35 Burst results for "Frederick Douglass"

"frederick douglass" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:41 min | 5 d ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on WTOP

"Off savings on fences, decks and pavers. Go to long fence dot com and schedule your free estimate today. It's four ten the man who climbed the Frederick Douglass bridge Friday morning to protest the Supreme Court's abortion decision has now been charged. The charges against Guido reichstadt include unlawful entry crowding and not obeying. Police kept the bridge closed during his roughly 30 hour protest, which finally ended Saturday afternoon. In an abortion rights protest earlier this month, he chained he chain locked himself to the unscalable fence outside of the Supreme Court. We continue to see efforts to strip the names of confederate generals from buildings and roadways in our area. James has more on what drivers in fairfax county think about changing names to numbers. The survey which had a small sample size found that the public prefers to just go with the road's numbers, so the new name for Lee highway named after Robert E. Lee would be route 29 and for Lee Jackson memorial highway named after Thomas Stonewall Jackson, the name would be route 50. I mean, I know this is a small sample set, but frankly, people already refer to these by their route numbers today. So it would be a less dramatic change in terms of lifestyle marketing, the daily lives of people who live and work in these two corridors. What a supervisor's chairman Jeff bouquet, the new signage could cost the county anywhere between 1,000,004.2 $1 million. Acacia James WTO P news. Metro sales office at the metro center station

Frederick Douglass bridge Guido reichstadt Supreme Court Thomas Stonewall Jackson fairfax county Lee highway Lee Jackson Robert E. Lee James Jeff bouquet Acacia James metro center station
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:07 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"My God it makes you laugh to think someone like me could keep someone like you. Remember what I become fun fact Peter Dinklage and screenwriter Eric Schmidt are a couple. As are Hayley Bennett and the film's director, Joe Wright. Think of it as a romantic behind the scenes footnote to a movie that's unabashedly romantic and spirit. Wright's filmmaking has a pleasing old fashioned sumptuousness. Courtesy of production designer Sarah Greenwood and costume designers Massimo cantini parini and Jacqueline Duran, who are Oscar nominated for their dazzling work here. And as always, write controls the camera with fluid grace. Letting us see the actors and dancers moving through space. With none of the busy cutting you get in so many contemporary movie musicals. Bennett is a trained singer, and she delivers the movie's strongest musical performance. Her rock sand really comes to emotional life when she's called on to sing. Dinklage has musical experience, too. He was the frontman of a 90s puck band called wizzy. And he expresses cyrano's every longing, with a deep, soulful baritone. He's an inspired choice for the role. Like Tyrion Lannister, whom dinklage played to perfection on Game of Thrones, cyrano is always the smartest person in the room. Easy to underestimate, but hard to defeat in a battle of wits or weapons. But dinklage shows you the deep ache at cyrano's core. And makes you feel the sting of his unrequited love. Some purists may miss that big nose, but there's something about the lack of prosthetic enhancements that makes dinklage's performance all the more poignant. What you see on screen is all him. Nothing more and nothing less. That disarming sincerity applies to the movie as a whole. It's not always the most graceful retelling of this oft told tale, but it's hard not to admire rights conviction. And sometimes his crazy audacity. Only a truly committed director would have opted to shoot a climactic battle scene at 16,000 feet above sea level. On the side of Mount Etna, a live volcano. It's a showy flourish for sure. But also a fitting one for a story of such grand, operatic passion, Justin Chang is the film critic for the LA times. He reviewed cyrano, starring Peter Dinklage. Fresh air's executive producer is Danny Miller, our senior producer today is Roberta shorrock. Our technical director and engineer is Audrey bentham, with additional engineering support from Joyce Lieberman, Julian hertzfeld, and Adam stanislavski. Our interviews and reviews are produced and edited by Amy salit, Phyllis Myers, Sam briger, Lauren krenzel, Heidi saman, Teresa Madden, Anne Marie baldonado, a challenger, Seth Kelly, and Kayla Lattimore. Our producer of digital media is Molly CV nesper for Terry gross. I'm Dave Davies..

dinklage cyrano Hayley Bennett Sarah Greenwood Massimo cantini parini Jacqueline Duran Peter Dinklage Dinklage Joe Wright Tyrion Lannister Eric Schmidt Wright Oscar Bennett Justin Chang Mount Etna Roberta shorrock Audrey bentham Danny Miller
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:37 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"But what modern conservatives have done is they plucked out pieces of rhetoric here and there and they've said, aha, you see, Douglas was not only a Republican. But he believed in individualism and self reliance and self help, which meant he didn't advocate for government assistance and so forth. I have to say, it's a terrible misuse and appropriation of Douglas because it ignores I would argue 80 or 90% of the rest of his ideas in the rest of his life. He was not anti government in the least. He believed an activist interventionist use of federal power to destroy slavery to destroy the confederacy and to reconceive the U.S. Constitution. But it's what we do with historical figures, but it's often a rather slippery misuse of the past. He did preach self reliance. There's no question about that, but you have to go back into that context and understand why. David by thanks so much for taking with us. My pleasure. Thanks for having me, Dave. Historian David blight recorded in 2018. His Pulitzer Prize winning book, Frederick Douglass, prophet of freedom, inspired a new HBO documentary about Douglas which premiered this week. It's titled Frederick Douglass in 5 speeches. Coming up, we remember physician and public health advocate Paul farmer, who died Monday. This is fresh air. Paul farmer, the physician and anthropologist known for his long-standing efforts to bring healthcare to some of the poorest people in the developing world, died Monday in Rwanda on the grounds of a hospital and university he helped establish. He was 62. Partners in health, the global organization he helped found said he died of an acute cardiac event. Farmer worked on public health projects in many countries, developing strategies for dealing with tuberculosis, HIV and Ebola, in addition to providing basic affordable care. When The New York Times contacted doctor Anthony Fauci about farmer's death, he wept in the interview, saying he and farmer had been like soul brothers. Farmer had long-standing ties to Haiti, where he founded a clinic decades ago that would grow into a network of 16 medical centers around the country. We have a short excerpt of my interview with farmer in 2011 after he'd been deeply involved in efforts.

Douglas Frederick Douglass David blight Paul farmer Pulitzer Prize HBO Dave U.S. David Rwanda Farmer Ebola Anthony Fauci tuberculosis HIV The New York Times Haiti
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To my 2018 interview with blight. His book is Frederick Douglass, prophet of freedom. Frederick Douglass is known as a real champion of women's suffrage. I think he was the only male speaker at the Seneca falls meeting in 1848, right? Yes. He's the only male speaker. He wasn't the only male signer of the declaration of sentiments at sonic a falls, but he was the only black person even attending it. He embraced women's suffrage early, and often. And except he got into a big problem later. Well, that's what I wanted to get to. He befriended Elizabeth cady Stanton and in the end, they had a falling out. It was over principle, right? What happened? Well, we're competing principles, of course. When it came time for the Fifteenth Amendment, the voting rights amendment passed in 1869, Douglass had a terrible falling out, with Susan Anthony and Elizabeth cady Stanton, who were the and others, but they were the two great leaders of the women's suffrage movement, and the whole debate was essentially about whether women would be included. In the voting rights amendment, and they were not, and the reason, of course, was that everyone with one eye open knew that if you put women's suffrage into that amendment it never would have passed, first the Congress and certainly wouldn't have passed in the state legislatures. So Douglass took the position that as he put it, it was the black man's hour. And this was the one chance to get the right to vote for black men, and that for now women would have to once again wait. Well, Stanton and Anthony were had run out of patience. They weren't going to wait any longer, but the problem was they've pushed back and fought back with racist language. Terribly racist language against Douglas and against black men generally. And Douglass handled most of that as a gentleman with grace except he also threw about some rather stereotypical claims, for example, he said, well, educated women can still have their husbands voting and their husbands can vote their interest, which brings pretty badly on our ears today. But it was one of those moments when you had to make choices and he took the choice of favoring the Fifteenth Amendment because it got at least black male suffrage into the constitution. You know, he became committed to the Republican Party..

Frederick Douglass Elizabeth cady Stanton Douglass Susan Anthony Seneca falls Stanton Congress Anthony Douglas Republican Party
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:15 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Slave is the preservation of the union. You know, when he was a young abolitionist, Frederick Douglass, like William lord garrison, didn't think the U.S. Constitution could be used to grant true equality. He came to regard it differently and saw the Civil War as a chance for a second American Revolution. And of course, the question was whether the slaves in the south would truly be given the rights of citizenship. And in 1866, he leads a delegation of blacks to meet with Andrew Johnson, who was the who had become president after Lincoln's assassination himself essentially a white supremacist. What happens at this meeting? It's an extraordinary meeting and it's a debacle. Douglas Lee's delegation. February 1866 of about 12 black men, to The White House to meet with Johnson, to talk to him about black civil and political rights and because at that point, the nature of the reconstruction laws and the soon to be Fourteenth Amendment was all up in the air, the debates were just beginning to happen in Congress, and there was Andrew Johnson seemingly standing in the way of it all, and did he ever. They had a bitter and terrible exchange that lasted almost an hour, Andrew Johnson gave a speech to this delegation that Douglas led a bitter speech. He blamed black people for the war. He told them they should really colonize themselves outside of the country. They should really leave, that political rights, especially the right to vote, who just never really going to be possible. And when Douglas tried at times to interrupt or interject, Johnson would tell him to be quiet, and just listen. And there were forced, basically, to listen. Douglass finally toward the end of this meeting got in a few lines and a few questions. He demanded the right to vote. He said the right to vote for black people is ultimate peace and freedom to the whole country. But as they were leaving, Andrew Johnson was overheard saying and was recorded even in the newspaper, that Douglas, he's just like every other N word I've ever known, he'll as soon cut your throat as anything. And Douglass overheard that. This is the president of the United States. Douglas then went back and with his oldest son Louis, who was at this meeting, they wrote a kind of a manifesto letter that was published. Denouncing Andrew Johnson and protesting. But most importantly, Douglas did what he always did. He went to his desk and he wrote a barn burner of a speech. He called it the perils to the republic. It was like it was a speech of warning that Andrew Johnson stands in the way here of the fruition of the victories of the Civil War..

Andrew Johnson William lord garrison Douglas Lee Douglas Frederick Douglass Johnson United States Lincoln Douglass White House Congress Louis
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:17 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Restfully. Drawing an audience in to some kind of situation, but nothing flamboyant about it. But then slowly, but surely working toward some kind of resolution, some kind of point, some kind of argument, some kind of moral message. And then sometimes in that last part of the speech, reaching these exuberant crescendos, that would just come out of him and shouts or in roars, people would say, he had that ability of performance. And he gained that by the simple power of repetition. But he had a performance of way of delivering his oratory that people just flocked to see. In fact, I say in the book at one point that seeing and hearing Douglas became through the course of the 19th century, a kind of American wonder of the world. If you came to America, you wanted to see Douglass speak if you could. It was that kind of an event. Douglas watched the crises over slavery build towards the Civil War, he was prepared to see a war in order to see slavery ended. What was his attitude towards Abraham Lincoln? Did they have a relationship? Douglas did have a relationship with Lincoln, but not until the war years. Doug was first became aware of Lincoln during the Lincoln Douglas debates. He followed in the newspapers and Douglas was even out in Illinois. During one or two of the debates. And we should note this is not Lincoln versus Frederick Douglass. No, no, no. Stephen Douglas. For the Senate race in 1858, he became intrigued with Lincoln then, of course, two years later, Lincoln runs for president. But their relationship was very testy. At first, Douglas was one of Lincoln's most ferocious critics in the first year or year and a half of the war because the war wasn't being made against slavery, and they were even trying to return fugitive slaves. So before they ever met Douglas had said some of the harshest things any critic of Lincoln had ever said. But things changed over the course of the war. They did. The Emancipation proclamation was probably critical there. It was absolutely critical into 1862, and Douglas was still hammering away at Lincoln at one point he called him the most powerful slave catcher in the country. But after the preliminary proclamation, September 62, and of course the final proclamation, January 63, Douglass's tune on Lincoln greatly changed. And then especially with the recruiting of black soldiers in the wake of the Emancipation proclamation and Douglas got deeply involved personally in recruiting members of the 54th Massachusetts regiment two of his own sons were members of that regiment. He slowly but surely changes his tune about Lincoln. He comes to see the war now as a crusade led by Lincoln and the Republicans to not only save the union, but do it by destroying slavery in everywhere he got a chance to say it he would say freedom to the slave is freedom to the nation. Freedom to the.

Lincoln Douglas Lincoln Douglas Douglass Stephen Douglas Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass Doug America Illinois Senate Massachusetts
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:45 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"And he then learns to preach from the text, which is, of course, the Protestant tradition, and it's there in that AME Zion church, as well as a couple public meetings where he gets discovered, so to speak, by the Massachusetts abolitionist to our disciples of William Lloyd garrison, and in the late summer of 1841 they invited this very young man he's 23 years old out to Nantucket to a big antislavery convention, and it was there in the athenaeum on Nantucket, where he gave his first speech to a room full of abolitionists, a room full of white people. And in essence, he got up and told some of his stories about his youth about being a slave, and he was a hit, a huge hit, and they hired him. To then go out on the road as an itinerant lecturer across New England at first, and eventually within a year or two, all across the northern states. He eventually becomes an establishes several newspapers and for the next 20 years becomes an activist. For abolition, he began with a pacifist as garrison was. How did Frederick Douglass's views about the means to abolish slavery? Evolve between then and the Civil War. Yes. That's a fascinating aspect of his life, because he undergoes a kind of ideological strategic even intellectual transformation, and the late 1840s, early 1850s. I think it's the first great transformation of his public life. He also had quite a breakdown in this period. He could barely make ends meet for his family. He is trying to be the self made man who could not provide. But he embraced, for example, things like the possible uses of violence. And that's in the wake one must know of the fugitive slave act, which radicalized a lot of people. The fugitive slave act of 1850 made everyone complicit with the returning fugitive slaves to their owners if they could be found. And by 1851, 1852, Douglas's writing editorials with lines such as, why do slave catchers fear having their throats cut? It's because they deserve to have them cut. He also embraced political parties vehemently. He came to see that if you don't attack the law, and you don't find a way to change the power at the base of slavery, you would never destroy it. So he's moving not only moving away from garrison. He's moving full force into the politics of antislavery. It's not going to be a smooth ride by any means through the 1850s. But by 51 and 52, he's become a thoroughgoing political abolitionist, believing in political parties, believing in political activism..

AME Zion church Nantucket William Lloyd garrison Frederick Douglass Massachusetts New England Douglas
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Personal life, his support for and bitter feud with leaders of the women's suffrage movement and his years as a Republican Party functionary when he took patronage jobs in the government. Douglas was a powerful orator and blight says the most photographed person of the 19th century. Blight's book is Frederick Douglass, prophet of freedom. Well, David blight welcome back to fresh air. Tell us about Frederick Douglass early life, where was he born? What was his life like as a slave? Well, first thank you, David. It's great to be back on fresh air. Frederick Douglas was born along a horseshoe bend in the tuckahoe river. On the eastern shore of Maryland, in 1818, it's a kind of a remote backwater at that point of the American slave society. It was born on the home hill farm, which was owned by his then master, Aaron Anthony, his mother. Was a still young woman named Harriet Bailey. He was probably born in his grandmother, Betsy Bailey's cabin, although we don't know for sure. And he never will know exactly who his father was, although one candidate is Aaron Antony himself, Douglas was always told that his father was his master, or one of his masters, so one of the facts of his youth that everyone should know is that he was in essence an orphan. He never knew his father. And he never saw his mother after the age of 6, and he had to practically invent images of her. He had very little memory of her, so as a child, he's essentially not altogether abandoned, but he's left without parents. And then he grows up. For 20 years, as a slave, about 11 of them on the eastern shore, and about 9 of those years in Baltimore, which, in fact, the city has everything to do with the fact that he would ever be able to escape. Right, in Baltimore, he lived among a lot of freed black men, right? And women. That's right. That's right. Baltimore was a great ocean port and a great shipbuilding city. And when in the year he escaped, 1838, Baltimore had about a 130,000 people. It was a big ocean port city. It only had about 3000 slaves, but it had about 17,000 free blacks. It was a very large, very active energetic free black community, and he grows up a midst of them as well, especially amidst them..

Frederick Douglass David blight Frederick Douglas tuckahoe river American slave society Aaron Anthony Betsy Bailey Douglas Aaron Antony Blight Republican Party Baltimore Maryland David
Mark Levin Reflects on Latest Abraham Lincoln Documentary on HISTORY

Mark Levin

01:55 min | 4 months ago

Mark Levin Reflects on Latest Abraham Lincoln Documentary on HISTORY

"There's a documentary that's on about Lincoln And eventually this before on the history channel And what's remarkable is that documentary its first night was up against my show on Sunday And yet we had over 2 million viewers which is massive for a Sunday Night at 8 p.m. eastern And yet I DVR didn't watched it After my show and I watched it the next night When you watch a show like that you watch the show on Churchill or you watch a show on Washington and so forth You know why these are great men These are great men that make extraordinarily difficult decisions while all the men and women around them are running around like chickens without a hit While they're getting all kinds of static all kinds of input all kinds of competing ideas and contradictory ideas What the people will and won't support and on and on and on and you have to mentally push your way through all that to try and figure out what the right thing is to do and how to get in front of the situation Lincoln insisted on keeping the union together And he eventually came to the position always opposed to slavery always That slavery had to be a rallying cry as well And no better man than Frederick Douglass Embraced him Be signed the Emancipation proclamation Was extremely unpopular in some quarters including in the north among so called moderate Democrats who had sided with the union

Lincoln Washington Frederick Douglass
Washington Post Slides Offensive Remark Against Justice Thomas

Mark Levin

01:06 min | 4 months ago

Washington Post Slides Offensive Remark Against Justice Thomas

"Washington Post slides offensive remark against clarence Thomas in the news report Quote why don't they just call him an Uncle Tom Christopher pandal for writing for blaze media Don't you understand the Democrats the media they stand for minorities They stand for civil liberties In Washington Post report on a top Democrat lawmaker's influence over Biden's next Supreme Court nominee Denigrated justice clarence Thomas the court's only black justice with a racially charged reference The compost referred to Thomas as the black justice whose rulings often resemble the thinking of white conservatives Let's just stop Did Frederick Douglass reflect the thinking of whites and white conservatives because ultimately he supported Lincoln What's going on here The racialism with loose abandoned like this

Tom Christopher Clarence Thomas Washington Post Biden Supreme Court Frederick Douglass Thomas Lincoln
On MLK Day, Biden says Americans must commit to King's work

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 5 months ago

On MLK Day, Biden says Americans must commit to King's work

"Martin Martin Luther Luther king's king's eldest eldest son son is is criticizing criticizing Congress Congress for for failing failing to to get get voting voting rights rights legislation legislation through through the the Senate Senate after after leading leading a a March March across across the the Frederick Frederick Douglass Douglass bridge bridge Washington Washington DC DC Martin Martin Luther Luther king king the the third third in in his his family family had had a a message message for for president president Biden Biden and and lawmakers lawmakers calling calling on on them them to to honor honor his his father's father's legacy legacy by by passing passing stalled stalled voting voting rights rights legislation legislation no no more more empty empty words words don't don't tell tell us us what what you you believe believe in in show show us us with with your your vote vote at at a a news news conference conference king king decried decried laws laws passed passed in in nineteen nineteen Republican Republican led led states states that that have have made made it it harder harder to to vote vote in in response response to to former former president president trump's trump's false false claims claims about about election election rigging rigging these these laws laws are are being being passed passed with with knife knife like like precision precision to to cut cut black black and and brown brown voters voters out out of of the the process process king king had had particularly particularly harsh harsh words words for for two two Democrats Democrats senators senators Kristin Kristin cinema cinema of of Arizona Arizona and and Joe Joe Manchin Manchin of of West West Virginia Virginia who who opposed opposed changing changing Senate Senate rules rules to to muscle muscle the the bill bill passed passed a a Republican Republican filibuster filibuster they they draw draw the the line line at at protecting protecting the the rights rights of of millions millions of of voters voters Senate Senate Majority Majority Leader Leader Chuck Chuck Schumer Schumer has has canceled canceled a a planned planned Senate Senate recess recess week week and and says says he he wants wants to to bring bring the the bill bill up up for for debate debate Jennifer Jennifer king king Washington Washington

Martin Martin Luther Luther Ki Senate Frederick Frederick Douglass D Martin Martin Luther Luther Ki President President Biden Bide Congress Washington Brown Brown Kristin Kristin King Joe Joe Manchin Manchin West West Virginia King King Donald Trump Arizona Bill Bill Majority Leader Leader Chuck C Virginia Senate Senate Jennifer Jennifer King King Wa
Robert Reilly Discusses Slavery and the 1619 Project

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:42 min | 6 months ago

Robert Reilly Discusses Slavery and the 1619 Project

"I'm glad that you have written this expanded edition of America on trial with clarity on the ridiculousness of the 1619 Project. One thing Erica might say that reinforces the point you just made that slavery was in institution from time immemorial is one thing the 1619 Project neglects to notice as they're saying the slavery was introduced in 1619 when black slaves were brought by Dutch traders to Virginia is that slavery was already widespread in the area of the American colonies, practiced by the Native Americans. Who enslaved each other. Can you imagine, can you imagine? But again, this is because we're both Christians. We understand that mankind has fallen. And a part from the God of scripture, what we do is scandalous is inhuman. So yes, slavery has existed. Always, it's a horror and we are right to be horrified by it, but if anything, it has been serious Christians that have labored against the slave trade. I wrote a book about William wilberforce, whom Frederick Douglass revered, so if a freed slave like Frederick Douglass can revere a white English man for taking a biblical stand against the slave trade, you do have to wonder how we could get to a point where we have to clarify that slavery was not invented by white people in 1619 and Jamestown. It's almost funny, but it's but it's

Erica Frederick Douglass America Virginia William Wilberforce Jamestown
The Case Against Cancelling Lincoln With Brian Kilmeade

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:13 min | 7 months ago

The Case Against Cancelling Lincoln With Brian Kilmeade

"Stuff. So I want to start with your book, Brian, because your books are always so historically compelling and important. And I have a real soft spot for Frederick Douglass. I think he's such an important American figure that people don't know about. The book is the president and the freedom fighter, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and their battle to save America's soul, tell us about the book and then tell us about the interesting relationship between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Hey, you know, I've had a chance to talk to your group too, and they're most intriguing people around. It gives you great hope for the next generation. But what I think this is, is fortunate is the timing. I didn't do it for this reason, but it was one of the reasons why there was so much interest in the book in that we're all talking about race again. We're talking about history again. We're talking about 1619 project again. We're also talking about CRT. All right, we don't talk about that we're looking you and I are trying to look to whitewash history. Don't say that fox looking to say, don't talk about slavery. I'm telling you right now. You can not talk about Frederick Douglas and not talk about slavery. He was born as slave. And do we soft better? No, it's in his biography. He wrote it 7 years after escaping freedom. He said, if you just busy, I could speak well and he had a great vocabulary. People started doubting that he was actually a slave he took his shirt off. Look at my back. Got whipped up beat, never knew his birthday, never knew his parents, but still there was a thirst to learn. So again, education is in the news. Frederick Douglass thirsting for it. Lincoln, but his dad would yell at him. What are you learning for? That's not going to help you work the field. This guy had a thirst to learn one year formal education. What are we talking about? This guy studied the founding fathers on his own. I did Frederick Douglass. And the more that they learned, the more they wanted to learn and just think about this. We're learning in school that America is inherently erased this country when these two people are in a very rough and rugged America without any social safety net without any, I don't know social infrastructure to bail them out. And they couldn't wait to make our country better. They weren't judging our country. They were involved in our country. And I think that's what the big message is.

Frederick Douglass Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglas Brian America FOX Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Their Battle to Save America's Soul With Brian Kilmeade

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:37 min | 8 months ago

Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Their Battle to Save America's Soul With Brian Kilmeade

"I'm talking to Brian kilmeade, author of the president and the freedom fighter, and you just shared something that I really was I never thought about this. So when Lincoln is elected in 1860, a number of states had seceded. First South Carolina 6 more. Okay, and so that's before his inauguration. Before he gets to The White House. Okay, so he's elected. They secede. And then on the assumption he's going to free the slaves and they're not going to deal with it. And he says to get them back into the union, he says you can have your slaves. Thirteenth Amendment could be yours. Okay, so that's the freed slaves. You could be enslaved. And so exactly how did that go? So obviously you said that Frederick Douglass feels betrayed. So it took him some time. I mean, it's kind of funny because you get this with Lincoln. He takes off everybody and at some point, right? And a real conservative today would say suspending habeas corpus. I don't know. You know, it's like it's very interesting that real leadership will do that. It will take off everybody in a way. But so for a while, it seems to me that Frederick Douglass must have not been very pleased with him. Absolutely not. And then when he brings up colonization to solve the problem of the African Americans in America, he say, listen, we made a big mistake. It happened before we were born. So can we send you back? So he invites newspapers, all the press with him, like selective members of the press. And he brings in African American leaders, doesn't invite Douglas. And he says, made a big mistake. Obviously, blacks and whites can't live together, and it's part of this part of the reason this is the reason for the war. So I would like to make you an offer give you plenty of money to go back to Central and South America or wherever you want to go. Douglas, everyone in South America or Africa. Africa, too. He said you could go wherever you wanted to go. We will send you. So we will free you and let you go. Absolutely out of the country. Out of the country. And this bothered Douglas. Beyond by these, I'm an American. I don't want to go anywhere. Where am I born? I'm born here. You got to send me elsewhere. Since when camp blacks and whites get together, remember, and I haven't brought this up yet, but they have another similarity. They both read this book called the Colombian orator. The Columbian order teaches how to speak publicly, teach how to hold yourself and also has great essays from these people like Cicero, Socrates, George Washington, people in our past, and they're thinking big and grandiose. So you wonder why that speech worked at 28? Lincoln's been reading every day since 7. That's right and envisioning himself on that level without the cockiness and ego with the humility to know that it may be what he was capable

Brian Kilmeade Frederick Douglass Lincoln Douglas South Carolina White House South America Africa America Cicero Socrates George Washington
Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 8 months ago

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"I'm talking to Brian kill me, you may know him from fox and friends, but he's written a lot of books. This one is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass in their battle to save America's soul. America soul could use a little saving right now. But we're not going to talk about that. What made you want to write a book combining these two figures? Well, I was looking for the last time I was here. You kind enough to interview me about Sam Houston, the Alamo Avengers. So I try to find an angle not plowed and the Alamo is, but San jacinto isn't 9 months later he ends up taking him out as San jacinto beating Santa Anna in 17 minutes because Texans know it, but the rest of the world. So I go, what's next? The Mexican war, I didn't think had enough. My opinion, I'm sure there's a lot there with Lee in the quartermaster grant and the fact that these generals fought on the same side and then years later, they'd be trying to kill each other and a lot of them successfully. I said, all right, the Civil War. What could I do that's not plowed ground from Ken burns a series to the remarkable book, David blight wrote about Frederick Douglas Scott? I think the book of the year, 5 years ago. And then what about Lincoln? I literally you and I gave the same situation. We get books about linking to our desks all the time, and they're all great. I'm waiting for nobody who's written been written about more. It's like maybe three people like who've written about Napoleon Jesus, Lincoln. I mean, I don't know how many books have been written about Lincoln. So yeah, what do you do for a fresh angle on the Civil War? So what I wanted to do is also I didn't mind tackling race, but I wanted to do it through quotes, not opinion. And racist never left the news, Black Lives Matter is raging at the time. And then you have you have a situation where as late as Condoleezza and rice Condoleezza Rice on the view, having to defend herself growing up in a Jim Crow south who knew all about racism, but grew up as his conservatives says, don't ever let it be an excuse. So I said, what have I talk about their parallel lives to the degree in which they read a lot of the same books? Did they overcame incredible obstacles? Nothing like Frederick Douglass. I get it. The guy was enslaved until he was in his 20 years old, two tries, got out in the second time within 7 years has a biography. It's a bestseller, and then starts a world tour and becomes famous in Scotland, Ireland, Germany, and England. This guy was a slave ten years before, but decides to come back to America because his 4 million enslaved 350,000 slave owners and he sees potential in this guy Lincoln and the Republican Party that we're finally ready to do

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug San Jacinto Alamo Avengers David Blight Frederick Douglas Scott Lincoln America Santa Anna Sam Houston Napoleon Jesus Texans Ken Burns FOX Brian Rice Condoleezza Rice LEE Condoleezza Jim Crow Frederick Douglass Scotland
Brian Kilmeade Knew Fox News Was Special 25 Years Ago

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:42 min | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Knew Fox News Was Special 25 Years Ago

"And today I get to talk to the author of a book called the president and the freedom fighter, Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass and their battle to save America soul. And the author of the book is someone you may know, named Brian kilmeade, Brian, you look very familiar. Eric, thanks so much for your support over the years. Every time I have a book out, you always say come down to this cathedral. And this place is the nicest studio I've ever seen. Period. Thank you very much. Look, this, I think I told you this. And by the way, people, if you're just tuning in, this guy has been on Fox and Friends for how many years now? 25. Radio show for 13. Well, hold on a second. Did you just say 25? Yeah, I started doing it in junior high. I thought so. Yeah, it was crazy. Playing pop Warner football and they grabbed you. It took me 12 years to be to get to Fox. And then once I got there, I realized how great it was, even though no one had heard of it yet. So when it started, I started filling in as a sports guy, and then it evolved and things started going crazy from the war from the election mess to the war on terror to the Iraq War. First election mess. Failure to a 2000 Chad hanging chads. Yes. So you are the youngest living institution in the country. Seriously, that's amazing 25 years from the beginning. Yeah, I mean, I knew when I walked into that place who was going to be special, they were all about winning. They're all about substance. They're all about getting things done completion oriented. Every time they would be a negative story out, they would put their headline on the wall. I'm like, wow, they're not running for negative stories. They would laugh at being laughed at. These guys, this is like Bill Parcells. And the Giants before they were even 500. Until recently, I'm talking about the build ourselves just 25 years. Good

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug Brian Kilmeade FOX Eric Brian America Football Iraq Bill Parcells Giants
Brian Kilmeade Explains the Relationship Between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains the Relationship Between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

"What was the relationship with Lincoln and Douglas was Lincoln intimidated by Douglas Douglas was a powerful figure Was it the reverse I mean what was the dynamic between the two Sadly link you never wrote about it but others said he talked about it Douglas was a overpowering figure in the time wanted an immediate Emancipation proclamation wanted to let blacks fight for their freedom He didn't do it And in the beginning he was he was given and said on his first inaugural hey guys come on back in We lost 7 states We need you back We can compromise what we've slavery for now Whatever you do come on back to wood and Douglas Are you kidding me You want them back This 4 million slaves there's 350,000 slave owners We have to end this now That's what you talked about in the Douglas debates do it But he knew Lincoln that if he did it you have no country you preside over because the north was exactly ready to fight for slavery either but gradually both things happen when they finally meet at The White House He realizes what winning was how sincerely was how deep he was and what a great listener he was And together the brief period of time they rallied with recruitment they rallied on issues getting equal to whites in the war and the respect that they had was enormous And I'll just share with you the last interchange He walks into the inaugural ball after only Yorkshire Greek and looks like she's delicacy of my friend Douglas What did you think of the speech We look back at this mister president Don't worry about me Look at all these people around us There's nobody's opinion that I care more about What did you think of the speech He said mister president a sacred effort And that was their last exchange So tell me how more they came and how important they were I mean to me I read that and I get

Douglas Lincoln Douglas Douglas White House
Brian Kilmeade Digs Deep Into the Story of Frederick Douglass in Latest Book

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Digs Deep Into the Story of Frederick Douglass in Latest Book

"Yeah and thanks for bringing me to that So what happens in life as soon as he started reading opening up his mind and really realizing what life could be reading about George Washington's Cicero Socrates the Bible And that's where they never told slaves to read because they thought a few educated and they want more We just want them to work for free And we all wanted to see what life could be because we wanted to think that they're inferior If you taught a slave to reiterate you could be arrested It was against the law He was determined to find another way Plus he was growing up in an area where you want his friends will wait Kids don't see color He was convinced of it he wrote about it because I'm convinced you don't see color adults make that And that's why it's just not digressed too much The CRT conversation you're having on a regular basis is not a side conversation It is the conversation because you're making first grade and look at their skin why You're making a fourth creator wonder if there are pressure why The two original question he tried is everything self esteem is everything So he they're trying to beat him and break him because he is so obstinate and so determined to matter questioning everything They sent him to a slave breaker And they slave breaker decide to do is going to work into the bone The way they describe it he was going through It sounds like he was dehydrated And instead of helping him they beat him He escapes and goes back to his original master And he goes you got to go back I licensed you Adam getting paid for this You got to go back So he has to go back And then all of a sudden you know he's going to get a beating Grabs his leg He breaks free to try to tie him up He won't have it He asks for help the guy when you get it So it's Douglas 17 years old against the slave breaker He goes I wouldn't attack him but every time he got close I busted him And went on for over an hour according to Douglas's biography and others And he gave me every guide that calls he beat the hell out

Cicero Socrates George Washington Adam Douglas
Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

The Dan Bongino Show

02:06 min | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

"Well number one it's a relief to do a book like you and I have friends and you would have me on if I had something on the history of sewing We would have and that was really why I cared about it But that's to know And yet sad that the issues that I'm talking about in the 18 50s 1860s is still exist today Not to the degree it is but we're still talking about racial unrest We're talking about an equity We're talking about reparations We're talking about how to handle it how to equal the playing field without making it unlevel for either side and how much anger we should have And then we watch conduits to rise go to the view And at the same excuse me I keep in the segregated south I don't want to make white children feel bad or something they had nothing to do with I don't want black kids to feel like they're victims And please don't let you survive on segregation because you can go to a movie theater or sit in the front of a bus and she wants to play and be killed because they were black but she led this country as Secretary of State national security adviser sovietologist in this country in 8 to two presidents You can accomplish anything even if the playing field is an equal And even if there is something unjust and nobody personified that better than Frederick Douglass Dan whenever we're going through we weren't out going into savoring We did that We know our parents We know of birthday Even if our parents are bad what about having none What about not even knowing who your siblings were What about not having close into your 7 8 years old What about is it by the time you escape and find a way to get free and by hook and cook to learn to read and write within 7 years of getting your freedom right to your biography and becoming an international bestseller and soon a lecturer whose statue sit in Scotland Ireland Germany and England today So dude I'm not saying we can all be Frederick Douglas but please don't tell me your circumstances so bad Life isn't fair I will never achieve I will never offer also soft pedal We the original sin of America No one will And I don't want to I bring quotes not opinion

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Scotland Ireland Germany England America
Brian Kilmeade Analyzes Frederick Douglas' Journey in 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Analyzes Frederick Douglas' Journey in 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"Now Frederick Douglass tell us a little bit about him He was clearly a brilliant man way ahead of his time Yeah brilliant in every way and determined And here's what I mean back then If you taught a slave to read and write you go to jail They knew If you give African Americans in equal shot on some level they knew there's no difference as we know between races So they said okay we need these guys and they got to work for us and we need these family break up These families is as brutal as you can imagine in the south and the north is only 1% of the African American population there They don't relate to slavery It's not part of their society But in the south it is and they were born into at these generations from Monroe to Jefferson to Washington They didn't invent it was happening on 7 continents All right hold your hold your thought The book is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass and the battle to save America's salts Fantastic book as are all of kilmeade's

Frederick Douglass Monroe Jefferson Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug Washington America Kilmeade
Brian Kilmeade Documents Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas' Relationship in New Book

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 8 months ago

Brian Kilmeade Documents Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas' Relationship in New Book

"It was a fascinating relationship between Lincoln and Frederick Douglass Douglass early on was a skeptic wasn't he But hopeful in that he sees this Lincoln He sees hears about him He knows that he's with his new Republican Party And he sees any reason everybody reads about the Douglas debates And he's talking about that everyone needs to be free and that we can not exist the way we're going at it And he had the courage to not only say these things but back them up Go back to our founding fathers and he said what did Jefferson think What did Monroe think Would Washington believe what was how would they feel about this When it went to the constitution what did they really expect And he concluded with Douglas concluded which gave Douglas hope that we were not living up to our constitution we did not have to redo our constitution We're based on the right things We weren't there yet as a country And nothing got solved until they met He began to see the potential in Lincoln but the country wasn't ready for a guy to walk in there and say yeah hey south release 350,000 land slave owners released 4 million slaves He knew we weren't there yet but he knew how to get us

Frederick Douglass Douglass Lincoln Douglas Republican Party Monroe Jefferson Washington
"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:27 min | 10 months ago

"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

"Is a crisis on the southern border and it does not involve robert francis aerobic and so robert francis rourke the fake irishman another fake hispanic irishman. He's very much irish. Thinking of running for the governor. The governor's mansion in texas doesn't involve him but it does involve the millions of people that are illegally flowing into our country. John adams famously. In a letter to the secretary of state. John marshall said why should we take the bread out of the mouths of our own children and give it to strangers. Frederick douglass. Who was incredible. And frederick does not get enough attention. In my opinion by republicans by conservatives by commentators said the old employments by which we have heretofore to four gain our livelihood are gradually and may it seem inevitably passing into other hands. Every hour sees the black man elbowed out of employment by some newly arrived immigrant whose hunger and whose color thought to give him a better title to the place. He's making a moral argument. That when you form a government your duty. Your responsibility is first and foremost dear fellow-countrymen to your citizens not to the foreigner not to the newly arrived person

Robert Francis Rourke Robert Francis John Marshall John Adams Frederick Douglass Texas Frederick
Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

All In with Chris Hayes

02:06 min | 10 months ago

Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

"All learn the story of the warren school at least the basics of it slavery and the rights and status of enslaved people through america into a civil war from eighteen sixty one eight hundred sixty five north. The union eventually won the south confederate states. That had seceded were vanquished and president abraham lincoln was assassinated. But we are not taught. Hardly ever i certainly was taught this only a little bit. We know less about is what came after after the union's victory which is a successful effort by those same confederate forces to win back white supremacy in the south and to win back. The story of their own nobility and those victories are marked with monuments to the confederacy to the losing side to the traders. Like this one. A robert ugly erected in the former capital of the confederacy in richmond virginia in one ninety twenty five years after lee's surrender napa mathematics and after the thirteenth and fourteenth and fifteen commitments which made slavery illegal and unconstitutional enshrined due process in our constitution and gave men of any color of the right to vote and full citizenship and after the union victory there was a hope born for people like frederick douglass and thaddeus stevens and harriet tubman of a true multiracial. Democracy enshrined in those civil war amendments of equal citizens under law with dignity and respect and freedom and the beginnings of that the period the period of reconstruction the south with federal troops deployed to keep the peace confederacy reduced to shameful abject defeat. Black people were voting. They were registering to vote and they were going to school. Becoming becoming local office. Holders and mayors town councilman and members of congress. Like senator hiram revels of mississippi. I bet you've probably never heard that name. Maybe some of you know it. We don't learn his name. The first african american to serve in the upper chamber these were the actual beginnings of a true genuine multiracial democracy in the south and in america that were then destroyed

Warren School Robert Ugly President Abraham Lincoln Thaddeus Stevens America Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Richmond Virginia LEE Senator Hiram Revels Mississippi Congress
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:32 min | 11 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"With and a point frederick to high positions in their government this was a feat of feats for any common man but was living me impossible dream for an african american man in that time period in his final position. Working as consul. General of haiti. Frederick disagreed with america's decision to acquire important haiti and converted to a military station in eighteen. Ninety one this division. And course of action. 'cause frederick to have to resign from the position as he truly did not believe in the cause. Frederick would spend the final years of his life in dc where he continued to be committed to activism and political justice. Sadly frederick's wife passed away on august fourth. Eighteen eighty two from a stroke. Frederick would go on to marry his secretary and an almost unheard of mood. That would put him at odds with his family. This was nothing new. To frederick and he would not be phased to speak more on his previously mentioned accolade of being the most photograph man of the nineteenth century. This was due in large part his visibility in his community and promoting the image of an educated intelligent and established african american man. I would also be involved in african american educational institutions in the dc area. His most prominent appointment was on the board of trustees at howard. University frederick was on board of trustees with howard university from eighteen seventy one to eighteen ninety five interacting with inspiring other trailblazers. Such as i to be wills can hint frederick would collaborate with either on a few projects. All centered around preserving and furthering african american culture in history. Frederick douglass passed away on february twentieth. Eighteen ninety five just after his birthday. Frederick's wife then created the frederick douglass memorial and historical association to preserve his home in all its contents. Fredericks home in c. Called cedar hill be acquired by the national park service in nineteen sixty two. It was then established as the frederick douglass national historic site in nineteen eighty-eight. Fun fact black. History month was established in february based on frederick's birthday of february fourteenth which was a guess to put it plainly frederick douglass was a formidable figure and activist in orator a writer. Our human rights advocate a husband and a father. Most importantly frederick was a man of action. Frederick lived a life that many of us could not even dream of enduring the suffering. But frederick didn't endure frederick overcame persevered and flourished. He went from being denied work on the shipyard to being invited back to the white house. He went from being illiterate to publishing multiple autobiographies newspapers and monthly publications. He went from being told he would amount to nothing to be. One of the most renowned statesman of his time frederick saw the status quo and thought. I'm going to change this. We can only hope to gain a modicum of the state leanness. That was frederick douglass..

Frederick frederick Sadly frederick haiti dc frederick douglass frederick douglass memorial an frederick douglass national hi howard university stroke america Fredericks wills cedar hill howard national park service white house
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:46 min | 11 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Hey there be one. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable odds so thank you so much for joining me again. This is part. Two of the frederick douglass series in part one. We've followed frederick journey from an enslaved child who was carted from plantation to plantation to a renowned orator and statesman who spent his days educating the public on his experiences in order to abolish the very system that held him captive for so many years. Yes that was a mouthful. Where'd we'd left off exactly. Was that frederick. Have begun working for to abolitionists. Organizations called the american anti-slavery society as well as the massachusetts anti-slavery society fergie quiz engaged in a tense debate with his comrades challenging their call for violence with the need for nonviolence in furthering their agenda again voicing his opinion too much opposition within his camp. But if anyone was familiar with going against the grain it was frederick douglass during this time period. While frederick traveled in spoke about his life he began to realize that his audience doubted the authenticity of his stories. Although frederick had indeed been enslaved people would point out articulate in educated he was highlighting his other worldly public speaking skills saying that someone who was enslaved would never be able to speak in such a way. These characteristics were presented as evidence that fragile could have never lived. The life he'd claimed with that in mind frederick began important work just a few years after his great debate at the national convention of colored citizens in buffalo. New york frederick would publish his first. Autobiography fredericks autobiography titled narrative of the life of frederick douglass. An american slave written by himself was published in eighteen forty five. This book was revolutionary and groundbreaking for several reasons. The biggest one being that frederick. Road it himself. It also served as a way of providing concrete intangible evidence of frederick's previous years in enslavement further legitimizing. His cause and his background frederick also published this book with full knowledge that he would be exposing himself to the possibility of being recaptured by his previous owner. Because keep in mind at this time. Frederick was a fugitive slave in quotation marks. At this point. With all this in. Mind frederick stu went ahead and published his autobiography as he believed there was more strength to be shared in the message. Frederick would go on to publish two more autobiographies later on in life. Audience is everywhere from america to overseas were enraptured with frederick's book the books international success encouraged frederick to take his lecture campaign across the pond right after his book was published frederick. We spent a few years traveling around the uk giving his amazing speeches and lectures. Eventually frederick was able to garner enough attention and support that the public campaigns secure his freedom was created in the uk. This campaign was successful. And frederick was legally granted freedom from his previous owner who still pursued frederick ruthlessly especially after his growing successes with his freedom and international fame in tow frederick.

frederick frederick douglass frederick journey american anti-slavery society national convention of colored ari massachusetts fredericks frederick stu Frederick buffalo New york america uk
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Everyone. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable arts. Now i don't know if you guys have any marylanders in your life besides me of course but one thing about us. We are crazy proud of our state heavy on the crazy. We put our state flag on anything you can think of in there so many stores here that sell literally only maryland state flag branded goods. And they are booming. Let me tell you guys lucrative lucrative businesses right there. So of course. I'm going to cover another amazing marylanders on my podcast are also wanna shout. A friend who inspired me and who basically told me this would be a great person to cover. I've been thinking about it. And i was like why not so. Let's get right into it. Oh and i love suggestions so feel free to send me a dm on instagram or facebook you know. Send me some of your own suggestions of inspirational people. I want to hear. I love it all. So the individual we're learning about today is another significant historical figure who was pivotal in social change in our society. Social change that we are still living in today. This person grew up in the worst of circumstances constantly beaten down and forced to believe that they were not worthy of basic human courtesy and respect in spite of this. They rose above their plight to become one of the most respected statesman in the history of the united states. This individual was an intellectual. A writer an abolitionist and an amazing orator among so many other outstanding things not to mention he was reportedly the most photographed american man of the nineteenth century. How does one even get that accolade. Amazing so we will be covering the scholar. The stately the savior frederick douglass. This is part. One of the two part frederick douglass series. so let's get right into it frederick. Douglass was born around february. Eighteen eighteen on a farm in talbert county maryland..

ari maryland instagram facebook frederick douglass united states Douglass talbert county
The Man in America Who Did More for African American Slaves Than Anyone Else Was Abraham Lincoln

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Man in America Who Did More for African American Slaves Than Anyone Else Was Abraham Lincoln

"The man in America who did more. For the African American slaves. Was Abraham Lincoln. And yet the critical race theory types and the rest said No, No, no. You don't understand. He wanted to send black people back to Liberia. He had different ideas and different thoughts. He becomes president, the United States. There's a civil war and he says We must keep the union together and we must destroy slavery. Frederick Douglass. Was skeptical of Lincoln became a huge Lincoln fan. As my dad wrote in his book. After the second inaugural address. The second shortest inaugural address in American history. And they profoundly brilliant and important speech that Lincoln wrote himself. Think it goes back to the White House. It's raining. The skies opened up when he gave a speech. By the way the sun came out. He goes back to the White House. They have a Sort of an inaugural event going on there. And he sees through the door that there's a little tussle going on. Does this black man is trying to get in to see the President Frederick Douglass. And he tells the equivalent of the secret service back then, the back off he wanted to talk to his friend. Frederick Douglass. It's Frederick Douglass, who Writes about this account. And Lincoln, says the Douglas What did you think? And Frederick Douglass said he could not have been more impressed.

Frederick Douglass Lincoln America Abraham Lincoln Liberia White House President Frederick Douglass Douglas
Democrats, Republicans clash over D.C. statehood effort

Here & Now

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Democrats, Republicans clash over D.C. statehood effort

"The House Committee on Oversight and Reform is hearing arguments on a bill to establish Washington D. C. As the 51st State MPR's Jen Newman reports, the effort faces long odds with significant Republican opposition. The bill would create the state of Washington, D. C, which would stand for Douglas Commonwealth named for Frederick Douglass. Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the district in Congress, as a nonvoting delegate. Says the more than 700,000 people who live in D C deserve representation. Do you think pays more federal taxes for capita than any state any state already in the union, the country's 51st state would consist of 66 out of the 68 square miles of the present day federal district. The remaining two square miles would be turned into a new capital and consist of the major federal buildings and monuments. The measure faces strong opposition by Republicans, who argue it Attempt by Democrats to gain more seats in Congress. Genuine NPR

House Committee On Oversight A Jen Newman Douglas Commonwealth Washington Eleanor Holmes Norton Frederick Douglass Congress NPR
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 1 year ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"I want to read that for you one more time and by the way all you a all you intellectuals out there out there talking about how awful it is that the kids these days how they talk like this. How awful awful that these kids talk like this. You know the reason. They talk like that because they know your full of shit shit and they know that you you built a country on slavery and there is shamed of you and they want they want to be like those people and you know what good for them and shame on you. Shame on you. Going around correcting people's english is if you're some sort of hot shit you're not you're not shit you ain't hot shit. You're shit correcting people. The way they speak your fool. That's the way that slaves used to speak. That's your ancestors our ancestors. America merida art history. Not black history that the ashamed of as not just not making these young girls feel sorry about their hair. They have nothing to be ashamed of. They did everything for you just like it says in the song. Listen to the song we raise the week. We peel the meat. They give us the corn. They give us the skin. We bake the bread. And that's the way they give us the cross they take this in the meal. We scan the pot they give us. They give us the liquor and say that's good enough for nigger walkover walkover you butter in the fat poor nigger. You can't get over that walk over. This is not a bad summary. The palpable injustice and fraud of slavery. Giving as it does to the lazy the idol the comforts which god designed should be given solely to the honest laborer year that the comfort that god designed should be given solely to the honest laborer not to the lazy mother. Fucker but what happens in society if you really think about it and see this is a god that look the oddest laborer of frederick douglass. God that was a died of honest laborer. The worker the working person you get it you get i. The left leans a little bit toward you. Know whatever ism you wanna call it this week but it's really just so called social democracy. Which is what. It's always been since the civil war idiot programmed in history. He can't change. It libertarian all. You want to go nowhere. You notice how you're going nowhere. It's gonna stay that way..

frederick douglass America civil war english this week one more time
"frederick douglass" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on KGO 810

"That we were lucky to have Lincoln because Lincoln was the man who understood what needed to be done to bring us to this point. 80 88 tennis, the telephone number. Oh, let's go to Is it a Rahm or Kerem in Palo Alto? I wrong, Erin. Hi. Hey. How you doing? It's Sarah more promise than expected of Persian flavor, too. So, yeah, of course I I Love the speech of you know what does the forces your life means? African Americans? That's not prevent him but but one of the things that I've been trying to promote for the last Number of years is that for those that would like to celebrate other than Independence Day on the Force of July, But it should be renamed code named Frederick Douglass Day so that we can appreciate that having alternative to all the nationalism and the flags and The pomp and circumstance is that some people want to, you know, celebrate. I don't particularly want to. So you know, don't you think that he has really been unless you pursue it? Or unless you're studying history in college? Don't you think Frederick Douglass has been left out when he is such a vitally important figure. Well, yeah, on goes for so many other extraordinary African American figures to say the least. So anyway, let's see if we can promote a new alternative where people can celebrate one or the other on the fourth day of July. And you know, maybe we can mix the two at some point to bring the country together. But there's a book and I read it with my wife some years ago. It's on, you know, called Douglas and Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Lincoln. And they're wonderful relationship. Private doctors could actually walk into the White House to the great to the chagrin of a love that was standing in line to get a swell anyway. I think that's what much thank you so much. I think that's one of my favorite stories and in such a small story, but it meant so much. That you know. Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass walk to the White House where there were all these people. White people lined up to have an audience with Abraham Lincoln. And when Lincoln saw that a Frederick Douglass had had approached the White House, he told the guard in the front. Bring him here. Now bring him right here. And they would have these long conversations It was. It was really remarkable. Yeah. Frederick Douglass was a truly remarkable man. I want to know more about him. And I'm hoping that I know there have been some biographies that have been written, and I just ordered the book that Ken was referencing, which is really an autobiography that Frederick Douglas wrote about himself. But I'd like to Seymour in our popular culture about Frederick Douglass. There's so many things about him that I find astounding, including his mastery of the English language. Oh, my God, the way this man writes, you know, Lincoln may have been one of the greatest orators of our history. So is Douglas. He Woz unbelievable and to think that he had been born into slavery. That he that he escaped slavery that he was largely self taught that he carried himself. With such pride with such great dignity, you know when we were talking when we were honoring Sicily, Taison images of Frederick Douglass kept coming back to me, just in the things that I've seen of him. The images that we do have are the drawings or the you know the early pictures that we do have a Frederick Douglass. What a marvelous figure in history he was, And I think that he insistently Tyson shared some of the same attributes. Okay, I got to take a break. I love talking about this stuff. But I need to invite Chip Franklin on so that he could tell us what he's got coming up on his show, Which is going to be next real quickly, so that I don't forget. We not only have Tim seeker on tomorrow to take us into the weekend with a little comic relief. We also know you spared me. That was my yea start. We all start. We also have a couple of guests who are going to be with us to talk about the mass of the E. D. D. And they're going to be taking listener phone calls to talk about unemployment. What's been going on What you could do what your recourse is what your problems are. And so we are inviting you to join us believe it starts at noon tomorrow. Here on KGO, um We're going to take your questions, and hopefully we're gonna be able to get some of those questions asked and answered, I mean, really taken care of. So you know where to go, so that you could get what you're entitled to. We'll be right back with Chip Franklin. This is K G o.

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Abraham Lincoln White House Erin Lincoln tennis Rahm Chip Franklin Palo Alto Sarah Sicily Tyson Seymour Ken Tim Taison
"frederick douglass" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The six foot five inch doofus masquerading as they are to go the Harlem to paint graffiti on the streets. Secondly, I think it's time to give indication Toe on old time radio cold named Jimmy from Brooklyn. He was right on target. Thank you. All right. Thanks for calling. Yeah, this guy. This mayor is just one creepy weirdo. I mean, he is, you know, Remember, In the beginning of all this, these psychologists tell honest crisis brings out the real character and people, you know, you see people's Realty true character. You've seen that with your friends and whom you know who is good. In this crisis. New is bad and Different businesses and this mayor, he was always thought of as a kind of left wing. Lazy didn't get anything done. But now he's just a creepy, weird, bizarre character, just making the most insane and named decisions. You know, as 40 people get shot in Manhattan. He's painting black lives matter. If every all these lives matter, stop, the shooting stopped the gunfire. That's the first step. You could paint that later. Paint that next week first stop the shooting, Then paint that he was going to paint it in front of Trump Tower. You notice he stopped. It was the season. What happened if they said I some complications? Yeah. The complication was everybody whispered into his ear. If you paint that in front of Trump Tower, you are not going to get a bailout. He may need to three billion a za bail out at some point you soon as you paint that there that will be the most expensive piece of graffiti ever in the history of the world. It'll cost you billions. Don't paint that there. Because it's just him being petty and stupid and weird. Let's go to Marie in Long Island. Hey, Marie. Good morning mark. How is people really need to do their homework? They want to stop playing a black national anthem before football games and It would read up on who this person James Weldon Johnson is. He was a black conservative Christian Republican who denounced the racist Democratic Party for lynching black people. I mean, they don't they're not going to catch is over. They have no idea. Anything that they're doing. All right, Marie, thanks for calling. I never did any homework in school, and suddenly I could do any homework now, but that's the problem. I said This was the beginning. This movement which started off as a movement, fighting for important changes and better procedures, and better policies and changes that will make a difference. It got hijacked by all these idiots and all these crazy groups and all these money raising groups. And now it's all out of control. It's just stupid, symbolic nonsense, knocking down statues just cause they're statues and knock down Abraham Lincoln statue every day, the one day the guy's getting assassinated for freeing the slaves. Next day, his statues getting torn down because he's a racist. Ah, who was the other one that was torn down? Frederick Frederick Douglass? Frederick Douglass? Here's Here's the guy. You want to make more statues for his statues getting they don't if they see the dark metal statue. They just knock it down. Dark green metal. Knock it down. Whatever it is, they don't know what anything is. Funny how all these statues weren't racist That would just find during the Obama years. Suddenly they're symbols of races. Stop with the statue's Forget the syrup. Forget the Uncle Ben. Forget all that start with important changes in procedures. You know, you're starting to get to stuff there like the choke all stick to important stuff. Anyway. When we come back, Michael Goodwin will be with us. The great columnist will talk to him next. On 7 10 w o R. Rewind of today's Mark Simone.

Trump Tower Marie Frederick Frederick Douglass James Weldon Johnson Jimmy Harlem Mark Simone Toe Michael Goodwin Manhattan Abraham Lincoln Brooklyn Long Island Obama Democratic Party football
"frederick douglass" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Right. Welcome back 7 51 here on the show Day radio program. Okay. So into the the old statue, Hopper, we put all the possible selections Show what statue? Do you think was ripped down over the weekend, and there were a few of them, but this is the one that should stand out to you. Which is the one that just had to go. I saw the weekend They tore down the air. They tried to tear down. They vandalized the Oregon Trail one Well, now, here's the thing. Here's the thing and I would be very interesting to watch him. Try to get the Bozeman Trail one which isn't Buffalo, too. You know the argument there is. Ah, this was about the expansion of the West in Native Americans, and all that are used again. I'm still on team. Stop destroying stuff, but At least they could make that argument to me. Right. At least you can kind of understand how they got there. So, no, we're going to need to go a little further east. Like, Oh, New York State of New York. Yeah. Rochester, New York To be exact. They're just outside. They tore down the Frederick Douglass statue. Black abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Had his statue torn from its base in Rochester, New York. Literally on the anniversary of his famous 18 52 anti slavery speech. And tossed into a ravine. I should say, Gorge, the jeunesse anti sage and easy, Jesse. I don't know, River Gorge about 50 feet away. The irony is that the statue wasn't just there by itself, either. Where? Who knows? Maybe they didn't know it's literally part of a larger monument, which includes Harriet Tubman and is located at a former underground railroad site. So absolutely, and saying, I don't know. Who do you think did it by the way? According to Twitter. I had to be. Ah, Supremacy. Yes, yes, You're absolutely right. It's because Only white supremacists would do that just to make you know it's to make him look bad. It's It's more psyops stuff. You gotta keep up on this. No. What's the reasoning, though? If it is they say, like I do know I have heard this before. In the past or people crazy people. Obviously they try to say Frederick Douglass was the original uncle Tom O G O t. I s armory front, too. Yes, yes. Zero g ut There we go. I don't know. Everything's great. I don't know, man. I just Again with the with the whole Oregon Trail thing, at least, you know, find make your argument. Go back to Harry Tubman. I Marquis pointed out a story that happened she saw on social media where guess there's these dolls that you collect. In the late nineties to thousands called the American Girl Dolls. All have stand there owns retail store. Oh, I had no idea you and I guess they all have individual stories. There's a group of people trying to stop the American girl store. This one the the African American one because they say it's connected to slavery. No people in the comments there pointing out Hava slaved all will know the story. What guess the family was. Enslave. They were slaves, and they escaped. They won their freedom and they ended up becoming becoming a huge entrepreneurs. And doing well. And people are like, well, you need to stop this doll because you're celebrating slavery. And I pointed out. It's like saying, you know. You're going to need to take down Harriet Tubman because she was associated with slavery. Same exactly. And now this happens with Frederick Douglass at the Harry Tubman play. I have a gift. No. Oh, here we go More of this stuff. I am psychic. You know, it isn't totally unintentional. I don't think select any girls.

Frederick Douglass statue Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Harry Tubman New York Rochester Oregon Trail Jesse Bozeman Trail Hopper Twitter River Gorge Gorge Oregon Tom
"frederick douglass" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on AP News

"Tubman and Frederick Douglass have been unveiled in the Maryland state house the statues dedicated during black history month were made to show Tubman and Douglas as they would have appeared in age and dressed in eighteen sixty four they're stuck in the old house chamber the same room where slavery was abolished in Maryland in eighteen sixty four both Tubman and Douglas were born on Maryland's eastern shore Tubman escape from slavery to become a leading abolitionist who helped slaves escape through the Underground Railroad Douglas also escaped slavery and he went on to become an author speaker abolitionist and supporter of women's rights his autobiography published in eighteen forty five was a bestseller that helped fuel the abolitionist movement a Japanese man who is just shy of his one hundred thirteenth birthday has now become the world's oldest man according to Guinness world records she said to want to not pay who was born in nineteen oh seven received a certificate for his accomplishment on Wednesday at a nursing home the previous record holder another Japanese man died last month the oldest living person who is a one hundred seventeen year old woman is also Japanese art not a has a sweet tooth he especially loves desserts like cream puffs and he also believes in smiling up until about a decade ago used to DO bonsai the Japanese traditional art of raising small sculpted trees and has had his work exhibited when asked about the secret to his longevity he said don't get angry and keep smiling the Australian government has scrapped a twelve year old time table for ending indigenous disadvantage saying that the policy had failed a new center left labor party government launched the ambitious closing the gap initiative in two thousand eight its goal was to achieve equality for indigenous Australians in health and life expectancy within a generation prime ministers that presented to parliament to report every year since then qualifying progress made in seven areas conservative prime minister Scott Morrison used his annual report to note that only two of the seven measures were on track closing the gap between indigenous and other Australians and finishing high school and getting four year olds and rolled in early education.

Tubman Frederick Douglass Douglas Maryland Underground Railroad Douglas Australian government prime minister Scott Morrison Guinness world
"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"About Frederick Douglass maybe don't realize what a superstar speaker on on every night on cable television telling the country what he thought about this policy that policy heat oven to media he was a star in the nineteenth century David blight author of this year's Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Frederick Douglass Michael join us on the next plane there show also discussing cannabis with your kids the Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC welcome back to all of I see I'm Jennifer Flanagan filling in for Alison Stewart it's been a decade since Linda Ronstadt last saying on stage the ten time Grammy winner and twenty six time nominee first emerged in the late sixties as a folk and pop artist with a uniquely powerful voice she going to record hits like you're no good when will I be loved and blue by you as well as recording don't know much with Aaron Neville and releasing two albums with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris later in life she lent her voice to the jazz standards operettas and Mexican folk music that you've grown up listening to in Arizona but beginning in the nineteen nineties Ronstadt began to feel her voice deteriorating later she would receive a Parkinson's diagnosis and she stopped performing in two thousand and nine she's been awarded the Latin Grammy lifetime achievement award been inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame and received the national medal of arts and humanities from president Obama in twenty fourteen and now her life and career are documented in the film Linda Ronstadt the sound of my voice which features interviews with the likes of Dolly Parton Emmylou Harris Jackson Browne Bonnie Raitt and even Ronstadt herself here's a clip.

Arizona Dolly Parton Emmylou Harris Ja Obama Grammy Brian Lehrer David Bonnie Raitt president lifetime achievement award Frederick Douglass Emmylou Harris Dolly Parton Aaron Neville Linda Ronstadt Alison Stewart Jennifer Flanagan cannabis Frederick Douglass Michael