like improving your performance at various tasks. I'll begin with a question, say you're running a race, you fallen behind. But in the last moments of the race, you get a sudden burst of energy. You run so fast that you're able to speed pass the person in second place. He passed the person. Second. What place are you in now. We'll get back to that in a bit. If the brain is made up of many parts than what is a good module taxonomy, can we group modules into categories to make them easier to understand there have been many theories put forward which divide the mine into some number of basic parts. For example, psychologists might talk about fast versus slow processes, emotional versus rational control versus automatic old versus new, lest you think two is the magic number. There are theories which use a different number of buckets. Freud talked about the mid ego and superego according to the Triune brain theory, we have a reptilian complex, a paleo mammalian complex and day Neo, mammalian complex. Some of these theories are better than others. I just wanna say there are many ways of carving. The mind and there are plenty of theories, those theories are not necessarily consistent with one another. I'm going to use Daniel condoms theory, which divides the mind into two parts, which he calls system one and system to the main reason I'm using this theory is I expect my listeners to be familiar with it, and it is good enough for our purposes. I don't actually use system one system two in my thinking about psychology, and certainly most psychologists don't if for no other reason that most psychologists are studying topics different from what common studied. And so his theory isn't very useful, but it's fine as an abstraction as long as we remember that it is a useful simplification in actually the brain is made up of many different modules and the modules have some combinations of features, but dividing up modules into buckets will work fine for where we are going. I'll quickly go over condoms. Two bucket theory where the mind is divided into system one and system. Two. System. One refers to brain processes that are fast, unconscious, automatic, emotional, your gut reaction to something. Examples of the things system. One does include see that an object is at a greater distance than another localize. The source of a specific sound, complete the phrase war and. Blink. Some probably you can quickly come up with war and peace other things system. One does display disgust when seeing a gruesome image solve two plus two equals what

Daniel Gamma Korda Larry Daniel Paleo Freud
Deep forehead wrinkles may signal a higher risk for cardiovascular mortality

Global News Podcast

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Deep forehead wrinkles may signal a higher risk for cardiovascular mortality

"For twenty years. Research is in front studied thousands of adults to analyze the connection between wrinkles on the Foret and the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. The team found that people with the most wrinkles with ten times more likely to die than those with no wrinkles. Once the research is did not find a definitive link between increased wrinkles and the risk of death from heart disease is believed that the hardening of arteries you to plank build up maybe the cools and his blood vessels in the Freud, assoc mall that the first show the banks of vessel aging whilst fried brow is no better predicting cardiovasc-. Risk than existing methods. Researchers said their findings could help raise concerns soon

Nelson Chamisa Emmerson Mnangagwa President Trump Heart Disease Harare Gareth Bala National Sports Stadium Robert Mugabe Rome Harare Emerson Managua Jenny Zimbabwe Costas Freud BOB Hadi Boehner Twenty Years
"freud" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

The Fundamentalists

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on The Fundamentalists

"So in for the calm and freud in these kind of thinkers the ideas actually the distinctions more complicated dot in appearance there is an essence which means that the truth of who we are is in our appearance it's not that there's the truth behind the appearance in reality we're just creatures onnell's or say play about him and then we have this allusion that we give ourselves to is that are found the seas on our way of presenting ourselves in the world while as type of appearance embodies some truth by their deepest desires fears on what it means to be a human in fact what it means to be what it means to exist which is kind of this is why freud said the truth is always spoken right that whenever people are speaking they're always telling you something not consciously but but in their appearance and what in high they has a hesitated it in the words that they use the mistakes they make their something true about what what it is to be something tree of their desires so all of this is coming to the point of saying that i think the the issue is the truth is an artist is not mimicking nature a good artist is bringing the essence that is with a niche jesus is on or someone good artists is when they whenever they draw pool they're not just mimicking so if you've ever seen an artist he literally just mimics nature it's boring the art is terrible but a great artist in some high in the in the appearance brings something essential yeah i was thinking about this with discussion i was having with a guy about star wars and we were talking about he was he was discussing star wars from an angle of like what it's doing to culture and sort of like how there's such a stark dichotomy between the good guys and the bad guys and star wars and you know the only way you know who abaga is in star wars is is that they're dressed in all black and that they're you know menacinglooking and the good guys these these you know they're dressed in beige is in lighter colors whites and all that and.

freud
"freud" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Freud it's nine o'clock this is cbs news on the hour presented by fisher investments i beater king were a half hour from the opening bell inviting out what's next after two days of huge losses on wall street us futures have been all over the place this morning in foreign markets have taken ahead cbs news financial contributor melody hopson says things are better than they look underlying fundamentals are so strong mental amy last but in nature markets around the globe so watch it investors do be average american during this period should do lat thing you should not be changing or a approach right now dow futures are down one hundred twenty two points s p futures down to the president's lawyers reportedly don't want him to talk to special counsel robert muller about the russia investigation cbs' major garrett says there is no decision yet and our senior legal analyst andrew cohen says talking could make sense for mr trump i think in the end we will see a deal here because both sides have an interest in making a deal muller of because he would want the interview with the president sooner rather than later and the present and as a political matter because it looks better for him if he voluntarily submits to the questioning then if he's dragging the court to do it former white house chief strategist steve bannon will not testify today before the house intelligence committee about the investigation cbs's annemarie green the white house does not want bannon into lance are questions about his time in the administration here's now delayed answering the committee's questions threetimes unclear if bannon will be held in content the us has launched a series of air strikes against taliban targets in northern afghanistan cbs's cami mccormick with more for the pentagon targets included taliban training facilities and stolen afghan army vehicles which have been use in a series of attacks against afghan security force wherever you live and work probably seems to have the worst traffic ever but a new study is pinned down for real that opening dance sequence in la la land where people dance on the roofs of their cars and a freeway traffic jam could have been filmed in real time conditions sahni los angeles confirmed as the world's most congested city followed by new york and moscow the traffic data firm in rex fines five of the world's.

cbs moscow la la pentagon cami mccormick afghanistan taliban chief strategist white house andrew cohen russia special counsel amy financial contributor melody hopson Freud new york los angeles
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Is to be an anathema to their regime they were convinced that freud led some kind of jewish conspiracy when five hundred jews committed suicide after the nazis were welcomed into austria anna asked her father whether they shouldn't killed themselves too but floyd refused why should they kill themselves especially since that was exactly with the nazis wanted but freud's children had no illusions of the horrors the nazis might inflict on them seeking help they approached freud's current dr a young man named max sure who had promised to be honest with freud i'm mike freud's past doctors who lied about his cancer and her brother convinced dr sure to supply them with barbiturates so they could commit suicide rather than die in concentration camps but even with pressure from family and friends freud remain stubborn about leaving vienna it wasn't until the gestapo the nazis secret police detained and interrogated freud's youngest daughter anna freud who is also of renounce psychologists following her father's footsteps did freud change his mind his beloved daughter had come very close to needing to use her vile of barbiturates and freud was not going to risk losing his family he announced that they would flee the country jones immediately jumped into action he used his personal connections to the home secretary of london as well as his influence in various science circles to get immigration permits for freud and his family the even used his connections to put diplomatic pressure on berlin and vienna so fraud could get out of the country it wasn't just jones that was rooting for freud's escape though american diplomats and even princess marie bonapartes whose ancestor was napoleon bonaparte disinherited brother helped freud and his family and even his physician max shaer's family flee the country but even with all this help freud's escape was blocked by legal and financial negotiations with the nazi authorities however the nazi kommissar who was put in charge of freud's assets.

floyd mike freud concentration camps vienna jones secretary london fraud marie bonapartes napoleon bonaparte max shaer austria berlin
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Freud however did take dosages advice to have the growth removed and sought treatment from rhino logist marcus hayek why he went to hayek was mysterious considering freud had apparently previously questioned the right knowledge is competency in his field nonetheless hayek performed the surgery and botched it just like emma ex dine freud started bleeding during and after the operation perhaps narrowly escaping death from bleeding out and just like extra time forwards life did not end on the operating table again he returned to his doctor deutch who realized further surgery would be necessary yet deutsche still refused to tell freud he had cancer even made freud's friends and fellow doctors promised not to tell freud about the cancer that isn't to say that he wasn't aware there was some problem with his jaw after all he was in constant pain and even began to lose his ability to speak eloquently he had a prosthetic device inserted in his mouth after several draw surgeries but freud's inability to speak clearly did not mar his ability to write and think in fact the same year marcus hayek perform josh surgery on him freud published a paper featuring the concept that would become perhaps his most famous theory that is the theory of the aid ego and superego if you remember back in eighteen ninety nine freud published the interpretation of dreams in which he suggested the existence of the unconscious over the following years he would shape this into a threelayer structure of mental organization the conscious the pre conscious and the unconscious on the conscious mon consisted of thoughts that were currently on one's mind the pre conscious was anything someone could conjure up from their memory banks and the unconscious which freud saw as the most significant of the three was the part of the mind you couldn't see it contained the primitive desires and impulses a person wasn't aware they had and it was also the lock lockedbox for what floyd called repressed memories this theory of the unconscious and repression became the mainstay for freud's clinical studies through the years freud continue to develop his theory eventually coming to a more concrete model of the mind with the public.

Freud marcus hayek deutch floyd emma deutsche josh
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Become a key launching point for freud's movement in nineteen '09 about a year after the first international psychoanalytic congress freud was invited to clark university to give five lectures and psychoanalysis who was awarded an honorary doctorate for his lectures which became the first public recognition of his work and begin to attract media interest it was also at these lectures that freud met psychiatrist james jackson putnam a harvard university professor who took a keen interest in freud's work putnam invited freud to country retreat where they spent four days excitedly discussing psychoanalysis and its place in treating illness which resulted in putnam publicly endorsing freud's work this represented a breakthrough for the psychoanalytic movement in the us and eventually led to the creation of the american psychoanalytic association several years later in 1911 meanwhile the official international psychoanalytic move meant was starting to take form in nineteen ten the international association of psychoanalyst's or the ipa was born it sprung from the international psychoanalytic congress a few years earlier and established carl young the psychologist who had visited freud's wednesday group and was inspired to create his own as the president of the association with fridge approval of course the ipa his goal was to promote and encourage the advancement of psychoanalysis as a profession the organization also strove to shield the public from own trained in quack psychologists by establishing standards for professional training in psychoanalysis as well as creating a credentials system for those who completed said training in addition the ipa encourage the foundation of a variety of new psychoanalysis focus journal's including one called the your book which karl young himself edited the result of the ipa was a swelling of new training.

freud professor us american psychoanalytic associ president clark university james jackson putnam official carl young karl young four days
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"By this time freud had completely abandoned hypnosis as a curative method and was all in on his new psychological treatment which he now called psychoanalysis or another term from the psychology textbooks he certainly coined a lot of terms did me he certainly did and for those who need a quick refresher psychoanalysis is a method of diagnosing entreating mental disorders by investigating the relationship between the conscious and unconscious mind it relied heavily on freud's theories of dream interpretation and free association as we mentioned before it was also around the time of forwards father's death that ford began to invest more time into dream analysis in eighteen ninety nine he published the interpretation of dreams in which he analysed existing dream theories in addition to interpreting the dreams of several of his patients for its theory basically said that all the thoughts and events of everyday life stayed in a person's mind even if they couldn't actively remember those thoughts and events which were then processed in the form of dreams he treated the dreams as wish fulfilment or a means of satisfying a desire that could not be satisfied in real life basically he believed dreams were a window into the primal desires of man he also explained his theory of how the mind is organized in particular he focused in on the division between the conscious and unconscious mind this eventually formed his famous id ego and superego theory of course the idea of the unconscious was not original to freud in fact several psychologists in the 1890s had referred to the unconscious and subconscious in their works and there was even a book published by philosopher edward vaughan hartmann in eighteen sixty nine long before freud's ideas on psychoanalysis entitled philosophy of the unconscious regardless freud used the idea of the unconscious mind to dig up the root of his patients.

freud ford edward vaughan hartmann
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Struggles and freud attempted to treat her by having nightly analysis sessions six times a week over the course of four years when anna was in her midtwenties he analysed her dreams emotions relationships and memories the to even talked about her sexual fantasies and masturbation habits to an outsider moves could be seen as a strange practice but for freud an ana it was a strengthening of their relationship and an affirmation of their individual passion for psychology in 1887 about a year after establishing his clinic freud met doctor that would become one of his closest friends and intellectual collaborators as well as providing for a rather interesting side story in the life of sigmund freud wilhelm fleece was an ear nose and throat specialist who like freud was a maverick when it came to medical theories both were outside the mainstream medical bubble and had a keen interest in developing radical new theories on sexuality lady both also believed in the importance of masturbation the use of condoms and coitus interruptus which were not all widely accepted at the time while fried was on track to developing theories on what would become psychoanalysis fleece was working on his own theories on human biorhythms which analyzes the physical emotional and intellectual cycles of man that were bestowed by nature at the time of birth to many of today's psychologists the theories are nothing more than pseudoscientific ramblings but to freud did they were brilliant in fact freud's obsession with fleece surpassed that of mere intellectual respect himself noted that he had a deep attachment to fleece fleece was not important freud just as a friend who's intellect match freud's fleeces theories were also pivotal to the development of freud's own theories on infantile sexuality and by sexuality in fact freud's first publication of the theory of the mind project for a science.

anna freud four years
"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"freud" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Before we get started with today's episode we wanted to thank you for supporting historical figures your support allows us to do what we love historical figures will be taking a twoweek break to celebrate the holidays we will not be releasing new episodes on december twenty seven or january third but we will be back weekly on january tenth with an episode on the right brothers in the meantime we wish you all happy holidays and we hope you enjoyed the new year park asked is excited to make 2018 our best year yet our goal is simple we want to create the best listener experience for you as possible none of this would be possible without you from the bottom of our hearts thank you i started my professional activity as a knowledge is trying to bring relief to mind erotic patients under the influence of an older friend and by my own efforts but discovered some important new facts about the unconscious in psychic life the role of instincts will urges and so on other these findings grew a new science psychoanalysis parts of psychology and a new method of treatment of the neuro seems i had to pay heavily for this bit of good luck people did not believe in my fax and thought my theories unsavory resistance will strong and the unrelenting in the end a succeeded in acquiring pupils and building up an international psychoanalytic association but the struggle is not yet over these were some of the final words uttered by the critically acclaimed psychologist sigmund freud through his years freud published dozens of famous papers stirred up controversy among experts in this field and created the idea of psychoanalysis he was certainly prolific in the field of psychology but what about the man himself how did you get his start and what did he do in between writing radical papers and treating patients and whatever happened to him after he published his final work.

sigmund freud twoweek
"freud" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"freud" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"I think particularly in an era when ego is so flagrantly on display at when narcissism is so extravagantly expressed it's good to remember that there are these depths that complicate our self presentation what crews dozen this book it sounds like is not just critique or attack for aids ideas but also serve goes after him on a human level and your review you say here we have freud the liar cheat incestuous child molester woman a hater moneyworship or chronic plagiarise are and all around nasty nut job it's pretty relentless cruise spends an inordinate amount of time on going over the story of freud's probable affair with his sisterinlaw meena i'm this is something that has now been public knowledge for decades that this probably occurred but there's something oddly prudish and inconsistent about what he does with this for one thing in one of the i think incorrect aspects of this book is cruises suggestion that freud was a true misogynist a deep misogynist in many many ways in which what freud did in terms of recognising female desires equal in significance to mailed is that i for example were were liberating for women but on the one hand he suggests that freud was constantly hostile to women and then he also says that in this affair in fact meena became a kind of emu's and influenced freud theoretically at many different stages in his own development and so i don't know why her status as a female means less than that of other women crews also says that the ways in which freud attacked the repressive morality of his age which was really a problem an and one thing that i write about is that the book makes it sound a bit as though human understanding of sexuality and of the essential universality desire was just growing enlarging just fine before freud came along and sort of made us all subject to his own strange obsessions this wasn't the case and you don't have to read very far in early 20th century literature lawyer 19th century literature to understand the the crippling effects of the social morris of the time.

freud meena one hand