10 Burst results for "Frederick March"

"frederick march" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

07:48 min | 5 months ago

"frederick march" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Were in the movie, the sea inside elmar Al dentro, this is playing Ramon San Pedro quadriplegic for decades who, in his mid 50s, is now fighting for the right today. This is in 1990 Spain. U one, let's just note before we even get into more of the background. You ended up winning the Venice Film Festival's best actor prize. Again, let's just note the only other people think about this company. The only other people who won that twice ever, Jean gabin, Frederick march, Marcello, mastriani, to Sheryl mafune, and Sean Penn. That's pretty unbelievable. Another film which was Spain's submission for the Oscars. This was two years after Mondays in the sun, and I want to ask you, you know, you had played a paralyzed person in live flesh, but this is now a movie based on a real person, true story, not only is the guy paralyzed, but he can only move above the neck, and he was in his mid 50s, you were 34. So how does one prepare and go about doing for months, basically 5 hours of makeup a day before lying motionless in bed for ten more hours, can't even move between takes because of continuity issues, talk about just that project and the acting challenge because if you have not seen this movie, folks take my word. This is as good as it gets. Thank you, Scott. It's a great movie. And he's one of those movies that I really speaks about death and it's a whole celebration of life. Because the guy on Ramon San Pedro the real person was really, really rooting for everybody's right to live beautifully and in the way they can and they wish as much as rooting for the people who like to die because they feel miserable with their own lives. And he did that through a very rational point of view. He was not mad. He was not depressed. He was absolutely capable of. Yeah, he knew what was going on. Absolutely. He broke books about it, so he was a very strong figure for human rights. And the preparation is always big when you do a real person and in this case he was more challenging because of the age difference. But Alejandro Mena near me, which is a great master and a great genius. And also, I had lots of footage of him, including the last moment of his life, which I have to see several times. And it was hard to see, but that moment really triggered the whole journey towards that moment, and helped me a big deal to be able to talk to the family. And it was one of those movies that, even if it was hard to be laid down for 5 days per week, for so many hours. For four months, I had a great fun doing it in the movie, because I felt that they were doing something that mattered. And yeah, absolutely. So in the meantime, I know you were intensively studying English to be able to do movies in the U.S. as well. And I think the first studio movie, it was a small part dipping your toe into the deep end, but for Michael Mann and collateral playing the guy who is sort of, I think, Jamie Foxx's. Mafia. Mafia, yeah. But that was the beginning of exposure to what it's like to make a big Hollywood movie before night falls was pretty independent. And this leads though to the one that certainly was the most high profile movie you had done up to that point. And that is No Country for Old Men. Which. When you first sign with your American agent, years earlier, and were asked who you wanted to work with out of anybody. And this was, again, before you were you. Well, I didn't meet myself. But yeah, I know what you mean. Who did you who did you say? The coin brothers. And how come? And I was doing a radio interview back in the day in 2000 for before night falls. For the Oscar Dominique, whatever. And that was crossing paths with a coin brothers. And I remember being like, so shy about it. So when they called me, I was like, oh yeah, I'm going to read and I read it. I was like, what the fuck is this? I said, make any sense. Yeah? So I went to the book. Yeah. And not much more. And I sat down with them in New York and said, listen, guys, I love you. I adore you. I've seen every movie of yours. I can not do this. I mean, I don't know what the role is. I don't speak English. I don't drive. I hate violence. There were laughing. That's why we want you. That's why we like you as a no, no, well, so again, I went to the harbor in New York. Yes. I mean, okay, I'll do it. And thank God I did. Yes. And that's because this character, Anton chigurh, psychopathic serial killer with a bad haircut and a cattle gun. As you say, it's not a character sort of reference the Corman McCarthy novel that inspired the script. We don't really know much about this guy. There's not any backstory all we know is that he's like the grim Reaper when he shows up, somebody's not going to come out of that room and he is. So how does one play let alone play well enough to win an Oscar? A guy like that. There's no information to work with. Yeah, and it's not even in the book either. So I guess the whole work that you have to do about creating a backstory is about really erasing that backstory. And I tried by the same time he was like, okay, I'm playing a symbol here. It's a symbolism of violence itself. I'm playing violence, and when violence takes place, it's unstoppable, and it doesn't do any good to anyone. It doesn't fix early destroys. And you have to embody that. And they agree with that. And that will imply, I don't know. To play it in many options, as many options as you wish, but I guess we went with this very cold option that was triggered to me or was inspired to me by the blank eyes of a shark when they attack. They go blind. They kind of not see what they are going to do. It's like they have a mission. And I did that. And for me it was tough. It was a tough shoot because I was shooting my own stuff. I didn't really cross paths with Josh or Tommie Johns. I was killing people. One after another. Yeah. God. It's like, God, this is not my kind of movie. But so I didn't see what the movie was until I saw it, and I was blown away. And they heard can happen because they brought a book with a picture of a brothel in the border with Mexico and Texas. Tommy Lee brought this, right? Yeah. And the coins were we want this guy. We want this look. And he was a guy holding.

Ramon San Pedro elmar Al dentro Jean gabin Frederick march mastriani Sheryl mafune Alejandro Mena Spain Venice Film Festival Marcello Sean Penn Oscars Oscar Dominique Michael Mann Jamie Foxx Anton chigurh Corman McCarthy Scott New York Hollywood
"frederick march" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

07:39 min | 10 months ago

"frederick march" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Back to. The Frederick march. Doctor Jekyll and mister Hyde. I think Ruben Miller directed that one. If I'm wrong, please in the right director. Quickly. But all through to Jean Cocteau's Orpheus and many, many other sense, but then you're trying to find something that makes it extra complicated as well. So let me ask you about that though. So when you're writing, do you write the challenge into the script and see if you can pull off what your visualizing or does it does it work differently from the writing process to figuring out what the shot lists are going to be and visualizing the movie. I mean, it's never written into the script. No. I mean, I would start conceiving that with the storyboards. And maybe more in that weird way of like, you know, VFX in this day and age can become like a crutch where people are actually relying on visual effects so much that they're not actually even attempting to do things that they could do it kept. So in this strange way, you're actually harking back to classic Hollywood techniques is like, yeah, you can do this. You just need to rehearse it a lot and so I think in a way that it's like if it seems like something, I mean, it is something that I think that the end result I'm incredibly proud of because they're really tricky shots to pull off. And like I said, you're entering into something where you're not quite sure whether it's going to work and that's, you know, a nice tightrope walk to go on. What do Anya and thomason, for example, know that they are getting themselves into a project where they're going to have to rehearse? And there are going to be these complicated moves. Obviously, they know your films. They know your work. They know that you have a flair for this kind of thing. But is there like a boot camp for your actors when you're going to do something like this? There is in a way, I think they were aware of it because I would tell them about the aspect of it. And I think probably one of the first things I did with Annie ran Thomas and his work with them in a choreographer. You know, we had this amazing choreographer gen white. And so, you know, we did, I think one of the first things we did with Thomas and was do some of that mirror choreography and just get in a way for them as actresses then it almost became a thing where they immediately bonded in the sense that they were always doing that trust exercises. Then they had to marry each other so much. But I'd have to ask them that, but I'm sure that they, as well as the script, there's like, I can give them as much supplemental material as they want to help them is a book about the period. If you want to watch any films, here's a great list of things of the time necessarily thrilled as a horror films are more like dramas of the time in terms of especially for like annually in terms of what screen acting consisted of in 1965, so it was very different to now, you know? I would give them as much or as little as they wanted. Music. Everything. So I think there is a sort of boot camp element to it in terms of it's more that I wouldn't say call it boot camp more is like the kind of the lab. Because before we shoot, we're going to try some stuff and see what works. And even in terms of when you're doing camera tests and you're trying different sort of lighting effects or, you know, you do cameras that's where your costume and makeup effects, but you also try out lighting techniques and you also try out the basic bones of a special effect or just to see if it works. I'm not the kind of person who likes leaving anything to chance on the day. I'd like to done a dry run of it in some form. Like some of the most complicated choreography shots in the movie, we were trying to do a Saturday afternoon rehearsal. And because we just didn't really have the time to be experimenting on the day. So even with things like the scenery and thomason is first goes into the 60s and she walks across the haymarket, which is one of the busiest streets in London. We could shoot on the haymarket and the city of Westminster. We're going to let us do that. But, you know, something that has to be scheduled three months in advance and it's like, you can shoot on the haymarket on this Sunday in August between the times of ten to 8 p.m. and two 30 a.m. and you can close the four lanes of traffic. But the 5th one has to be open for buses and administers of fire engines. And but also, we certainly know that there is no way to rehearse that shot because you don't have the location until ten 30. So we had to rehearse on an airstrip where we chalked out the road and we knew exactly the distance and it's like, this is the door. This is where you're coming from. These are the four lines of traffic. Here's some cars on an asterisk. So there's lots of things like that where you're just kind of doing a lot of dress rehearsals. Because in a way, I guess it would be no different to putting a musical or a play on. There's an element of it where you're doing it live as in we're going to try and do this thing in this uninterrupted take. So the only way to do that is just to rehearse. And so we did a lot of dance rehearsals and movement rehearsals. And beyond what I'd done in baby drivers, obviously, there's dance sequences in the movie. But I actually kept Jennifer white the choreographer throughout the entire shoot because she actually kind of brought what she was doing into just the general movement because you've seen the film, but there's a sort of point in the movie where everything starts to feel like you're in a lucid dream. And so they're sort of elements of like dream like choreography that kind of spill out beyond the dance sequences. And so in terms of interacting with light and cues or just, you know, like the way of kind of like sort of moving in a scene. So it was amazing to be able to kind of experiment with that stuff before you start shooting and everybody come to the set with another knowledge of how this is going to be pulled off. It's interesting. I feel like your films are becoming a little bit more like ballet in a way. You know, I mean, Baby Driver obviously has a lot of that synchronicity is so key to telling that story. And this is very similar. How much of it is about realizing the vision and how much of it is about challenging yourself with a new movie? Because I hear you get excited, explaining the mirror effects. And I can see how much that still gets you jazzed to try to conquer the problem of this vision that you have in your head. I think it's both a thing is challenging yourself and trying to further yourself like, you know, I've been lucky very fortunate enough to most of the things that I've done have some new element to them. And I think because, you know, films take a long time to make and it's the as fun as it is and as much of a privilege it is to make movies. It is so mentally and physically taxing on so many levels that the idea of doing something like that for three years of real life and just doing things that you've done before is just not as interesting as throwing in a new element and working with people that you've never worked before or trying something on screen that you've.

mister Hyde Ruben Miller thomason gen white Jean Cocteau Thomas Frederick Anya Hollywood Annie Westminster Jennifer white London
"frederick march" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:17 min | 1 year ago

"frederick march" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Thing is when I first looked at that dress, I recognize the font. And without the I mean your glances, something we're going to give you. You glance at the billboard and you see a swoop. You know when the soup you know, it's not an ad for new balance, right? You know, it's an ad for Nike. The Nike swoop is right there. So I'm looking at the fund, not we're looking what it says, and I would have sworn my brain said it says, Eat more chicken. Sure. That's kind of where I was. I was like, Okay, good. That's a that's the more chicken brand there. Anybody see the irony of her? By the way doing this and that Gale of the cost tens of thousands of dollars to attend, and her tickets were competent, of course. So she could go on her little Video rump. Lowering her tickets were free. And those on the left are saying Oh, she trolled the rich people. You kidding me? She wants to be the rich people. Come on. Elliot is in Tulsa. He's first up this hour. Good morning, Elliot. Thanks for hanging on. Well, thanks. I like to talk about MSNBC. We talk about chicken noodle news a lot yet, But the hateful rhetoric like to kind of break into two parts yesterday they were making General Milley out as a hero. He was a great guy for exposing our psycho present. This is seven days in May with brutal Lancaster in Frederick, March from 1964. This is overthrowing the government. And I just have example, after example, maybe I could stay them or maybe obvious of the hate for Trump on him and MSNBC. It kind of starts with Tom Steyer's The multibillionaire. He had something calling peach now in 2000 and 15, Steve Schmidt, the old Who was you with McCain and Danny. These people used terms like vile, despicable and they literally set we will do anything. You have discussed morality earlier. Anything, regardless of morality to destroy this man, and that's what they've done for six years. Some other examples they tried to tie Mueller into Watergate. People are on all these were gay leftovers. Nick Akerman. Elizabeth Elizabeth Holtzman to try and draw an analogy between the Watergate and President Trump during the during the Mar hearing. This is Trump was beaten by hate, not a policy. You can disagree with maybe one or two of his policy and policy. The meeting was absolutely right. The most things and the election, unfortunately, was just not on policy. No, there's not let me walk through a logical syllogism with your bucket. When you say that the left does not have a core beliefs on which they're acting. Let me suggest that they do is just to take a paradigm shift. To understand who they are and what they actually desire. If man is to search for The ultimate good and try to achieve the ultimate good. Then one would argue that man is actually working in a moral fashion and also working in his best interests at the same time, correct All right. So the for the left the ultimate good. Is power. And control because they believe they have the power and control. They're smarter than we are so they can help us. Poor yokels somehow learn how to tie our shoes. Exactly. Right. So the shirts say it deplorable. They called me gun grabbers. The elite and the media. Just look down on us is track. So then the the idea of pursuing the ultimate good has to be seen as a good in and of itself and for people on the left. Thus Achieving power achieving control. They are doing good acts because in their mind, it's the power in the control. That is the good for which they are reaching. Uh and they do this because they truly believe That they are smarter than we are. And they are more able to tell us how we should behave. So for folks who say that regeneration and certain conditions group to believe that Yeah. The election legal illegal were invented. Prove that Yeah, it's it's the acquisition and maintenance of power. That's what they've always been about. And I've kind of taken my time to kind of walk through how you can justify this. And to me. This is what makes sense. If power is the ultimate good because you believe you are good and you want to do good things. Then then it's perfectly justifiable to do whatever is necessary to achieve that power so that you can continue to even more good. Good. We are the evil couple. If I could just two little examples of Where's the show? Called our cartoon president that they had for Trump? Where's the list of Biden lives like The Washington Post falsely listed to trump light? Where's the list of Biden deaths from Covid like they did every day for Trump. It's just so obvious today by this is willing to pay attention. It's right there. Elliot. Thanks for the call. Appreciate. All right. Donald Trump was on Newsmax TV with Sean Spicer yesterday. And talking about General Milley and talking about, uh, Bob Woodward. And the former president 45 had some pretty interesting things to say. About Millie and his purported behavior. David is actually true, which is hard to believe that he would have called China and done these things and was willing to advise them of an attack or in advance of an attack. That's treason. And I would think I've had so many calls today saying that's treason. Number one number two. It's totally ridiculous. I never thought of it. You were there you were. You would do what was happening in the White House. You have plenty of friends. You never heard the word China mentioned it things like this. You heard A lot of anger about China on trade, and we made a great trade deal. You heard a lot of anger in China with the China virus. You know, of course, for those who may have missed the first part of the story. According to Bob Woodward for his upcoming book. Milley said that he went to all the senior officers and had them commit to him personally not pledged to the allegiance. Uh, not pledge your allegiance to the flag of the United States and to the Republic for which it stands. By pledge or allegiance to General Mark Milley and the power he commands. That's what he wanted. And Trump says the whole thing on its face is kind of idiotic for him to say for him to say that I would even think about attacking China. I think he's trying to just get out of his incompetent withdrawal out of Afghanistan. The worst the dumbest thing that anybody seen. Probably the most embarrassing thing that's ever happened to our country where they killed our soldiers. They we left with embarrassment on our face. We left Americans behind and we left $85 billion worth of the best equipment in the world that I bought because I was the one that rebuilt our military, and then Biden gave it away. For him to say that I was going to attack. China is the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard. And everybody knows it. Everybody knows it. It was a ridiculous charge, however. I would argue that this this particular little kerfuffle Can be best summer summarized in five words. Five words. This is part of the operating mantra for the Biden administration without thinking about the American public. Poll look a shiny penny. They're assuming we.

Steve Schmidt Nick Akerman Bob Woodward Donald Trump Sean Spicer Nike Elliot $85 billion Tulsa Tom Steyer Elizabeth Elizabeth Holtzman 2000 Trump David Danny Milley Frederick MSNBC Five words six years
"frederick march" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"With the election all the polls were hurt in her favor but the majority of the people that elected him are just like me and you a lot of others were set out here in the wings watching all these idiots the one this riding and looting as part of a police cars and all that but what it comes right down to the election Donald trump's gonna take about landslide gardening all good buddies while told us all that a while ago did he not I think he's I believe he did a lot today others a lot of people that hope you are right on that then we will we will see come November so maybe our listeners are right on the poll we got to Twitter poll those who argue that within seven five percent to five percent that ain't it the hello store today in history June eight sixteen sixty three the Portuguese victory at the battle of Hey Mike CO ensured Portugal's independence from Spain out there on the Iberian financial seventeen eighty nine James Madison introduced twelve proposed amendments to the United States constitution and Congress I was very important eighteen sixty one in the American Civil War Tennessee seceded from the union eighteen sixty two in the civil war the battle of cross keys Confederate forces under general Stonewall Jackson save the army of northern Virginia from a union assault on the James potential up led by general George McClellan eighteen eighty seven Herman Hollerith applied for a U. S. patent for the art of compiling statistics which was his punched card calculator I like his name Herman Hollerith yes yeah nineteen twelve Carla Mel incorporated universal pictures in nineteen twenty eight the second northern expedition the national revolutionary army captured Pete king whose name is changed to Beijing which it is now nineteen forty nine Helen Keller Dorothy Parker Danny Kaye Frederick March John Garfield Paul muny and Edward G. Robinson are named in an F. B. I. report as Communist Party members nineteen forty nine George Orwell's nineteen eighty four book is published his look into the future and a lot of things came through there nineteen huh great but how it is nineteen fifty three the U. S. Supreme Court rules in DC versus John R. Thompson that restaurants in Washington DC cannot refuse to serve black patrons nineteen sixty six the National Football League and the American Football League announced a merger effective in nineteen seventy nineteen seventy two the Vietnam War and you've probably seen these pictures nine year old fun team came folk is burned by napalm and it was captured by an Associated Press photographer Nick ut just moments later while the young girl is seen running down a road in what would become an iconic Pulitzer Prize winning photo and finally in nineteen ninety five downed US Air Force pilot Scott o'grady is rescued by U. S. marines in Bosnia which is quite a story and it's been made into a movie as well and that is our today in history for June the eighth and coming up we're gonna be talking to Felix Vega our legal expert but are expert on a whole bunch of other stuff as well big story today Minneapolis well the Washington post wants them to ban any TV series about police any movies I guess too yeah movies movies and TV shows about police their arrival yes a push start again give you were all help her fight Elmer Fudd will no longer be carrying a rifle in H. B. O.'s acts there in there too many tunes cartoons and no more T. N. T. here yeah yes somebody said no more pistols yep if you can't have those guns people are idiots it's eight twenty eight on A. M. Tampa Bay your morning Cup of Sean this is the the morning we learned that this country is great because of.

"frederick march" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"On CBS in nineteen forty two it was on the air for the next twenty years with many talented directors in fact each brought his own mark to suspense making it one of the most diverse unusually broad based programs on the air suspense was known as the actors theatre folks like Frederick March Charles Laughton Peter Lori Gregory Peck Olivia de Havilland Orson Welles head of the cast many top film stars asked to return for encore performances early in the program a general format was established and continue throughout suspense open with the sound of soft church bells intermingled with stinging music by the fall of the first year Joseph Kerns the grim voice fellow known as the man in black was aboard incinerator that continued through the Roma wines beers with Truman Bradley doing the commercials the man in black it disappeared by the time the program went to sixty minutes in nineteen forty eight return with us now to those five of those days of yester year with suspense and then surprise guest starring in the strange death of Charles Duberstein from November of nineteen forty three another classic radio moments from the archives of yester year and this is the man in black winter Olympians program the same adding our Hollywood cast tonight is the distinguished American actor the star of the Broadway suspense drama angel street has recently returned to this post three to his film career Mr Vincent Price do not dispense play which presents with the price at which is produced and directed by Williams related episode in recent years and the unfriendly not the capital of Berlin the strange death of by E. Jackie human tonight stay all if you have been with us before you'll know that dispenses compounded of mystery and suspicion and dangerous adventure in this series on tales calculated to increase to offer you a precarious situation and would hold it for you and now with the strange death of Charles Bernstein and the performance of instant price we gain over the doing and I would think I'd be I thought that somebody discovered my intentions met me to the breaking point nothing it's it's everything it runs smoothly as I'd planned no evidence not the slightest trace nothing and yet I was cracked a quiet how the papers in my briefcase trying to get information forwarded to my office and he knew our power he didn't know I stood.

CBS Truman Bradley Charles Duberstein Mr Vincent Price Williams Berlin Charles Bernstein Charles Laughton Peter Lori Gr Joseph Kerns E. Jackie
"frederick march" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Beach house sits on Saint Phillip's island South Carolina just across the water from Hilton head it's four bedrooms and four baths being renovated for rent this spring Roger just how much it'll go for but the home of the island used to belong to Ted Turner before he sold it to South Carolina for four point nine billion dollars one of my house too late it's already been purchased is just over forty six hundred square feet four bedrooms four baths but since it's a Malibu California mansion as it's Janet Jackson once rented it twenty eight million dollars was shelled out by the new orders Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers and former racecar driver data give Patrick want to buy a house that's three hundred forty acres on the island of Martha's vineyard Massachusetts a former sheep farm with a cedar shingled Cape Cod style of home mobile sixty five hundred square feet five bedrooms five baths library chef's kitchen and views of the Atlantic from most rooms for a mere sixty five million dollars you can I have one of the former homes of Jackie Kennedy one of my house it's in Beverly hills of just over an acre on a quiet cul de sac just over eleven thousand square feet five bedrooms thirteen baths with a fireplace GM a dining room that seats twenty originally built in nineteen thirty four four actor Frederick March now for forty four and a half million dollars you can own what was until twenty oh six the happily ever after home the mention of Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston one of my house say Manhattan penthouse apartment actually over four thousand square feet of the twenty ninth of thirty floors with three bedrooms five baths game room eat in shifts kitchen and spectacular views of New York City originally priced at fifteen and a half million south Robert twelve million you get the Manhattan digs of Jennifer Lawrence and want to buy a house overlooking the Los Angeles skyline is is nearly seven thousand square foot home on an acre of land seven bedrooms eleven **** matic fireplaces and redwood log flooring in the cigar lounge rigidly price to forty two and a half million it's not down to sixteen point nine million to own actor John berry boards former mansion including his opium den opium not included the off beat I Jimbo added on this date in nineteen thirteen the sixteenth amendment to the U. S. constitution providing for a federal income tax was ratified America in the morning for Monday February third twenty twenty is produced by Tom delay.

Jennifer Aniston twenty twenty John berry Los Angeles Manhattan cul de sac Cape Cod Green Bay Packers Hilton Tom delay America Jimbo opium Jennifer Lawrence New York City Saint Phillip Brad Pitt Frederick March GM
"frederick march" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Is right is the for the work of an unknown he's not unknown he's Michelangelo Leonardo Maxwell hello my all that's all and you know my brother is a great a great on the air brothers Van **** he you ordered this year and you all going to love well not that high I would if you gave me a no no no no you keep you Monica my I think you will remind me how you're going to find it the other and you you will hold hi again when you believe me or not I think you gave it to me for nothing and that they give it to you over your naked not there again you will train eighteen forty three it's been the Charlie McCarthy show with special guest star Elsa Maxwell in a moment suspense and the perfect plan as the best of the golden age of radio continues right here on yester year the sounds of the golden age of radio continue with yester year here's Craig Roberts thank you Damon again welcome back to yester year suspense radio's outstanding theater of thrills as a build itself was first heard on CBS in June of nineteen forty two it continued on the air for the next twenty years with many talented directors each one brought his own mark to suspense making it one of the most divers unusually broad based shows on the air suspense down with life or death situations that element was usually established within the first few minutes of the program then through characterization and audio coloring little touches were added to heighten the sensation of impending doom that was what suspense was all about the slow tightening of the knocked dispense was known as the actors theatre and featured such luminaries as Cary Grant Frederick March Charles Laughton Humphrey Bogart Lucille Ball Olivia de Havilland Gregory Peck Peter Laurie Henry Fonda and Orson Welles were frequently in members of the cast many top film stars asked return for encore performances early in the show what general format was established and stuck to throughout suspense open with the ringing of soft church bells intermingled with stinging music by the fall of its first year Joseph Kerns a grim voice fellow known as the man in black was aboard as the narrator that stuck through the Roma wine years with Truman Bradley another of radio's most distinguished voice is doing the commercials the man in black it disappeared by the time the program went to sixty minutes in nineteen forty eight the Spencer was twenty year run continued right up to the end of net work radio finally succumbing to television in the early nineteen sixties here now from may of nineteen sixty is suspense and of the perfect plan from yester year at all another tale well calculated to keep you and being an ingenious scheme Hey all as in just one minute we.

"frederick march" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:21 min | 3 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Got a big movie opened up today spider man far from home I believe it's called a course I have I saw the first spider man have you seen any the spider man movie title are they any good roll same that's the thing that you've seen one why go back yeah I I I mean just different carriers Peter Parker now I don't know who this guy is yeah I need to go on I don't know I remember there were who was the original Peter Parker when that with the first spider man movie came out Tobey Maguire acquiring I'll be like what he's got to be a little old to be Peter Parker now he can't beat them now this is a look at it I guess yeah well I left Holland that Tom Holland well I know he's good actor Tom all bless check in with someone who knows what he's talking about differ you owe our movie that guy Joe Neumayer good morning to you Jack good morning yeah right at that point where it's like everybody's going to get to be spider man for fifteen minutes you know the size of the war allied yeah this guy Tom how he's actually the best of the spider man if that if you want to say that I feel like the the last guy who got the the two movies Andrew Garfield actually okay actor use any of the great on Broadway in sales yeah great another thing I do feel like his movies were bad so this guy Tom Holland is great this movie played a man far from home I liked it and giving it three stars ultimately it's not as good as the last one which is called spider man homecoming which it took place you know all in queens in New York and was fun now this one here goes on a class trip with his with his friend Peter Parker doesn't of course runs into trouble now there's a really cool thing about this movie them a try not to give any spoilers away and it it doesn't make the movie yeah I thought a five star movie but it's really interesting how they do it and as such I'm gonna say that like the first half of the movie is really silly as a lot of teams and it's a lot of you know you know Peter Parker has a crush on NJ his girlfriend there or you know the girl he likes and in school and it's sort of like I was sitting there going you know I would rather watch the spider man from the Electric Company than that like this is ridiculous or like the old TV show for the animated show and then it sort of does something that switching things around and you kind of understand why the first half of the movie was what it was and it gets better and Jake Gyllenhaal shows up you this character he Mysterio who got like a big fish bowl on its head and it he says he's from alternate earth or something so you got to kind of pay attention a little bit it doesn't make the movie a five to review but when it does the thing that it does you kind of go all this is kind of a cool little trick that the polling and if you can appreciate a little bit treated ours alternately how the special effects these days don't spray zipping around all through the city and yep all the way through you know it's sort of like I mean the thing had to exist on T. G. I. and with spider man for the first part of it came out in two thousand two years for missing pulled McGuire like that was you know Stan Lee was sort of astounded it was sort of like the thing he always wanted to be it was a like a nineteen seventies TV show where they kind of like to sort of pull the guy Nicholas Hammond up up you know a a prop but building wall with like strings because we're seeing kind of floating up the CG I in this is terrific but those original Spiderman movies I will say that the second one is still my favorite spider man two which is also ironically like the second biggest July fourth movie opening of all time that was it's like number two behind one of the transformers movie so that one would doc doc we're all from right Dr well my favorite one so who is the villain in the spider man movie I got to become a cagey about that only two spoilers week that's part of the fun well in the beginning spider man and the serial fight the use or the individual healthcare to those who that is fight these giant sort of fire and water monsters called elementals that are sort of made out of earth and fire and all the all the element and and are kind of destroying cities around Europe but there's interesting stuff that happens with those aren't really necessarily the villains so I kind of can't say but if you know anything about the comic books some of the things I said kind of makes you feel like okay like Mysterio you know with the villain in the comic book so there's there's things that like that that go on I know I'm sounding really cagey but the heart of this movie is if you go into it expecting one thing and then the other stuff happens that's where the fun of this movie is so I'm sorry for being so you know full TV ads I got a kind of protect a little the spoilers for them because that's what the only place for the fun is about Zendaya's the she's great in a movie yeah she's really terrific people is Mary Jane and and you know that they're kind of re imagine a lot of these characters and and I think that she's really she's really put a lot of all of the supporting cast is really fun and that the kids will play his pals are are sort of put into them that first hour it's sort of a lot of them it's kind of only them and you kind of wish that there was sort of more the movie then you understand why there's not so yeah it's a it's a three star will be they'll ultimately and and Tom Holland a lot of fun is great yeah what else is headed our way this summer that you're looking forward to lunch from one of the also this weekend if you have if you like horror films I know you do Michael will be called mid summer that's come out that's from the director of hereditary and it's sort of a look a little like the wicker man from a few years well I I I like the original wicker mail yeah yeah of the three rats with Christopher Lee right exactly and Edward Woodward was on the equalizer right that's right so it's a little like that it's a you know you know the kind of all once once the line description a bunch of college kids find themselves at this sort of weird Norwegian fair or Swedish fair it's like you know the northern Europe at the source we dish kind of summer fair that one of them whose an exchange student invite them to add one thing after other happened and things get creature is actually a really really creepy movie I give that three stars also if it alternately doesn't sort of become the the fact that it should but it's really fun to kind of watch it happens of you like the wicker man or movies like that or horror movies this is one to kind of check out as well but be patient with a group of the the creepy to sort of build through the whole thing yeah yeah how about a patriotic movie for the fourth of July what would you recommend classes what are you what do you consider that a lot of ways you can go with that people talk about Yankee doodle dandy at we need to or best years of our lives which I love it's a great movie right saving private Ryan there's two I wanted to bring up to really quick point obviously jogged a great moment in the at the fourth of July at the beach and a bill called Avalon that's gonna come rific opening of the fourth of July and the fireworks happening in Baltimore on the turn of the century but my ultimate patriotic movie to be out of it is called the right people know what the right stuff the great movie from nineteen yeah the time based on the Tom Wolfe book yep that's about the space program of the sixties it's really terrific and it's sort of it's patriotically in his bones without necessarily pushing it too much and it's horrible that American can do spirit I love it it's one of my favorite movies and that was from eighty three so that's my ultimate patriotic movie how would you guys you have Jeff favorites I would go with the best years of our lives that such a it's such a great movie and you know the performance and that that's so good is it's Gary Cooper right yeah I don't know but I've been through a lot of Frederick marks I've got right right yeah I I type of March I meant to say it was so easy is Frederick March gets back from World War two and he's clearly he's clearly become alcoholic because of what he saw in the war but it's never mentioned that he's an alcoholic you just really get the sense that he's drinking all the time to dull the pain of being and our very subtle movie beautiful I would go independence day science fiction twenty eight twelve yes no mine are talking yeah this is a case that would put a touching adult movie had better be raining heavily on the fourth of July hello Myrna Loy as great as the white another thing about benches for life it's a really adult movie and that was like that to those characters you know kind of take a look at like three different a characters returning home and the private market leader of middle class folks I've got two kids they live in a an apartment building there sort of a sense of that because of the the average Americans and what the war did to that yeah I love that you're alive that task fell Hey I did that I gave Anthony our associate producer the treasure of the Sierra Madre tal yeah you think of that did you understand it together I well I guess we're gonna talk about tomorrow it's going to have or have our movie matinee with Anthony tomorrow he will give us his review but it's a terrific movie okay loaded with only widely collected they find the treasure in like you know one of the gumball machines or something of a restaurant I really like no no it's not the kind of movie and well don't put a pastime but W. O. R. movie that a guy Chou nu buyer thanks Joe when we get back big upset at Wimbledon yesterday Joe the youngest player ever qualify took down Venus Williams we'll check in the Tom rivers ABC news correspondent who's at Wimbledon well our.

Peter Parker two thousand two years fifteen minutes
"frederick march" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

12:28 min | 3 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Was the first cubs game the regular season cubs game. But then in the summertime there was the scopes monkey trial, which, which is a really famous trial that WGN provided coverage for sure. Share with us a little information about them. An engineer by name poll deal that took it down through Tennessee, where this trial was going to be, and this was William Jennings. Bryan. Clearance. Daryl involved in the trial, high school teacher by the name of John scoots. He was indicted for teaching evolution in high school. Right. Right. Brian argued for the prosecution Darrow for the defense. Now, you wanna know how much influence radio had that particular trial until when the WGN microphone arrived. They placed it in the center of the courtroom, and they rearranged the seating in the courtroom around the WGN microphones. Everybody could listen to this thing, everybody could speak into the thing, so you had you had William Jennings. Bryan Clarence Darrow. And you had the sound of the judge in all of this sort of thing. And sometimes there was a headed to the jury out. Of the courtroom, because there was something they wanted to discuss the jury excuse me outside of the courthouse on the grounds. Where speakers were set up so that the public would listen to the trial being broadcast. So the jury is out on the grounds around the courthouse listening to the radio in the radio was broadcasting, what's going on inside the courthouse? It was an amazing thing. Absolutely. And this. Of course, this whole idea of WGN, and broadcasting so-called monkey trial from Tennessee. Was depicted in the movie inherit the wind with Spencer, Tracy is. Based on Darrow in Frederick March, as a character based on Brian, this was an expensive thing for WGN to is costing, I think, like a grand a day. Oh, yeah. The thirteenth of July till it twenty first of all, I just put it really put him on the map in it. Yeah. It really. That. WGN radio was responsible for so many what we would call today. Actu- elegies, right. Get many actualities today are forty seconds. But this was, you know, all these days maisy. Well, then, here we go then later in the fall of Chicago Tribune purchased to Elgin radio stations to expand their coverage areas. So this is, as we start climbing to our fifty thousand watts. But for time WGN, and w which was Tribune's national magazine liberty shared, the ninety frequency and went back and forth. So again, I don't think we're still on seven twenty here. And then you know, in, in the fall, we had a Christmas, Carol was performed on the radio, which we, by the way we just did this last Christmas to. So this tradition continues here at w. This Christmas, Carol broadcast in December of nineteen twenty five the it was performed by person by the name of Bill. Hey, bill. Hey, was an announcer WGN and later, when Amos and Andy emerged Bill. Hey, was the announcer for that show and he well, he opened the program? Every night with your they are Evenson Andy. So that's so there is going back to December twenty five sometime before Amos and Andy made an appearance will. Yeah, in and I know that Amos and Andy which I want to tell the story to is something that started on WGN with a different name, actually, it was this week this past week that they celebrated also in undiversified, but tell tell the story about salmon Henry into Amos and Andy. There were two two type performers on WGN singing, mostly by name a Freeman Gosden and Charles corral, and they would they were on here and they were there on the schedule another place, and they would do these little things. And so they, they finally gave him an anchor spot on the air, and frankly, it was Colonel McCormick who suggested to the program director of WGN, who suggested two guys in corral that they do a little sketch on their program based on a very popular Tribune comic strip called the Gump's now, Gaza corral, read the Gump says that many, many, many people did. But they couldn't figure out how they could bring these two characters Andy Gump and his wife and all that stuff to radio. So they kind of dismissed that idea, but events. The developed a character that two characters called Sam, and Henry started early in twenty six. It was said in an African American community. But the main characters were voiced by these two guys who were Caucasian, right? Anyway. Salmon Hammy was very popular very, very popular. And so what it was one of the first sitcoms, it was is actually if not the first WGN. Two guys doing stuff on radio. Bob and Ray did it to, you know, later, and I don't think we call Bob and Ray sitcoms remember, we, we had salmon Henry. So they were they were doing a good job, and they wanted they wanted to expand they wanted to do more than what when they were being heard on WGN, and they started to try to try to do something with recordings that. They could they call it bicycling from radio radio station to radio station kind of forming a little syndicated program to go out there and that was a little bit difficult. But they had heard that another station in town was soon going to join the Columbia broadcasting system. And they went over there. And they. They decided that they would join this other station because they would be an network because WGN was an independent station, hurdle, hurt in a large midwest area, not associated with anybody as so. So guys in Carell went up to the top of the Drake hotel to talk to the boss at WGN, and they said that they were they had this opportunity to go and they, they would like to take it in relieved of the contract. Well, their contract that they had was really kind of a handshake and didn't hold any real water. So manager said, well, you guys got wanna do this. You can do it. It's probably a pretty good break for you. We understand that first time management ever understood that right? And that's another milestone. Hello. And they said, oh, by the way, you can't take with you. The name salmon Henry because by this time salmon Henry had become a one panel comic strip in the Tribune. Got it now, now that was a copy written and all that stuff. So they said, well, okay, we'll change. We'll do something we won't. We won't take the names with so they, they left the manager's office at the top of the Drake, they get into an elevator and starting to go down. And you're thinking, well, what could we call us and realize that the elevator operator was somebody that they hadn't seen many times those with days before automated elevators, the elevator operators in there? And they knew this fella's name happened to be Amos didn't register elevator descends to the main lobby of the Drake hotel the door opens in there. There's someone mopping up the lobby of the elevator lobby and they knew him. Because they'd seen a many times as they broadcast programming from there in his name was Andy, and Freeman Gosden looked at Charles corral. They both at the same time just about said, Amos, and Andy, and Amos and Andy, they became and they, they took the job, and they went up there, and they became radio's all time favorites will, and they did this for thirty years. And of course, they will you television. But I mean it, it, it had its controversies really at the end of the fifties in, in the sixties and got pulled out this syndication of one place when they came on when they started all of this stuff black face on radio was a common thing. Yeah. It was it was all over the place. So they weren't the. They were extraordinary popular because of how they did it. Yeah. And the, the people from all over every walk of life, listening into their program has salmon, Henry, and later, as Amos antibody started in Chicago at WGN, but then, you know, we started expanding a little bit more. And in, you know, there was a our first commercial program debuted it was called the radio floor Walker in nineteen twenty eight what was that all about? That was a variety program really just had. However, the thing that was made a different was that it had injured. It had commercials interspersed throughout the program. And listeners were complaining about that. So listen figured I paid for the radio. Why do we have to pay for the programming, but I'm not even paying for the programming, but I have to listen to it. Yeah. Right. Right. So the commercials, but they were starting to re people responding to respond to those, those commercials, and they were very, very subtle commercials that was going on at that time. But the Tribune as, as it were was did not consider radio a commercial enterprises. So they had lost his nearly a million dollars for the first fifteen years as, as it was on the air, but they persisted in, if they had only had Wally Phillips back in those days. Any busters. Variety program that they had. And, and, and that was music that was live music. Can there was a lot of live music on the air, but they were also as, as they did with the remote broadcasts for the special events. They had a lot of remote broadcasts coming from music, venues and hotels, and nightclubs and places like that all around all around the city of Chicago. In fact, in some time later WGN was known as the best station in the nation as far as bands were concern in all the bands really owed a great deal of success to WGN and other stations that were carrying those basically, sustaining meeting noncommercial band, remotes from one venue or another. I mean, the arrogance the tree in the edge water beach hotel downtown hotels like the Palmer house, and the Bismarck hotel, and the, the Blackhawk restaurant can Wabash ran off. That's where. Coon Sanders, Nighthawks we're broadcasting on a regular basis, and those bands all recognize the fact that people would hear them on the radio and the usually the late evening. And then when the ban came to their town. They would be recognizable and people would come out to go see the bands and hear them dance in person, and that really made made it for the big bands, the little bands, the big bands, the local bands, all of the bands were so big because of radio and WGN had really radio terrific signal and they got all over the place. So they were able to really promote the big band music in the Blackhawk restaurant. I mean, that was a very, very popular place for all these bands. And there was, I mean, there's tons of contents out there that I think you can still get like through the audio file of a lot of these performances. Yeah. Right. Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. So it's it's it was radio was very big with music. And it really didn't come until much much later in the earliest years where they were starting to play recordings some of the programs were playing recordings. But. You know people had records at home. They had the old wind up Vitrolles and they opened the two doors in the front. You know, why ended up on.

WGN Amos Tribune Evenson Andy Henry Bryan Clarence Darrow William Jennings Brian Freeman Gosden Bryan Tennessee Chicago Tribune Andy Gump Drake hotel Chicago Blackhawk restaurant cubs
"frederick march" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"frederick march" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"And you spray the Colorado and shoot it. And that's it sounds simple task. But it love it. It's one of those things that you know, there's a lot of those, you know, being boxed in and having a problem, or is it to a real advantage because then you learn things, and there's a reason why you're you were in the first place to try to solve that in. And I learned something on. On Empire Strikes Back that I've never forgotten. It was a shot flying over at the beginning of the film flying over Hof, and which the ice planet, and you kind of look down, and you see a Tonton and it's running along down there. And it's like, you just think of it. Well, that's that. Okay. Great. It's it's lucre. I don't know if it's lucre Han running after. Looking for the other one or whatever and the way that Sartre started was Georgia's walked in right near the end of the show and show me this background plate from helicopter where you pushing in over the ice. He'll about hundred feet in the air and the cameras tilts down to the icefield. There's nothing there. And he said can you put a Tonton in here with the guy running on it? And I looked at and this is pre computers, right? No. There's no way with all those camera movements that you can do it and get a stop motion character in there. There's no way, and he said just think about it think about it. Okay. And he walked out and within fifteen minutes figured it out. That's fantastic. And I just learned the power of not giving up and thinking about there's usually some way to put pieces together to get something that's going to work was that up, and it it was awfully printed. But the trick was getting the Tonton the perspective on Taunton to be correct. One to lock it to the ground. So like it was running on the ground and then getting. Slightly bigger as you move in. Then as you're supposedly over looking down on your now looking down at its head because you're like looking down. Then how did you do it that you just have to break it down frame by frame and match. No. It's the rig was always done frame by frame. But it's real there's some talk about it. But it, but it's the motion was done an animation stand and the Tonton was being held on a rotator. So he could rotate from looking at in profile to to looking down at the top. And it's, you know, the animated just push in to get closer to it. And we plotted it essentially the same way they used to do all those all the Tom and Jerry cartoons with Gene, Kelly and everything that was all hard work on animation stand. I just did it in three D space instead of in to space, but you know, it it took a leap of faith. And all it took the challenge to do it, and knowing that that shot was better than if I said, let's just do it as a big. Model and it'll be fine. No. Because it's better if it's real so I took the time to think about it. I want to see a question about the problem solving. And this is something we asked you Mike when you were on the show you were trying to solve the problem of that specific piece of music for up. And you said it finally came to you in the shower. Yes, it did. Dennis. Are you just sitting when you need to solve a problem like that you just sitting at the computer and say and just to do you have to walk away? Do you have to go for a walk? You have to do some kind of other exercise. I mean, how does it happen that say, that's it? You're Eka there. It can be both. There can be the Rica moments. But often it's there when you're just trying to figure it out at the moment. But you know, if you can't figure it out you're still are thinking about it. Your subconscious is really working. I mean, that's the that's the reason all of us. I think are alive I'm fascinated with this keeps going there was a special of fact that hustle people for years. He was finally revealed how they did it. But that was I mean, I always love transformation scenes that was like and there too. I knew how they did it. But I love watching it the old time, and that was the transformation scene in Frederick marches..

Tonton Sartre Colorado Frederick Dennis Georgia Mike Taunton Tom Kelly Jerry Gene fifteen minutes hundred feet