19 Burst results for "Freedom Democratic Party"

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:57 min | 8 months ago

Who Is Activist, Ella Baker

"From Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny. Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Very. Excited to present our. September. This month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up and fought against injustice and for a better world today, we're talking about a woman who doesn't often receive the recognition she deserves for her behind the scenes activism. As a prolific activist, she had a hand in society changing work major civil rights leaders turned to her for her organizational skills. Let's talk about Ella Josephine Baker. Sisters in the struggle for human dignity and freedom. I am here to represent. The struggle that has gone on for three hundred years. Ella Baker was born on December thirteenth nineteen o three in Norfolk Virginia. She grew up in North Carolina on the very same land where her grandparents were enslaved a few decades earlier. Ella's mother was part of the Local Missionary Association. She helped feed their hungry neighbors and encouraged women to be a force for positive change this activism and kindness stuck with Allah. Ellis studied at Shaw University in Raleigh North Carolina and graduated as Class Valedictorian nineteen twenty seven shortly after she moved to New York City in Nineteen thirty ELA joined several women's organizations and served as national director of the Young Negroes Cooperative League that organization focused on supporting the economic development of the black community in nineteen forty Ella started working as a field secretary for the N. Double A. C., p. she moved up to work as director of branches after just three years. She later also served as the president of the New York. City branch. Then in Nineteen fifty-six, Ella Co created the organization in French. Which bought the oppressive Jim Crow laws in the south. The following year a move to Atlanta to help with Martin Luther King Junior's Organization the southern Christian Leadership Conference. At that time, the SC L. C. was a brand new venture. It was created after successes like the Montgomery bus boycott black leaders including Martin Luther. King Junior created the organization to assemble more boycotts and. Throughout the south. But for the venture to be successful, it would take a masterful organizer while Martin Luther King Junior took the reins as the SEC's public figurehead Ella worked behind the scenes setting the organization's agenda and framing the issues. She organized the crusade for citizenship a campaign to support voting rights. For African Americans, she also helped Rodney Atlanta s ELC headquarters and even served as a temporary director for several months after the resignation of the previous office holder, Ellis desire to focus on the issues and to have influence over the. Direction often clashed with the group's main. Right, as ellos considering resigning in nineteen sixty radical act of civil disobedience inspired her to take a new direction on February first black college students in Greensboro. North Carolina where I'm from refused to leave a lunch counter. Worth's where they'd been denied service for Joseph McNeil Franklin McCain and their to college dorm mates that time was February first one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty. The day they walked into a Greensboro. Woolworth's and sat down at the segregated lunch counter. Ella wrote a letter that encourage students across the south to join forces and take similar acts of protest. She also organized a meeting at Shaw University for the students who spearheaded the citizens from those meetings, the student nonviolent coordinating committee or Snick was created. snick would have a profound impact on the civil rights movement. Ella encourage snack to focus on practicing group centered activism rather than leader centered activism in contrast to the SE L. C.'s leadership style with Mlk at the forefront. Under, this method, of Leadership Snick ran many successful initiatives including the nineteen sixty one freedom rides and the nineteen sixty, four freedom summer and Mississippi L. continued her activism through the sixties. She was also a consultant for the Southern Conference Education Fund and organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic. Party she later returned to New York City and continued her work until she passed away on. December thirteenth nineteen eighty six. She was eighty three years old. Ella Baker was an incredible driving force behind much of the public civil rights work. We learn about in school while she never sought the spotlight she was committed to improving life for future generations

Ella Ella Josephine Baker Ella Co Consultant North Carolina New York City Greensboro Martin Luther King Shaw University Ellis Martin Luther Kaplan L. C. Southern Christian Leadership Raleigh North Carolina Woolworth Joseph Mcneil Franklin Mccain Atlanta Montgomery
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:16 min | 8 months ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"More at safety action center, not pg dot com. Coming up in eight o'clock a half an hour from now. Science Friday. The topic. One of the topics is skin Science Cove. It has led some people to shower less. The upside better skin joined science Friday for the history of why we started showering in the first place and redefine healthy skin. Les will hear about Aya was devastating to rate show weather event and why it was so unexpected. It's 7 30. Good evening. This is fresh air. I'm Dave Davies in for Terry Gross. Let's get back to Terry's 2014 interview about Freedom Summer a movement in 1964 to open the poles to African Americans in Mississippi. Freedom. Summer was organized by Snick. The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, which brought down about 700 students, mostly white students from the North to help register African Americans to vote. Racism was so institutionalized in Mississippi that it was dangerous for black people to register. The presence of the white students helped focus national attention on what African Americans were facing. Harry spoke to Charles Cobb, one of the organizers of Freedom Summer and with Stanley Nelson, who directed a documentary about freedom Summer now streaming on PBS dot or GE. Nelson explained how freedom summer led to the formation of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. 1964 was a presidential election year and Lyndon Johnson would be nominated for for the presidency in Atlantic City. So the idea of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party was to take an alternate delegation. To the convention in Atlantic City and try to obtain the right to be seated as opposed to the regular delegation from Mississippi. The regular delegation from Mississippi was all white. It was no way an African American person could become part of that delegation, and that was against the rules of the Democratic National Convention. So the idea was we will. We will take our own delegation, which is integrated, and we'll take that and get a hearing at the Democratic National Convention and be seated as the delegation from Mississippi instead of what was called a regular delegation. The all White delegation Charles Cobb did the members of Snake who organized Mississippi Freedom Summer think that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party would actually be seated. At the Democratic Convention and be allowed to replace the official Mississippi delegation. Did you see it as a more symbolic action, or did you think we have a chance? In the real world of politics. This might actually happen. I think most of the delegation felt they would be seated and many and sneak and core felt the delegation would be seated. Our lawyer, Joe Row famous Democratic Party lawyer Was encouraging on this point. If you can get the story out, you will be seated and I think the delegation would have been seated accepted. Lyndon Johnson pulled all his political levers ruthlessly. To force sympathetic Democrat from the north and from the West, in particular to back away from the M F D P. Let me add something about about the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in the and the convention, the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party got what it wanted at the convention. It's got its hearing at the convention, and it had an incredible lineup, which was televised from the convention. So Martin Luther King spoke in favor of the Mississippi Democratic Party. Redish Warner, whose husband had recently been killed, spoke and Fannie Lou Hamer was kind of like the cleanup hitter. She was the final speaker who spoke eloquently about what it meant to be African American Mississippian and denied her right and they really won the day. I mean, they had won, they had swayed the convention to their side. Until Lyndon Johnson stepped in. What did President Johnson do to prevent to try to prevent the Mississippi delegation from being seated at the convention? He threatened people, he said, You know, you want to be a judge. Not if you support the M F D p He used Hubert Humphrey as his hatchet man. In fact, Us dangling the vice presidency over he would hump for his head saying, You want to be vice president. The vice presidential candidate. You help me squash this challenge by the Mississippi. Democratic Party. He used the labor unions water, Ruth. Told Martin Luther King, If you back the FDP, don't look for any more money from us to Martin with the King's credit. He never backed away from the M F D P. This's a political ruthlessness. That's not unusual in American politics. You've seen it with Tammany Hall politicians. You saw it with a Dick daily political machine. And you've seen it in Boston and Other places. It's that kind of political ruthlessness that was brought to bear at the 1964 Democratic Party National Convention to make sure That that m f d p Freedom Democratic Party delegation didn't get seated. What is your understanding of why LBJ didn't want the alternate delegation seated. He had already signed the Civil Rights Act. He worked really hard to get that past. So what was his fear? Well, I think you know LBJ was a complicated man. You know, he wanted the Democratic National Convention to be kind of a coronation. You know of him and for it to go very, very smoothly from all indications he was really paranoid that Bobby Kennedy had a plan and that any disruption in the convention would then allow Bobby Kennedy To enact his plan, and his plan, then would be to kind of sees the mo mentum and somehow place himself in position to get the nomination for the presidency of the United States. It's ridiculous, but from multiple sources that we did in the film that was part of Johnson's thinking. So a compromise was reached. What was the compromise? I don't think a compromise was was ever really reached. And Charlie, you should probably proposed. I'll put it that way. No, it wasn't proposed amount now. No, no Bob Moses, Fannie Lou Hamer Ed King, who was a member of the delegation, Aaron Henry, who was the head of the delegation. Several other people were in conversation, inhuman Humphrey's hotel suite about a compromise. If Green, who was congresswoman from Oregon, had put a very serious proposal on the table, saying that Each delegation would that be asked to swear loyalty to the Democratic Party and to the presidential Nominee that emerged out of convention and delegates who swore that would be seated both from the M F, D P and the All White because The Mississippi delegation had come to Atlantic City, the Democratic Party National Convention. Having announced their support for Barry Goldwater. Precisely because that's one of the aftermath of the 1960 for Civil Rights Act. What happened during this meeting Wass, somebody knock on the door. And said, Turn on the television and look and there was Walter Mondale announcing a compromise. Now that compromise and not been discussed with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In the compromise, he announced Wass that the Democratic Party was prepared to seat Two Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegates as honorary delegates, and then they proceeded the name who those delegates would be Fannie Lou Hamer and Edwin King. And they would be given some kind of special status. At the convention. Well, what irritated the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party People wass that one they presumed a name who the two diets.

Mississippi Freedom Democratic Mississippi Democratic Party Mississippi Democratic Party Freedom Democratic Party Democratic Party National Conv Democratic Convention President Johnson Fannie Lou Hamer Martin Luther King Atlantic City Hubert Humphrey Charles Cobb M F D Student Nonviolent Coordinatin Wass Barry Goldwater
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:29 min | 8 months ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on KQED Radio

"South Asian woman to accept the nomination for vice president for a major political party. Black women have been an essential part of the Democratic Party. For more than half a century. A recent Pew study found that 87% of black women identified as Democrats, making them one of the most party loyal demographics in the country. Yet they've often been sidelined, forced to fight for a seat at the table and left off the pages of history. Some more numbers to consider only 47 black women have ever served in Congress in Kamala Harris is only the second black woman to be a senator. The black women have helped shape the ideology of the party and have played a central role in the lead up to the 2020 election when a record breaking 122 black women filed to run for congressional seats. I'm Bridget Bergen in Vega. Marking this historic moment and reflecting on the critical but often overlooked work of black women in the Democratic Party. That's where we start today on the take away. Joining me now is co brag. A reporter for the 19th, a nonprofit newsroom with a focus on gender policy and politics. Thank you for joining US co Thank you for having me. And also with us is Cat Stafford, an Associated Press reporter on race and ethnicity. Hi cat. Hi. How are you doing? Bridget? I'm great. And Kat. I want to start with big picture. Black women are one of the most consistent voting demographics in the country, and this holds true across this diverse population. What drives the turnout. Black women when they hit the poles when they usher their families their frames, they know that they are not just voting for a simple reason. Many of these women believe they're voting for life or death through their communities. When you look at The legacy of black women. Black people in this nation. This nation has AH, long history of racism. We're still dealing with the effects of slavery and systemic racism still permeates through the fabric of this nation. So when black women hits of the poles, they head to the polls with that on their shoulders with that in their mind, so When you have calmly hairs reaching this new level for black women within politics is quite an emotional moment for many of them and cat despite being faithful Democrat voters. How has the Democratic Party sideline black women? So historically, black women have been the ones who have organized. I believe Camel hair stated disinherit expected, she noted the legacy of black women those who came before her, she noticed that black women have rallied. They have marched. They have fought for many of these movements that have led us to this point today, for that was the civil rights movement or the fight. For women to get the right to vote, which we know that that come into fruition for black women until many, many years later. So when you talk about the legacy of black women, they are the ones who have been the backbone of the struggles in America, and that, in turn, though, has forced them to be on the sidelines because of racism because of sexism. Which in many cases only women of color face that double edged toward Cho. Senator Harris is now one of the few examples of the black woman in politics who actually has a seat at the highest table. What's the significance of this moment in terms of the leadership opportunity, but also the burden? Yes. So I think that Senator Harris got to this in her speech last night in talking about the multifaceted nous of this moment. She's really specific about where she fits into the legacy of this nation by sharing a lot of parts of What made her her She talked about. Howard University. She talked about being a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority incorporated, and all of these things made her who she was since she was born at that hospital in Oakland. I think this is the first time for a lot of people that she was very, very specific. In talking about who her family was who she thought to be the people that have gotten her to this moment whether they have what they are alive to see her or not, And I think this is happening in the moment of Democratic National Convention. That is, they keep referring to is an unconventional convention because of this moment that we're facing this pandemic. And she was one of the only people to mention that the 19th amendment, the centennial of which we're celebrating this week did what did not successfully achieve access to the ballot for all I think it is definitely a landmark on. But it's something that minors room is named after a bout with an asterisk right to denote the fact that not all people, not all women got the right to vote following this amendment to the Constitution. And I think that's really important. And I think she knows that in this moment as both Senator Harris and Michelle Obama have stated in their speeches that they love their country, But I think when you hear the on ly black woman in the U. S Senate, and if she is elected to the lighthouse will leave that Senate without a black woman there Toe. She talks about opening doors. Being the first of many, but without someone else to take up that baton. I think that when she especially black women say that they're fighting for equality and access in this country out of a love that is also carrying a lot of what was in the trauma and the legacy of what it means to fight for the ballot, And I think She did an excellent job of mentioning a lot of black women who I hope people will learn about married Church. Terrell Mary McLeod Bethune, Diane Nash, Fannie Lou Hamer. I'm so glad you mentioned that go because, you know, I want to spend a moment talking about some of those women that Senator Harris mentioned last night. You know, Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist. Lots of our listeners will know her work well, but for those who don't Can you talk about her impact and influence on the Democratic Party? Absolutely so I have roots in Mississippi and so standing. Lou Hamer is wanted in so many ways. She was a farmer. She was a sharecropper, and she fought to push the party toe where it needed to go. To push the party to see women like her who had carried this nation who had built this nation right and yet could not be elected. Did not have this party did not make room And so she founded the Freedom Democratic Party. Really push the party where she wanted to see you go. And I think that that's really important to lift her name up in this moment, right when you know Fannie Lou Hamer was fighting for food access for farmers in the Mississippi Delta, who I mean the irony is so burning that like to be a farmer to be a sharecropper. To be the descendant of the enslaved and yet be hungry, And we're now in this moment where so many people are facing hunger in this pandemic and racism and just so many dueling factors that make life really hard. I think the lift her name up is really important and also a nod to the work that Senator Harris and Joe Biden and will have to do to honor the fact that there are a lot of people who want to see the Democratic Party incorporate people further on the left. Andi incorporate those eyes and pushing further and the reality is there's a lot of criticism. Because of their records, with the crime Bill and Senator Harris coming from a law enforcement background. We're in the moment where we're still facing, you know the ramifications of the uprisings who saw this summer? And people want to see more..

Democratic Party Senator Harris Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom Democratic Party Bridget Bergen senator Kamala Harris vice president US congressional reporter Congress Alpha Kappa Alpha Associated Press Vega Mississippi Cat Stafford Howard University
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:13 min | 8 months ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Work of black women in the Democratic Party. That's where we start today on the take away. Joining me now is co brag. A reporter for the 19th, a nonprofit newsroom with a focus on gender policy and politics. Thank you for joining US co Thank you for having me. And also with us is Cat Stafford, an Associated Press reporter on race and ethnicity. Hi cat. Hi. How are you doing? Bridget? I'm great. And Kat. I want to start with big picture. Black women are one of the most consistent voting demographics in the country. And this holds true across this diverse population. What drives the turnout? Black women when they hit the poles when they usher their families, their frames, they know that they are not just voting for a simple reason. Many of these women believe they're voting. For life or death for their communities. When you look at the legacy of black women, black people in this nation, this nation has AH, long history of racism. We're still dealing with the effects of Slavery and systemic racism still permeates through the fabric of this nation. So when black women hits of the poles, they head to the polls with that on their shoulders with that in their mind, So when you have camel hairs reaching this new level for black women within politics is quite an emotional moment for many of them. Venkat despite being faithful Democrat voters. How has the Democratic Party sidelined black women So historically, black women have been the ones who have organized. I believe, Kamala Harris stated disinherit acceptance speech, she noted. The legacy of black women those who came before her. She noted that black women have rally they have marched. They have fought for many of these movements that have led us to this point today, for that was the silver rights movement or the fight for women to get the right to vote, which we know that that come into fruition for black women until many, many years later. So when you talk about the legacy of black women, they are the ones who have been the backbone of the struggles in America. And that, in turn, though, has forced them to be on the sidelines because of racism because of sexism, which in many cases only women of color face that double edged toward Cho. Senator Harris is now one of the few examples of the black woman in politics who actually has a seat at the highest table. What's the significance of this moment in terms of the leadership opportunity, but also the burden? Yes. So I think that Senator Harris got to this in her speech last night in talking about the multifaceted nous of this moment. She's really specific about where she fits into the legacy of this nation by sharing a lot of parts of What made her her She talked about. Howard University. She talked about being a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority incorporated, and all of these things made her who she was since she was born at that hospital in Oakland. I think this is the first time for a lot of people that she was very, very specific. In talking about who her family was who she thought to be the people that have gotten her to this moment whether they have whether they are alive to see her or not, And I think this is happening in the moment of Ah Democratic National Convention. That is, they keep referring to is an unconventional convention because of this moment that we're facing this pandemic. And she was one of the only people to mention that the 19th amendment, the centennial of which we're celebrating this week did what did not successfully achieve access to the ballot for all I think it is definitely a landmark. And that is something that my newsroom is named after a bout with an asterisk right to denote the fact that not all people, not all women got the right to vote following this amendment to the Constitution. And I think that's really important. And I think she knows that in this moment as both Senator Harris and Michelle Obama have seen in their speeches that they love their country, But I think when you hear the on ly black woman in the U. S Senate, and if she is elected to the White House will leave that Senate without a black woman. They're toe. She talks about opening doors being the first of many, but without someone else to take up that baton. I think that when she especially black women say that they're fighting for equality and access in this country out of a love that is also carrying a lot of what cat was saying. The trauma and the legacy of what it means to fight for the ballot. And I think She did an excellent job of mentioning a lot of black women who I hope people will learn about married Church. Terrell Mary McLeod Bethune, Diane Nash, Fannie Lou Hamer. I'm so glad you mentioned that co because, you know, I want to spend a moment talking about some of those women that Senator Harris mentioned last night. You know, Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist. Lots of our listeners will know her work well, but for those who don't Can you talk about her impact and influence on the Democratic Party? Absolutely so I have roots in Mississippi and so standing. Lillehammer is iconic in so many ways. She was a farmer. She was a sharecropper, and she fought to push the party toe where it needed to go. To push the party to see women like her who had carried this nation who had built this nation right and yet could not be elected. Did not have this party did not make room And so she founded. The Freedom Democratic Party really pushed the party where she wanted to see it. Go. And I think that that's really important toe lift her name up in this moment, right when you know Fannie Lou Hamer was fighting for food access for farmers in the Mississippi Delta, who I mean, the irony is so burning that like to be a farmer to be a sharecropper to be the descendant of the enslaved. And yet be hungry. And we're now in this moment where so many people are facing hunger in this pandemic and racism and just so many dueling factors that make life really hard, I think for lift her name up. Is really important and also a nod to the work that Senator Harris and Joe Biden will have to do to honor the fact that there are a lot of people who want to see the Democratic Party incorporate people further on the left, Andi corporate's dies and push him further and the reality is there's a lot of criticism. Because of their records, with the crime Bill and Senator Harris coming from a law enforcement background. We're in the moment where we're still facing, you know the ramifications of the uprisings who saw this summer? And people want to see more. Can't let let's talk a moment about Shirley Chisholm famously on bought an embossed. She was the first black woman elected to the house and then ran for president in 1972. What affected just seeing a black woman run for president at that time have on future generations, including someone like Senator Harris. I'm so glad you brought Shirley Chisholm because I I just had a story where I actually spoke with Hazel Deuce. Who's this long time activist 88 years old and she walked me through that moment of when she saw Shirley Chisholm. Get on that stage in 1972 in Miami and for her, and for so many black women, it was more than just the historical moment. It was a moment of hope. Ah, moment that they knew would open more doors a moment that they knew that eventually would potentially lead to opportunity for someone to come through, like humble hairs, and that's really The legacy of Chisholm. That's the legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer. That's the legacy of all of these black women who have come before Camilla hairs and I just thought it was so poignant last night when she said That as Americans, we all stand on their shoulders. And that's true because once again black women have been at the forefront of these fights for so long. It is just now that people have fully began to realize. Their power in the strength that they bring with them to this table. Cat. The pandemic overshadows everything about this election in this convention, and Senator Harris spoke to that last night, connecting it to the work we need to do to fight racism. This virus..

Senator Harris Democratic Party Fannie Lou Hamer Shirley Chisholm Freedom Democratic Party US reporter Cat Stafford Associated Press Alpha Kappa Alpha Mississippi Howard University Lillehammer Bridget Kat Terrell Mary McLeod Bethune Venkat America Cho
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"The Freedom Democrats chose Fannie Lou Hamer as their most important witness before the credentials committee. She spoke for eight minutes without notes. Her hands clasped in front of her. Mrs Hamer told the story of her beating in the why known jail the previous year her crime again using the whites only restroom at a bus station WHO LINE. The Bay came to my fail. One of these men were the State Highway Patrol. Said we're GONNA make you wish you would be the jailers. Put Her in cell where two black men were locked up. The authorities ordered the black man to beat Mrs Hamer with a blackjack a police baton feet on the ground state highway patrolman auto the Second Negro to take the blackjack I began to scream and one white man got up and began to beat in my head empowerment to hook one white man address had worked up on. He walked over on address. I address down and he addressed back up. I was in jail when Matt Albers was murdered. All of its own account of we won't register to become first class and up. The Freedom Democratic Party is not treated now our question a male American the land of the free in the home of brain. We have to sleep with our phones off the hook because find my threaten Dana. Because we won't to did some human being stated stated the case and she told her story and told the story of the People Mississippi and we really thought we had one today several Mississippi and said they believed that if the credentials committee had taken a vote right then they would have seated the Freedom Democrats and sent the all White Democrats home but party leaders intervened Lyndon Johnson was afraid he'd lose any support. He had among white southerners in the November general election if the Freedom Democrats the IMF DP were seated Johnson asked Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey his choice for vice president to negotiate with the freedom. Democrats Bob Moses. Johnson is the President Johnson. Says if you want to be vice president then you deliver this so it straight POW politics the MVP. You get this monkey off. Our back. Humphries young protege from Minnesota and another future vice president is Walter. Mondale at Humphries. Direction Mondale offer the Freedom. Democrats a compromise to members of their delegation. One black and one white would be seated as delegates at large members of the all white party would be seated only if they promised to support Johnson for president and the National Party promised never again to see a segregated delegation Mondale announced the proposed compromise at the Convention. It may not satisfy everybody the screamed on the right or the freemen the left but we think it is they compromise. Everybody rejected the plan. Most members of the all White Mississippi Party were goldwater supporters. After Mondale's proposal all but four of them left the convention. The Freedom Democrats said no to the compromise to UNITA blackwell. The organizer we heard from earlier from Myers Ville was one of the party's delegates The compromise was was two seats and MS Hayman said we. We don't take no two seats all of our sixty caves that no two seats I would say first of all They came with a powerful moral case. I interviewed Walter. Mondale in Nineteen ninety-four recounting the indisputable fact that Blacks and Mississippi were sealed out of the Democratic Party that the delegation that had been officially sent from Mississippi which was all white was selected on a rigged discriminatory basis and that. Our party finally had to do something about what was Moral disgrace in the end. They just didn't have the guts to do it. Snack staff member Frank Smith. Everybody agreed with us off knew it was wrong. The all new violated the constitution. They all knew it had to be done sooner or later. They all knew all of the right things they just couldn't do it at the time and Disillusioned also great deal. I this losing actually the civil rights movement quite considerably and I think it was a great disappointment. John Lewis this could have been. I think the real final Straw that set in a period of discontent and appear of bitterness and a D. Deep despair on the part of a lot of young people that work so hard right after freedom. Summer young organizers felt they had taken on American racism and got trampled lead registered few black voters in Mississippi. Their challenge to the Democratic Party had been turned aside Dave. Dennis was the Mississippi Director of the Congress of racial equality but it achieved more than it exposed to system. Okay from top to bottom and what it did is supposed to show that that there was a conspiracy to some extent unwritten. You know there was just so far that people are going to make changes to work on step on too many people's toes at this time in this country in really what type of Iraq this country was pulled others looking back later had a more positive. Take on the summer. And what it accomplished. I think that every time we got someone to register the vote every time we got someone to attempt to rich about whether they were successful or not. Every time we got someone white allowed to stay in their home every time we got someone to stand up and say yes we had changed now. You don't do that and then undo it two weeks later and go back and become what you were before that act. People came out of the Mississippi Summer Project and looked at the questions that affected our lives ever after questions about gender questions about sexuality questions about war and peace and We had Real knowledge of a way to function what we were unable to do it. Maybe IN MISSISSIPPI BUT WE ABLE TO BILL O. MISSISSIPPI BILL ON ATLANTA'S CITY. And I think we did it in some the Selma to Montgomery March in the spring of nineteen sixty five was followed a few months later by the signing of a landmark bill to Mississippi Summer Project laid the foundation created the climate created environment for the passage of the nineteen sixty-five to make it possible for hundreds and thousands and millions of blacks to become registered. Devoted.

Freedom Democrats Mississippi Mondale Democrats White Mississippi Party Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom Democratic Party Lyndon Johnson Democratic Party vice president president Minnesota State Highway Patrol Matt Albers Senator Hubert Humphrey Humphries John Lewis Dana
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Scene On Radio

Scene On Radio

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Scene On Radio

"The Nation's response to the killing of white civil rights workers drove home a central point of Freedom Summer Volunteer Robbie. Osman told me for the first time. He really grasped the double standard that valued white lives more than black lives a double standard. Not just in the south but embedded in. Us Culture the very reason that we were there as white college students was that unless the country's attention was focused by by the presence of those people that this country was accustomed to caring about namely White College Students Nothing would happen. And if it was only people who this country was not accustomed to carrying about namely Black Mississippians. Then nothing would happen. And I think that what embarrasses me is the extent to which I was capable of forgetting are underestimating that. I'm it's not that I didn't know it it's that I didn't feel it. You will look out. Their new highway patrol would be sitting in white and police would be right here. They would always be because this was the corner. You know aaliyah. During the summer of Nineteen Sixty four UNITA blackwell's home became a focal point. For Civil Rights Activity as project director for Issaquah County in the Delta Blackwell had summer volunteers sleep on the floor effort to room house. And she oversaw the county's voter registration efforts because it was album daily operation. You know it wasn't like you was at home and going to prepare Get up and clean up your house and and do a meal and sit around and talk to people are good workers. I'm this was it. You know you ate. You slept you. Did everything in terms of voter registration volunteer Joe. More of Minnesota and Mississippi and Rosie head were among those who spent the summer looking for potential black voters and members for the new Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. So men going going door to door. Usually we were in pairs. While we were always in pairs usually a black person and a white person we will go from house to house and talk to people and try to encourage them to come out meetings and explain to them how they could get registered to vote in what you know good. It would do them if they could get ready to be a home on the side of the road and you'd have to park your car and you knew that if anybody came by while you were parked there if it was anybody who is related to the clan of the White Citizens Council or some racist. They know your car and your license plate so you're immediately putting the people you're talking to at risk a lot of time. We will get put out of the people they wouldn't let us pay as the gate or they'll just say They didn't want to talk to us. They didn't want to be involved in the maze and they would just be afraid to talk on the surface. The voter registration drive failed out of half a million black mississippians of voting age. Fewer than two thousand were approved as voters during freedom. Summer but that was expected the point was to show the country. How the state systematically disenfranchised black voters at the same time though a lot more black people signed up for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party which would soon make history at the Democratic National Convention..

Mississippi Freedom Democratic Osman White Citizens Council Us Issaquah County White College Mississippi Democratic Party Delta Blackwell UNITA director Minnesota Rosie head Joe
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

13:20 min | 1 year ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Oh Lee. So she was given the name cokie by her brother. Thomas who had trouble pronouncing Kerlin show stuck in okay. Perfect to her father was Thomas Hale boggs senior a former Democratic majority leader of the House who served in Congress for more than three decades before he disappeared on a campaign campaign flight in Alaska. Like just gone in. Nineteen seventy-two literally all. Npr wrote about that. That was the lowest ended. We'RE GONNA circle back into an update presumed dead. Yes but the fact that the whole sentences. Her father was a congressperson and then his plane disappeared. It was down. Oh found the plane. All dead just disappeared. Yeah Hey hey planes because you can just disappear you just disappear. So her father disappeared on a campaign flight in Alaska in nineteen seventy two. Her mother Lindy Claiborne. Boggs took her husband's seat and served for seventeen years. La La Ninety. Thank you lady that he bugs. I was like Oh my God I mean this is thanks. Liberty wore one might or nine. She also served. Lindy also served as the US ambassador to the Vatican. Oh so that was super interesting. S Cookie Roberts is the only member of her immediate family not to run for Congress. Oh my God. I am the black sheep right at Thanksgiving. Aw but we're cookie. Roberts considered her role as a journalist and political analysis analyst as her way of like giving back and I mean she's not obviously not in the political world. Obviously that's her life's were met. She won Roberts numerous awards during her long journalism including three emmys. The Edward R Murrow award. She was inducted into the broadcasting and Cable Hall of fame. Love and she was recognized by the American women in Radio and Television as one of the fifty. Greatest Women in the history of broadcasting. Yeah cokie Roberts Zakharov cookie robbery love that I was. That was one of those. Like you know where you get the alerts on your phone that so and so is dead hand. Yeah it's a bummer of your Aubert's okay. I don't know if we can get this going. This like connection between people. The next one is completely different. Great I all of them are completely different. Great Okay so my next one is Fannie Lou Hammer and so this is all coming from the women's National History Museum And Debra Michaels who edited this piece. It's such a great website the national hip What do you have any loo? No but I have somebody who she who the person who wrote your material row yours material for somebody that we have similar interests. Okay this is fanny Lou Hammer. So Hammer was born on October. Six nineteen seventeen in Montgomery County Mississippi the twentieth and last child of Sharecroppers Luella and James Townsend. She grew up in poverty and at age. Six Hammer joined her family picking cotton by age twelve. She left school to work in. Nineteen forty four. She married Perry Hammer and the couple toiled on the Mississippi plantation owned by B. D. marlow until nineteen sixty two. So this sort of background information about her. This is like it all comes to so nineteen sixty. One Hammer received a hysterectomy by white doctor without her consent. Undergoing surgery to remove a uterine tumor such forced sterilization of black women as a way to reduce the black population was so widespread that it was dubbed a Mississippi Appendectomy. Oh I know yeah so. That's summer the summer of nineteen sixty one hammer attended a meeting led by civil rights activists James Foreman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee or the S. MCC C. And James Bevan of the southern Christian Leadership Conference the SEC Hammer was incensed by efforts to deny blacks the right to vote she became an S. NCC organizer and on August thirty first nineteen sixty two lead seventeen volunteers to register to vote at the Indian Ola Mississippi. Courthouse denied the right to vote due to an unfair literacy tests. The group was harassed on their way home when police stopped their bus and find them one hundred dollars for a trumped up charge that the bus was to yellow. What I know I know Jesus Christ in June of nineteen sixty three after successfully registering to vote hammer and several other. Black women were arrested for sitting in a whites. Only bus station restaurant in Charleston South Carolina at jailhouse she and several of the women were brutally beaten leaving hammer with a lifelong injury from a blood clot in her eye. Kidney damage and like damage so nineteen sixty four hammers. National Reputation soared as she co founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party which challenged the local democratic parties effort to block Black Participation Hammer and other IM- FTP members went to the Democratic National Convention. That year arguing to be recognized as the official delegation when Hammer spoke before the credentials committee calling for a mandatory mandatory. Integrated states delegations president Lyndon Johnson held a televised press conference so she would not get any television. Oh she was so afraid of her. Wow but her speech with its poignant. Description of racial prejudice in the south was televised later by nineteen sixty eight hammers vision for a Racial Party. And delegations had become a reality and hammer was a member of. Mississippi's first integrated delegation. Wow Hammer Victoria gray and and divine became the first black women to stand in the US. Congress when they unsuccessfully protested a Mississippi House election Then in Nineteen seventy-one. Hammer helped found the national women's Political Caucus. Wow Yeah and so. This is other sort of facts. Frustrated by the political process hammer turned to economics as a strategy for greater racial equality in nineteen sixty eight. She began a pig bank to provide free pigs for black farmers to breed raise and slaughter a year later. She launched the freedom farm cooperative buying land so that blacks could own and farm collectively with the assistance of donors. She purchased six hundred and forty acres and launched a cup store boutique and sewing enterprise. She singlehandedly ensured that two hundred units of low income housing were built many still exist today. The F. C. Or the freedom farm cooperative lasted until the mid nineteen seventies at its heyday. It was among the largest employers in the Sunflower County and then in nineteen seventy seven hammer of breast cancer at the age of fifty nine. But she's like a credited as like when you talk about the people who suffrage movements yes especially like you know feminist suffrage move people Fannie Lou Hammer is like often left off the list but she was like insert like she was one of the first women to do first black women to do so many things and like and like really what is effectively. What we now call micro grants. Yeah like I don't know if that she invented them. I don't know the history of micro me as a black woman in the south yeah was effectively putting two purpose micro grants for the betterment of the community. That's crazy love Fannie Lou. Wow Great. We'll we're going to do my complement to that. Which I'm sure you've heard of this person. I just I felt like I I had heard of her. Yeah and I didn't know as much as I should about her? Yeah he's definitely somebody who's talked about but not forgiving space but not enough so we're giving space. This is also. This is the link for this one coming from the National Women's History Museum with information written by Debra michaels goodness high some talk about Shirley Chisholm. Okay yes Shirley. So Shirley Anita's eight hill. Chisholm was the first African American woman in Congress and the first woman and African American to seek the nomination for president of the United States from one of the two major political parties. Yeah so she was born in Brooklyn New York on November heyhoe on November thirtieth nineteen twenty four. She was the oldest of four daughters to immigrant. Parents Charles Saint Hill. Who's a factory worker from? Guyana and Ruby Seal Saint Hill who was a seamstress from Barbados Love Shirley graduated from Brooklyn College where her professors encouraged her to get into politics but she considered herself to have quote a double handicap being both black and female ti so she. After graduating from Brooklyn college she worked in a nursery school and then went on to get her master's in Early Childhood Education. From Columbia. Even though she had like pushed the political stuff away she did start to get involved in local clubs which is like her trajectory is like star local our local and work your way up and she. I mean her. Biography is amazing and you know obviously so she was. She got her masters from Columbia. She got involved with the League of Women. Voters the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and W. P. The Urban League and the Democratic Party Club in bed. Stuy Brooklyn Lovat. So she was like I'm Gonna. She was like no. I said No. I'm going to like involve our her. Yeah Yeah so then. In nineteen sixty four Chisholm ran for and became the second African American in the New York. State legislature yes love it and then in nineteen sixty eight. She ran for and won her seat in Congress. Yes she yes black woman and Congress. Thank you dean sixty eight nineteen that is that is like literally they same time that Fannie Lou Hammer stuff is going down then okay so then She was fighting Shirley as they she was that was that was her nickname her name. She introduced more than fifty pieces of legislation in Congress and championed racial and gender equality the plight of the poor and ending the Vietnam War. Thank you Shirley Shirley. She was a CO founder of the National Women's political caucus teen seventy one and in nineteen seventy seven became the first black woman and second woman ever to serve on the powerful house. Rules Committee She so cool she so. In nineteen seventy two. She ran for the Democratic Party. Presidential nomination ran into some speed bumps much like our friend. Fanny I imagine. She was blocked from participating in televised primary debates. Yup and after taking legal action was permitted to make just one speech like Jesus the same story. It's the same story like Jesus. Battery like boy. Did Jesus give a speech? Did you miss televised? I know the same parallels yeah stories. So yeah so. She was blocked from participating in televised primary debates and after taking legal action was permitted to make just one speech still students women and minorities followed the Chisholm trail. She entered twelve primaries in earned. One hundred fifty two of the electoral delegates which was ten percent of the total. Yeah that's not that's not bad. That's not it's not bad despite an under-financed campaign contentiousness from the predominantly male congressional black caucus. She was absorbed by all that she was able to get ten percent of the vote. She retired from Congress in nineteen eighty. Three she served a long time. Yeah that's a long time. Say Twenty years and then she taught at Mount Holyoke College and Co founded. The National Political Congress of Black Women Love. She moved to Florida in Nineteen ninety-one. Good get some raise. Outta here get some Sun. At some point I forget which president was but somebody was like. Hey do you want to be ambassador to this thing? And she's like I've done my way and then she died in two thousand five mile while I know so amazing. Yep He's crazy amazing. We're going to take a quick break for a little word from our sponsors support.

Fannie Lou Hammer Congress Perry Hammer Shirley Shirley National Women Thomas Hale boggs Shirley Chisholm United States Mississippi president Mississippi Freedom Democratic Cookie Roberts Columbia Npr National Political Congress Alaska Debra Michaels Lindy Claiborne Political Caucus New York
The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

Retropod

05:10 min | 1 year ago

The unstoppable Fannie Lou Hamer

"She walked with a limp. She had a blood clot behind her eye from being severely beaten in Mississippi jail. Her name was was Fannie Lou Hamer. She was the youngest of twenty children born to black sharecroppers in Mississippi and in late nineteen sixty four for president Lyndon B Johnson was absolutely terrified of her why she was about to make make an appeal before the credentials panel at the Democratic National Convention. The potential implications were profound. Hamer represented the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party a racially integrated coalition of delegates Hamer wanted to challenge the seats of the current aren't all white democratic delegation from their state saying that they were in violation of the party's rules because they had systematically excluded excluded black citizens according to Time magazine. Johnson was worried that Hamer speech could offend the Southern Democrats whose votes he needed for reelection he wanted her silenced but Hamer had a following that rivaled that of Dr Martin Luther Author King Junior and she would not go unheard. Hamer was born in one thousand nine hundred seventeen in the Mississippi Delta. The share cropping system kept her parents in debt and without enough food to feed their twenty children in the Winter Hebrew tied rags on her feet because she often didn't have shoes. She started picking cotton when she was six years old. Aw Hamer started her civil rights work in nineteen sixty one after she was sterilized without consent during what it should have been a minor surgery she tried to register to vote in one thousand nine hundred sixty two but was turned away after she failed illiteracy literacy tests which were used in the south to discourage black people from voting the clerk asked Hamer complicated questions like interpreting the state constitution after she failed the test. She told the clerk she'd be back when Hamer returned to the plantation in that day. She was fired from her job but she wasn't defeated. Hamer became a student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee a community organizer and helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in reaction to the lack of integration in the state's Democratic Party party as a candidate from the party. She ran for Congress in nineteen sixty four against democratic incumbent Jamie L whitten at that year's Democratic Democrat National Convention. Hey made her way to the stage through a crowd of men who refused to make space for her other members of the civil rights movement including Martin Luther King Junior spoke but all eyes were on her. She then talked for thirteen minutes Mr Chairman and to could dentures committee. My name is Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer. She called for mandatory delegation an integration and recounted her experience trying to register to vote. It was the thirty first of all the night being the eighteen of US travel. Put the six miles the county courthouse in in the normal tried to register to become first. I player Hamer describes being arrested in beaten in Mississippi jail after white waitress at a rest. Stop refused her service. That's how she got the blood clot. All of this is own account. We won't be registered to become first-class. NFL Freedom Democratic Party is not beating not after her testimony humor and other other Freedom Party members discovered that Johnson a wildly tough politician had held a news conference so that national television networks could he cover her testimony live. She was livid but Johnson's efforts to silencer didn't work that that night in a hot Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer and the rest of the country watched her testimony broadcast in prime time on the evening news news less than a year later. Congress passed the Voting Rights Act and at the nineteen sixty eight convention in Chicago. He became team the first African American to be seated as a delegate. She received a standing ovation.

Mrs Fannie Lou Hamer Mississippi Freedom Democratic Atlantic City Hotel Room Hamer Mississippi Hamer Lyndon B Johnson Freedom Democratic Party Freedom Party Stop Mississippi Delta Congress Martin Luther King Dr Martin Luther Author King J Time Magazine United States Jamie L Whitten President Trump
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Maginness August twenty third nineteen sixty four you're an FBI agent assigned to infiltrate monitor civil rights activists. You're meeting with your boss FBI assistant, director Dc Deloitte in a room at the Atlantis hotel and casino in Atlantic City. Hotels, adjacent to boardwalk hall side of this year's democratic national convention loads. Looks at his no pan. Let's say you're working on the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party, congress of racial equality and student nonviolent coordinating committee. Yes, sir. Plus Martin Luther King impaired reston. What's the status of the electron avalance? We have devices place in all hotel rooms and meeting rooms that those groups will use during the convention, the only hold up as the king and Russ and rooms we are yet where they're stay the president and director are counting on us. We cannot have any surprises Deloitte is number three official in the bureau. He's leading the Cohen, tell pro operation the convention, you know, he's ambitious and views himself as Hoover's heir-apparent long with. Just about everyone else in the bureau and this operation was commissioned by president Johnson himself. So you wonder if deloche is maneuvering to have LBJ appoint him to replace the director sooner rather than later, we are prepared, sir. Once we know where king arrested will be well, install microphones and get wiretaps. We'll be doing black bag jobs nightly on all rooms looking for documents drugs and other contraband, the directors especially interested in Dr king, as you know, we've been monitoring his tell rooms for months. Yes, sir. I supervise one of those installations, then you know, he has been involved in several the as on with women late night parties and things. Yes. Those sorts of details should be included in a separate report for the directors is only and should not be shared with anyone from the White House. I cannot stress that enough. Understood sir, king's room should be monitored by a trusted agent to his notes in the tapes should be brought directly to me to not hand them over to clerk for transcription. Yes, sir. I'll be updating the. White House director Hoover in real time. So reports should be filed in a timely manner. Absolutely, sir. And they're very interested to know of any demonstrations picketing press conference other public events ahead of time. Okay. What about disruption, we have informants and all of those groups? Yes. And we have someone in every strategy meeting. They have orders to create disgreements disruptions complicate the discussions you page through your notes, we've arraigned for NBC press credentials for fourteen agents. One of our reporter agents has gained the confidence. Several leaders in the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party good. Have they obtained any insights? You'd be surprised how many people are to open up to reporters we've had several off the record conversations with leaders of the target groups already. Excellent. I can't stress enough. How much is riding on that? The president is really putting pressure on the director your orders in this monitoring operation have come to wreck from president Lyndon Johnson. The president believes his reelection depends on the success of your work is civil rights becomes the focus of media coverage. He could lose white votes in the south you shut your notebook shove it into your bag. Your I ask is check your informants to see. What room the Reverend Dr Martin Luther King junior will occupy that room when he bugs and wiretaps. FBI assistant director Dc Deloitte, later claimed in his memoirs that the civil rights monitoring operation was legal under a law that allowed the FBI to contribute to presidential security, but security was not the goal of the nineteen sixty four democratic national convention authorisation and most of the tactics placing microphones tapping phone lines without a court order and break ins what the bureau referred to as black bag jobs were simply illegal Hoover and Johnson had a personal connection for years..

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Unraveling democracy and start attacking just people having access to the ballot. It snowballs. I and the golden gopher and they go further, and so what you've seen in in even in North Carolina. It's really it's a it's an ongoing struggle in a ballot. That now they're actually just pass the voter ID law that folks have been pushing back for years and years and years, you're looking at Gerry mammoth, some of the worst gerrymandering in the country happened in south and North Carolina. Which is why you you can get more democratic votes yet. You get the Democrats get less because they'll come back the dish. I think we've got to see all this has been a orchestrated concerted effort and strategy by publican Pap party to undermine the democratic process. This is what I said over and over again, if we take this outback change a nation in those former slaves except the ratio number between blacks advice if it looks like sample in North Carolina like five thousand blacks on registered on a thousand more than Cohen changes everything in Georgia for six hundred thousand on the books on registered voters. So when when when the black votes are come to live in the south connects is why Brown allies, it changes everything for the whole nation. Yes. Right. Absolutely. From Jackson that decisively. Why lightbulbs matter we literally created by vocalist? All right in our co-founded. We've studied the movement. We study what happened in Mississippi freedom Democratic Party. We we studied the election patterns. We studied law part of what we know is we know that literally the black vote paralytic, and it's always been on the forefront. It's always been on the vanguard progressive change in this country. Always and the south at all his lands away. There's been this idea of we've got this red state blue state in many ways, the south has been kind of written off even by the Democratic Party because in presidential elections because the based on that strategy, but when you really look at progressive power, right where you really can flip and shift this nation is really is in the south is in the south and keep places outside region as well. But that minimally when we allow the voting rights of black folk in Alabama and MRs. Zippy and George that eventually don't strategies it's kind of like test rashes, eventually they come to you. And I think that we've got a really see this as an art of change. And to me, I think that we can treat this like this is one of the pieces. That's very frustrating for me. If I'm hearing the commentary on TV on the radio, and we just act like this is just something normal that, you know, the public is look what they're doing it, Wisconsin. No, we need to look at what both the doing impairs and in France right now at the end of the day, they take to the streets. This is a moment in history that if we've got a really look at this as serious as it is this is an absolute bloodless coup is really is to really unraveled foundation of democracy. To create the south, basically is is a rear votes and blue need. And when the need. Medicaid..

North Carolina Democratic Party Gerry mammoth France Brown Jackson Wisconsin Mississippi Cohen Georgia MRs. Zippy Alabama George
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Even look Carolina is really is a is an ongoing struggle in a ballot that now they're actually just passed a voter ID law that folks have been pushing back for years and years and years, you're looking at Gerry man, some of the worst gerrymandering in the country happened in south and North Carolina. Which is why you can get more democratic votes. You get the Democrats get less because dot com. The. We've got the all this has been a orchestrated concerted effort and strategy Republican Pap party to undermine the democratic process. This is what walk into said over and over again if we take this out back. Changed a nation in those former sleep fix the ratio number between blacks advice, if they looks quite sample Oskar Orlando like five hundred fifty thousand blacks on registered in two thousand one but your changes everything in Georgia for six hundred thousand on the books unregistered stays thousand move voters. So when when when the black votes are come to live in the south is why Brown allies, it changes everything for the whole nation. Yes. Right after Lutely from Jackson. Decisively. Why we've literally created by vocalist. All right on our co-founded. We've studied the movement. We study what happened in Mississippi freedom Democratic Party. We we've studied inflection patterns. We studied law part of what we know if we know that literally the black vote is catalytic, and it's always been on the forefront. It's always been on the vanguard progressive change in this country. Always and the south. That's always led the way there's been this idea of we've got this red state blue state in many ways, the south has been kind of written on even by the Democratic Party because in presidential elections because of based on that strategy, but when you really look at progressive power, right where you really can flip and shift this nation is really is in the south is in the south and key places outside region as well, but that middle when we allow the voting rights of black folk in Alabama and Mississippi and Georgia that eventually strategies.

Democratic Party Georgia Mississippi North Carolina Carolina Oskar Orlando Lutely Brown Alabama
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

15:44 min | 2 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Two three nine three eight five. We want to have a great show today. We comment we come in with the heat today. Why the Democrats losing the black vote? The love affair is over. David alexander. Bullock, live the people show broadcasting live from Ferndale Michigan from the patriotdetroit bringing. Some non traditional conservative views nontraditional, non conservative views to to this station. Look follow me on Twitter. D Alexander be follow me on Facebook. David Alexander, Bullock, share the show. We just getting started. We'll be here for the whole hour four pm to five pm eastern for those of you that adjust tuning in definitely shared a show on your Facebook page. This is going to be a very very important conversation for a couple reasons. One of the democratic the Democrats are losing their swayed better. Look, the Democrats are losing their sway. On the African American vote across the country and Michigan, obviously is very very important for the Democrats. But so are other states. We are headed towards a very very contested. At least some people think they contested midterm election, and we are inundated with Don news about Donald Trump. And the Republicans of what they're doing. Look, we want to talk about the love affairs over the the honeymoon is over the the honeymoon is over. Why did how did the Democrats are losing the black vote? How the Democrats lost the black vote? Democrats continue to lose support in the black community. And you know, I think really the Republicans have a a plan to try to reinvigorate and create build momentum for support from the African American community for the Republican party. Look, do you just tuned in to the people show? I'm sharing this stuff on all of my Facebook page is the people show shared on your Facebook page. All right, come on in and you become a part of the conversation shared on your page. You can also call in. If you want to at one eight hundred nine two three nine three eight five, and let's talk about it. Now. Let's just just so that we can kind of prime the pump here. Let me begin by saying, you know, a lot of black folks vote for the Democratic Party. Just because that's something that black folks have done, rob. You know, sense black folks really had been making forays into national politics, usually our relationship with the Democratic Party was about presidential politics. Not local politics. It was the Black Panther party that that that really began to be a political parties in places like Alabama. To handle local politics. They moved out west. We remember the Black Panther party for the guns and the berets. But really it was a movement to build local political parties, you may remember Fannie, Lou Hamer who went and contra Hubert Humphrey and contra Dr Martin Luther King, a black delegation, Mississippi freedom Democratic Party, but really was a move for self-determination political self-determination having their own party since then there has been this kind of love affair between black America and the Democrats. But I think that the honeymoon is over I think the love affair is fading away. Now, if you go back far enough, you'll discover that most Democrats historically were southerners and supported segregation and plantations and all kinds of things, and that it was ABRAHAM LINCOLN a Republican that made a big contribution with respect to the emancipation proclamation did not free to slaves, but was much more than any democrat would have done at that time. So. You know, the love affair with whatever party Republican democrat. You know, if you have a blind love affair for political party than I just had to say, you're an idiot. And there's no need to vote for party. If that party doesn't do anything for you. And the dams have been losing momentum. Black folks are rethinking the Democratic Party. It's not just meeting with Trump is not just Jim Brown meeting with Trump is not just Steve Harvey meeting with Trump is not just, sir. Is not just passed a John gray and other pastors meeting with Trump, it's bigger than that. You know, it's not that the African American community is going pro Republican so much as it is that black folks have really beginning to think the now is not a ton split the vote to rich white bowl men that are Republicans are worth it. Well, you know, thank you Commissioner all from bend harbor for tuning in. I'm not talking about splitting the vote. I'm talking about getting something for your vote. And I think we had to really think about what have we gotten for the vote. Now, if I'm going to if I'm going to vote, and I'm going to vote on Bolton, I'm voting green party candidates. That's an I'm doing people really need to take a look at the green party. Only reason why green the green party has not had as much success as other parties is because people haven't voted for. It's not about splitting the vote is by getting something for you vote. And we are already we being in most of the people. I talked to already know that, you know, no matter who I vote for I get the same thing. I'm glad some people. Get into this conversation because we got folks on the lie. But let's talk about it for the next forty five minutes or so the love of after this go the Democrats was wrong. Okay. Not the words, but you'll get the point the JJ. I hope I hit this button. Right JJ. I've been doing this for a couple of weeks. Now, I don't I don't remember how to do this every week. All right. I did it J. Good afternoon. You're on the people show talk to us. Well, I'm not a black person. So I can't speak for my biscuit using store. cO judgment. I see that the Democrats for all those years were against black people with you know, what are you? What are you gonna southern confederacy? That was all Democrats. Right. But in recent stop. All you have to do about you in your own area. When I'm nineteen sixty two it was the richest city for capital and all the United States and today, it's the poor city per capita of the United States. And what does nineteen sixty two after it was the last time a Republican ran the city of Detroit. And I'm not a Republican. I'm a libertarian all I can see wherever I look wherever the Democrats have consolidated power like in the big cities you find nothing but misery. Man, J J. Jay, I'm a I'm a had to say thanks for calling in. And I'm going to have to agree with you as somebody who has voted for a democrat every time JJ, thanks for calling. I'm at the agree with you. Because look. The the party does not value the black vote, and we keep black dance getting not the foot votes. What up Marcel as actually I'm saying the party does not value to vote, but I'm going to go deeper in the show and talk and talk about some things the party actually does like Democrats have actually done some things that are actually anti the black vote. But but let's take a call because at least she's from Troy is on the air. Good afternoon. Least you talk to us. You know? So I'm independent, right? Always have always will be both the people. Party come on say it. But I will say this Atlanta, is example, couch with that gentleman. Just say it's not black people came a crash per se contract is the value of the people who are elected in office. Say that to say this degree is a democrat a black woman city card in Highland Park. Michigan right primary election bring folks polling places historic polling places. So it's senior citizens disenfranchising over two thousand elderly in the city of Highland Park. That to me says she has another agenda not in the best interest of the majority black city that she their survey for me at this point. You know, we're saying, and then this woman literally if you wanted to get to the polls in you jacomb, we said okay five we'll take that challenge. And we had someone donate. Handicap accessible van for the Highland Park. Green. A letter to foster and told them that we didn't need Mannerheim apart. Yeah. That's not vote depression black on black voter suppression. Then what is it? Yeah. Alicia I want to slow down a little bit. Because I hear what you're saying. And I agree I think definitely black on black voter suppression. But it's also democrat on democrat voter suppression is a is a democrat blocking other people who typically vote democrat for Democrats to vote and not caring about their vote. If we if we if we add Detroit's clerk to Highland park's clerk, then we got to African American women who are Democrats dad, potentially have a reputation for disrupting the voting process of African Americans are typically vote democrat, which is precisely my point. I'm not saying, right? Be pro party at all. I'm saying be pro policy. I'm saying, be pro agenda. Then I'm asking all of you people who have a diction to the Democratic Party to tell me what they have done and what you got for. A your vote when you vote it all your life footed Democrats now are ramp a chair the town glare. Hank Johnson told put that on Facebook page. I ran for chair the thirteenth. I was duly elected. It was the U A W and the Michigan Democratic Party that got their lawyers and overturned my duly elected championships. And we still want in a second election. It wasn't there. Republicans death fought against David Bulat. It was the Democrats who fought against Democrats who elected me at all. I'm saying is it's time out for us. To get pimped. Right. And not get anything for our vote. So to that end. I wanna say this you ask the question. And I'll let you answer what we ended up doing with the democratic vote say, and I'm not pro I'm challenged with Obama's Dutch one thing that he did. And I'm gonna say this, and without you respect when it comes to y'all care. It made a difference when it comes to most significantly. What is when you hate crimes? Becoming a federal offence. But thirteen back to federal he wrote that into the defense Bill would Republican with your stupid, you read it you realize that he made hate crimes a federal offence a bench. So I think the Democrats do that Republicans don't do. But I will say this is the individual Barack Obama said don't believe nothing. I say watch what I do. Joining us. Now, you write anything, I at least I wanna thank you for calling him making us aware what's going on the Highland Park. But I wanna keep it local. And don't get me wrong. I understand Affordable Healthcare Act some people like it. Some people don't it helps some people it doesn't help of this person for folks like me, you know, I don't know if I want the federal government mandate that I had to have anything that I got to pay for and I didn't even get a chance to decide whether or not I wanted to buy it. But that's a whole nother conversation. Let's keep it local. Where where was the Democratic Party during the Flint water crisis? They were invisible. Okay. Snyder was on the ropes. Okay. Who who defended Rick Snyder? When the people were trying to recall him, the Democrats, do you wait w SEI you now, you can't tell me what I know. You can't tell me what I know. Who defended Snyder? It wasn't just the Republican party. The Democrats medifast night ahead. A major democrat as his chief of staff doing this. I term we the only ones who believe that these people don't work together. And we're the ones on the outs. What about the close schools? What about the EA? In fact, how do we get -mergency management? It was governor Granholm that got us emergency management and the parts place that she was the one who opened up the door for Robert Bob who opened up the door for public act four who got us to public act, four thirty six and nobody. He wants to tell the truth. It don't matter who's in charge Republican democrat. We're not getting nothing and we run into the polls not even looking at the names of people just looking for democrat under nine and both of them. I'm not vote for Gretchen Whitmer because democrat I'm not voting for Ghana Gilchrist because he tall and black. I'm not voting for and Debbie stabbing. She a democrat. I'm not nobody because they don't even know what that means. I'm only voting for somebody. If they share my interests and are going to fight for what I need in my community other than that date democrat Republican get back. And if you brainwashed enough, if you if you saw a dictated to the crowd that you got to do with somebody else is doing, and you don't even know why. Then that's a bigger problem. They're having to do nothing politician. For this year. I'm just going to tell you I am voting. And I'm going to tell you why revenue and I'm just gonna tell you why I'm voting for progression. And I'm voting for Dana. Why because I asked him I asked one quick question. If you elected into office, will you prosecute weeks night. If a poisoning those children will hold on now Gretchen going to say, yeah. Because she wants to vote, but where she was Ingram county. Prosecutor she didn't even go after. So she not go to the doctor that touched fifty girls in places that I came on the radio. She prosecu- Rick Snyder CA going prosecutor Gretchen donate. No water is seen Gretchen March Flint. I see Gretchen tribute. No water. I see Gretchen do not. Now, you can't tell me what I ain't saying. But I'm telling you, we ain't seen it who saw Gretz in two years ago. Where was aggressive when the crisis started share? Share with snoop Dogg was but he was a Russell Simmons had on fat far, but he was dead Jamal Bryant was there. But if Gretchen Whitmore was in visit. So don't tell me where Gretzky going do last time. I saw Gretchen Whitmer. She was saying who is how to pick here like a black church. I'm trying to cheer you. If you fall helped me Eddie Murphy for the banana tailpipe and vote for woman has a track record of nothingness..

Democrats Democratic Party Republican party Facebook Highland Park Gretchen Whitmer Michigan Democratic Party green party Michigan Rick Snyder Donald Trump Barack Obama African American community Twitter David alexander Detroit Gretchen Gretchen March Flint Ferndale Gretchen Whitmore
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Face of a society that was consistently robbing dignity and also claimed black people had, no history and it was a refusal of the lie of, racial inferiority and it became a. Touch point For organization right so people again to sing, it at graduations at weekly simply Political, programs As a way of repeatedly that's telling themselves a story of who, they were and but also socializing people into a, belief system System that was about the struggle against racial Wadia belief system The court of their history And really enabled the building. Of a narrative of themselves that was contrary To this larger system of racial exclusion and I think it's, incredibly important I spend a. Lotta time in the book writing about children and it was really important it's part. Of the socialization I focused on the song as as an instance of cop, black formal culture which was. The kind of ritual practices Has serious ritual practices that party, institutional life partner, political associations deeply association life in general Not just Americans at the black Americans had in particular and what that enabled, and so in this moment You know which we are seeing much of this the shame of our history rearing its head. Again part of what I put the book with his actually an argument that we need to restore recuperate some. Of the practices that gay people, and the kind of resilience that was necessary to withstand an entire, society, it was built on their exclusion but also to strive for something just more equitable more humane Imani Perry Princeton University professor author of the. Book may we forever stand Thank you that, was lovely to listen to Hello Jackson it's wonderful to be here, as, an alabamian it feels very familiar Cheryl cash George law professor Well charlottesville The organizing principle for the Tiki torch guys was white nationalism and my book loving Is about the four. Hundred year history of constructing trying to construct a fictional lightness and then protect it And you know what what's odd a lot of people don't realize whiteness is a concept didn't even exist In. Colonial times in the first half of the seventeenth century you could find Indigenous black and white bonded, people working together And they would get drunk together have sex sometimes Mary Steele hawks together run off to live with the Indians and. Most pointedly for the plutocrats who oppress them sometimes they would rise up in revolt together and the main message of my book loving is that whiteness was created to solve a class. Conflict between wealthy planters and poor white servants it had a political function and this dog whistling to divide and conquer people who might collectively demand something of rich people continues to this day and every time in this country that. We have an assertion or reassertion of lightness there's a background Politic economics story a foodie Kratz betraying the very people their. Dog whistling to In this book I, feature I'm attracted to subversives who cross color lines. For love, or particularly activists and I'm, a child of a, civil rights family my father, God bless. In John Cassian founded the Alabama Cleveland Queant of the Mississippi freedom Democratic Party I, grew up around biracial, activists, who, joyfully, subverted white, supremacy feature. Throughout the book some of. My favorites suburban Fred Douglas Badia. Stevens and his I think common law wife, Lydia Smith a mixed race woman they. Were, stationed agents, on underground railroad together and this is a lesser known tradition Then what did, you think about Charlottesville last, year in. Particular yeah white nationalists or Laura Ingram people who openly declare that they fear and, don't like demographic change, what, they, really, need to, fear and. I try to emphasize this. In the book is a growing. Class of what I call culturally dexterous whites, that accepts diversity and even likes it I feature Let, me say. Sixty percent White millennials those under thirty agree with the black lives matter movement and, its? Critique of law, enforcement right so you know older, generations of, lights at fear the future, they they. Ought also fear dear grandchildren Their grandchildren.

Charlottesville professor Stevens Imani Perry Princeton Universi Mary Steele Politic economics Laura Ingram Fred Douglas Badia John Cassian partner Alabama Cleveland Queant Jackson Democratic Party Cheryl Lydia Smith Mississippi Sixty percent Hundred year
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:13 min | 3 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"The country i meet people who are miss fairfax kids and people are starved especially young people i say no they didn't close the school five years ago go yes they did you can look that one up made a springer was a she was she was she lived in pittsburgh primarily but what she did was she got involved in the labor movement and she set the groundwork for the afl cio 's involvement in the liberation movements in africa this is very big deal there are a couple books written about her but about as with all these other women you can do almost a whole library on them that's major springer molly moon i put her in there because molly moon i was laughing say molly mona's bushy like me i met molly moon because she was the founder of the national urban league guild and you look at her i call her stealth radical because what she did was during the time we're we're trying to figure out what to call ourselves now we'd been called names that were less pleasant than this so where we colored black negro african american what we call and there was a lot of disagreement among people in the gaspara until molly moon became a bridge over that and molly moon said oh well you know african american that's very specific and that incorporates everybody not everyone totally agreed with her but that's one thing that she did the other thing that she in the forties she has her she and her husband henry lee moon who is the director of communications for the naacp there are civil rights royalty national urban league naacp they started interracial gatherings in new york city and you think well that's not the south but it's still segregated and so that's one of the things that she did and mahlangu wasn't great mentor for me fannie lou hamer sick and tired of being sick and tired we know that fannie lou hamer a sharecropper like like my grandmother my grandmother gra my grandparents had thirty five acres and you're also sharecroppers they never got their forty acres in a neil fannie lou hamer spoke passionately at the nineteen sixty four democratic convention representing the mississippi freedom democratic party and she was so powerful that lbj lyndon baines johnson called a fake news conference so that he could take attention from from her while she was she was speaking he's like who is that little woman speaking you might have said something else because lbj was a little profane base who is that woman speaking so faneuil louima's very powerful i knew she was powerful even before that because i saw her speak with same time choosing dressing a rally in lowndes county alabama and stokely carmichael who later became sacred turi was speaking and he was using language she didn't quite approval she's very fine christian lady so he kept talking so mrs hamer came up and he's like way up here and she's weighed on there and she said she said so clearly stop talk like that chatroom out i don't know they don't remember the exact words and he said yes ma'am and all i can think of ood that's a powerful woman and so she was winston and debbie hudson lived and worked in lee county mississippi a winston was active in the naacp so she had a former position but informally what they did was they they did voter registration they they did a lot of work there's a book about them called mississippi harmony you can read more about them but they represent another group of women who've worked so hard in the civil rights movement and who are unacknowledged montgomery bus boycott nine hundred fifty five fifty six why did i include.

fairfax thirty five acres forty acres five years
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The he expressed to a friend of his who became a friend of ours a gentleman by the name of reverend ed king for the mississippi freedom democratic party hit expressed to at king that he knew that what was likely to happen was so much of the rumors and innuendo that hoover had in his in his files and again a lot of it may very well just been false or partly only partly true but king had a strong sense that it was about to come out on him and that that would have put him in a position where he would have been delegitimize within the black clergy and that he he had a sense that he would other people would have had to have taken the lead after the poor people's campaign but he certainly even in the same speech he said i let a lived a long life everyone wants to live a long life but he had come to the terms that he was either he was going to be taken out through the nastiness of j edgar hoover and people like that in terms of rumor innuendo or i mean if he kept on going he knew just as we said earlier that a lot of what saved his life where were random events it wasn't like he was being protected by the military and secret service so he had to have known that you know things would have been inevitable in that way but i don't think he would've wanted to deliberately leave his kids fatherless all that kind of stuff bob is in las vegas on the wildcard line now hi bob good morning george thank you very much for.

mississippi democratic party hoover j edgar hoover las vegas ed king
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The first word lisa we gotta make you wish he would say i was carried out of that fell into another play all weather had two mcveigh freely the state highway patrol men out of the first negro the take the flag guy the first negro frills not all of me by autos from the state highway patrol them for me to lay down on a plus bad on my face and i lay it on my face the first negro began and i will freeze by the fascinating people mcdonald's i will tell him or hands behind that that time oh my god will qualify polio when i was six after the fast had beat on people's exalts the state highway patrol went out of the effects of goal to take the black the fact that growth would get him to be than i began to work my and the state highway patrol when all of the first big role had leads to settle must be the keeps to work it must be i began scream and one wiseman battle and began to be in my head on sale one wanted 'mama breast had worst past he when paul mcgrath abreast down address by go i will be in jail when mattiello who murdered all of this is the only mcconnell we want to read the book comes first class and if the freedoms democratic party is not pleaded now i still a male now the man mother in the home of a brave well we have what about homeadvisor the girl but we won't live from human being in america thank you he was not seated until four years later at the 1968 democratic convention fanny lou hamer and dick gregory are just two of the more familiar voices in the civil rights struggle uncounted numbers spoke out before them generations of african americans demanding to live as americans uh oh our the invention of audio reporting in the late 1800s made it possible to capture the sound of black protest had to hear how it changed over time the dropped one of the board of directors i'm one third of the.

lisa polio paul mcgrath mcconnell democratic party mcveigh mcdonald wiseman fanny lou hamer dick gregory four years
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

The Nicole Sandler Show

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on The Nicole Sandler Show

"And they are i mean one of my friends i think you even make me nobody i don't wanna use his name just sent a letter to chuck schumer ready sent me a copy of it we resigning from the democratic party this guy i've noticed got for decades he has been a major democratic donor he resigned from the party's he's never giving any money to a democrat again that's how angry he is uh and but i wanna i wanna read something that i just got did you know um you i don't know if i pronounce his name right eugene per year now i don't i don't know him he gene is one of the most brilliant political leaders in america the guy is just brilliant he he yeah he ran for like a an a a seat in washington dc city council he actually was on some minor parties some socialist party i should say running for vice president and he's a wider and but but the guy is just absolutely brilliant and and he he he said something that i think is worth repeating i'm i'm i'm gonna be reproduced it on my blog but it's not there yet i i just wanted to read it i think it's important for people who are upset about what happened to uh to franken okay uh told i'm gonna read it word for word just historically here there was always a push for the civil rights movement to moderate itself was subject itself purely to the political demands of the democratic party at the moment the argument was that if they did not it would cause a white backlash that could kill the momentum on civil rights legislation priorities in fact the 1966 election was a backlash election indeed kill the open housing bill but who your wants to argue the mississippi freedom democratic party should have taken those two season shut up further the same bill ended up passing after the uprising.

democratic party eugene vice president civil rights mississippi chuck schumer america washington dc city franken
"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Here & Now

"Right in it and if we decide to expand just a little bit what we consider to be kind of interest in the room i mean you raise the point jeremy about political conventions the mississippi freedom democratic party in mid 1960s was trying to break its way into what was basically a close political process to them right their interests were not represented by southern democrats he certainly be limping represented by what was perceived to be the establishment democrats from even from the north and so there was a way in which i think of the expansion of that political parties ability to represent the constituents of the south was exactly about this very power of who gets to craft the legislation that determines the allocations of basic rights and citizenship and so i'm happy to say at least that the memory of the civil rights era provide some cautionary tale i think for what's going on now in the senate but i think we should also be very clear and careful about describing what we're seeing a somehow being unprecedented there's a long history of disenfranchisement in people being excluded that a chasing us from accepting this as the kind of new status quo you may now both leave the room we're going to deal with some secrets at a nathan coddle and joanne friedman oregon's and co has the weekly podcast backstory thank you so much as always thanks for having us this here and now podcast is sponsored by sip procuder making it quick and easy to find quality candidates instantly post your job to over one hundred job sites including social media networks like facebook and twitter all with a single click plus get access to over six million resumes select screen and rate candidates with ziprecruiter is easy to use dashboard and find the right higher fast find out why ziprecruiter has been used by fortune one hundred companies and thousands of small and medium sized businesses get started for free today at ziprecruiter dot com slash here.

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"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Gastropod

Gastropod

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"freedom democratic party" Discussed on Gastropod

"Nature boxes offering our fans fifty percent off your first order when you go to nature box dot com slash gaster pot that's nature bucks dot com slash gastre pod for fifty percent off your first order before the break we mentioned a woman named fanny lou hamer jonty is a huge fan danny lu was born to sharecroppers in nineteen seventeen in mississippi one of twenty children she started working in the fields at six and dropped out of school at twelve even without formal education though she became a major force in politics after she attended a protest meeting in nineteen sixty two she eventually helped found the mississippi freedom democratic party it was an opposition to the states all white delegation to the democratic convention so many of us know fairly lou hamer is the voting rights act with a who listeners know failures of rights act was i think of her is one of the boldest and most radical of southerners and she fought for access to the ballot in the nineteenth sixties at a moment when that was one of the most dangerous things oblak mississippi and could do yet i think oftentimes we lose a threat of her story a really important threat of her story is that fanny lou hamer recognize like dr king recognized that the next step after acquiring the right to vote was acquiring economic independence and fannie lou hamer a mississippi delta native thought that if black suthers win a acquire economic independence they should rely on that agricultural knowledge that they had developed over generations and so she began the freedom farm cooperative in the mississippi delta.

fanny lou hamer jonty danny lu mississippi voting rights act dr king mississippi delta lou hamer fanny lou hamer fifty percent