5 Burst results for "Frederick Olmsted"

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

06:35 min | Last month

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Air, circulation as you're talking about sunlight things like that I, mean feel like a simple ideas can go a really long way here but Michael can hang on for a second because this has touched a nerve among star listeners. So let's go to Owen who calling from Buffalo New York Oh and you're on the air. and. Oh Frederick Olmsted Buffalo. New York is a major beneficiary of his vision. We have lots of green space. But the modern trend economic pressure from the developers is to rebuild our tax base. The government unfortunately is knuckling under this pressure as well. To create. A. New Urban Slum tenement situation with density density density. I understand the economic pressure to maximize ren incomes. But, the other thing I I embrace diversity and that's a wonderful thing that we have mixed housing mixed neighborhoods. That are affordable. There's the idea of a micro house so that you could still have greenspace on your property, but these huge projects of multiples we mentioned someone from Toronto I. Feel we're being invaded getting this economic pressure from the Canadians to do what they've the mistakes they made on the waterfront in Ontario to build these massive high density skyscrapers that blackout the view and limit public access to the waterfront. but also natural light how. I enjoy my single family home. I enjoy natural light on all four sides have friends that live in condos. They have a little light one little window that faces street and it's like living in a cave. Yeah. So Owen you've brought up a really, very important point in this conversation and I wanNA. Let Ken Greenburg, who is our guest joining us from Toronto to to engage with this idea because Kennedy we talked about density versus crowding but but respond to owens concerns here about the economic pressures leading to a particular kind of density which may not. Be Good for for individual health or even community health. Yeah I'M GONNA go back to Frederick loans said come up twice in the conversation already and people may not know that although he's considered one of the founders. Of the contemporary practice of landscape architecture, he started off as an abolitionist. BEF- during civil war and is back on those public health. And that's really what inspired him to create Central Park. But I think. The caller is raising a really important issue and it goes back to this issue of generosity of I. would call it the public realm. And not only is it healthy in terms of ability to be in fresh air to exercise your but for social cohesion? which turns out to be one of the key factors of resiliency in a society in times of crisis is extremely important. We need those places where we connect with each other where we know each other and where we can fall back on each other and in nine hundred, ninety, five in Chicago. There was a famous heatwave and one of the really interesting discoveries was that in the neighborhoods that had a strong social structure so that people look in on each other they checked out how seniors were doing, for example, during the heat wave. The number of people who were who died as a result the heat wave was much lower than in neighborhoods where people were relatively disconnected alienated fragmented, and so I think is has put an enormous new focus again. On a failing, which was the loss of that generosity in public realm. As one of the concepts that I with a lot these days is the idea of the twenty minute neighborhood. which is anchored by h immunity. How was School Library Community Centre Daycare? Local shopping all the things that people do an course of their daily lives so that you have the opportunity to build that social cohesion. which is so critical in moments likely one we're experiencing. Can if I just my drill down a little bit more into what Owen was saying because density I, it's not just density versus crowding two different ways of looking at bringing more people within a of a square mile for example, but he was also talking about that there are. Financial structures zoning laws that are helping to To foster these big. A. Big New buildings that have lots of units in them I mean he was hot calling them basically new tenements and look in in some American cities in particular when the cost of housing is rising ever higher. One of the solutions has been. Let's build more. Let's build more apartments more densely populated neighborhoods and so I think to own was was questioning the. Downside of that. So how can we build more while also at the same time factoring in all the things that you just talked about regarding the twenty minute neighborhood I mean do we have the legal structure for that? Can? Yes. So I I'm co founder something called the city. Building Institute Oppressing University We've just put out a report called density done right And the point is that. Not Density just doing clusters of very high buildings altogether is not the answer. The answer is distributed density and we're looking at the entire city region of Toronto. We're going to grow out six and a half million to thirteen point five, million, by two, thousand, forty, one. So we're all these people are GonNa go and what we're arguing or that would that report argues is that there are tremendous opportunities which would be beneficial of. Going for what's called the missing middle in scale. Between the single family home and the forty story tower is a whole range of building types everything from lane way housing with you would.

Owen Toronto Frederick Olmsted Buffalo Buffalo New York New York Michael Building Institute Oppressing Central Park Frederick Ken Greenburg School Library Community Centr BEF Chicago co founder Ontario owens Kennedy
"frederick olmsted" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

14:53 min | 7 months ago

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on Think Again

"It's challenged entropy and entropy takes challenge lightly if there's any better metaphor for this struggle than trying to make a big budget movie with even shred of integrity. I haven't found it on the one hand. You've got the impossible dream this faith in the beautiful thing that supposed to emerge at the end of the process on the other hand. The process is a hellish sausage. Making machine studio bosses financing and acts of God like four days of flash flooding in the middle of your big shoot. You might as well be Don Quixote doing battle with a windmill. What kind of masochist would put themselves through that my guest today? Terry Gilliam is that very masochist and we should be grateful because his stomach for the fight has given US movies like the Fisher King Brazil. Twelve monkeys and Monty. Python's life of Brian and now almost thirty years after his. First biblically disastrous. Attempt to make it the man. Who Killed Don Quixote starring Adam driver and Jonathan Pryce? The movie is funny. Thrilling and unpretentious deep as the best of Gillingham's work. It's also kind of like one of those Russian Matriochka dolls film inside a film inside a film all of the metaphors for the holy folly of believing in anything at all. Welcome to think again. What intro your use of the analogy of Russian dolls is very good because the film kept growing over the years? I mean literally is thirty since I called the executive producer of Baron Munchausen and said I need twenty million dollars. I have two names for you. One of them is Gilliam. And the other is quixote and Jake who was executive producer says done. You've got it so I had the money thirty years ago right and then life takes over. Yeah and the audience may not know this. But all of this is well documented in the elementary. Lost in La Mancha that many many things went wrong with the production watching that thing and watching you there you have this. Sort of like bemused ability to not your. Sometimes you're cursing and sometimes you're upset but for the most part you seem to be like okay. All of this stuff is going insanely Ron and I thought to myself. How do you do that with that? Level of pressure and intensity. Are you just a Buddhist or something life just kind of happens? I am fatalist what it comes down to a fatalist always whatever. I'm doing something I'm always thinking about how it's going to go wrong so I've accepted the fact it's a disaster before it happens in a strange way. It does as you say it doesn't Bake me crazed and virulent when it is going wrong. But I'M NOT SURPRISED. Goes wrong when you mentioned in your intro. The word entropy. Yeah it is what it's all about we're subject to enter and we're fighting all of the time and one thing that I understood from your biography it seems like and I don't know whether there's just making the best of reality but it seems like some part of you enjoys and is activated by challenges. You know I think you're right. I mean I rail against the limitations that are always thrust upon me the time or money or whatever or lack of talent any of those things and yet it gets by adrenaline going and when my adrenaline gets going it seems to take over all my double thinking all my concerns. It just drives me like a drug addict and I love adrenaline because to me. It's the business of stop thinking and just do in play if you've prepared if you've got enough stuff inside enough clarity what you're trying to do. You can find ways around brick walls. I find interesting because they blocked the path that I've been planning for some time and I used to bang my head endlessly against them but I've gotten better at finding away around them or over them or under them. I mean it's hard enough to make a big budget Hollywood movie anyway. But you do some of that stuff to yourself in a way with this maximalism of your style just like piling layer things on complex defying them right. I'm as we're talking to them wearing alice in wonderland t shirt and your first. The first I didn't know what a visionary production that never happened was was going to be a summer camp for the kind of vows in wonderland right that was just so over the top. It was literally impossible. It's one of the book is just. It's it's my Bible Lose Ranger is. It's the absurdity of life the impossible the misunderstanding of things. About how you see things in ways that are not normal or uncommon waves of viewing the world. That's really important and I think this is very go. Go ahead and get to be critical about a friend of mine. Tim Burton his Alice in Wonderland Film. I saw feel that made no sense. That's different from nonsense. No sense is very different from nonsense. Alice is about nonsense. That was actually marveling the other was remembering Lewis Carroll and thinking about what polymath gifts the he was a logistician. He was a mathematician. You know we. He gave us this hallucinatory crazy thing but but he also had this incredible grounding in mathematical logic totally and he had this obsession of this little girl and all you do is try to make her love you by telling her tales inspiring her imagination right. And that's it's sad and it's beautiful. I was in a bar the other day and I was alone and I was overhearing two people talking one was an older attorney who I think was hitting on younger female attorney but the important part is he was telling her that there are apparently. Apparently this is well known there are two kinds of muppets. Chaos muppets and order. Muppets in Jim. Henson's universe okay. Some whose job is to create chaos. Another whose job is graced order so it was wondering on the way over here. Which are you asking for an order? I think the chaos I'm probably the chaos Mumford that feeds on order. Or maybe I'm the order. Muppet needs chaos to survive. I'm both things I think. It's always intrigues me. Is like the Hindu Goddess Kali. Who's both the Creator and the destroyer and it's this conflict. What makes life interesting? It's what we all go through. And that's in the case of Cayote look at the dreaver dreamer fantasists the guy who is imagining a more noble beautiful world world of chivalry and yet this show by who is the other half of the story. He's the man with his feet on the ground. The realist the pragmatist. And they're trapped together on their journey. There's something really interesting that happens in your the man who killed Don Quixote which reminded me in a weird way of the Fisher king which I loved by the way in college. I watched that movie a hundred times. I think okay so this is probably a cockamamie theory all right. But here's what I was thinking in the man who killed Don Quixote. Adam driver is playing. Toby Toby is a director. He kind of went on the reverse. Course that you went. You were in advertising briefly in the sixties right in and then escaped and escape. Thank God and he's he's gone from student film making at least to advertising. And how many years ago is it. That he made his Don Quixote Student Film Twenty Years Previously Right though and essentially it has this active fantasy. This active art of his has destroyed some lives and then in the Fisher King. You Have Jeff Bridges Character. Jack who also through his art as it were has destroyed lives you know and so I I was looking at this and I was thinking about guilt. Your job is to kind of come up with these creations. You sort of like steamroll over the world. You'd get all this money. Do these make the thing happen. But I'm not trying to psychoanalyze you. I'm just wondering whether there's something in what I'm sensing. What you're saying is interest is strange because we had a screening of yoga a few weeks ago in England and somebody brought up the Fisher king connection. I had never thought about. It is the same story is about guilt is so much the center of the things about Romance. Love and Perry Ki Oti. Who believes in rescuing damsels from insurance buildings and all this and they are so similar. It's what's horrible about it as my wife always says. I make the same film just different costumes. And an instance of that connection which I wasn't aware of until we can go and somebody mentioned this connection and you picked it up. I would argue that. They are for sure very different films. But they're just strong symbolic echoes. There and I was thinking about something you said. In your autobiography you started out toward a humanitarian paths. You were going to go. Yeah I went to college out of presbytery scholarship. I was going to be a missionary. Bring good to the world. Maybe Jesus as well I don't know. And so then monty python you're thinking satire is conservative and in some ways reinforces the values of the dominant class. And so you wanted to make a different kind of movie. I wondered whether that guilt thing. Whether there's a thing in there about art making an ambivalence in a sense you know on some level about what impact? It's having on the world on others. You know on nine hundred south to me. It's more about responsibility. The power we are wielding. When we do these things make movies effect. They have on people and I think if they're having a negative effect on you have any set of humanity left. You should be trapped in your guilt for a while and I also again is Christian background of punishment of suffering sacrifice. These are words that keep popping Tony at all. Those things exactly and grace is the most beautiful. The first time I went to India years ago as I saw grace I felt the Indians had grace because they were living in poverty. It was really held. People in our beds are slept in twenty four hours a day. You new ships keep coming on. Old Ladies are running out in the middle of traffic in the middle of DEL- Deli to pick up some cows shit for cooking that night and yet they do it with a smile and a sense of grace. Now that I'm GonNa go down some dangerous when I was thirteen. Went TO HOT SPRINGS. Arkansas where my grandparents lived my dad's from the south from Tennessee. My grandparents were well. My grandfather was a preacher methods pitcher or baptist. I can't remember but I remember went through hot springs and it was so civilized so graceful so gentle genteel people on the. It didn't matter what color you were. Everybody was good morning sir. Now the difference which took me awhile on Santa later till Rosa Parks got on the bus. Is that as long as everybody accepted their place in the stratum then you could be graceful in India. The caste system I'm convinced is one reason that keeps the place exploding. If you're born into that cast you stay within those limitations is when we come and become people like Americans and think any of us can be the president can be anything then. It gets difficult now. Giving people hope and dreams and possible frustration and anger and it goes on. I think the world experienced in hot springs. It was almost like a antebellum south in some weird way. I much prefer what came after Rosa. Rosa Parks is one of the great heroines of the modern world. Because suddenly no. I'm not going to sit in the back. I am as good as the guys up front. And of course that brings lots of chaos and frustration and anger and danger but as part of the chaos that brings a new order. You can't swim upstream against entropy without some suffering coming as a result about some struggle. Maybe it's an American in England. You grew up in Minnesota right. I've never grown up. Is the problem when I came to England the First Time. I've referred to as a MONO-SYLLABIC MINNESOTA FAR boy now. I'm a country boy. That's where I began. I love growing up. In the natural world. Dirt Moss swamps rivers all trees. I come to New York like I am at the moment. This mom this is. We should be proud of. This is what we created as. Well David Attenborough New York I reacted New York. This is what I do. We were walking in the park. Sporting say park is quite an extraordinary place in the middle of this man made the sound is blotted out by the buildings and yet there's a bit out there with granite coming up out of the ground there's grass squirrels and as fantastic in the middle of this manmade world is a bit of nature and speaking of ordering kiosks. Frederick olmsted you know who made Central Park? He actually ended up Liking Prospect Park. Which did next better because it was more wild and less. Baroque and less sort of organized. It's a fine line. We tread then. That's what we do. I mean you know David Attenborough. Scottish new series out of Net flicks our plan. Oh I saw that. Yeah just come up. I have seen. It's got to hopefully make a difference but we can't really stop ourselves. We are a very dangerous species. Arthur Kessler years ago. Used to think that we were one of nature's dead ends because our brain structure. We've got our spinal cord. The most basic then on top of that is the reptile brain. And then above. That is the horse brain and finding the human brain now. The lower brains connective tissue. The brain on top doesn't have enough connection with the more primal versions. Anything's we just might be a dead end experiment and sometimes when I watch the nature programs and see what we're doing to the planet. I think I hope we are dead end because I want this little ball of water to survive. I don't know if I'm more optimistic but I'm more hopeful at the moment on that just in the sense that I hope that all of this is an opportunity for some kind of large scale awakening. I mean granted. Human history does not inspire much confidence. But I'm counting on the kids now. Yeah exactly kids crusade is. There's a Swedish girl and then there's a fourteen year old girl in New York and sits in the park there on the weekends with their placards that's important because I really felt that the previous generation had been so spoiled and I thought the corporations had taken over buddies brain. We've got lots of toys to play which we're not a goodies goodies. Were all we were thinking about..

Don Quixote England executive producer New York David Attenborough Terry Gilliam Muppets India Adam driver Rosa Parks Baron Munchausen US Gillingham Brian Tim Burton Lewis Carroll Jonathan Pryce attorney Jeff Bridges La Mancha
"frederick olmsted" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:30 min | 10 months ago

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on KGO 810

"Phone and turned on the light and realized that it was the profile and had some research in the school's library revealed a series of frescoes had been painted on the school walls in the thirties and painted over one of them by noted artist and teacher Frederick Olmsted junior the school got a grant to uncover tidy patches to see what was there hi there with just a hint of what live below the school recently got another grant to remove the paint that's when the plain white walls came a portal to the past this is wild who knew that the San Francisco school board was covering up murals in the thirties we're down there about maybe twelve or so layers of paint architectural conservative Molly Lambert and her team the way the forgotten decades to reveal the mural below I'm amazed how much energy they fit into the news and I don't have the skill the first was painted in the new deal era when art celebrated people on the job it's an image depicting workers and a marble factory I mean look at this now it would be what people coding look around our the keyboard yeah this guy even has a cigarette since Chesterfield on it you really get to see all of the details the brush strokes that you're not on the sheeting and home turns.

Frederick Olmsted Molly Lambert Chesterfield San Francisco school
"frederick olmsted" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on WGN Radio

"About the Jackson. Parents. Incite who happen to live in high park. Rushing park. South shore and live one, the rubber by group called outside residents for claiming represents virtually all of these people, they are demanding that they, they tire state of Illinois Tae for this construction and rehabilitation and changing all the streets. And now I did the math on it. They. Neighborhoods constitutes a number of people that will pay zero point seven percent of the king hundred million dollars while the rest of the day or pay ninety nine point three percent of the two hundred million dollars. Now on top of wanting demanding that the entire state of Illinois case for a center by private institution of private corporation. They are also demanding a CPA community benefits agreement to provide them with benefits. Apparently the they don't feel that the economic benefits that will flow from having. Yeah. I'm dubious about that, too. But you know what you aren't dwelling on. And I'm a little surprised Charlotte is I, I, I think what worries people is the slippery slope that if we allow this, private enterprise, and, you know, when you say private enterprise, you make it sound like they're going to put a Burger King there of. Library or a presidential center. I know there's different things, but this thing with Obama's name on it doesn't feel private, it feels institutional. It feels public even though that's a distinction with the difference. But I I'm not as alarming by the fact that it's private. But I thought what would alarm, you is the fact that now if we're going to allow private enterprise to go into this public space, doesn't that will in fact, I think that's what Ron is calling about. Hey Ron, you're on WGN. What's your concern on the air? John, John, I was born and raised in Chicago. I retired from working in Chicago about three years ago. So I'm Chicago. Okay. Yeah, but I see here happening and President Obama's leading the charge. This is the beginning of the destruction of lakefront. You're gonna see casinos hotels and driving on lakeshore drive on. I'll be lots of sunshine coming in with the blue. Yeah. That's, that's the most worrisome thing to me round. Thanks for the Charlotte. Remember what the nice folk on two months ago about this. I mentioned that this is a terrible president. This opens the door to having their important. Very rich people. Demanding their twenty acres of Jackson, power or any other park to build their personal private center. You may not see much of a find it very important. But it's very important because what one individual does that lead to wait for everybody else to do with that is to meet one of the most disturbing things about this is the president that there's a setting. Other important lich capable Bill their management themselves in public. The cats. The judge said it was the public good that this private enterprise. All right. Yes. It is not the purpose of the Chicago. The. Are supposed to be open in free for everybody. This particular park was designed by Frederick olmsted, and all that to be a man who was a great abolitionist. I don't think anybody is aware of that day stood abolition a toast. This late in order for him to make his Mark in the world. Is he became a landscape architect, and he just signed? City that was intended to be available to all people to use of all races and colors. And he designed that were to have no building in them. And there is no building in Jackson card for five hundred forty or whatever number eight is it is. And this is going to this is a president. That's. Destroyed the goal of Mr. olmstead I wonder what he would say, though. I mean, it's a little ironic that the person that'll violate that is, in fact, an African American president of the United States, but that's great history. I did not know that Charlotte, we're out of time. So are there will be an appeal? Maybe this isn't the last time you and I talk about this. Okay. I say, not saying you so much. Shit. Good luck to you. By charlotte. Edelman is one of the voices on the other side. She'd led the lawsuit. Can you tell? It's two fifty one on WGN next together. We got more free tickets for you to go to.

president President Obama Chicago WGN Charlotte Illinois Rushing park Jackson Ron Edelman Frederick olmsted John Bill United States Mr. olmstead two hundred million dollars hundred million dollars seven percent three percent
"frederick olmsted" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"frederick olmsted" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"The blue sky mausoleum is one of three Frank Lloyd Wright memorial sculptures in the world. Yeah. Have you seen it? I have not seen it in person. Because when I was there they had was that two thousand four. Yeah. They had the. Darwin Martin house that I was interning yet. They were like, oh, yeah. This just went up because I think I was I was entering their two thousand six so no, I didn't actually get to go and see. It force lawn is very big my dad used to run through there when we still lived in the buffalo in the city of buffalo. He would go run through there because it's Frederick olmsted designed park slash cemetery. And it's very beautiful. And there are a lot of famous people there, and I'm sure you will mention one of them. I will tell you include president Millard, Fillmore politician. Shirley, Chisholm singer, Rick James. Yes, Anson Goodyear. The first president of MoMA Darwin d Martin said Willis carrier, the inventor of air conditioning, and many many many many mayors of buffalo. I'm looking through the list, and they're just like little blow. Maybe you're buffalo. Yeah. We'll Rick James. I one day. I went out there. And I was like bitch. I'm gonna find that Rick James. Like tombstone forest lawn from what I remembered does not have the have a map like full out map. But they don't have like here is where. That kind of thing. So you have to kind of find it, and I was expecting more from Rick James state like I was expecting to be like covered in glitter be like flashy. It was just like a nice black granite tombstone say Rick James, it does say Rick James. I think it's like Richard quotes, Rick James musician, blah, blah, blah. It's it's very unobtrusive. It's not huge. And I saw Miller Fillmore, which is a little bit more. He's got like a column in all sorts of fun stuff. But it's a very beautiful cemetery, and we should go. We should go to forest lawn, and then we should go to the inauguration site. Agreed. So. One more in America wanted to tell you about is mount Mariah cemetery in deadwood, South Dakota. So deadwood was named after the dead trees found in its culture in the entire city is a national historic landmark district for its well preserved gold rush era architecture by tradition. The American flag flies over the cemetery. Twenty four hours a day rather than merely from sunrise to sunset, it's the resting place of while Bill hickok. Oh is the well-known gambler and gunslinger who participated in many shoot outs. So when wild Bill hickok died. He was holding a pair of aces and eights and that series of cards became known to poker players are all around the world as the deadman's hand, also claiming Jane, so she was born Martha Jane canary, she was tobacco spitting beer. Guzzling foul mouth woman who preferred men's clothing into dresses hell ya and also like my favorite name of anybody. I've ever heard from the old west gosh ready. Yes. Potato creek, Johnny. Yes. Be creek John all take creek, John Parrott, he's paying and potato creek. When he found a leg shaped gold nugget. And the nugget was reportedly the largest piece of gold ever found in the black heels lucky prospector became an instant did with login known as potato creek. But. Cree potato creek, Johnny. I love that. So he's buried there. He's buried their odd bless him. I don't know what happened to his nugget. But. Other cemeteries across the globe. You got lake low Recoleta cemetery and win Aries. Argentina contains the graves of notable people, including Eva Perron presidents of Argentina Nobel prize winners, the founder of the Argentine navy and a granddaughter of Napoleon and twenty eleven the BBC held it as one of the world's best cemeteries and in twenty thirteen CNN listed among the ten most beautiful cemeteries in the room. Also in South America. The memorial network poll ECU Manica, Brazil, okay, it's one of the first places to implement a vertical cemetery concept. What how it is thirty two stories high. It was built an eight in nineteen Eighty-four and it currently holds the Guinness world record for the tallest cemetery. Okay. Sri szekely. It's like a high rise building filled with dead people dead people. How is there not a horror movie about that yet? That's she work on it too. High rise working title working..

Rick James buffalo mount Mariah cemetery Bill hickok Darwin Martin Miller Fillmore tallest cemetery slash cemetery blue sky mausoleum Frank Lloyd Wright memorial Martha Jane canary Frederick olmsted John Parrott Anson Goodyear president Millard Argentina Sri szekely Fillmore South America