35 Burst results for "Fresh Air"

Belarus' leader of 26 years warns against election protests

Fresh Air

00:56 sec | 3 d ago

Belarus' leader of 26 years warns against election protests

"Says his security forces have arrested US citizens ahead of his country's presidential election Sunday, saying Belarus is facing hybrid warfare. NPR's Lucien Kim. Reports. Belarus has already detained 33 Russian nationalists accused of trying to stir up trouble before the vote. Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko, running for a six term, met with security officials in the capital, Minsk. Somebody. People with American passports and Mary Toe American diplomats have been arrested, Lukashenko said. Last week. The Salish Clara if a native Belarussian, who works as a political consultant in Washington, was arrested during a visit home. He denies working for Lukashenko's opponents, many of whom are in jail. Belarussian opposition, which says Lukashenka will use mass vote rigging to hang on to power is already planning protests. Asian Kim NPR NEWS Moscow The

Belarussian President Alexande Belarus Kim Npr Lucien Kim Belarussian NPR Salish Clara Mary Toe Minsk United States Lukashenka Consultant Washington
Pelosi: Trump speech plan latest effort to 'degrade' the White House

Fresh Air

00:46 sec | 4 d ago

Pelosi: Trump speech plan latest effort to 'degrade' the White House

"Speaker Nancy Pelosi is blasting President Trump for floating the idea of using the White House to accept the Republican presidential nomination later this month. Speaking on MSNBC today, Pelosi said the president has no right to even suggest it for the president, United States to degrade once again the White House as he has done over and over again. By saying he's going to completely politicize. It is something that should be rejected right out of hand. The Trump campaign had planned to hold the Republican National Convention in Florida and North Carolina by canceled amid a surgeon New Corona virus cases. The Washington Post reported yesterday that Republican officials were considering using the White House South Lawn to stage trumps acceptance speech.

White House President Trump White House South Lawn Nancy Pelosi Msnbc Washington Post United States North Carolina Florida
Fresh air and fear of mass transit puts bicycles back on Mumbai streets

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:12 min | 4 d ago

Fresh air and fear of mass transit puts bicycles back on Mumbai streets

"GonNa, start with Mumbai Bicycle Counselors Why are they getting on the bikes? Like most cities around the World Mumbai has started rolling out pop bike lanes to accommodate I mean I've I've seen a huge increase in the number of black as people sort of shook public transport during the pandemic but the city is taking it one step further than pop up bike lanes are going. Install in positions of influence in city, Council counselors for its twenty four wards who are going to advocate for cycling, which is really exciting. So they're gonNA essentially, they're going to be Negotiating with stakeholders like local businesses are the civic authorities, NGO schools and colleges. To help the rollout of black lines and black infrastructure in the CD and looking helping to set up Docs for for bikes for for people to pick him up from train stations, and even setting up training zones in parts of the city for people that aren't perhaps confident on their bikes to learn. But a bit of a backlash Montrose in some places over the provision ice lanes. Maybe, this is the city that actually could have used simple counselors because because to me, it seems like there's been a little bit of a breakdown in communication in Montreal or at least certainly in terms of engagement with with the local communities. Said, they're rolling out temporary black lanes as many cities are but. A stretch in in Montreal on a believe it's it's not street Notre Dame street West outside a few venerable restaurants and establishments. Has received some backlash from from the restaurant owners there, and actually we didn't twenty four hours the city at roll back their plans to the temporary Klein and sorry it had been installed removed temporary black line and I think for me here. The thing that's interesting about this story is clearly there wasn't enough consultation and and perhaps perhaps the solution. That I propose wasn't necessarily suitable for that part of the city which clearly is relying on people unfortunately, not unfortunately, the reality is that lots of people in the city still need to be able to drive their cars and drive to these restaurants and and perhaps a better solution that balanced bike lanes with car parking motive might have served the solution that.

Mumbai Bicycle Counselors Montreal Klein Mumbai
Overcoming Resentment

The Daily Meditation Podcast

05:07 min | 5 d ago

Overcoming Resentment

"Been reading about forgiveness and I came across a simple but pretty powerful article on. The website from the Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Dot Org mark, and this is an article that I'll be sharing with you today it's titled Forgiveness letting go of Grudges and bitterness. So this is some insight to take into your meditation today. Holding. A grudge. Can impact you pretty dramatically both physically and emotionally. If you are unforgiving. A Ken. Bring anger and bitterness into your relationships, and also into most any of your experiences, they can always seem a little tinged by bitterness. You can become wrapped up. In, the wrong that was done to you that you have a hard time enjoying the president or it consumes you so much that. Even when you're having fun and you're getting together with people, a lot of times you bond over the issue of the wrong that has been done to you. You can become depressed and anxious. You can feel like your life lacks meaning or purpose. and. You can begin to lose your hope in life your spiritual beliefs. You can lose. Connection with those that mean most to you. Or feel detached from people. That you love because you're hurting so much. So wrapped up in. This bitterness. It's so pervasive around you. And I want to share with you a story that someone in my own spiritual group I meet with every morning. She is a former teacher for special needs children. And she talked about how there was a teacher that she used to work with in the classroom and this person would. Be So negative and so heavy that it was like a dark cloud in the classroom it affected every wine. And people tried to gloss over it and be positive but. She was really bitter. And on days when she was absent from school. It was like a breath of fresh air flowed in the classroom. And she had real sorrow in her life. Her brother. Was a missing person. And I don't believe they ever found him. So, you can imagine the grief and the sorrow. From having no closure over her brother. Suddenly Missing This was heartbreak in her life and it permeated everything and you can understand it. You can have compassion. For what she was going through. But imagine. How she cast such a cloud over so many others. She may have even traumatized many people. Because she was so negative. I'm sure that you have met people like that. So have you can have compassion for. Someone who is struggling they're had dark their negative they're angry. This can help you to soften. The impact of their anger and bitterness. And you might find that you may act in the same way. So. What happens to your mind and body when you forgive Well, there are many things as you can imagine, but I'll share. Some of the positive impacts when you forgive someone from this article. You begin to have healthier relationships. You Improve Your mental health. Anxiety and stress and hostility are lessened. Your blood pressure goes down you have fewer symptoms of depression and your immune system is stronger.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Dot President Trump Anxiety Depression
Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

Fresh Air

05:02 min | 6 d ago

Fear Of Death Is Contagious In The Psychological Thriller 'She Dies Tomorrow'

"Our film critic Justin Chang says, she dies tomorrow feel surprisingly in tune with our present moment of unease. Everything you need to know going into sheet is tomorrow is pretty much right there in the title. This moody and more deadly funny psychological horror film opens on a young. Woman. Who Awakens one morning with a horrifying from edition of doom she believes that she's going to die tomorrow and it sends her into an eerily calm. Almost Zombie like trance. She wanders the rooms of her recently purchased lock home. She plays Mozart's requiem repeatedly on a record player and shops online for an urn to hold her cremated remains. She never explains why she thinks her death is imminent, but the look on her face is so grave and haunted that we find ourselves believing it to. The woman played by the excellent actress Caitlin she'll is named amy. Not. Coincidentally, that's also the name of the filmmaker amy scientists who has said that the movie was inspired by her own experiences with anxiety and her recognition of how easily that panic could affect those around her. And she dies tomorrow the fear of death proves contagious. The mere act telling someone that you're going to die tomorrow is enough to plant the idea that they are going to die tomorrow and so on and so on. The first person amy tells is her friend Jane played with a sharp comic edge by Jane Addams who thinks she's being ridiculous but the seed has been planted by the time Jane stops by her brother's house where a birthday party for her sister in law is in full swing she too has come to believe that she's going to die tomorrow. And once she voices this fear, the other party guests, it's only a matter of time before they also succumb. In the montage you're about to hear Simon's uses thunderously loud music written by Mondo boys and wild strobe lighting effects to achieve startling moments of operatic intensity. I'm going. To die. Tomorrow. Throughout the movie in these feverishly heightened intervals, Simon seems to be expressing level of horror that the characters themselves cannot. Jane's brother and sister in law. That's Christmas Gina and Katie Nolan do panic a little over what will happen to their daughter when they're both gone. But for the most part, everyone here tends to retreat into their own private moods showing little concern for others Jennifer Kim plays a party guest who abruptly breaks off a relationship something she'd been meaning to do for months. Her now ex boyfriend played by tune had been bay does something much more frighteningly impulsive. Interestingly no one really tries to ward off the crisis or even figure out what's going on a sense of futility sets in and stays there. There's something troublingly resonant for me about the characters inertia. Speaking as someone who's able to work from home and hasn't suffered so many have during the pandemic I'm not afraid of dying tomorrow but I recognize something of myself incitements as characters, the ones who retreat into a state of false calm maybe because screaming and expressing how they really feel might be too horrible or flat out exhausting to bear. I don't want to overstate the metaphorical implications of she is tomorrow, which was made well before the pandemic. But Simon's clearly has her finger on something about how people might respond or not respond to an invisible threat. She's made a fascinating disaster movie of the mind. This is the second feature scientists as written and directed seven years after her debut film. The lovers on the run drama sun don't shine. She's worked for more than a decade as an actor writer director and producer rooted in the independent film world, but with increasing forays into Hollywood. She's one of the key creative forces behind the TV series, the girlfriend experience, and you might also have seen her performances in recent studio thrillers like Alien Covenant and Pet cemetery a role that helped her finance this much lower budget horror movie. Depending on your persuasion, don't like she dies tomorrow might not sound like ideal pandemic viewing but I think one of the great virtues of the horror genre is that it can put our own fears into perspective. There can be enormous value in confronting our feelings of dread had on and feeling a sense of kinship with characters who are confronting there's to. Sign it's doesn't provide easy answers. She also doesn't tell us if her characters worries are justified. She closes the movie on a note, picked between serenity and alarm leaving us to wonder if the end is as near as it seems or tomorrow might, in fact, be another day.

Jane Addams Simon AMY Justin Chang Mozart Caitlin Mondo Jennifer Kim Pet Cemetery Gina Hollywood Katie Nolan Writer Producer Director
Lebanon's Foreign Minister Quits Over Lack of 'Will to Reform'

Fresh Air

00:51 sec | 6 d ago

Lebanon's Foreign Minister Quits Over Lack of 'Will to Reform'

"Lebanon's foreign minister has resigned in protest as the government there fails to implement reforms to save the country from the economic collapse. NPR's Ruth Sherlock has more In a strongly worded statement Following his resignation, Foreign Minister Nassif Hetty warned that Lebanon is becoming a failed state. Foreign donors say they won't aid the country until the government takes action on long delayed reforms to tackle corruption and the squandering of state funds that are at the heart of the current economic crisis. Foreign minister. Hetty said he was leaving the government to protest the lack of will to implement these reforms. He said he still sees politicians working to preserve their own interests over those of the country. If they don't come together in the interests of the Lebanese people, he said, God forbid the ship will sink with everyone on it. Ruth Sherlock NPR

Nassif Hetty Ruth Sherlock Npr Lebanon Ruth Sherlock NPR
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | Last week

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley
Coronavirus Q&A: Running Outside and Petting Dogs

Short Wave

04:14 min | Last week

Coronavirus Q&A: Running Outside and Petting Dogs

"Let's get to the questions. We got so many from our list. We picked a few and show them to you. So we're going to have you answer them right now and provide color commentary throughout you. Sure. All right first question? What's the deal with running? I've heard inflicting things. What's the likelihood of? It means bread of someone runs past me okay. So this question makes total sense to me because I think there were some scary kind of initial studies around this. Man where it says runners could spread it for twenty feet and they were these vectors but that was kind of mildly debunked. Yeah. It was kind of dismissed them and there are parts of it that made sense but it wasn't considered to be like actually a real world scenario that was tested and it's really hard test that so. When I think about running, of course, it depends on what space you're in, right. So outside in fresh air going to have a lower risk if you're somebody if you wearing a mask if that person's wearing a mask, all of those things kind of factor in and as best we can tell Sam as a you know a somewhat general rule. The majority of transmission happens in close indoor situations where you're spending a good bit of time together. That is why it is absolutely essential to be wearing a mask especially inside it doesn't mean that there's no risk if you're outside and there's only a brief encounter but it's reduced. Running and you pass somebody for a second. I'm not super worried about that situation now they cough and sneeze, and you just slam right into it. Say I'm that's a different scenario. Go Home, wash your face, wash your hands but the you know the experts that I'm talking to are not super worried about that situation art follow up question for you on this topic as a runner. I have heard mixed messaging about wearing a mask. When you run some folks say well, you're outside you're moving fast, just dodge even stay away from people others are like you have to have it on all the time when I've done both. But when I've tried to run with a mask on my entire five miles I ended up with the wet mask and it's like I'm waterboarding myself. Yeah absolutely I mean, of course, wearing a mask if you can is a good situation and if you're in a really really busy city and you can't get away from people if you're like constantly dodging people I actually do think it's probably a good idea. But if you're in an area where it's a little bit more open, I would say it's probably okay not to wear a mask when you're running A. Anytime, you have the choice between them a mask is going to be a safer bet but if you can get up really early before somebody's out there or go somewhere else in and it's you know like either I'm not gonNA run or I'm gonNA run without a mask. Then I think that's a decision you have to make. So you're saying we should be doing three am runs in cemeteries. Sam Stop. Phone. It in get up at three am and got it done. Get it done. Get it done. Yes. Next. Question from a listener about animals can I say hi to other people's Dogs Oh yeah, Samson is this question for Melissa is this question? This question is from Sanders. From. My Heart. And make sure they're OK. Okay. So I looked this up because I wasn't sure and the CDC has weirdly complicated guidance on this. So really some pets like dogs or cats have caught Kovic from humans, but the CDC says the risk of dogs than giving Cova to people is considered low like there's no evidence that you can get it from the for or the hair of other pets. But one of those owners that kisses your dog on the mound, I was just about to say. But this because the CDC still says, you should not interact with dogs outside their household. So I'm like man I guess the CDC is worried about people getting pet saliva in their mouths, but you shouldn't be mcing on somebody else's dog anyway Sam. If you see a dog and the dog is really really really cute. Oh my God you part of the Kids Sam Palmer's the kiss I cannot miss the kids you are. You're going to have to definitely miss the kiss for a while so but so but I will say, honestly, you know briefly a dog has come up to me and the dog park it's onerous faraway I pet it. I'll say I have pet but the. Official guidance lead those dogs alone. Sam. Understood understood.

CDC SAM Sam Palmer Sam Stop Official Samson Sanders Kovic Cova Melissa
Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

Fresh Air

00:27 sec | Last week

Oregon state police arrive in Portland in push to stop riots

"Oregon State police will take the place of federal law enforcement officers guarding the federal courthouse in Portland, Oregon, Public Broadcasting's Conrad Wilson reports. The city's police department will work alongside state troopers. During a news conference, Portland police Chief Chuck Leavell criticized a recent City Council resolution that prevents Portland please from working with federal officers. He says it creates a potentially more dangerous scenario. But he also says he hopes the reduction of a federal president's calmed tensions in downtown

Oregon State Police Portland Chuck Leavell Oregon Conrad Wilson Public Broadcasting City Council President Trump
Miami Marlins Outbreak Wreaks Havoc on M.L.B. Schedule

Fresh Air

02:09 min | Last week

Miami Marlins Outbreak Wreaks Havoc on M.L.B. Schedule

"Major league baseball season got underway last week. But so far it's been rough. More than half of the act of Miami Marlins players and several coaches from the team have tested positive for the Corona virus. As a result, Marlins games have been postponed through at least Sunday. But despite concerns over additional outbreaks, Major League Baseball officials have so far balked at the idea of canceling this truncated season altogether. Here's MLB commissioner Rob Manfred discussing the Marlin situation on ESPN on Monday. I don't put this in the nightmare category. I mean, obviously, we don't want any player. To get exposed. It's not a positive thing, but I don't see it as a nightmare. We built the protocols to allow us to continue to play. That's why we have the expanded rosters. That's why we have the pool off additional players. And we think we can keep people safe and continue to play. I've got J. McManus with me. Now she's the director of the Maris Center for Sports Communication and a sports columnist for the New York Daily News, Jane Great to have you with us. Oh, thanks for having me it. Rob Manfred, who We just heard MLB commissioner. There sounded pretty confident at least that he was going to be able to keep his player safe. But the Marlin situation sounds quite alarming. Tell us, you know how things have developed since the first cases were identified on the team. The proof is in front of him hasn't been able to keep his players safe. So the question is, what do they do now? The way that this developed was after a game in Sun on Sunday, where the Marlins were playing the Phillies before that game player had had tested positive for the Corona virus and the team of wanted to play that game anyway. And so I went ahead and played and of course, that Opens the door to exposure not just to the Marlins players, but also to the to the Phillies. And to anybody who's been working in that clubhouse. And so what you have, then is you know one test, turning into multiple tests in an outbreak and a team one of the 30 teams not being able to play going forward and quarantined in Philadelphia. Until they can figure out how to move this season forward

Marlins Rob Manfred J. Mcmanus Commissioner Major League Baseball Baseball Phillies Jane Great MLB Philadelphia Espn Maris Center For Sports Commun New York Daily News Sports Columnist
Trump’s National Security Adviser Tests Positive for Coronavirus

Fresh Air

00:26 sec | Last week

Trump’s National Security Adviser Tests Positive for Coronavirus

"President Trump's National security adviser Robert O'Brien has Cove in 19. NPR's Kelsey Snell has more O'Brien is the most senior White House official to get the virus and he is quite close to Trump and this is the latest in a number of known cases in the Trump or but you may remember back in May. Katie Miller, the spokeswoman for Vice President, Mike Pence, also tested positive, and we've also seen military aides and members of the campaign. Advanced Team test

President Trump Robert O'brien Vice President Mike Pence Kelsey Snell Katie Miller White House NPR Cove Official
Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

VNN Focus

08:20 min | Last week

Becoming a home carer during a pandemic

"3.3 million home health workers such as nurses, therapists and personal care AIDS provide a range of medical and daily living services to nearly 12 million people around the US, However, the covert pandemic is putting pressure on this workforce already in crisis due to shortages. Especially in some states that are experiencing an increase in covert cases. Alexandra Harrell is the founder of an organization called Patty and Ricky. And she offers tips on how family members can assist their loved ones during their new role as a caregiver during the pandemic really hard time for individuals with disabilities or chronic health conditions, illnesses they're scared that people home health care is coming to their homes. Because they're scared to Kobe and many family members have decided to have their family members were just abilities, chronic condition their elderly parents live with that. So there's a lot of new caregivers right now. And those, of course, are being experienced. You know the new caregivers that they're not used to this, I guess because they're they're usually out at work or wherever they go every day. And so now they're at home with the person who needs to care right? Because they're new to the caregiving, which is a new role for them can be really challenging at first. You know they used to having maybe they're assisted living facility, which many have been throughout the country, so it's just been a really hard time, but I do have some chips. Kind of support papers up. I was a kid, my mom Patty, Patty, Patty, with my mom. Okay? And he was really fashionable. Really Cool on me. What? Brain cancer. When I was 19 years old. It was just me and her and I came home from college and so caretaker. And it wasn't during a pandemic so he can be difficult. But it's not. You know, it was definitely a challenging time. But you know, I have some things that really supported me. You know terms of looking at our home environment, for instance, you know the home environment accessible of safe. Always you could. You know with that, with grant bars and anti slip mats in the shower, shower chairs, really thinking about how can you take her home and they get more accessible for your family members? So that was something that was really helpful to me. And I just made my mom being ableto navigate house in ways that She wouldn't have been able to otherwise so number one looking at your environment and you know, making a structure that had time and schedules for medication and Well in terms of medication. It's really important you set those alarms on the phones have printed a person's never lists. Doctor's phone numbers just like thinking ahead. A worst case scenario is I'm usually a really optimistic but I just believe that you prepare. It won't happen. Right way ready to go your cellphone Chargers medication extra set of clothes. You know, just so you know, I believe I have packed. We wouldn't have to go. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, that was really helpful. That had to be you know, 19 years old. Two dozen have to do that alone. That had to be I don't know the word daunting does it justice and I'd just be incredible. No, I was, um You know, my mom is such an incredible mama raised me to be able to take care earn raised me to be okay. You don't know her since she passed away when I was 20 But it was it was really challenging. But I didn't know it was important to you that during that such a hard time that me and my mom Joy way, laughed. A lot had been so sure to watch television and crafts or whatever, you know, walk around the block. Get some fresh air. It was back, and it was definitely really challenging. Um and I wish my mom wasn't 50 years old when she was nine, but I had to do it way early. Um, I'm really happy that I could give her Looks like it was actually a really positive end of life. So it was. It was really hard, but I need my company Toddy and Ricky after her. She was such a cool woman when she was here. I just wanted to bring together adaptive clothing. Dot com. We have some really great adaptive clothing and accessories and adoptive shoes that make make dressing dressing dressing easier easier easier it it it having having having adaptive adaptive adaptive clothing clothing clothing can can can really really really support support support dressing dressing dressing and and and undressing undressing undressing in in in it. it. it. Can Can provide provide independence independence for for people people with with disabilities. disabilities. And those that are aging on a doctor's holding something I wish I had what I was cured giving for my mom. Yeah, Yeah. Now you also You also had a cousin who was unable to care for themselves. What was that experience like? Yes. So in the company that I have Patti and lucky he was my cousin. Okay? And he was born unable to walk or talk, and he really showed me. What is with you here? What's his vehicle to get what he needed to go but could also be a fashion accessory, and he really showed me that we can communicate so much. It doesn't have to necessarily Peter, our voice. It could be drugs, eyes compete your communication but but especially especially pressed pressed that that would would communicate communicate things things that that he he needed needed a a working working or or different different expression expression that that he he would would point point to to a a different different button button that that would would his his parents parents sent sent him him to to use use to to communicate communicate it. Just my my friendship with my cousin Ricky really formed. How see disability today just as humans. We all have different years and whether physical, emotional mental we all have different going on. You know, that was really important to me When I started. Patty and Ricky is really have products for everyone and So people that doesn't have to be a medical supply store. You know, it can really be a fashion store and our clothing accessories. We saw him Paddy rookie dotcom are really Universally designed so that it's just sharper designed with Velcro and Matt strategic zippers for women, men, kids, we just make clothing is your front and you would never know. It's been adoptive. Yeah. I really owe a lot of my work. I really have no idea what I'm just like You have any HD? Anxiety. You know my whole anxiety. But it's you know, it's really a part of many things of who I am. And you know I don't want you. I talk Teo, the Alzheimer's Foundation of America, and they were saying some of the same things you are, but especially with Alzheimer's. It is Wow, it is so different. It's such a con founding disease that those family members are really, really struggling right now. You know, too for that, Do you deal with that as well? Oh, yes, we have. We have don't clothing really easy. Holding a lot of customers during this time, a lot of care givers it No, I think it's really important to remember the Cherokee ever burn is a real thing and show your words have to be taking care of themselves, not guilty and having to order food. You're financially for shop for them a grocery store. Just different ways to utilize friend technology, Teo and for help if they need to make sure that you still care about taking care of themselves. Yeah, I think it's really huge. I back my mom definitely was ignored my own use. So I believe that you know, caregivers. Make sure to take that personal time. Careful, only is well taken care of herself. It's going to take care of someone else.

Patty Ricky United States Kobe TEO Alexandra Harrell Aids Brain Cancer Founder Patti Alzheimer Toddy Peter Alzheimer's Foundation Of Amer
Solar Orbiter Snaps Closest Pictures Ever of the Sun – Reveals New “Campfires” Phenomena

Fresh Air

05:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Solar Orbiter Snaps Closest Pictures Ever of the Sun – Reveals New “Campfires” Phenomena

"With summer here. Most of the news about our home star. The sun most likely will involve sunscreen right And that's something we should all be paying attention to. But scientists are also paying close attention to the surface of the sun, because despite it being so ever present, we still have a lot to learn about the sun. And they have just announced that the solar orbiter a satellite orbiting the sun has just sent back Some photos of surprising events on the sun's surface. Here to talk to us about these new images is Aneke to Groove instrument operation scientists for these solar orbiter she's based in Madrid, Spain, and joins us today. By Skype. Welcome to science Friday. No, I believe that these are the closest direct images of the sun's surface. Is that right? That's correcting the There has never being cameras actually observing the sum from that close, So we have had satellites going closer, but never with images never with telescopes. So tell us this being a radio program when you looked at those images. What air So what was that surprising thing you saw on the surface of the sun? Well, so first. We were really excited to see these first images because these are really the very first day that we got from the satellite. S so it's even just test images still, but we could already see new features. So about what we saw, Mamie was in the B imager. So that is a telescope that is looking at the Somme in extreme ultraviolet light. You cannot see that from worth because the atmosphere is blocking it. But we can see it from space. And so there you see part of the atmosphere that some the solar Corona and that atmosphere is currently very quiet. There's not that much activity on the sun. But now it turned out when we're resuming in that we see very little eruptions, which are much, much smaller than the ones we can usually see. And so this was quite a surprise because we have never seen these features before. And they were called campfires. If I'm reading this correctly, yes, because indeed they looked like this little flashes or flames off off light on DH. Actually, they they look like the many, many brothers ofthe solar flares and solar flares are much bigger eruptions off. Off radiation from the sun, and sometimes they also cause clouds ofthe solar plus muscle solar material That leaves the sun and so this thing to be And micro thin air. So to state so very small eruptions. That's kinda interesting. Do we know anything about Thies? Small eruptions? Ah, and how do we study these further? Well, so that's one of the strength ofthe solar orbiter that he does not only have these camera either has many different telescopes in total six, which will all observe the son of different wavelengths, so you see slightly different temperatures on the sun and slightly different lives. So the next bit will be to analyze these new features. In all those different types of light tto find out what exactly is happen and then we also have sensors which are measuring the environment on the spacecraft. And they can see what's actually coming out of the sun. So the effects ofthe these little activity on the environment of the sun and later also on Earth. So tell me, though, What mysteries you are most interested in and finding out more. About what? What keeps you up at night? Well, One thing that we are really excited about is that Salaam better will also look at the solar poles. So the North Pole and this house full of the sun, and we have never ever seen this before. We also don't know whether there's any activity going on there or how to some structure at these north and South pole, and this is important to wonder. Somehow, all these activity hurts. Because the sun has an activity cycles. It's not always as active. It has times several years where it's quite quiet, which is now the period we are in now and then we expect in two or three years from now there will be more solar activity. There will be some what we call solar storms. So this is the time when the sun is very exit, and then it will go back to a quieter stage. And we don't really honest that how that works, and we think that one of the keys Lie with the solar poles. So that's the part I'm most excited about. You know, I never thought about the sun having polls. I know that the Earth has polls. What creates the poles on the sun? Also, when I talk about poles, I talk mainly about the magnetic poles. So the son has a magnetic field while the earth magnetic things one me the North Pole and assess full But on the sonnets are much more complicated because there's magnetic field gets completely tangled. And this is actually what causes the activity and what causes this cycle in food.

North Pole Thies Madrid Spain Mamie
Speaker System Blocks City Noise

60-Second Science

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Speaker System Blocks City Noise

"Restaurants Schools Dennis Office. They're all keeping more windows open to increase ventilation and hopefully decrease the chances of encountering the corona virus, but letting in fresh air also, let's in more noise. Now researchers come up with a device that's like noise cancelling headphones, but for a building it looks the same principle, so he detects noise coming into the windows and. Considering the. Bon lomb and ACOUSTICAL engineer at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore device looks like a grid of small speakers and fits over an open window, a microphone samples incoming noise, and then sends the Speaker Grid. Instructions on what sort of anti-noise to omit. The result is to cancel out the incoming sound for example. Here's the sound of a commuter train in Singapore with no noise control. Now here's that same sound with the array of noise. Cancelling speakers turned on. Compare that to a closed window. The anti-noise device is almost as good, and it allows air to keep flowing into and out of the window. The details are in the Journal, Scientific Reports The devices just a prototype, so it's still expensive, and it doesn't block out all sounds it only masks sound at frequencies from three hundred thousand Hertz which includes the rumble of freeways, trains and planes, but even that could come in handy in a place like Singapore. Again base a plane flying past. Bond says Singapore already has a lot of green buildings that use natural ventilation, but they don inside this when you have a lot of openings in the building that noise comes in so you need. Some wake managed aid increasing noise. A grid of window speakers could do the trick especially if people prioritize peace and quiet over good view, which folks at home and do all

Singapore Schools Dennis Office Nanyang Technological Universi Bon Lomb Bond Engineer
Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

Fresh Air

00:42 sec | 2 weeks ago

Spelman College Announces Virtual Instruction for the Fall

"College and elite. Historically Black College in Atlanta is among a growing number of colleges that are reversing their decisions to bring some students back to campus, with cases rising in Georgia and the politicising of that state's response. Spellman President Mary Schmitt. Campbell says it would be irresponsible to bring students back. We felt very comfortable about what the protocols and practices we were putting into place on our campuses. The one science students walked outside of those gates. Once they went into the city of Atlanta. They were an environment that we felt was Virtually unregulated because classes will be entirely online. Spellman has announced a tuition discount,

Spellman President Mary Schmit Atlanta Black College Campbell Georgia
Game Scoop

Game Scoop!

05:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Game Scoop

"Okay? Let's talk about what we've been playing I know at least seventeen on Ivan playing ghost of Sakina just their view. Our interview a came out this week. got a nine from Mitchell ends. Everybody seems to be really really enjoying it. I know I. Am that also true for both of you? Hands Down like gotta be the most gorgeous game I've ever played. It's very pretty. It's very pretty. I mean there's just there's firefly's everywhere. They're like little butterflies. flapping around the attention to detail is amazing, but like even when you're walking over yellow like yellow leaves from from falling from the trees you can see. They're like sweeping up behind you and they go faster as you run faster. It really is amazing to look at 'EM SALMON I. We're talking about this at some point off. Scoop. and Sam mentioned like it's such a bummer when it's nighttime because you don't get to see all of all of this like loveliness and all its glory. But. Yeah, understand are really cool, but sunny day really really makes things amazing in that game, and then there's these moments where like I I mean they sat when you go into a story, they set the time for that and that's like a trick they're using because sometimes you're like in the the golden forest area, and everything's like autumn looking because y'all. It's like all seasons at once in that game. And and you. The Sun is like as big as the screen is. Gold and everything is silhouetted in, and it's just like it's unbelievable, but it's still an open world game, and that'll just happen. Naturally were moving around. It's like the thing that breath wild did which I thought was really cool. Which says well is the wind like like these Grassy Plains, the wind looks amazing, sweeping through them, and there's giant fields of flowers, and you keep like our. That's probably going to be the most beautiful. Beautiful place in the game and then they went up it with like another field of flowers has cool rocks in it or something, or they have like a swarm of starlings that is the most realistic depiction of a swarm of birds have ever seen in any games in any way just looks incredible analytical. All three of those elements that you mentioned are also gameplay elements. The bird heads the flowers and the wind. The wind actually really liked that. They use the wind to tell you where to go. Yeah although really cool mechanic. Yeah, it's really windy and my Sushi Malvo because I'm just like. Wait. What direction wait am I going the right way? My Hair's total again. Just miserable, be a nice summer fall, maybe autumn or Spring Day, but it's just a little bit chilly because of that wind. I'm playing it coming immediately coming off of last part too, so it's a little bit interesting. compete playing those games one after the other last of his party was really like shooting for the stars and trying to get do something different. Give you an original experience play with the way narratives working games play with your expectations, trying to do all this new stuff or as ghosts of Sushi. Shema I feel like it's just a very traditional open world action game, which isn't a knock against it at all I just feel it's like the AAA open action game refined to perfection. It's honestly the breath of fresh air that I was hoping for following the. Exactly that kind of air. Thank you. Breath of fresh wind. Because I mean aside from all this stuff about like the last of us being this really like dark and brutal world that depicts humanity in such a like depressing perspective go Sushi Shema is pretty much the opposite of that in a lot of ways but I like like I'm going really slowly through the main story beats actually because I. Love The side quests in the site. I'll give you something different. level you up in different ways, or you can get legendary armor and weapons with some of the. Specific side quests so I I just love being in the world and spending as much time as possible searching everywhere like looking for all the little elements of the story that are living in these tiny pockets as opposed to the loss of us, which is just as like grand big cinematic experience, also you use triangle really dominantly in the last of us for like access points like opening doors, or whatever, and then in goes Chima. You are, too, so I have definitely accidentally hacked the hell out of my poor horse, trying to mount it, which which sources you big or jumped off the Horse I. Yeah! I picked the white horse and I named him Nobu for trust. three two three horses that you get to choose from Black Arstan puffy. That's exactly what I have class. Hacking I. Aside from the beauty of the game. I think there's a little bit of like Damon was saying like what? What's an open world RPG going for like it is trying to? It's more like assassins creed in anything else, but I I personally like it better than assassins creed I think it's like a a because I like the sword combat. Now it's been frustrating for a very long time, but now I have like these multiple stances. Stances them switching through. It's really fun. I found the way that I like to play, which is rolling a lot and dodging instead of parrying which I just suck at I'm just so bad at that and a better fighting games, too. I always knew like I. Play Friends. Wednesday got good at blocking and like street fighter two. I'd be like well. I can't play anymore I. Just don't like I'm out

Ivan Mitchell Grassy Plains Shema Black Arstan Chima Damon Scoop. SAM
Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

Science Magazine Podcast

14:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Reopening schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

"Now we have contributing correspondent. Gretchen Vogel she in two other science news staff Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan. whalen worked on comprehensive story on reopening schools during the coronavirus pandemic. Hi, Gretchen Hi, this is a very complicated story and tell you the truth. I'm a little frustrated because I. Just WanNa answers, but there are so many unanswered questions out there about current Ivars in children for example, how likely are kids to get an infection if they're exposed to an infected person? Do we have any numbers on that? The story was was fascinating, but also really frustrating to work on because we kept saying. Why are these answers so? There are no hard and fast answers, but there is accumulating evidence that kids newborns up to for purposes, eighteen are less likely to be It's not clear why that is, but it does seem likely that children are about one half to one third as likely as adults to catch the virus in the first place. That's not one hundred percent clear, but let's consistently showing. Showing up in a lot of data then once we get past that question of how likely is a kit? Get infected. We ask the next question. It's still open, which is if they do get exposed to infection and they acquire it. Do they actually get sick? That is also not a number that we know in part because there's so little testing of people who don't. Don't show any symptoms and to find out if somebody is infected, but not showing any symptoms, you have to test a whole lot of people for the trifecta of unknown. How likely is a kid to transmit this infection? So there is some evidence out there saying that even if they do get infected, they are somewhat less likely to share it to other people. That's correct. Correct. There were a couple of intriguing case studies early on I was a kid. In France, who was infected, a family friend was in a ski chalet with his family, and t caught the virus. He tested positive, but didn't yet. No, that between the time he was infected, and and the time he was tested. He attended ski school and Language School in his regular school. Officials, tracked down more than seventy of his contacts and none of them ended up being infected. Even two of his siblings were uninfected. All three siblings shared other viruses, some minor cold viruses. They all had it was that they had contact with each other, but the coronavirus did not pass from this child to anyone else. They could find so that's really intriguing, but it's only one case right right, so it's hard to extrapolate from that. What our story talks about are some newer data from France that are also intriguing in a little town north of Paris. There was pretty large outbreak in high school early February. Teachers happened to get infected way before anybody knew that the coronavirus was circulated in France and so two weeks between the second of February and the fourteenth February when the school went on winter break, the virus had a chance to spread a few weeks later, when researchers looked at how many people had antibodies to the virus, they found that thirty eight percent of pupils, forty-three percent of teachers and fifty nine percent of non teaching staff had been infected, the also looked however at elementary schools in the town and there they found three kids who based on when symptoms had started, and the fact that they also had antibodies to the coronavirus. They figured these three. Three kids probably had been infected by their family members, and then attended school, because they weren't very sick, but they were infected, and they checked with all of their close contacts, and it did not look like they had passed it on to anyone. So this is getting at the idea that there is a sliding scale that younger students might be less likely to carry INS spread versus older students in the high school years. Certainly babies seem to be least impacted and toddlers, and then elementary school kids, and then as you get past the age of ten or eleven, the risk of both acquiring and passing on the virus does seem to increase and high school. School kids seem to be fairly good at both acquiring and passing on the virus be not quite as good as adults, but there does seem to be an increasing risk of both catching and passing on the virus as you age, but that's great news right if that's true, that is really good news for safety of babies for the safety of preschools, and for the safety of elementary schools we have now are setup. We have the limited knowledge we have about their risks of getting sick or infecting others, and then we are talking about reopening schools as the end of summer approaches. What parents would administrators governments are trying to do is balance the risks to. To the health of children and staff against the risk of not having their kids in school, what kinds of things that have taken consideration on that other side of the equation? What our kids missing out on besides actual learning? If they don't go to school in the fall, such a balancing act, because schools are really really important for kids and for society as a whole right, they go to school first contacts, and for their emotional and social development, and then lots and lots of kids and the world get a fair amount of their food at school. Especially, the most vulnerable kids are really dependent on some of the food programs that are at schools. Also sadly, schools are place where some of the most vulnerable kids who might be subject to abuse at home where some of those signs are picked up, and where other adults in their lives can raise red flags and say hey. Maybe something's not right here, so there have been signs that child abuse cases have also been going up as kids have been staying away from school. There's a lot of pressure to reopen schools, but there's. There's not a lot of information about how to do that safely. But as part of your reporting on this year team did some pretty extensive research into how all these different programs that have reopened have fared he. You talk a little bit about what you looked at and what you're looking for. We did to a lot of research. We're intrigued because I live in Berlin and Jennifer lives in Philadelphia and Megan lives in Washington DC. DC Jennifer and I, both have elementary and middle school aged kids Jennifer's were at home. Mine started to go back to school with other kids in Germany at the beginning of May. This part time just a couple of days a week. My fifth grader for example went four days the whole week part time, and then was two weeks off, and then again went four days, and then was two weeks off. They were trying to keep. Keep class sizes super small so that if somebody did happen to be infected and attend school, they would only infect portion of their class. Not Everybody and they tried to keep the desks spaced far apart, so they were trying to keep as few in the classroom as possible so that they can keep a distance from each other. That was my experience in Germany and we wanted to know how other countries had approached the question. We looked at everywhere from South Africa to Benin to South Korea and Japan and Taiwan and lots of countries across Europe. Canada had opened some schools. Most schools in the US had stayed closed in part because summer vacation tends to happen a little earlier in the US, so we took a look at what had happened in those countries that had opened up to different degrees, for example the Netherlands started back with their elementary schools I and small classes, and only part time, but then they gradually as. As things went well, and they saw very few outbreaks in schools gradually opened more and more than we at the same time checked to see if overall rates of infection in the country had changed and in many places we found they hadn't. There's a big caveat there. Though most of these countries had fairly low rates at the time that they open schools, and they had the system place when an outbreak maybe happened to detected and to identify context and isolate them for the two weeks that you. You need to isolate people to make sure they're not going to pass that on. So what is a common practice? When a student has positive for coronavirus, some places would close the whole school. If one student was infected, other places would only isolate the people who had been in direct contact with the student, so their classmates with a subset of classmates that they had been attending within their small reduced size classes, and then that teacher, or any other teachers. We didn't see a big difference in. In end outcome race between those approaches. What did seem to make a big difference when you looked at all these different schools what seemed to make the most difference was close a small, so the kids could stay separate and wearing masks. Now there were different approaches in different places for example, most places in Germany made them optional, although some in some schools, everybody had masks on it and others only when you came in or were in the bathroom or in the hallways. Did you wear your mask? Israel was one interesting example where they did not try and reduce class sizes, so they went back to their fairly large classes thirty to forty kids. But they really did mandate masks for everybody, and that seemed to go k, until it got super, Super Hot, and then it was just impossible to ask people to wear masks all day, and so the health department and the Education Department said Okay Fine. Let's leave the masks away, but then about two weeks later they had a humongous outbreak in one high school, and some other smaller outbreaks in other places as well so it it. It suggestive that asks. There were making a difference when they couldn't do. The distancing that were happening in other places like Denmark where they they went to great lengths, and even held classes, churches, or outside, or whatever to keep kids as far apart as possible and as much fresh air between them as possible I'm in Indiana and I actually have my daughter in daycare right now because I'm in a county with st low levels. I am very nervous about it, and we keep our eye on the numbers. Because that's what I see as really important gauge for whether or not, it's safe to have my kid go to a situation with six other kids. Do you feel like that background level what your community spread like is important for what's happening at your school. Absolutely, Yes, that is a huge caveat that cannot emphasize enough that the background level of community spread needs to be at A. A low enough place that you can identify outbreaks when they happened in noticed them, and that you can take measures to try and slow them down I. Think if that situation then the harm to kids. Keeping schools close vastly outweighs the potential risk of opening schools right now. Schools are closed colleges or closed, but once the university kids come back, and all the schools are open. We might see a very different background that we need to take into consideration. And Be Flexible. If school need to close again, absolutely universities are such a different situation than high schools elementary schools I mean as we talked about the risk increasing with age, so I think that's going to be a real issue in the fall as universities try to open back up. What do you think are the main takeaways from your review of all these different openings in different countries and in different schools? It's still a little unsatisfying, yeah. Is operatives data are really of still released sparse and it super frustrating, because it's such an important question. It feels like we should have better answers, but we simply don't yet. I do think the main takeaway is is you have to be flexible if to recognize that you can't go back to pretending that the viruses and there or if you do you're GONNA end up with big outbreaks and you're. GonNa have to shut everything down again. Like happened in Israel. One other interesting takeaway that I found was that when we looked at the outbreaks that had been identified, it was frequently teachers who were more affected than kids often. Often it was hard to tell because there were very very few cases where people had really carefully done the tracing that they did in that town in France, but it looked at first glances, or maybe the teachers were spreading it to each other more than to and from the kids. I think that's something that's important to keep in mind as we move toward reopening, because teachers are better able. I think than kids to do the physical distancing. I think it's it's helpful to realize that. Maybe adults are the bigger risk factor than the kids I know. A lot of teachers are super worried about going back for good reason we know as parents and teachers. The kids are generally really good at spreading germs. Happens every single winter exactly and so when the middle of pandemic where people are dying, and then somebody says well. You have to go back and stand in a classroom with even half of the normal kids. In contact with these lovely little people who you really enjoy being with, but you also see his German accelerators All, day long is definitely giving a lot of teachers. Pause for good reason, but I think one of the things that we did see emerging as a pattern was the teachers maybe should be wary of each other more than they need to be wary of their of their students I do think also that reducing class sizes and finding some sort of creative hybrid solution where kids. Kids are in school part of the time, but then doing the distance learning also part of the time. I think that's GonNa to be unfortunately the way forward for now until we get things a little bit more under control. We've talked mostly about anecdotal findings, so far are their studies in schools that are taking a look at this and going to give us some good. Good answers. That's another thing that the story mentions. There are a couple of real studies that are starting in the UK there researchers who have started projects at several schools where anybody who wants can be tested both for antibodies and active virus, and so they're hoping to get a better picture of when somebody's infected. How far it spreads in a school and in Berlin and in. In the state, German state of Bavaria also very projects have started all right. Thank you so much, Gretchen thank you Gretchen.

France Jennifer Cousin Franklin Megan Germany Gretchen Vogel Berlin Israel Language School United States Bavaria UK Canada Paris Education Department Indiana Europe Washington Dc South Africa Denmark Megan
'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

Fresh Air

05:30 min | 3 weeks ago

'Palm Springs' Romantic Comedy Is A Total Winner For The Lockdown Era

"Are film critic Justin. Chang says it could be an especially good time to watch palm springs, a romantic comedy about two people forced to repeat the same day. Over and over again it stars Andy Sandberg, and Kristen, Milly Odi it streaming on Hulu and playing in some drive in theaters around the country. Palm Springs a hot ticket at this year's Sundance Film Festival one of the last public events to take place before the movie industry shutdown. I didn't see it there, but having caught up with it months later at home I can't help but feel as though this breezily entertaining movie. Please a little differently in the era of covid nineteen. It's a comedy. About is the LATIAN repetition which might not sound too appealing at a time when many of us are also leading lives of isolation and repetition. But don't let that dissuade you. This first feature directed by Max barbeque cow, and written by Andy Sierra turns out to be a total winner, Sharp, funny, and even profound in a sneakily offhand way. The story is a riff on that Herald Ramos Classic Groundhog Day in which Bill Murray had to keep replaying the same day until he learned to become a selfless person, but palm springs is trying to push that message. It knows that just getting through life with your dignity intact can be hard enough. That's certainly true for Sarah played by Kristen me not who's serving as maid of honor in her sister's wedding in the California desert town of Palm Springs. S Sarah Drinks too much and stumbles her way through the reception. She finds herself intrigued by one of the Guests Niles played by Andy, Sandberg. Niles is kind of a goofball, but also manages to work the room with disarming ease. It's almost as if he's been through this event before and knows everything that's going to happen. Sarah finds out why when she follows him that night into a mysterious cave out in the desert. Within seconds she's waking up the next morning only to find that. It's actually the same morning as before the morning of the wedding. Time has reset itself. In a panic Sarah Trucks Down Niles at the hotel where they're staying. He explains that when she entered the cave, she made a big mistake because he followed me. What's going on? I tried to stop. But, what is this? When is this? Yeah. About that so. This is today. Today is yesterday and tomorrow is also today. It's one of. Infinite time loop situations you might have heard about. That I might have heard about. There's been a lot of those infinite time loop situations in recent movies and TV. Some of them excellent like the Tom. Cruise Action Thriller Edge of tomorrow in the NETFLIX's mystery series. Russian doll. The pop savvy makers of Palm Springs clearly no those stories and suspect that you might know them to. As a result, they're able to jettison a lot of the usual exposition about how this world works and simply cut to the chase. Sarah is eager to bust out of the time loop but Niles. WHO's been stuck here for ages tries to dissuade her. Virtuous acts won't work. Suicide won't work although that doesn't Stop Sarah driving straight into the path of an oncoming truck just to see what happens. Eventually Niles persuades her to stop fighting the space time continuum, and just enjoy their time together, and so she does with the threat of permanent removed. These two misfits are suddenly free to embrace the craziness of every moment. Sometimes, they blow off the wedding to go on long desert drives and hang out in bars. Sometimes they stick around for the wedding, so they can play tricks on the guests. WHO WON'T REMEMBER ANYTHING ANYWAY? The guests are played by fine actors. Including Peter Gallagher June squibb and Meredith Hagner. J. K. Simmons also gives a terrific wildcard performance as a guy who POPs up at the wedding on Sundays, but not others for reasons that the story will soon make amusingly clear. As fiendishly clever, as it is on the surface, palm springs has a pretty straightforward takeaway, since life can sometimes be pointless and tedious whether you're stuck in a time loop or not, you might as well spend it with someone you love. It's pretty good advice. Even Still Sarah doesn't know how much longer she can stand being trapped in this desert purgatory, especially since Niles seem so lazily resigned as fate. I won't give away whether they succeed in escaping or not I will say that the movie doesn't entirely avoid a tired gender dynamic in which a smart determined woman has to expend a lot of emotional and mental energy, and just to get her boyfriend to WanNa move forward. But I love the way the actors conspired subvert that Dynamic Sandberg isn't that's Hilarious as he was in the Music Biz? Satire pop star never stopped never stopping, but he does have the whole. Doofus slacker routine down Pat. But, he's eclipsed by Milly Ot, a versatile performer who won a grammy for the Broadway musical once, and who can turn from madcap comedy to breathtaking emotion on a dime. I'd watch her. Any Day. Justin Chang is a film critic at the L. A. Times.

Sarah Drinks Palm Springs Niles Dynamic Sandberg Justin Chang Andy Sierra Kristen Hulu Netflix Grammy Bill Murray J. K. Simmons California Herald Ramos L. A. Times PAT Sharp Peter Gallagher June Squibb
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:31 min | 3 months ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That's Louis Armstrong. Coaching singer Lottie Linnea from a recording archive at the Louis Armstrong House Museum. Michael cogs well was the executive director of the museum. He died last week. Cogs well spoke with Terry Gross in two thousand one. His final project is a twenty three million dollar education center across the street from the Armstrong House to hold the archives and Exhibition. Gallery and a jazz club though. Construction has been halted because of the CORONA VIRUS PANDEMIC COMING UP DAVID B. And Cooley reviews upload the new comedy series by Greg Daniels who brought us the American version of the Office. This is fresh air support for. Npr comes from whyy presenting the pulse. A podcast that takes you on adventures into unexpected corners of health and science plastic in the guts of deep sea creatures crying after anesthesia building. Your own Internet. Each episode is full of fascinating stories and Big Ideas. The pulse available. Where you get your podcasts or at whyy dot org. Hi It's Terry Gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like David Bowie aretha Franklin Johnny Cash. John Updike Tony Morrison Search for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air. Archived Dot Org. That's fresh air archive dot org former Saturday. Night live writer Greg Daniels who went on to create the American adaptation of the British Sitcom. The office has two new series. Premiering in May later this month he and his NBC office star. Steve Carell re team for a new Netflix comedy called Space Force and starting today Amazon presents. Another new Greg Daniels comedy. It's called upload and our TV critic David in Cooley has a review of that one. Welcome to Upload Nathan made it Lakeview. You lucky duck in the new Greg Daniels Scifi Comedy Upload Nathan Brown played by Robbie Mel is the lead character. But he's not so lucky first of all we hardly get the no Nathan and the world of the near future in which he lives when he stops living. The handsome young man dies in a freak accident involving his self driving car and he has. Wealthy girlfriend puts up the money to have his memories and personality uploaded into a lookalike. Avatar AVATAR resides in. What now passes for his eternal afterlife in a world? Not of his own making actually. It's a world made by giant corporation. One of several competing to offer people an alternative to dying in the natural way in dealing with whatever does or doesn't come next one of the many brilliant concepts in this new upload show. Is that series creator? Greg Daniels envisions his imaginary world as a place where this transition from bio to upload as they call it is a predominantly financial transaction. The more you can afford the better your computerized afterlife and Nathan. Because he's girlfriend's family literally owns. The place gets to live with the one percenters whether he wants to or not here. He is waking up for the first time to his new reality guided by a computer tech back in the real world. An upload clients support staffer named Nora. Who SERVES AS PERSONAL? Siri or Alexa. She's played by Andy Allo and she's instantly likable as he is her. Co-star do you see anything some kind of old fashioned room looking over a lake beautiful trees? Well sharks swimming right towards me. What Okay No. That's not supposed to having any sense of humor. Nice so welcome to Lakeview the only digital afterlife environment modeled on the Grand Victorian hotels of the United States and Canada. Hope it's not too Ralph Lauren. For you never really my thing but it's kind of cool yeah uplifting views healthy pursuits timeless Americana Arthur slaves. What are you serious one. This is a design scheme and to. That's not even the right period. Lakeview is open to all races religions genders. Absolutely anybody in upload we get to explore both worlds the computer generated lakeview and the real world of twenty thirty three which is when this series begins and Nathan dies in both places the details comic and otherwise or crammed into each frame like panels from a drawing in mad magazine. The closer you look the more you'll find in the real world. Nora has a vintage political poster on her wall. Supporting the twenty. Twenty four political ticket of Oprah and Kamla in the afterlife. Avatars residents can adjust the seasons of the gorgeous view outside their window. Just by turning the dial on a sort of landscape thermostat kind of like changing the background on your zoom meeting. Breakfast buffets are loaded with endless treats but like most of the things in these for profit virtual realities. You have to pay extra to get what you want. In Nathan case. His girlfriend Ingrid played by Allegra Edwards controls. His budget and decides as each purchase request comes to her account. Whether or not to indulge him there even her ways for the virtual in real worlds to interact. Nora as a client support. Technician can visit his world as her own. Temporary Avatar and Ingrid and Nathan can see each other by visual computer links watching and talking on monitors. That's an accidental. Extra creepy touch because watching them reach out to each other trying to connect only through. Tv screens suddenly feels much too familiar. But upload this new comedy without a laugh track does more than just create inventive new worlds. Like the good place. It's full of thoughtful questions and challenging ideas about the meaning of life itself and of Death Itself Upload also holds up to comparisons with episodes of Black Mirror covering the worlds within worlds of avatars and computerized identity and to similar themes in Westworld and the movie her and very quickly upload reveals himself to have even more layers. It's a love story with Nathan Nora extremely attracted to one another but fighting seemingly insurmountable obstacles and before long Nathan begins to suspect that the freak accident that killed him was no accident at all that turns this Sitcom into a mystery series to as Nathan and others set out to solve a murder. His I love upload because it's so smart so funny and so imaginatively complicated. It may sound like a paradox but watching the TV show right now about a character who feels confined helpless and trapped in these troubled days when many of share those same feelings turns out to be a wonderful way to escape. David in Cooley is editor of the website TV worth watching and professor of TV studies at Rohan University on Monday. Show we welcome back. Fashion Mentor. Tim Gunn his new fashion competition. Show making the cut features ECO conscious designs that fit all body types enter gender-neutral. We'll hear more about his life how he came to love teaching despite a difficult start struggles as a teenager and his father who worked closely with J Edgar Hoover in the FBI. I hope you can join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our Technical Director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering support choice Lieberman and Julian Herzfeld. Our interviews and reviews are produced an edited by. Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers Sam Brigger Lauren Crendall Heidi Soman Theresa Madden Moves. Eighty via challenor. And Seth Kelly. Our associate producer of digital media. Is Molly Seavy Nesper? Roberta shorrock directs. The show for Terry Gross days..

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"In Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today comic and after Wanda Sykes. If you voted for trump came to see me that's how Sykes opens her. Netflix comedy special called not normal which is nominated for two emmys emmys Sykes does a lot of political humor and has done material about being black and lesbian in the Obama era and now in the trump era. Her wife is white. They have have to white children and when her wife's family or the white friends come over Sykes jokes that she feels like a minority in her own home as sometimes I'll call. I'll call a friendly really. Hey man what you doin. Well come over at heels. Well you got so many white people in your house. WANDA SYKES COMING UP ON FRESH AIR support for this podcast comes from the Neubauer Family Foundation Supporting W._H._Y._Y.'s fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging encouraging meaningful conversation. My guest is comic.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineers are Bentham our associate producer for digital media is Molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry gross. This message comes from NPR sponsor. Comcast business. Business has always been driven by innovators. That's why Comcast business is helping you with technology that provides better experiences. Comcast business beyond fast.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Gotcha. He can't even talk. Grow speechless time and thirty five years. I regret we are out of time. Okay. I can do this is fresh air. It's been a great honor to speak with you. Thanks so much for accepting this award and thank you. Thank you for Elvis things you've written for your TV shows for your movies. Thank you for being you. Thank you. Bring pepper. Carey grows. Interviewed Henry Louis gates last may when he was in Philadelphia to accept the WHYY. Lifelong learning Ord gates is the host of the TV genealogy series. Finding your roots. Terry will be one of the guests whose family history is explored next year in the sixth season of the show, the fifth season of finding your roots is currently showing on PBS. Fresher weekend is produced by Teresa Madden. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineer this week is Audrey Bentham. Our interviews and reviews are produced an edited by Amy salad Phyllis Myers. Roberta shorrock Sam brigger, Lauren. Cranston, Heidi soman mood, Zeti Challenor and Seth Kelly. Molly seavy nesper is our associate producer of digital media for Terry gross. I'm Davies support for NPR and the following message. Come from Sony Pictures classics presenting standing Ali, a new film by John Baird, Steve Coogan, and John C Reilly star as laurel and hardy embarking on a comeback tour and their later years now playing in theaters everywhere.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"On the. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineers or do Bentham our associate producer of digital media is Molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show. I'm Terry gross. All of us at fresh air wish you a merry Christmas. And for those of you who will be working thanks for holding things together, which makes it possible for others to take the day off tomorrow on fresh air. We reprieves are in-studio concert of new routes and rockabilly Christmas songs performed in our studio by their composer, JD, McPherson and his band. They have a new album of original holiday music called socks. I hope you'll join us. Just. Pre. That. Snow? Just because. With. Just. Chris paul.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for NPR and the following message come from carmax carmax makes it easy to sell your car by providing free vehicle appraisals with actual ridden offers not estimates to learn more and schedule your free appraisal, visit carmax dot com. This is fresh air. I'm Terry gross. The depth of America's opioid epidemic can be measured in appalling statistics. Two point six million addicts in the US seventy. Two thousand overdose deaths last year. A rate of nearly two hundred per day. Our guest Beth Macy takes ground level. Look at the crisis in a new book focusing on central Appalachia which she calls the birthplace of the modern opioid epidemic. Maisy has spent three decades reporting on the region focusing on social and economic trends and how they affect ordinary people. Her book is an intimate look at cops, judges drug dealers, young heroine users and their long-suffering parents, doctors and health activists struggling to fight the epidemic and executives of a pharmaceutical company that aggressively marketed opioids. Many users became addicted to drugs such as Oxycontin when they were. Prescribed for pain after minor surgery or other treatment, and then moved to heroin when it became harder to get more pills. Beth. Macy's previous books include factory men and true vine fresh Air's. Dave Davies spoke to her about her new book, dope sick dealers doctors and the drug company that addicted America will Beth Macy. Welcome back to fresh air. You begin the book with a visit to a prison inmate named Ronnie Jones, and you spent a long time trying to arrange this visit. Why were you so interested in talking to him? I had been asked by mother in Strasburg, Virginia, which is in the northern Shenandoah valley full of little Adila small farm towns, civil war monuments. And this mother I met me at her son's great. His name is Jessie ball Strich, and he had been the high school football star in the town. She had his grave situated right next to the high school. The cemetery was right next door and she had. His grave on the edge so she could visit him and overlook the football field where he had once been able to move the audience to roars simply by pumping his fists, and he had died of a heroin overdose, and she wanted me to find out why was her beautiful burly son who never missed a day of work? Why did he end up dead on somebody else's bathroom floor? So I just started pulling the strings as we do in journalism. And I found out that he was one of the ways that he became further in meshed in his addiction was that a twice convicted drug dealer head landed in this region a year earlier and had said about according to the prosecutors, turning a handful of heroin users into hundreds almost overnight. But of course it was more complicated than that. So she said, I want you to. Find out why so I can understand because I don't understand. I thought it was just pills. Now this was a stable middle class community and Ronnie Jones. This dealer. I mean, it seems as you describe it kind of just took this place by storm and havoc followed what was distinct about his business model. His way of distributing the drug Ronnie had landed in Woodstock, Virginia, near Strasbourg. He was serving the final part of a sentence for an earlier drug related charge, and it was a reentry program designed to help felons get job skills. And when he ended that job, he tried to as he told me, go legit in town. He tried to set up a business in computer repair, and he said, nobody would rent space to him. Nobody would hire him. He ended up losing the chicken plant job when he got sick and he remembered he had been in the break room of the chicken plant, and he had previously had charges on dealing crack and marijuana, and somebody pointed out that everybody was already hooked. On pills here. And they said, if you really wanna make money, you're not going to go back to dealing marijuana and crack. You need to bring heroin in there were prescription

Beth Macy Ronnie Jones heroin America Terry gross carmax Virginia US NPR marijuana high school Maisy Strasburg Appalachia football Adila Shenandoah valley Dave Davies Strasbourg
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Politics in America. I'm Dave Davies, and this is fresh air. Support for fresh air and the following message come from fracture fracture turns your favorite digital memories into meaningful photo decor by printing them directly on glass. They come ready to display out of the box, including the wall hanger or optional stand fracture prints are handmade in Gainesville, Florida, give a unique gift or focus on the moments that tell your story, fresh air listeners can save fifteen percents on their first order by visiting fracture me dot com. Slash fresh air. Hey, guys here and on the latest episode of how I built this, how Stewart Butterfield failed in two companies pivoted and then built to amazing new companies flicker and slack check out how I built this wherever you listen to podcasts, we're speaking with journalists, Michael Scott Moore who was working on a story about Somali pirates in two thousand twelve when he was seized and held hostage for two and a half years. You've actually were taking back off of the ship and resumed your life of being moved from one house to another. In this went on for a very, very long time with intermittent phone calls to your mother negotiations. You know, people in prison sometimes adjust to life there. They make a life, not not the one they would have chosen and I'm wondering how you adapt it to this. I mean, surely you didn't come to think of this as home, but did it get normal in some way. How did you, how did you maintain your your mental state slowly at settled in after about a month or so that I was going to be there for a long time. And once I realized I was in the house where I wasn't gonna move for awhile, I asked for yoga, mat. I asked for Matt where I could do yoga, and I tried to do it out of eyesight of the pirates. 'cause I figured it would just sort of baffle them or make them laugh, and that's exactly what it did, but they, you know, they never had me out of their sight. So first time I did yoga, all their heads sort of looked in through the doorway and they started to laugh, but then they started to do yoga with me. Some of them were aware of not getting much exercise either in these prison houses. So they would come in with sort of cardboard flats, but broken down boxes, right, to stand on on the filthy floor. And they had these makeshift yoga mats and started to the impostors. So you had your own class? I have my own class. Yeah. After a while, I started to correct their postures. Did that create abundance will sure. I, I mean, with the guards who were inclined to be friendly to me already, some of those were guards that knew me from the ship or from before they became almost friends. You know, the other guards really wouldn't. You know, didn't seem to care about me at all and didn't even wanna hear a word of Somali from me. But with those guards that could build up a a report with a friendly ones, and we could sort of mix are Molly in English and have conversations. You're a writer, it, it's a longtime habit and a metal refuge. And I gather sometimes you head notebook. Sometimes you wrote things that were confiscated and lost. But when you could ride, was it helpful? What did you write about? Oh, it was incredibly helpful. And of course, the first few times I had notebooks, I, I think I had my notes confiscated twice while I was a hostage. And those first couple of times, of course, I was writing about what was happening. And that was probably a mistake. So the the bosses were very curious about what I was writing. And sometimes I even quoted one of the guards, you know, naming the boss or something like that. And I, I got the impression that some of the guards might have been punished for some of the things I'd written. So the third time I got my hands on a notebook which was very late. So I once I was brought back onto land, I, I went very long time with no notes, no pen or paper. And that was horrible. That was awful. Once I got my hands on pen and paper again, I started to write recipes and I started to draft a novel. So I wrote about things that were not going on, and that actually helped me hang onto the notebooks recipes recipes. I

Matt Gainesville Dave Davies Florida Stewart Butterfield America Michael Scott Moore writer Molly
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:28 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Limitations apply. This is fresh air last Thursday, the national memorial for peace and Justice opened in Montgomery, Alabama, honoring the victims of American lynchings fresh air commentator, Matt Johnson has this story of his own family's brush with the dark legacy of lynching. When I was a kid, my mom told me a story about her grandfather that he got in trouble with some white men down south and escaped lynching by running to Chicago, that he chose his new last name Jones because it was the most common name in the phone book that for years, he would sit in his chair facing the door shock gun on his lap waiting for them to come for is to dream about this image. Nightmares really thing is I never knew much more about the story than that until last month. When I found out the secret was literally in my blood the whole time. See, I took one of those DNA tests awhile back and the company connected me to a bunch of people listed as cousins now more. Most of these were just Randolph. I mean, we're all cousins if you go back enough, but one woman reached out to me Donna because it turned out not only did we have genetic ties together, but also several of her family members and my family members reported DNA matches. But we couldn't figure out why that was two years ago and then a month back. She contacted me again, Donna figured it out from the historical record. She found this is the best I can put the story together now. In nineteen. Oh four, my family, black farmers and aching county, South Carolina bought a mule at this time in place, a mule was more than just an animal. It was a means to a livelihood. The problem was the guy who ran the country store claim. The mule was actually his said it was sold illegally by someone leasing it and he wanted back. But my cousin said that was between him and the leasers he'd already paid his money. So he told the merchant, no, and they were black and poor, and he was white and wealthy and it was nineteen four in the south. So it didn't end well. The merchant and his hired hands showed up at my ancestors home on Christmas Eve pass, eleven at night. They illegally came in the house, pulled a gun on my cousin bound his wrists behind his back. There were planning on pulling him out in the dark to deliver what they considered Justice was likely meant hanging him until his neck snap. All this or MU. But the thing is that in check the rest of the house, they didn't realize my grandpa was in a room just beyond with the shotgun aimed right at them. He was eleven years old. When he fired. He hit the merchant. I in the shoulder and then in the gut shot in shock, the guy walked around the room before finally, collapsing dying soon after. My great grandfather got away partly because the resulting Lynch mob wasted time chasing false leads, partly because his older brother whisked him away to Chicago, where the great migration of northbound southern blacks covered their tracks for them. And that's what makes this story. So rare because between eighteen seventy seven to nineteen fifty over four thousand black people didn't escape. Instead they were publicly murdered, supposedly for crimes, but always to reinforce the social order that was white supremacy. The horror of lynchings always been a part of my ancestry memory. I'd imagine that's true for majority of African Americans, I wrote a graphic novel about lynching, so it's not a new subject to me, but knowing the real story of my own family's brush with lynching, it made a real reading the newspaper clippings, seeing the pictures, feeling the utter vulnerability of black life and tin. Roof sacks the darkness of the fields and the hostile world beyond them, knowing how much has changed since then. Knowing how much hasn't. I get now why? My great grandfather sat at the door with a shotgun. It wasn't about defense. It was about PTSD. I was on the road when I found out the whole story. So I called my daughter to break the news knowing she probably wouldn't care because for her at sixteen it's beyond. Imagination us trying to get her to understand the enormity and figured I was failing. But then she says, wait, dad, if they lynched your great grandfather, you wouldn't be here. No baby. I wouldn't be here. And either. Would you or your brother or your sister or grandmother, or aunt or cousins? None of us would be here. When I hung up the phone. Here's the part that hit me over four thousand people, murdered erased, family trees pulled at their roots. So tell me this America how many other people aren't here. Matt Johnson is the author of the novels loving day and Pimm. A new edition of his graphic novel. Incognito is out this year, the national memorial for peace and Justice. Honoring the victims of lynchings opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama, coming up, David Elstein reviews the new film Tully, this is fresh air. I'm Scott detro-. There is so much political news to follow these days, but you don't have to keep up with all of it. You just have to keep up with us on the NPR politics podcast. You can find us on the NPR one app or wherever you get your podcasts director, Jason Reitman and screenwriter Diablo Cody, I collaborated on the teen pregnancy, comedy, Juno, and then went on to make young adult starring Charlie's Theran. The three director writer and star reunite for Tully in which they're on, plays an exhausted mom who hires a night nanny played by MacKenzie Davis to help out with the baby film critic, David Edelstein, has this review the intimate drama, telly center. On postpartum depression, a clinical term that doesn't begin to capture the alien nation that the movie's main character feels after giving birth to her. Third child Shirley's thera plays the mother Marlo a first name I've never heard of for a woman outside Marlo Thomas who in the sixty sitcom, that girl was the archetypal effervescent single gal. I wonder if that's who Diablo Cody. The screenwriter was thinking of cody's Marlow was once that girl, but is now Wade out figuratively and literally since therein gained fifty pounds for the part and vividly Vokes. The helplessness and self disgust of someone who no longer feels at home in her body. When the baby girl arrives more low already has a daughter as well as a son with an unspecified neurological issue who's on the brink of getting kicked out of elementary school for disruptive behavior. Her. Husband played by Ron Livingston is a non presence even when he isn't traveling for his floundering startup. He doesn't seem to regard childcare as his responsibility. The title character enters twenty or so minutes into the film. Tully is nightmares. A woman hired by more lows, rich concerned brother to arrive after dark, sit beside the baby and when required bring the infant to her sleeping. Mother's breast Marlow expect someone older, but Tully played by MacKenzie. Davis is a twenty six year old free spirit with uncanny insight into more lows, divided self telly shows great sympathy, but more lows. Feelings are all mixed up. Is she being seduced? Mucked telly gets in so close. It's a little creepy. He seemed like a great mom. Great moms organized class parties and casino night. They bake cupcakes look like minions. All this things. I'm just tired to do, even getting dressed, feels exhausting. I have my closet and I just think I just do this downside living on a planet with a short solar day. Although jubilees even shorter. Like a book of fun facts, popular fourth graders Diablo Cody has never written a relationship between two people as tent, allies, ING as the one between Marlow and Tully, their encounters turn. What might have been glib, sour comedy into something strange and mythic in which Marlowe dreams of mermaids sit side by side with the most mundane demands of childcare, glib and sour is how I describe cody's previous collaborations with director, Jason Reitman, Juno, which I knew would be a hit even as I cringed at self-conscious. One liners and young adult starring Theran as a selfish woman on a visit to her tacky hometown right men and Cody seemed to enjoy scoring points off their characters and the first part of Tully centers on other people's in sensitivity towards the desperately unhappy more low. There's the woman at a coffee shop who. Disapproves of the still pregnant Marlow ordering a d-calif because it still has trace amounts of caffeine. There's more lows, rich brothers, smug wife, who points out that the chicken fingers more low Saad is eating have growth hormones, which is not just rude but deeply unfeeling since it's all more low can do to get the kid to eat anything, but the cheap shots fall by the wayside went tally appears and the movie contracts and deepens the Kenzi Davis is magnetic. She changes the movies, rhythms for the stranger, and she and Charlie there and make beautiful mysterious music together. Watch Marlow flinch in response to tallies prying questions about her past active sex life and present nod existent one about unfulfilled him bishops versus smothering. Realities. Cody seems to be writing from her unconscious. I shivered when Tully eases Marlow to sleep. Saying of the infant girl, she'll grow a little overnight. So will we, we're suddenly prepared for more lows. Desperate attempt to keep up with Tully in the final act when she and the young woman roar off towards lower Manhattan to an underworld of drinking and drugs and thrash metal, that's both exhilarating and scary the final scenes of telly or route shocking insane. And at the same time, warm and reassuring some essential primal drama has been enacted and now everyone on screen and off can get a good night's sleep. David Elstein is film critic for New York magazine on Monday show. Chef Lidia busty on 'age tells her story from growing up on the family farm where they raised and grew their own food to escaping communists who took over their region of Italy after World War Two becoming refugees. Immigrating to America opening. First restaurant and getting her own cooking show. She has a new memoir hope. You can join us. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering support from Joyce Lieberman Julian Herzfeld. Our associate producer for digital media is Molly seavy nesper Roberta. Shorrock directs the show for Terry gross. I'm Dave Davis.

Tully Diablo Cody Marlow Fresh Air MacKenzie Davis David Elstein Montgomery Justice Alabama Matt Johnson Chicago America Jason Reitman director Donna Charlie Juno Randolph South Carolina
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To fresh air and congratulations on the golden globe thank you very exciting yet in q yes so i want to start by talking about day of the dead because that's the holiday that is supposed to unite the family the ancestors as well as the living people so what is the day of the dead well the day the dead or a dea to martos or d dea delors more toast depending on where you live and where you grew up is a is a tradition in mexico that happens once a year it's the first couple of days of november and it's a celebration were essentially at a time for families to remember their loved ones who are no longer with them and they actually believe that their ancestors their loved ones are returning to be with the family it's it's kind of like a family reunion that spans the divide between the living and the dead and many people will build a friend as these kind of offerings in their homes were they'll put out photos of their loved ones and they'll they'll put out foods that they loved in life you know sometimes you'll see you know to leader bottles of coq sitting honey a friend if that's something that somebody loved the idea being that they're coming back to be with the family and celebrate and in part take of things that they loved in life and adrian out has a hard even celebrated in your family uh when i was growing up no not so much my mother's from mexico but where she was raised they didn't celebrate their them what both the same way that we saw when we did our research in oaxaca michoacan but there was definitely in the way that the family talks about death and talks about remembrance and and talks about being connected to stories and people who've passed that was something that was familiar to me that was something where at any funeral afterwards the f music would come out in the food we come out and the stories would come out and that sense of not accepting death as being final as much as knowing that that imprint that that person left on your life is important to talk about is important to celebrate that was uh kind of my access point for this story is your father.

mexico adrian oaxaca michoacan
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this npr podcast in the following message come from paramount pictures and the new film downsizing from alexander payne the director of sideways and the descendants starring matt damon kristoff vaults hong xiao and than wig in theaters december 22nd from whyy in philadelphia i'm teary grows with fresh air today we talk with robert siegel he's retiring from npr in january after hosting all things considered for thirty years he's been at npr even longer than that he first joined as a newscaster in nineteen seventy six we'll hear his first npr broadcast i'll talk i'll i'll i'll tell you anything knepper all my sleep stop letting also the year and television we sit down with our tv critic david beyond coolly to talk about his ten best list i wish it were twenty or thirty television is so good that's coming up on fresh air all oh eighty support for this podcast comes from the neubauer family foundation supporting whyy s fresh air and its commitment to sharing ideas and encouraging meaningful conversation this is fresh air i'm cheri gross no britain's margaret thatcher in moscow on all things considered i'm rene montaigne and i'm robert siegel if that introduction to all things considered sounds both familiar different it's because it was recorded thirty years ago on the day robert siegel became a host of the program on january fifth he's retiring from npr so i asked him to come talk with us about a subject he doesn't typically talk about on all things considered himself his career at npr dates way back to nineteen 76 when he worked as a newscaster he became an editor a year later in 1979 he opened npr's london bureau he spent the next four years reporting from around europe and serving as the bureau's senior editor then he returned to washington to direct npr's news and information department robert thank you for coming to fresh air thank you for all the great work you've done on npr over the years and for helping to make npr would it is today so i wanna start.

rene montaigne washington senior editor europe london cheri gross david whyy hong xiao matt damon editor alexander payne moscow margaret thatcher britain neubauer family foundation tv critic npr robert siegel philadelphia director thirty years four years
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this mpr podcast and the following message come from ibm with exceptional knowledge and technology you can realise the exponential outcomes this is you to the power of ibm find out moreibmcomyou from whyy in philadelphia i'm teary gross with fresh air today the new netflixing western series godless had sole buyers and pray that roy good don't never showed up here but if he does not only you will mean kick him in the human suffer that's jeff daniels he plays the show's main villain we'll talk with the writer and director of the series scott frank you know i love the western so much why not embrace every single cliche i can think of from you know the breaking of horses to the train robbery's to the two guys facing each other in the street the mysterious loaner godless also has things you won't find and classic western is like a town run by women because the men died in a mining disaster a lesbian couple and an interracial romance frank also wrote the screenplay history for get shorty an out of sight this is teary gross in the spirit of giving the season i want you to know that npr podcast like fresh air are dependent on the health of the whole public radio system so i'm hoping that you will support your local station which means you'll be supporting its reporting on your community we've made it easy you can just go to donate that nprorgfresh air then you can share why you donated using the hashtag why public radio thank you.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And the devil's backbone he spoke with fresh air producer sam brigher they started with a clip agents strickland has called elisa and her friend and coworkers zelda into his office to sat whether he can trust them to clean the lab where the secret asset the creature is held zelda played by octavia spencer explains that elisa is mute i efsa mostly on account of she came talk air she death said she said she can hear you all the scars on your neck and that's what did it got your voice watchman she said she said she was a baby will do that to maimi world is sent four when you say so delilah well let me say this up front you clean that lab you get out the thing we keep in there is an affront do you know what an affront is something offensive that's right i should know dragnet filthy thing out of the river marking south america all the way here and along the way we didn't get to like each other much that's a scene from the new movie the shape of water by guillermo del toro gear modell tora welcome back to fresh air very happy to be here so why did you wanna make a movie about a romance between in and fibia s creature ended mute woman when the idea for me was to try and do i'm over the talk about law being beyond warned so then and actually the screenplay makes a point of firm showing your than the characters that have the power of speech that talk uh have part of a trouble communicating with each other and then the cavs at jost are and other they can discover each other under essence through looks to the dodge through presence body language and mostly.

elisa cavs jost producer sam brigher strickland zelda octavia spencer
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message comes from artifact uprising turning digital photos it's a premium photo books calendars and more use code fresh at artifact uprising dot com slash fresh for ten percent off meaningful holiday photo gifts from whyy in philadelphia and teary grows with fresh air today karmuk an actor patten oswald in his new netflix comedy special he talks about life in the trump era then he goes to a very personal place and talks about the sudden death of his wife last year it was difficult to return to the comedy stage but at some point it seemed like the healthiest way of working through his pain and when he returned he knew he couldn't just talk about his pain he had also be funny a musician cake on stage and ilk guys noga torn trump that well go no we were totally cool would you singing about your pain but sing about it we'll also talk about oswald voice over work i also do a character on both check horseman called pinkie penguin uh kinky his coach acts agent he's just the most beaten town human being on the planet patten as well coming up on fresh air one i've got a holiday request i hope you'll consider supporting public radio shows and podcast an easy way to support all of it it's a to your local station the station will use some of the money to fund local programs and reporting and some of the money to pay its npr membership fee that fee is used to fund npr national shows and podcasts you can donate to your station by visiting donate dot npr dot org slash fresh air and then share why you donated with hashtag why public radio thanks and happy holidays.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for fresh air and the following message comes from rocket mortgage by quicken loans when it comes to refinancing your existing mortgage or buying a home rocket mortgage lets you understand all the details so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you goats or rocket mortgage dot com slash fresh air from whyy in philadelphia interior gross with fresh air heavy thanksgiving today jimmy fallon tax about hosting the tonight show an lots of other things i like many other comics he insists he had a happy childhood remember we add there was a report card from kindergarten and the comment from the teacher was jimmy smiles too much i would smile evil when i get a yelda as is always happy kid after becoming famous and saturday night live he went through a phase of wanting to be cool even if it meant having to do something he wasn't good at so he told his agent i don't want to do any movies a unless it's a western and they were like you realize built make west here what are you talking about i go i wanna to be like shot off a horse or something and justin chang chiang reviews the new film about winston churchill starring gary oldman that's coming up on fresh air hey it's garros here host of how i built this with a quick recommendation in every holiday weekend company a lot of waiting traffic airport security lines and so why are you waiting wanted you just been on how i built this each episode i speak with a founder of a company who has an incredible story of how it all began you can find how i built this on the npr one app or wherever you get your podcasts this is fresh air interior gross happy thanksgiving we wanted to play something really fun for the holiday so we're going to listen back to my recent interview with jimmy fallon the host of the tonight show we talked about the tonight show and lots of other things but first we talked about his new children's book everything is mama it's his second book for children just beginning to learn language each page has an illustration of a mother animal teaching her baby animal anew word the mother holds up an object or points to it and says what it is like xu or waffle.

philadelphia justin chang chiang winston churchill gary oldman garros founder npr jimmy fallon whyy thanksgiving
"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for fresh air and the following message comes from rocket mortgage by quicken loans when it comes to refinancing your existing mortgage or buying a home rocket mortgage lets you understand all the details so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you goats or rocket mortgage dot com slash fresh air from whyy in philadelphia and terry gross with fresh air today greta gurwin the coal writer and star of france sa and mistress america and costar of greenberg and 20th century women now she's making her derek to'real debut with the new film lady bird which he also wrote about a high school senior preparing for college trying to assert her independence from her mother which leads to lots of arguments about kind of everything i don't know any woman who has a simple relationship with their mother or with their daughter and i feel that it's not something that's given as much cinematic time as it is worthy of it also we listen back to an excerpt of my two thousand nine interview with healthcare economist over reinhard who died monday at the age of eighty among the things he wrote about was the hidden costs of the health care bureaucracy that's coming up on fresh air where can we debate today's big issues without getting attack for speaking our minds one a provides a safe smart place for tough conversations every weekday and the friday news roundup breaks down the weeks top stories i'm joshua johnson check out the one a podcast on the npr one app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from hbo jon stewart returns to host the live comedy benefit in the upcoming festival night of too many stars america unites froth ism programmes presented in partnership with next for autism airing saturday november 18th eight pm eastern five pm pacific only on hbo from whyy in philadelphia and kyrie grows with fresh air today the challenges of reporting on sexual harassment and sexual assault we talked with new york times investigative journalist jodie counter and megan to we they broke the harvey weinstein story and interviewed weinstein it was tough to kind of no which harvey which version of harvey was going to be showing up for these interviews was it going to be the one who is trying to battle left out of the story or with at one that he is going to try to flatter us out of the story to we also reported on the sexual misconduct allegations against donald trump kanter reported on the sexual misconduct allegation wins against louis ck but unlike louis c k and weinstein trump's career was not derailed by the allegations after the weinstein story broke two we heard from some of the women who had accused trump of crossing the line with them a lot of them felt like they had been forgotten like they had been brushed under the rug that's on fresh air where can we the bait today's big issues without getting attack for speaking our minds one a provides a safe smart place for tough conversations every weekday and the friday news roundup breaks down the weeks top stories i'm joshua johnson check out the one a podcast on the npr one app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

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"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fresh air" Discussed on Fresh Air

"We'll be right back this is fresh air do support for this podcast in the following message comes from little passports your child can become is knowledgeable in worldly as a news reporter with a subscription so little passports explore a new country each month as packages arrived featuring faraway places in your first few months get a real amethyst from brazil and assume she eraser set from japan bind special offers for fresh air listeners at little passports dot com slash fresh so i'm not sure why we know who invented money but we do know who invented bitcoin except we don't know because because that's a good read in it yeah it's a it's a pseudonym he never really revealed you he was even you than covering this fair for years don't know who he is right i i i don't even know what he he right i was going to say that it so people frequently say he she they are at in case it is a sort of autonomists you know being that of some sort but what you know what we do know is that the person who first introduced this back in in two thousand eight and then released the first software a few months later uh went by the name of the toshiba komodo and communicated essentially only by email um would would get on sort of chats and and and sort of social media forums but always under that soast to the toshi knock komodo pseudonym.

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