35 Burst results for "Frederick Douglass"

Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Their Battle to Save America's Soul With Brian Kilmeade

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Their Battle to Save America's Soul With Brian Kilmeade

"I'm talking to Brian kilmeade, author of the president and the freedom fighter, and you just shared something that I really was I never thought about this. So when Lincoln is elected in 1860, a number of states had seceded. First South Carolina 6 more. Okay, and so that's before his inauguration. Before he gets to The White House. Okay, so he's elected. They secede. And then on the assumption he's going to free the slaves and they're not going to deal with it. And he says to get them back into the union, he says you can have your slaves. Thirteenth Amendment could be yours. Okay, so that's the freed slaves. You could be enslaved. And so exactly how did that go? So obviously you said that Frederick Douglass feels betrayed. So it took him some time. I mean, it's kind of funny because you get this with Lincoln. He takes off everybody and at some point, right? And a real conservative today would say suspending habeas corpus. I don't know. You know, it's like it's very interesting that real leadership will do that. It will take off everybody in a way. But so for a while, it seems to me that Frederick Douglass must have not been very pleased with him. Absolutely not. And then when he brings up colonization to solve the problem of the African Americans in America, he say, listen, we made a big mistake. It happened before we were born. So can we send you back? So he invites newspapers, all the press with him, like selective members of the press. And he brings in African American leaders, doesn't invite Douglas. And he says, made a big mistake. Obviously, blacks and whites can't live together, and it's part of this part of the reason this is the reason for the war. So I would like to make you an offer give you plenty of money to go back to Central and South America or wherever you want to go. Douglas, everyone in South America or Africa. Africa, too. He said you could go wherever you wanted to go. We will send you. So we will free you and let you go. Absolutely out of the country. Out of the country. And this bothered Douglas. Beyond by these, I'm an American. I don't want to go anywhere. Where am I born? I'm born here. You got to send me elsewhere. Since when camp blacks and whites get together, remember, and I haven't brought this up yet, but they have another similarity. They both read this book called the Colombian orator. The Columbian order teaches how to speak publicly, teach how to hold yourself and also has great essays from these people like Cicero, Socrates, George Washington, people in our past, and they're thinking big and grandiose. So you wonder why that speech worked at 28? Lincoln's been reading every day since 7. That's right and envisioning himself on that level without the cockiness and ego with the humility to know that it may be what he was capable

Brian Kilmeade Frederick Douglass Lincoln Douglas South Carolina White House South America Africa America Cicero Socrates George Washington
Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Fox's Brian Kilmeade Discusses His New Book 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"I'm talking to Brian kill me, you may know him from fox and friends, but he's written a lot of books. This one is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass in their battle to save America's soul. America soul could use a little saving right now. But we're not going to talk about that. What made you want to write a book combining these two figures? Well, I was looking for the last time I was here. You kind enough to interview me about Sam Houston, the Alamo Avengers. So I try to find an angle not plowed and the Alamo is, but San jacinto isn't 9 months later he ends up taking him out as San jacinto beating Santa Anna in 17 minutes because Texans know it, but the rest of the world. So I go, what's next? The Mexican war, I didn't think had enough. My opinion, I'm sure there's a lot there with Lee in the quartermaster grant and the fact that these generals fought on the same side and then years later, they'd be trying to kill each other and a lot of them successfully. I said, all right, the Civil War. What could I do that's not plowed ground from Ken burns a series to the remarkable book, David blight wrote about Frederick Douglas Scott? I think the book of the year, 5 years ago. And then what about Lincoln? I literally you and I gave the same situation. We get books about linking to our desks all the time, and they're all great. I'm waiting for nobody who's written been written about more. It's like maybe three people like who've written about Napoleon Jesus, Lincoln. I mean, I don't know how many books have been written about Lincoln. So yeah, what do you do for a fresh angle on the Civil War? So what I wanted to do is also I didn't mind tackling race, but I wanted to do it through quotes, not opinion. And racist never left the news, Black Lives Matter is raging at the time. And then you have you have a situation where as late as Condoleezza and rice Condoleezza Rice on the view, having to defend herself growing up in a Jim Crow south who knew all about racism, but grew up as his conservatives says, don't ever let it be an excuse. So I said, what have I talk about their parallel lives to the degree in which they read a lot of the same books? Did they overcame incredible obstacles? Nothing like Frederick Douglass. I get it. The guy was enslaved until he was in his 20 years old, two tries, got out in the second time within 7 years has a biography. It's a bestseller, and then starts a world tour and becomes famous in Scotland, Ireland, Germany, and England. This guy was a slave ten years before, but decides to come back to America because his 4 million enslaved 350,000 slave owners and he sees potential in this guy Lincoln and the Republican Party that we're finally ready to do

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug San Jacinto Alamo Avengers David Blight Frederick Douglas Scott Lincoln America Santa Anna Sam Houston Napoleon Jesus Texans Ken Burns FOX Brian Rice Condoleezza Rice LEE Condoleezza Jim Crow Frederick Douglass Scotland
Brian Kilmeade Knew Fox News Was Special 25 Years Ago

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Knew Fox News Was Special 25 Years Ago

"And today I get to talk to the author of a book called the president and the freedom fighter, Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass and their battle to save America soul. And the author of the book is someone you may know, named Brian kilmeade, Brian, you look very familiar. Eric, thanks so much for your support over the years. Every time I have a book out, you always say come down to this cathedral. And this place is the nicest studio I've ever seen. Period. Thank you very much. Look, this, I think I told you this. And by the way, people, if you're just tuning in, this guy has been on Fox and Friends for how many years now? 25. Radio show for 13. Well, hold on a second. Did you just say 25? Yeah, I started doing it in junior high. I thought so. Yeah, it was crazy. Playing pop Warner football and they grabbed you. It took me 12 years to be to get to Fox. And then once I got there, I realized how great it was, even though no one had heard of it yet. So when it started, I started filling in as a sports guy, and then it evolved and things started going crazy from the war from the election mess to the war on terror to the Iraq War. First election mess. Failure to a 2000 Chad hanging chads. Yes. So you are the youngest living institution in the country. Seriously, that's amazing 25 years from the beginning. Yeah, I mean, I knew when I walked into that place who was going to be special, they were all about winning. They're all about substance. They're all about getting things done completion oriented. Every time they would be a negative story out, they would put their headline on the wall. I'm like, wow, they're not running for negative stories. They would laugh at being laughed at. These guys, this is like Bill Parcells. And the Giants before they were even 500. Until recently, I'm talking about the build ourselves just 25 years. Good

Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug Brian Kilmeade FOX Eric Brian America Football Iraq Bill Parcells Giants
Brian Kilmeade Explains the Relationship Between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

The Dan Bongino Show

01:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains the Relationship Between Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass

"What was the relationship with Lincoln and Douglas was Lincoln intimidated by Douglas Douglas was a powerful figure Was it the reverse I mean what was the dynamic between the two Sadly link you never wrote about it but others said he talked about it Douglas was a overpowering figure in the time wanted an immediate Emancipation proclamation wanted to let blacks fight for their freedom He didn't do it And in the beginning he was he was given and said on his first inaugural hey guys come on back in We lost 7 states We need you back We can compromise what we've slavery for now Whatever you do come on back to wood and Douglas Are you kidding me You want them back This 4 million slaves there's 350,000 slave owners We have to end this now That's what you talked about in the Douglas debates do it But he knew Lincoln that if he did it you have no country you preside over because the north was exactly ready to fight for slavery either but gradually both things happen when they finally meet at The White House He realizes what winning was how sincerely was how deep he was and what a great listener he was And together the brief period of time they rallied with recruitment they rallied on issues getting equal to whites in the war and the respect that they had was enormous And I'll just share with you the last interchange He walks into the inaugural ball after only Yorkshire Greek and looks like she's delicacy of my friend Douglas What did you think of the speech We look back at this mister president Don't worry about me Look at all these people around us There's nobody's opinion that I care more about What did you think of the speech He said mister president a sacred effort And that was their last exchange So tell me how more they came and how important they were I mean to me I read that and I get

Douglas Lincoln Douglas Douglas White House
Brian Kilmeade Digs Deep Into the Story of Frederick Douglass in Latest Book

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Digs Deep Into the Story of Frederick Douglass in Latest Book

"Yeah and thanks for bringing me to that So what happens in life as soon as he started reading opening up his mind and really realizing what life could be reading about George Washington's Cicero Socrates the Bible And that's where they never told slaves to read because they thought a few educated and they want more We just want them to work for free And we all wanted to see what life could be because we wanted to think that they're inferior If you taught a slave to reiterate you could be arrested It was against the law He was determined to find another way Plus he was growing up in an area where you want his friends will wait Kids don't see color He was convinced of it he wrote about it because I'm convinced you don't see color adults make that And that's why it's just not digressed too much The CRT conversation you're having on a regular basis is not a side conversation It is the conversation because you're making first grade and look at their skin why You're making a fourth creator wonder if there are pressure why The two original question he tried is everything self esteem is everything So he they're trying to beat him and break him because he is so obstinate and so determined to matter questioning everything They sent him to a slave breaker And they slave breaker decide to do is going to work into the bone The way they describe it he was going through It sounds like he was dehydrated And instead of helping him they beat him He escapes and goes back to his original master And he goes you got to go back I licensed you Adam getting paid for this You got to go back So he has to go back And then all of a sudden you know he's going to get a beating Grabs his leg He breaks free to try to tie him up He won't have it He asks for help the guy when you get it So it's Douglas 17 years old against the slave breaker He goes I wouldn't attack him but every time he got close I busted him And went on for over an hour according to Douglas's biography and others And he gave me every guide that calls he beat the hell out

Cicero Socrates George Washington Adam Douglas
Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

The Dan Bongino Show

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Explains Why He Wrote 'The President and The Freedom Fighter'

"Well number one it's a relief to do a book like you and I have friends and you would have me on if I had something on the history of sewing We would have and that was really why I cared about it But that's to know And yet sad that the issues that I'm talking about in the 18 50s 1860s is still exist today Not to the degree it is but we're still talking about racial unrest We're talking about an equity We're talking about reparations We're talking about how to handle it how to equal the playing field without making it unlevel for either side and how much anger we should have And then we watch conduits to rise go to the view And at the same excuse me I keep in the segregated south I don't want to make white children feel bad or something they had nothing to do with I don't want black kids to feel like they're victims And please don't let you survive on segregation because you can go to a movie theater or sit in the front of a bus and she wants to play and be killed because they were black but she led this country as Secretary of State national security adviser sovietologist in this country in 8 to two presidents You can accomplish anything even if the playing field is an equal And even if there is something unjust and nobody personified that better than Frederick Douglass Dan whenever we're going through we weren't out going into savoring We did that We know our parents We know of birthday Even if our parents are bad what about having none What about not even knowing who your siblings were What about not having close into your 7 8 years old What about is it by the time you escape and find a way to get free and by hook and cook to learn to read and write within 7 years of getting your freedom right to your biography and becoming an international bestseller and soon a lecturer whose statue sit in Scotland Ireland Germany and England today So dude I'm not saying we can all be Frederick Douglas but please don't tell me your circumstances so bad Life isn't fair I will never achieve I will never offer also soft pedal We the original sin of America No one will And I don't want to I bring quotes not opinion

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Scotland Ireland Germany England America
Brian Kilmeade Analyzes Frederick Douglas' Journey in 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

Mark Levin

00:58 sec | 3 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Analyzes Frederick Douglas' Journey in 'The President and the Freedom Fighter'

"Now Frederick Douglass tell us a little bit about him He was clearly a brilliant man way ahead of his time Yeah brilliant in every way and determined And here's what I mean back then If you taught a slave to read and write you go to jail They knew If you give African Americans in equal shot on some level they knew there's no difference as we know between races So they said okay we need these guys and they got to work for us and we need these family break up These families is as brutal as you can imagine in the south and the north is only 1% of the African American population there They don't relate to slavery It's not part of their society But in the south it is and they were born into at these generations from Monroe to Jefferson to Washington They didn't invent it was happening on 7 continents All right hold your hold your thought The book is called the president and the freedom fighter Abraham Lincoln Frederick Douglass and the battle to save America's salts Fantastic book as are all of kilmeade's

Frederick Douglass Monroe Jefferson Abraham Lincoln Frederick Doug Washington America Kilmeade
Brian Kilmeade Documents Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas' Relationship in New Book

Mark Levin

01:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Brian Kilmeade Documents Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas' Relationship in New Book

"It was a fascinating relationship between Lincoln and Frederick Douglass Douglass early on was a skeptic wasn't he But hopeful in that he sees this Lincoln He sees hears about him He knows that he's with his new Republican Party And he sees any reason everybody reads about the Douglas debates And he's talking about that everyone needs to be free and that we can not exist the way we're going at it And he had the courage to not only say these things but back them up Go back to our founding fathers and he said what did Jefferson think What did Monroe think Would Washington believe what was how would they feel about this When it went to the constitution what did they really expect And he concluded with Douglas concluded which gave Douglas hope that we were not living up to our constitution we did not have to redo our constitution We're based on the right things We weren't there yet as a country And nothing got solved until they met He began to see the potential in Lincoln but the country wasn't ready for a guy to walk in there and say yeah hey south release 350,000 land slave owners released 4 million slaves He knew we weren't there yet but he knew how to get us

Frederick Douglass Douglass Lincoln Douglas Republican Party Monroe Jefferson Washington
"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:27 min | 2 months ago

"Why Should We Take the Bread Out of the Mouths of Our Own Children and Give It to Strangers?"

"Is a crisis on the southern border and it does not involve robert francis aerobic and so robert francis rourke the fake irishman another fake hispanic irishman. He's very much irish. Thinking of running for the governor. The governor's mansion in texas doesn't involve him but it does involve the millions of people that are illegally flowing into our country. John adams famously. In a letter to the secretary of state. John marshall said why should we take the bread out of the mouths of our own children and give it to strangers. Frederick douglass. Who was incredible. And frederick does not get enough attention. In my opinion by republicans by conservatives by commentators said the old employments by which we have heretofore to four gain our livelihood are gradually and may it seem inevitably passing into other hands. Every hour sees the black man elbowed out of employment by some newly arrived immigrant whose hunger and whose color thought to give him a better title to the place. He's making a moral argument. That when you form a government your duty. Your responsibility is first and foremost dear fellow-countrymen to your citizens not to the foreigner not to the newly arrived person

Robert Francis Rourke Robert Francis John Marshall John Adams Frederick Douglass Texas Frederick
Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

All In with Chris Hayes

02:06 min | 2 months ago

Virginia Removes Robert E. Lee Statue From Capital

"All learn the story of the warren school at least the basics of it slavery and the rights and status of enslaved people through america into a civil war from eighteen sixty one eight hundred sixty five north. The union eventually won the south confederate states. That had seceded were vanquished and president abraham lincoln was assassinated. But we are not taught. Hardly ever i certainly was taught this only a little bit. We know less about is what came after after the union's victory which is a successful effort by those same confederate forces to win back white supremacy in the south and to win back. The story of their own nobility and those victories are marked with monuments to the confederacy to the losing side to the traders. Like this one. A robert ugly erected in the former capital of the confederacy in richmond virginia in one ninety twenty five years after lee's surrender napa mathematics and after the thirteenth and fourteenth and fifteen commitments which made slavery illegal and unconstitutional enshrined due process in our constitution and gave men of any color of the right to vote and full citizenship and after the union victory there was a hope born for people like frederick douglass and thaddeus stevens and harriet tubman of a true multiracial. Democracy enshrined in those civil war amendments of equal citizens under law with dignity and respect and freedom and the beginnings of that the period the period of reconstruction the south with federal troops deployed to keep the peace confederacy reduced to shameful abject defeat. Black people were voting. They were registering to vote and they were going to school. Becoming becoming local office. Holders and mayors town councilman and members of congress. Like senator hiram revels of mississippi. I bet you've probably never heard that name. Maybe some of you know it. We don't learn his name. The first african american to serve in the upper chamber these were the actual beginnings of a true genuine multiracial democracy in the south and in america that were then destroyed

Warren School Robert Ugly President Abraham Lincoln Thaddeus Stevens America Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Richmond Virginia LEE Senator Hiram Revels Mississippi Congress
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:32 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"With and a point frederick to high positions in their government this was a feat of feats for any common man but was living me impossible dream for an african american man in that time period in his final position. Working as consul. General of haiti. Frederick disagreed with america's decision to acquire important haiti and converted to a military station in eighteen. Ninety one this division. And course of action. 'cause frederick to have to resign from the position as he truly did not believe in the cause. Frederick would spend the final years of his life in dc where he continued to be committed to activism and political justice. Sadly frederick's wife passed away on august fourth. Eighteen eighty two from a stroke. Frederick would go on to marry his secretary and an almost unheard of mood. That would put him at odds with his family. This was nothing new. To frederick and he would not be phased to speak more on his previously mentioned accolade of being the most photograph man of the nineteenth century. This was due in large part his visibility in his community and promoting the image of an educated intelligent and established african american man. I would also be involved in african american educational institutions in the dc area. His most prominent appointment was on the board of trustees at howard. University frederick was on board of trustees with howard university from eighteen seventy one to eighteen ninety five interacting with inspiring other trailblazers. Such as i to be wills can hint frederick would collaborate with either on a few projects. All centered around preserving and furthering african american culture in history. Frederick douglass passed away on february twentieth. Eighteen ninety five just after his birthday. Frederick's wife then created the frederick douglass memorial and historical association to preserve his home in all its contents. Fredericks home in c. Called cedar hill be acquired by the national park service in nineteen sixty two. It was then established as the frederick douglass national historic site in nineteen eighty-eight. Fun fact black. History month was established in february based on frederick's birthday of february fourteenth which was a guess to put it plainly frederick douglass was a formidable figure and activist in orator a writer. Our human rights advocate a husband and a father. Most importantly frederick was a man of action. Frederick lived a life that many of us could not even dream of enduring the suffering. But frederick didn't endure frederick overcame persevered and flourished. He went from being denied work on the shipyard to being invited back to the white house. He went from being illiterate to publishing multiple autobiographies newspapers and monthly publications. He went from being told he would amount to nothing to be. One of the most renowned statesman of his time frederick saw the status quo and thought. I'm going to change this. We can only hope to gain a modicum of the state leanness. That was frederick douglass..

Frederick frederick Sadly frederick haiti dc frederick douglass frederick douglass memorial an frederick douglass national hi howard university stroke america Fredericks wills cedar hill howard national park service white house
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

02:38 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"African americans were freed from slavery but still had much work to do to establish themselves in a society that did not want to welcome them. Frederick worked in various ways to help extend civil rights to newly freed. African americans in particular frederick supported several amendments further protecting and establish african americans such as suffrage and instituting the fourteenth amendment. To put it simply. Frederick was an advocate for human rights. It is not well known. I don't think that frederick attended the eighteen. Forty eight women's rights convention in new york and was coined. A women's rights advocate frederick truly believed in the concept that african americans should come together and political matters as there was strength in numbers due to the extreme racism and violence being perpetrated against african americans in southern states. Frederick also supported african americans moving to northern areas where they're at the very least tolerated though not wholly accepted it as equals in eighteen. Seventy two frederick would make his big move to washington dc. This is also where frederick would establish his final newspaper titled new national era unfortunately unlike his previous newspapers this one will collapse due to mismanagement just a couple years after it was published. Not to be confused. Though frederick had many other projects going on at the same time in eighteen seventy four frederick was named the president of friedman savings entrust sadly this too would collapse due to poor management within the bank. That frederick was not made aware of until much later the ramifications from the failed bank position did more to hurt fredericks reputation than anything something that he'd worked hard to build in the dc political network. Frederick was able to successfully repair his reputation in dc going on to receive multiple positions in government. Starting in eighteen. Seventy seven frederick was appointed as the first african-american. Us marshal by president rutherford hayes. He was then appointed to the position of recorder of deeds for the district of columbia in eighteen. Eighty one by president. James garfield frederick was also appointed as the us minister resident in consul for haiti in eighteen. Eighty nine by president ben harrison. If you've been keeping track that is four separate. Us presidents who were confident enough to strategize..

frederick Frederick frederick truly friedman savings washington dc new york fredericks rutherford hayes James garfield frederick us ben harrison columbia haiti
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Hey there be one. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable odds so thank you so much for joining me again. This is part. Two of the frederick douglass series in part one. We've followed frederick journey from an enslaved child who was carted from plantation to plantation to a renowned orator and statesman who spent his days educating the public on his experiences in order to abolish the very system that held him captive for so many years. Yes that was a mouthful. Where'd we'd left off exactly. Was that frederick. Have begun working for to abolitionists. Organizations called the american anti-slavery society as well as the massachusetts anti-slavery society fergie quiz engaged in a tense debate with his comrades challenging their call for violence with the need for nonviolence in furthering their agenda again voicing his opinion too much opposition within his camp. But if anyone was familiar with going against the grain it was frederick douglass during this time period. While frederick traveled in spoke about his life he began to realize that his audience doubted the authenticity of his stories. Although frederick had indeed been enslaved people would point out articulate in educated he was highlighting his other worldly public speaking skills saying that someone who was enslaved would never be able to speak in such a way. These characteristics were presented as evidence that fragile could have never lived. The life he'd claimed with that in mind frederick began important work just a few years after his great debate at the national convention of colored citizens in buffalo. New york frederick would publish his first. Autobiography fredericks autobiography titled narrative of the life of frederick douglass. An american slave written by himself was published in eighteen forty five. This book was revolutionary and groundbreaking for several reasons. The biggest one being that frederick. Road it himself. It also served as a way of providing concrete intangible evidence of frederick's previous years in enslavement further legitimizing. His cause and his background frederick also published this book with full knowledge that he would be exposing himself to the possibility of being recaptured by his previous owner. Because keep in mind at this time. Frederick was a fugitive slave in quotation marks. At this point. With all this in. Mind frederick stu went ahead and published his autobiography as he believed there was more strength to be shared in the message. Frederick would go on to publish two more autobiographies later on in life. Audience is everywhere from america to overseas were enraptured with frederick's book the books international success encouraged frederick to take his lecture campaign across the pond right after his book was published frederick. We spent a few years traveling around the uk giving his amazing speeches and lectures. Eventually frederick was able to garner enough attention and support that the public campaigns secure his freedom was created in the uk. This campaign was successful. And frederick was legally granted freedom from his previous owner who still pursued frederick ruthlessly especially after his growing successes with his freedom and international fame in tow frederick.

frederick frederick douglass frederick journey american anti-slavery society national convention of colored ari massachusetts fredericks frederick stu Frederick buffalo New york america uk
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

03:47 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"The massachusetts area had a strong abolitionist movement. And frederick discovered an abolitionist. Newspaper called the liberator in eighteen. Forty one frederick decided to attend the massachusetts anti-slavery society convention while at the convention a gentleman by the name of william coffin invited frederick to speak to the attendees after having heard frederick stunning or tori skills in new bedford. Frederick speech was an absolute hit and he was promptly recruited to join the group. It can truly be said. That frederick wasn't abolitionist. His entire life but he began to travel and spent his time promoting after joining the massachusetts anti-slavery society as well as the american anti-slavery society. The belief of the american anti-slavery society was that slavery was a moral wrong. That should be eradicated through. Non-violent means in education frederick was particularly strong on promoting the nonviolent aspect of resisting slavery in eighteen forty. Three frederick attended the national convention of colored citizens in buffalo new york while they're another african. American abolitionist named henry highland garnet gave a speech with the central theme of slaves having a violent uprising against their owners. This was a controversial declaration and one that sparked a fierce debate. Between frederick and henry fergie made it clear that he did not support such a notion or any plan of action that insinuated or required violence consequently frederick strength in his beliefs. Put him at odds with those who looked just like him. Other african american abolitionists were very much in favor of the idea of an uprising. Putting frederick as the odd man out although his beliefs were not universally liked or accepted. This did not prevent frederick from being vocal about them. It's difficult to stand up for what you believe in but even more so when the people who are supposed to be your allies. Become your opposition. Frederick strength of character his unending curiosity and intelligence so much can be said for the fire. That was inside. Frederick douglass frederick had the almost magical ability to connect with the crowd and impart a piece of himself his passion for peace education and freedom for all enough that people of all colors travel far and wide just for a chance to hear him speak to be able to command. A room in that manner requires a degree of self assurance that we could all aspire to. I'm gonna end part one right here as this is really a jumping. Off point for frederick skyrocketing career just as a reminder frederick was born. Enslaved beaten abused degraded beyond belief. It was illegal for him to even learn how to read and write to possess basic literacy skills. He had now at this point in his life become one of the most renowned orators of his time spreading the word about his experiences. Educating others helping to relieve the pain for generations after him frederick took what was given to him and molded it into something fierce resilient in tough welcome continue has amazing story in part to as frederick is just getting started in his outstanding legacy so you can find made of metal podcast on facebook and instagram at made of metal podcast altogether and that made of metal m.

frederick massachusetts william coffin american anti-slavery society national convention of colored henry highland garnet henry fergie Frederick new bedford Frederick douglass frederick buffalo frederick skyrocketing new york instagram facebook
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

Made of Mettle

05:54 min | 4 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Made of Mettle

"Everyone. My name is ari in welcome to made of metal a motivational podcast. Where we tell stories about regular people overcoming insurmountable arts. Now i don't know if you guys have any marylanders in your life besides me of course but one thing about us. We are crazy proud of our state heavy on the crazy. We put our state flag on anything you can think of in there so many stores here that sell literally only maryland state flag branded goods. And they are booming. Let me tell you guys lucrative lucrative businesses right there. So of course. I'm going to cover another amazing marylanders on my podcast are also wanna shout. A friend who inspired me and who basically told me this would be a great person to cover. I've been thinking about it. And i was like why not so. Let's get right into it. Oh and i love suggestions so feel free to send me a dm on instagram or facebook you know. Send me some of your own suggestions of inspirational people. I want to hear. I love it all. So the individual we're learning about today is another significant historical figure who was pivotal in social change in our society. Social change that we are still living in today. This person grew up in the worst of circumstances constantly beaten down and forced to believe that they were not worthy of basic human courtesy and respect in spite of this. They rose above their plight to become one of the most respected statesman in the history of the united states. This individual was an intellectual. A writer an abolitionist and an amazing orator among so many other outstanding things not to mention he was reportedly the most photographed american man of the nineteenth century. How does one even get that accolade. Amazing so we will be covering the scholar. The stately the savior frederick douglass. This is part. One of the two part frederick douglass series. so let's get right into it frederick. Douglass was born around february. Eighteen eighteen on a farm in talbert county maryland..

ari maryland instagram facebook frederick douglass united states Douglass talbert county
The Man in America Who Did More for African American Slaves Than Anyone Else Was Abraham Lincoln

Mark Levin

01:58 min | 5 months ago

The Man in America Who Did More for African American Slaves Than Anyone Else Was Abraham Lincoln

"The man in America who did more. For the African American slaves. Was Abraham Lincoln. And yet the critical race theory types and the rest said No, No, no. You don't understand. He wanted to send black people back to Liberia. He had different ideas and different thoughts. He becomes president, the United States. There's a civil war and he says We must keep the union together and we must destroy slavery. Frederick Douglass. Was skeptical of Lincoln became a huge Lincoln fan. As my dad wrote in his book. After the second inaugural address. The second shortest inaugural address in American history. And they profoundly brilliant and important speech that Lincoln wrote himself. Think it goes back to the White House. It's raining. The skies opened up when he gave a speech. By the way the sun came out. He goes back to the White House. They have a Sort of an inaugural event going on there. And he sees through the door that there's a little tussle going on. Does this black man is trying to get in to see the President Frederick Douglass. And he tells the equivalent of the secret service back then, the back off he wanted to talk to his friend. Frederick Douglass. It's Frederick Douglass, who Writes about this account. And Lincoln, says the Douglas What did you think? And Frederick Douglass said he could not have been more impressed.

Frederick Douglass Lincoln America Abraham Lincoln Liberia White House President Frederick Douglass Douglas
Democrats, Republicans clash over D.C. statehood effort

Here & Now

01:02 min | 8 months ago

Democrats, Republicans clash over D.C. statehood effort

"The House Committee on Oversight and Reform is hearing arguments on a bill to establish Washington D. C. As the 51st State MPR's Jen Newman reports, the effort faces long odds with significant Republican opposition. The bill would create the state of Washington, D. C, which would stand for Douglas Commonwealth named for Frederick Douglass. Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the district in Congress, as a nonvoting delegate. Says the more than 700,000 people who live in D C deserve representation. Do you think pays more federal taxes for capita than any state any state already in the union, the country's 51st state would consist of 66 out of the 68 square miles of the present day federal district. The remaining two square miles would be turned into a new capital and consist of the major federal buildings and monuments. The measure faces strong opposition by Republicans, who argue it Attempt by Democrats to gain more seats in Congress. Genuine NPR

House Committee On Oversight A Jen Newman Douglas Commonwealth Washington Eleanor Holmes Norton Frederick Douglass Congress NPR
Faketinas

Locatora Radio

05:02 min | 9 months ago

Faketinas

"Get started with. I think this person or this story broke during the summer. it's kinda hard to tell now with the pandemic. what time is like but one other prominent ones that i remember seeing that wino- was flooding. Our timeline was the story of jessica. Craig aka or formerly known as jess la. Barletta cringe already awesome early known formerly known best. I'm about that. Let's get started. Let's talk about her. Yes so this woman has allegedly and apparently apparently been taking on different like black and afro sport identities throughout her life. She's an a professor or was a professor and academic where george washington university and university teaching. You know black studies are afrikaner studies and publishing books but at some point she were shifting from being in a north african to being african american and then being afro latin next sand after boaty gua was i think the final landing place for her her official forum her final warm so jessica. Krog just aka justifiable maleta hers combination of black fishing and being a fake tina at the same time and She got called out basically rightfully so rightfully so by a group of professors who are after latina's who had issues with her they were witness to or on the receiving end of like aggression from her and like prejudice and bad behavior while she was masquerading as after let nine different contexts. Apparently being super like belligerent towards black women in my on cool and really I think overcompensating and so trying to be an ex sorted extreme caricature of like this south bronx like her. Allegedly her mother was like a drug addicts prostitutes like this narrative that should created about herself so black women in the academy you know began talking about these different experiences and came forward and said This is not right. Yeah she was definitely performing like whoa kness being extreme radical like it was very performative. She was a published academic author and she also received a ton of accolades rice. She received she was a finalist. For the twenty twenty frederick douglass prize book prize presented by yale's gilder lehrman center the study of slavery resistance and abolition. She also was nominated or a finalist for the twenty thousand nine. Harriet tubman book prize and just received a ton of accolades has really been propelled or was propelled forward and questionably hired because of not solely for her identity. But because of the work she was doing and also the way. She positioned herself as offer latino or body gua and it's very cringe to think about all of the opportunities she stole from actual author. Latinas boras caribbean women. That are doing if not the same work or better work you know. And so it's that was probably one of the first ones that we saw. And then i think it kind of just opened up the floodgates for a lot of others than i don't know about you ma. But in my chicano studies department at uc santa barbara. There were a couple of fake denies that i will not name. They were not. They weren't anyone that i took like. I didn't take any classes with them but they were around. People talked about them. People knew like this person is very white claims this this cheek. Ghana mohican identity. You know is wide. Skin blue is performing she gun. You know some kind of ghana identity wearing that. I had because with the free that carlo ecstatic the whole thing right and it's like you like i they weren't. They were my peers. I was a student right. But i have friends that were graduate students. And they would tell me about these. Things happen. And in their cohort or in their in their seminars. And so you know. I think if if you've been in academia right. I haven't been to grad school. But i was an undergrad but i've i've definitely seen the fake tina's around so they definitely exists and i think this one opened the floodgates for a ton of

Craig Aka Jess La Boaty Gua Krog Jessica Barletta Yale's Gilder Lehrman Center George Washington University South Bronx Tina Latinas Boras Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Ghana Caribbean Santa Barbara Carlo Academia
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

02:04 min | 9 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Sermons and thanksgiving's with all your religious parade and solemnity are to him mere bombast fraud deception in piety and hypocrisy a thinly-veiled cover up primes which would disgrace the nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and blood. Even the people of the united states frederick douglass abby black history month. I agree. I agree i agree. I know that you don't hit me with a whip. But i know that i almost died on a train and no one did anything and i don't think it's a coincidence that i'm black. You haven't convinced me. You won't convince me i don't believe in your morality i reject it. It's time for the like you said not light but i'm not in a light year house on fire but then a light twitter on fire. Light it all on fire. And i'm going to i'm going to. I'm gonna be that righteous awakening that he's talking about from the very unrighteous place and i hope you get used to it. Because i'm not going anywhere. Hey you want sponsor as go ahead. If not don't know sweat off my sack you can do it by liking and subscribing on youtube more content please. Mcp if you like food check us out on tiktok more content please mcp. I do a lotta kito cooking there. You could also find on pinterest. It more contemplative. Mcp you can also check us out on anchor and you can sponsor is on there as well if you want to. But if you don't have any money like i said it's fine. I'm not necessarily doing this for the money. It's maybe a little bit of money for my son but that's it all right. Everyone thank you so much for joining me for this very important episode of more content. Talk i love frederick douglass He's inspired me to who i am today and now you know y all right. Everyone have a wonderful evening bye bye..

youtube frederick douglass twitter today earth united states Mcp pinterest kito anchor
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

05:34 min | 9 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"The young people could meet and enjoy each other society. The drinking man could get plenty of whiskey. I can't just be liquor. You look down as you're an idiot and the religious man could hope. Praia means preach prion exhort plenty of religious slavery plenty. You didn't get shit. You didn't get anything. You have the same shit that you had back. Then you see talked about money they make you a few bucks here. You go take a few bucks leave me alone. Slave shut up. that's all. it is before the holidays. There were pleasures in prospect. After the holidays they were pledged memory and they serve to keep our thoughts and wishes of a more dangerous character. These holidays were also used. As conductors or safety values to carry out the explosive elements inseparable from the human mind reduced the condition of slavery before these the rigors of bondage would have become too severe for endurance and the slave would have been forced to dangerous desperation. We think of that. What do you think of the fact. The damn fact that sounds like most people's lives. Oh you will give them a few bucks. Gimme gimme a couple of extra bucks shuts up and goes back to go back to work. You wanna you another holiday you want you want to you. You wanna go to a sporting event. I got free tickets. This they used to do my job. They used to give little free tickets on bus rides. I know i don't wanna go. It's fun because it's just a distract you from real shit real problems in the workplace. We had all these terrible You know. I won't say where i worked because i'll get in trouble because it was never proven because you can't prove shit to these you know because idiots they walk all over you and you got a bunch of morons for co workers and they. They don't wanna look into anything. They wanna rock the boat but anyway long story short. This place. I worked had a mold problem k. They did and But you know certain amounts that you have to test for this regulations and whatnot. And they didn't they didn't meet the criteria but people are still getting sick. And in the meantime they giving people all these prizes little pats and rewards and the working.

a couple of extra bucks a few bucks each
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:24 min | 9 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"I want to read that for you one more time and by the way all you a all you intellectuals out there out there talking about how awful it is that the kids these days how they talk like this. How awful awful that these kids talk like this. You know the reason. They talk like that because they know your full of shit shit and they know that you you built a country on slavery and there is shamed of you and they want they want to be like those people and you know what good for them and shame on you. Shame on you. Going around correcting people's english is if you're some sort of hot shit you're not you're not shit you ain't hot shit. You're shit correcting people. The way they speak your fool. That's the way that slaves used to speak. That's your ancestors our ancestors. America merida art history. Not black history that the ashamed of as not just not making these young girls feel sorry about their hair. They have nothing to be ashamed of. They did everything for you just like it says in the song. Listen to the song we raise the week. We peel the meat. They give us the corn. They give us the skin. We bake the bread. And that's the way they give us the cross they take this in the meal. We scan the pot they give us. They give us the liquor and say that's good enough for nigger walkover walkover you butter in the fat poor nigger. You can't get over that walk over. This is not a bad summary. The palpable injustice and fraud of slavery. Giving as it does to the lazy the idol the comforts which god designed should be given solely to the honest laborer year that the comfort that god designed should be given solely to the honest laborer not to the lazy mother. Fucker but what happens in society if you really think about it and see this is a god that look the oddest laborer of frederick douglass. God that was a died of honest laborer. The worker the working person you get it you get i. The left leans a little bit toward you. Know whatever ism you wanna call it this week but it's really just so called social democracy. Which is what. It's always been since the civil war idiot programmed in history. He can't change. It libertarian all. You want to go nowhere. You notice how you're going nowhere. It's gonna stay that way..

frederick douglass America civil war english this week one more time
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

03:12 min | 9 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"This is from the life. And times of frederick douglass. The days between christmas day and new year's eve the slaves holidays during these days all regular work was suspended and there was nothing to do but to keep fires and look after the stock. We regarded this time own by the grace of our masters and we therefore used it or abused it as we please. Those who had families at a distance were expected to visit them and spend time with them the entire week the younger slaves or the unmarried ones were expected to see to the animals and attend to incidental duties at home. The holidays were variously. Spent the sober thinking. Industrious ones would employ themselves. In manufacturing corn brooms mats horse holders baskets and some of these were very well made another class. Spent their time in hunting. Possums coons rabbits and the other game but the majority spent the holidays in sports ball play wrestling boxing. Running foot races dancing and drinking whisky and this latter mode was generally most agreeable to their masters a slave. Who would work during the holidays was thought by his master undeserving of holidays. There was in the simple act of continued work an accusation against slaves and the slave could not help thinking that if he made three dollars during the holidays he might make three hundred during the year. Not to be drunk during the holidays was disgraceful. The fiddling dancing and juba lead beating was carried on all directions. This latter performance was strictly southern. It's applied the place of violin or other musical instruments and was played so easily that almost every farm had its juba beater the performer improvises. He beat the instrument marking the words. Is he saying so as to have them fall pat with movement of his hands. Once in a while among a massive nonsense and wild frolic. A sharp pit was given to the meanness of slaveholders. Take.

three dollars three hundred christmas day new year's eve frederick douglass
"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:19 min | 9 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on More Content Talk

"So i wanted to to look at how we got here. Then obviously it starts with slavery right. I didn't guiding come here. Because i wanted to come here. I was my my ancestors before steer forced to come here. My father was very unhappy for various reasons they want. They want to wipe it away. They just want to say well. If you're unhappy it's genetic listen convenient and society doesn't have to work right. Look what happened from that philosophy. Your whole society collapsed because of that philosophy. Because you thought that oh well if we just classify it as a mental disorder. We classify sadness and unhappiness. And just you know not being fulfilled and maybe being bored if we just classify all those things is mental disorders and then eventually we can outlaw them. Which is what always happens. And then you know we won't have to have responsibility for anything. That'd be nice and isn't that moral and that's where it always ends. That's that was the the movement that was the ultimate culmination of that when when idiocy is allowed to go unchecked and people are allowed to call people things say well that's lesser person you know and they don't really matter you get things like eugenics you get things like slavery so let's look at the black history of this particular nasty attitude and what it does to people..

"frederick douglass" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:49 min | 10 months ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on KGO 810

"That we were lucky to have Lincoln because Lincoln was the man who understood what needed to be done to bring us to this point. 80 88 tennis, the telephone number. Oh, let's go to Is it a Rahm or Kerem in Palo Alto? I wrong, Erin. Hi. Hey. How you doing? It's Sarah more promise than expected of Persian flavor, too. So, yeah, of course I I Love the speech of you know what does the forces your life means? African Americans? That's not prevent him but but one of the things that I've been trying to promote for the last Number of years is that for those that would like to celebrate other than Independence Day on the Force of July, But it should be renamed code named Frederick Douglass Day so that we can appreciate that having alternative to all the nationalism and the flags and The pomp and circumstance is that some people want to, you know, celebrate. I don't particularly want to. So you know, don't you think that he has really been unless you pursue it? Or unless you're studying history in college? Don't you think Frederick Douglass has been left out when he is such a vitally important figure. Well, yeah, on goes for so many other extraordinary African American figures to say the least. So anyway, let's see if we can promote a new alternative where people can celebrate one or the other on the fourth day of July. And you know, maybe we can mix the two at some point to bring the country together. But there's a book and I read it with my wife some years ago. It's on, you know, called Douglas and Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and Lincoln. And they're wonderful relationship. Private doctors could actually walk into the White House to the great to the chagrin of a love that was standing in line to get a swell anyway. I think that's what much thank you so much. I think that's one of my favorite stories and in such a small story, but it meant so much. That you know. Frederick Douglass, Frederick Douglass walk to the White House where there were all these people. White people lined up to have an audience with Abraham Lincoln. And when Lincoln saw that a Frederick Douglass had had approached the White House, he told the guard in the front. Bring him here. Now bring him right here. And they would have these long conversations It was. It was really remarkable. Yeah. Frederick Douglass was a truly remarkable man. I want to know more about him. And I'm hoping that I know there have been some biographies that have been written, and I just ordered the book that Ken was referencing, which is really an autobiography that Frederick Douglas wrote about himself. But I'd like to Seymour in our popular culture about Frederick Douglass. There's so many things about him that I find astounding, including his mastery of the English language. Oh, my God, the way this man writes, you know, Lincoln may have been one of the greatest orators of our history. So is Douglas. He Woz unbelievable and to think that he had been born into slavery. That he that he escaped slavery that he was largely self taught that he carried himself. With such pride with such great dignity, you know when we were talking when we were honoring Sicily, Taison images of Frederick Douglass kept coming back to me, just in the things that I've seen of him. The images that we do have are the drawings or the you know the early pictures that we do have a Frederick Douglass. What a marvelous figure in history he was, And I think that he insistently Tyson shared some of the same attributes. Okay, I got to take a break. I love talking about this stuff. But I need to invite Chip Franklin on so that he could tell us what he's got coming up on his show, Which is going to be next real quickly, so that I don't forget. We not only have Tim seeker on tomorrow to take us into the weekend with a little comic relief. We also know you spared me. That was my yea start. We all start. We also have a couple of guests who are going to be with us to talk about the mass of the E. D. D. And they're going to be taking listener phone calls to talk about unemployment. What's been going on What you could do what your recourse is what your problems are. And so we are inviting you to join us believe it starts at noon tomorrow. Here on KGO, um We're going to take your questions, and hopefully we're gonna be able to get some of those questions asked and answered, I mean, really taken care of. So you know where to go, so that you could get what you're entitled to. We'll be right back with Chip Franklin. This is K G o.

Frederick Douglass Frederick Douglas Abraham Lincoln White House Erin Lincoln tennis Rahm Chip Franklin Palo Alto Sarah Sicily Tyson Seymour Ken Tim Taison
"frederick douglass" Discussed on Little News Ears

Little News Ears

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on Little News Ears

"Care more about the world. Today's date is July 7th. 2020 or first kid line is Statue of Frederick Douglass in New York was broken on purpose Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave in famous speaker who spoke against slavery many years ago or second kid line is protesting against the police officer has made more people get covid-19 Orchard kid line is in you morricone. The oscar-winning film composer has died at the age of ninety one. He wrote lots of music for famous movies or for kid line is Donald Trump speaks in front of Rushmore against removing Confederate statues and warns people of culture wars or V. Get line is out for being elected Trump promised to drain the swamp which means to take out people who only cared about themselves and not the greater good of America, but those same types of people are Helping him try to get elected in 2020. For question of the day who was Frederick Douglass. Hey, he was an escaped slave who spoke against slavery be he was Trump in another life. See it was a famous composer of movies and the answer is a he was an escaped slave. We spoke against slavery. Thanks for listening to kick. He's kit lines. There's a lot of news for kids at little news years., We're also on YouTube and major but casting platforms. May your sweetness shine and your colors.

Frederick Douglass YouTube morricone officer New York America
President Trump speaks to Black business leaders in Atlanta

Pat Thurston

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

President Trump speaks to Black business leaders in Atlanta

"Speaking in Atlanta this hour at his campaign's black Economic Empowerment movement, the president detailing plans for the black community, he says, including job growth and a pledge to invest in black owned businesses. Our movement is welcoming. Millions of black Americans back to the Republican Party, the party of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Li.

Black Economic Empowerment Mov Republican Party Frederick Douglass Abraham Li President Trump Atlanta
White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

White GWU professor at Washington DC's GWU admits she falsely claimed Black identity

"It's an unusual confession tonight from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she has lied about being black. Krug wrote that throughout her adult life, she claimed to have North African African American and Caribbean heritage but is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass Book prize is, she says she's battled unaddressed mental health problems since she was a child when she first began claiming a false identity. Krug, right. She believes in can't cancel culture and that she should absolutely be canceled. But she did not say whether she would rot a resign now from G W.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
White college professor admits she lied about being Black

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

White college professor admits she lied about being Black

"And unusual confession this evening from a history professor at George Washington University in a blogger Post today, Jessica Krug says that she lied about bleep being black crew growth and throughout her adult life she claimed to have North African, African American and Caribbean heritage. But is in fact white and Jewish. She says her appropriation of black identity was unethical, immoral and anti black. Kruger is an expert in African American history, imperialism and colonialism and is a finalist for both the Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass book prices. She says she's battled unaddressed mental health issues since she was a child. When she first began claiming a false identity, Krug writes that she believes in cancel culture and that she should absolutely be cancelled. But she did not say whether she would resign from the school.

Jessica Krug Harriet Tubman George Washington University Frederick Douglass Professor Kruger
The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

Can We Talk?

05:32 min | 1 year ago

The Nineteenth Amendment Turns 100

"On this centennial of the nineteenth amendment. Celebrate the persistence of the suffragettes and also recognize that the generations long fight was marred by racism, classism and anti-semitism. In this episode of Can we talk will explore the role of African American and Jewish women in fighting for women's right to vote and the lessons we can learn from the history. Judith Rosenbaum talked with three historians and she's here now to share those interviews with us. Hi, Judith Honey. So who are we going to hear from? I? I, will hear from Ellen de Boys. She's professor emeritus at Ucla, and she's been researching and writing about the suffrage movement since the early nineteen seventies her newest book is suffrage women's long battle for the vote. And true to the title of her book, She talks a lot about how drawn out this fight was and the incredible tenacity of the women who fought for the right to vote I take a long time that it took the stubbornness and consistency of the leaders who refused to give up to use the quote that was used against Elizabeth Warren. Nevertheless they persisted. Several generations lived and died without winning the vote and still did not give up. So I would say democracy is frequently if not always imperilled must be regularly defended or it will be lost. Alas I would say our constitutional order which we think of as being like the sun in the morning in the moon at night may not be eternal and we must act for. And finally, that in our activism, you really have to take the long view and not be discouraged because we're GONNA lose a lot like, Allen I too have found both wisdom and warnings in the suffrage movement. After the two thousand sixteen election I turned to history since as a historian that's what I tend to do and I was really drawn to the stories of the suffragettes. They gave me some perspective and reminded me to take the long view. I was worried about the next four years while these people who worked tirelessly for decades and many of them died before seeing the fruits of their labor. I asked Ellen how they sustain the Movement for so long she reminded me that while women were fighting for the right to vote, they made plenty of other gains along the way. So we have education, we have professions women are. Their lawyers their writers artists. So much so that by the time selfridge calms, it's almost like. To put it in a good way. It's like the icing on the cake to put it in a bad way. It's so overdue of women are a quarter of the labor force hold visions of the American economy couldn't exist that working women. So let's leftist politics and the question is why keep women out of politics? The other thing I would say is it's important to remember that along the way there are suffrage achievements of the most important of which are that many of the states west of the Mississippi are granting women are women are winning their activism. Right to vote, they have full voting rights. They are voting for president, a women of Colorado vote for president in every election starting in eighteen nineties. I the time that this effort to change. Suffrage state-by-state slightly crosses the Mississippi and arrives at victory in most powerful state in the union. York in nineteen seventeen over four million women, vote. So they already have the vote. These are important victories but Ellen, and I also talked about the failures of the suffrage movement especially, the racism that emerged in the fight over the Fifteenth Amendment the Fifteenth Amendment granted African American men the right to vote in eighteen seventy right prior to that suffer and abolitionist worked closely together and rallied around the call for universal suffrage that is voting rights for all. But in the lead up to the Fifteenth Amendment when it became clear that the Republican Party would only support suffrage for black men the movement split. Some were willing to accept the compromise voting rights for African. American men but not for women and some were not and this created a really painful rift. That's when the famous. Between abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass, and suffrage leaders, Susan B., Anthony and Elizabeth cady stanton was shattered. Yes. Stanton and Anthony News that the opportunity an amendment wouldn't come around again for a long time. They were enraged that after decades of activism both against slavery and four women's rights, women were being told to wait and they and other white Selfridge's felt it was unfair that quote unquote on educated black men would get the vote before educated white women. Here's what Ellen says about Stanton's public response. Stanton's particularly. Speaks over a period of a couple months really drawing on a lot of racist rhetoric and it's very painful. She was in her sort of core elitist. And that had a racist element to it, but it also had anti immigrant element to it too. She thought as she used to say women like herself shouldn't have to wait to get the vote until the daughter of. Blacks in butchers she said got vote.

Ellen Judith Rosenbaum Elizabeth Cady Stanton Mississippi Classism Judith Honey Ellen De Boys Elizabeth Warren President Trump Republican Party York Ucla Frederick Douglass Allen Colorado Anthony News Susan B. Anthony
Ladies' First

Your Brain on Facts

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Ladies' First

"Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests.

Valentina Tereshkova Tennessee Cornelius Vanderbilt President Trump Victoria Woodhall Muriel Siebert Victoria Claflin Woodhall Claflin United States Luke Soviet Government Frederick Douglass Rian Margaret Smith House Judiciary Committee Asthma United Clinton Congressman
"frederick douglass" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The six foot five inch doofus masquerading as they are to go the Harlem to paint graffiti on the streets. Secondly, I think it's time to give indication Toe on old time radio cold named Jimmy from Brooklyn. He was right on target. Thank you. All right. Thanks for calling. Yeah, this guy. This mayor is just one creepy weirdo. I mean, he is, you know, Remember, In the beginning of all this, these psychologists tell honest crisis brings out the real character and people, you know, you see people's Realty true character. You've seen that with your friends and whom you know who is good. In this crisis. New is bad and Different businesses and this mayor, he was always thought of as a kind of left wing. Lazy didn't get anything done. But now he's just a creepy, weird, bizarre character, just making the most insane and named decisions. You know, as 40 people get shot in Manhattan. He's painting black lives matter. If every all these lives matter, stop, the shooting stopped the gunfire. That's the first step. You could paint that later. Paint that next week first stop the shooting, Then paint that he was going to paint it in front of Trump Tower. You notice he stopped. It was the season. What happened if they said I some complications? Yeah. The complication was everybody whispered into his ear. If you paint that in front of Trump Tower, you are not going to get a bailout. He may need to three billion a za bail out at some point you soon as you paint that there that will be the most expensive piece of graffiti ever in the history of the world. It'll cost you billions. Don't paint that there. Because it's just him being petty and stupid and weird. Let's go to Marie in Long Island. Hey, Marie. Good morning mark. How is people really need to do their homework? They want to stop playing a black national anthem before football games and It would read up on who this person James Weldon Johnson is. He was a black conservative Christian Republican who denounced the racist Democratic Party for lynching black people. I mean, they don't they're not going to catch is over. They have no idea. Anything that they're doing. All right, Marie, thanks for calling. I never did any homework in school, and suddenly I could do any homework now, but that's the problem. I said This was the beginning. This movement which started off as a movement, fighting for important changes and better procedures, and better policies and changes that will make a difference. It got hijacked by all these idiots and all these crazy groups and all these money raising groups. And now it's all out of control. It's just stupid, symbolic nonsense, knocking down statues just cause they're statues and knock down Abraham Lincoln statue every day, the one day the guy's getting assassinated for freeing the slaves. Next day, his statues getting torn down because he's a racist. Ah, who was the other one that was torn down? Frederick Frederick Douglass? Frederick Douglass? Here's Here's the guy. You want to make more statues for his statues getting they don't if they see the dark metal statue. They just knock it down. Dark green metal. Knock it down. Whatever it is, they don't know what anything is. Funny how all these statues weren't racist That would just find during the Obama years. Suddenly they're symbols of races. Stop with the statue's Forget the syrup. Forget the Uncle Ben. Forget all that start with important changes in procedures. You know, you're starting to get to stuff there like the choke all stick to important stuff. Anyway. When we come back, Michael Goodwin will be with us. The great columnist will talk to him next. On 7 10 w o R. Rewind of today's Mark Simone.

Trump Tower Marie Frederick Frederick Douglass James Weldon Johnson Jimmy Harlem Mark Simone Toe Michael Goodwin Manhattan Abraham Lincoln Brooklyn Long Island Obama Democratic Party football
"frederick douglass" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Right. Welcome back 7 51 here on the show Day radio program. Okay. So into the the old statue, Hopper, we put all the possible selections Show what statue? Do you think was ripped down over the weekend, and there were a few of them, but this is the one that should stand out to you. Which is the one that just had to go. I saw the weekend They tore down the air. They tried to tear down. They vandalized the Oregon Trail one Well, now, here's the thing. Here's the thing and I would be very interesting to watch him. Try to get the Bozeman Trail one which isn't Buffalo, too. You know the argument there is. Ah, this was about the expansion of the West in Native Americans, and all that are used again. I'm still on team. Stop destroying stuff, but At least they could make that argument to me. Right. At least you can kind of understand how they got there. So, no, we're going to need to go a little further east. Like, Oh, New York State of New York. Yeah. Rochester, New York To be exact. They're just outside. They tore down the Frederick Douglass statue. Black abolitionist Frederick Douglass. Had his statue torn from its base in Rochester, New York. Literally on the anniversary of his famous 18 52 anti slavery speech. And tossed into a ravine. I should say, Gorge, the jeunesse anti sage and easy, Jesse. I don't know, River Gorge about 50 feet away. The irony is that the statue wasn't just there by itself, either. Where? Who knows? Maybe they didn't know it's literally part of a larger monument, which includes Harriet Tubman and is located at a former underground railroad site. So absolutely, and saying, I don't know. Who do you think did it by the way? According to Twitter. I had to be. Ah, Supremacy. Yes, yes, You're absolutely right. It's because Only white supremacists would do that just to make you know it's to make him look bad. It's It's more psyops stuff. You gotta keep up on this. No. What's the reasoning, though? If it is they say, like I do know I have heard this before. In the past or people crazy people. Obviously they try to say Frederick Douglass was the original uncle Tom O G O t. I s armory front, too. Yes, yes. Zero g ut There we go. I don't know. Everything's great. I don't know, man. I just Again with the with the whole Oregon Trail thing, at least, you know, find make your argument. Go back to Harry Tubman. I Marquis pointed out a story that happened she saw on social media where guess there's these dolls that you collect. In the late nineties to thousands called the American Girl Dolls. All have stand there owns retail store. Oh, I had no idea you and I guess they all have individual stories. There's a group of people trying to stop the American girl store. This one the the African American one because they say it's connected to slavery. No people in the comments there pointing out Hava slaved all will know the story. What guess the family was. Enslave. They were slaves, and they escaped. They won their freedom and they ended up becoming becoming a huge entrepreneurs. And doing well. And people are like, well, you need to stop this doll because you're celebrating slavery. And I pointed out. It's like saying, you know. You're going to need to take down Harriet Tubman because she was associated with slavery. Same exactly. And now this happens with Frederick Douglass at the Harry Tubman play. I have a gift. No. Oh, here we go More of this stuff. I am psychic. You know, it isn't totally unintentional. I don't think select any girls.

Frederick Douglass statue Frederick Douglass Harriet Tubman Harry Tubman New York Rochester Oregon Trail Jesse Bozeman Trail Hopper Twitter River Gorge Gorge Oregon Tom
"frederick douglass" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on AP News

"Tubman and Frederick Douglass have been unveiled in the Maryland state house the statues dedicated during black history month were made to show Tubman and Douglas as they would have appeared in age and dressed in eighteen sixty four they're stuck in the old house chamber the same room where slavery was abolished in Maryland in eighteen sixty four both Tubman and Douglas were born on Maryland's eastern shore Tubman escape from slavery to become a leading abolitionist who helped slaves escape through the Underground Railroad Douglas also escaped slavery and he went on to become an author speaker abolitionist and supporter of women's rights his autobiography published in eighteen forty five was a bestseller that helped fuel the abolitionist movement a Japanese man who is just shy of his one hundred thirteenth birthday has now become the world's oldest man according to Guinness world records she said to want to not pay who was born in nineteen oh seven received a certificate for his accomplishment on Wednesday at a nursing home the previous record holder another Japanese man died last month the oldest living person who is a one hundred seventeen year old woman is also Japanese art not a has a sweet tooth he especially loves desserts like cream puffs and he also believes in smiling up until about a decade ago used to DO bonsai the Japanese traditional art of raising small sculpted trees and has had his work exhibited when asked about the secret to his longevity he said don't get angry and keep smiling the Australian government has scrapped a twelve year old time table for ending indigenous disadvantage saying that the policy had failed a new center left labor party government launched the ambitious closing the gap initiative in two thousand eight its goal was to achieve equality for indigenous Australians in health and life expectancy within a generation prime ministers that presented to parliament to report every year since then qualifying progress made in seven areas conservative prime minister Scott Morrison used his annual report to note that only two of the seven measures were on track closing the gap between indigenous and other Australians and finishing high school and getting four year olds and rolled in early education.

Tubman Frederick Douglass Douglas Maryland Underground Railroad Douglas Australian government prime minister Scott Morrison Guinness world
"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:38 min | 2 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Newest Frederick Douglass book was named one of the New York times ten best books of twenty eighteen it's called Frederick Douglass profit of freedom David blight is director of the gilder Lehrman center for the study of slavery resistance and abolition at Yale and he joins me now professor blighted sonata welcome to W. NYC the honors mind Brian thanks for having me before we get into some of the book content what did you mean by modern day conservatives appropriating Frederick Douglass what's the Douglas reality that and what's the distortion well the right wing in this country has been doing this for a long time they particularly point to Douglas's advocacy frequent advocacy of black self reliance in the nineteenth century he did indeed advocate black self reliance he often said in answer to the question what shall be done with the Negro he would say let him alone but given fair play and and what what modern conservatives of done from Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas to the Cato Institute in a recent book called self made man to many others including black conservatives I must say is they go into that part of Douglas is thought they pluck it out of time in context and they say you see Douglas was a rugged individualists who believed in self help bootstrap philosophy to do that is to ignore say perhaps at least ninety percent of the rest of Douglass's life and thought it is to ignore his long work has a radical abolitionist and particularly it ignores the Douglas always and everywhere advocated energetic activist interventionist use of federal power to destroy slavery to try to defeat the confederacy and to establish civil and political rights for African Americans but what modern conservatism done is to try to take the greatest black spokesman of the nineteenth century and one of the greatest of all all of our history and appropriate him further because in their side it's it's what we've always done with Lincoln it's what we tend to do with Martin Luther king any major figure in American history will be appropriated like this but one past does get misuse we have to say so do you have any idea if that's what was on trump's mind this idea Frederick Douglass and black self reliance when he implied Douglas is alive today and being recognized more and more would that be total speculation it be total speculation I have no idea what's on trump's mind all we can say is that that statement did two things it demonstrated the significance of presidential ignorance but it also and up a swath of space of for us to try to than educated is amazing I've been giving dozens and dozens and dozens of book talks around the country about this book I've lectured on Douglas for years and everywhere I go this particular trump quote emerges somehow from the audience in some way or form usually and some sort of humorous way but also as a way of saying is it possible that large swaths of this country still don't even know who Douglas is an answer to that is probably yes so to give our listeners a sense of the enormity of Frederick Douglass in his lifetime you're right that he was probably the most photographed American in the entire nineteen century he wrote three autobiographies that became instant classics and it's likely that more Americans heard him speak than any other public figure of his time so can you give us a sense of how an African American would have been the most seen speaker of that era yes it has to do first of all with his genius as an orator his or his public oratory career begins in eighteen forty one and it will last more than fifty years he traveled thousands of miles it's impossible to actually calculate an exact number but the only American who probably traveled more distance than Douglas as an itinerant lecturer is probably Mark Twain twenty one to Asia so did the changes the game Douglas was always on the road whether it's during his abolitionist career down to the civil war or his post war thirty year career of lecturing and traveling and speaking sometimes as just hired should talk was speaker and sometimes as a political speaker in election campaigns for the Republican Party he probably reached more people in his audiences than any other speaker of the nineteenth century and along with that of course came all of them both pleasures and perils of fame that go with being such a noted public personality it needs to also be said that he he had from an early age a genius with words a genius with language he could find them metaphors he could find and explanations he could find in his story telling which was often rooted in biblical story ways of capturing what Americans were feeling experiencing doing whether they agreed with him or not and that is why I put the word profit in the title of this book it took me some time to get the confidence to do that but he did have that quality of a prophetic voice that capacity to find the words to explain both catastrophe and trying to explain pivots in history to explain the meaning of the vents to explain an idea like slavery and idea like freedom as well if not better than anyone else in that century your book focuses mostly on the last third of Douglass's life from the years right after the civil war through his death in eighteen ninety five and you're right you're right about well I'm curious if the content or emphasis of his speeches evolved much as he got older it did indeed they changed a great deal I focus on the entire life the the entire trajectory of his seventy seven years he lives most of the nineteenth century but I became especially fascinated with that last third of his life the older Douglas that people tend not to know much about if Americans know Douglas it's probably because they've read is first autobiography in school and they know about the heroic Douglas Douglas who overcame slavery who became the famous abolitionist who then became the great advocate of events a patient in the war but after the war he he became a political analyst he became the old radical outsider who became a political insider he became a federal bureaucrat who became a functionary in the Republican Party but he continued to lecture on every subject from his famous speech called self made man to another famous speech called the composite nation which was really a very modern imagine the idea of a multi cultural multi ethnic America to every kind of racial issue in American society from violence and terrorism to lynching to the Kansas exodus and he was always always preaching to his audiences about the power and significance of America's creeds of the natural rights tradition first principles of the declaration of independence and above all in those last thirty years he was always preaching to his audiences the significance of the triumph of the civil war and the remaking of the nation through the thirteenth fourteenth and fifteenth amendments he was always trying to hold on to his own kind of abolitionists memory of that great pivotal event of the century the civil war it's Brian Lehrer show history segment on W. NYC with David blight director of the gilder Lehrman center for the study of slavery resistance and abolition at Yale his book name one of the best ten books of twenty eighteen by the times is Frederick Douglass profit of freedom you just said that Douglas had become a functionary of the Republican Party of course that was the party of Lincoln at that time but you're right about Douglas seeing the Republican Party retreat from the egalitarian ism of reconstruction to become the party of big business can you describe a little of how the Republican Party changed in the last decades of the nineteenth century and how Frederick Douglass responded to that publicly sure it became a big dilemma for him because the Republican Party for him was not just the party of Lincoln it was the party of emancipation it was the party that it preserved and save the union the part grant and he campaigned vigorously for grant in eighteen sixty eight nineteen seventy two but that party does change into the eighteen seventies as northerners rich eight from their support of the reconstruction policies and governments in the south and is this white southern Democrats troll of the ex Confederate states establish white supremacists regimes that Republican Party began to backtrack it indeed be came by the Gilded Age the late eighteen seventies and into the eighties a party of big business party that argued mostly for the the great railroads of the steel companies and the like a party that became rather anti labor and so it was difficult for Douglas to continually shoulder up to the Republicans but he did none the less in one of the most fascinating parts of Douglases story is how does this old radical when he becomes a political insider inside the Republican Party how does he cope with that how does he sustain that how does the defendant the truth is sometimes he had a very difficult time defending them but he always said the Republican Party is the ship all else is the seat there really was no where else for black voters where they could vote to go then the Republican Party because the Democrats became a fiercely white supremacist organization they always have been but think we came more so by the eighteen seventies and eighteen eighties and to his death Douglas campaign for every Republican candidate for president from Lincoln's reelection in eighteen sixty four to the election of eighteen ninety two but it was a difficult dance and he took a critical criticism from the next generation particularly of black leaders who wanted to develop some kind a new fusion politics or tried to imagine third party movements it's it's a very modern dilemma it's a dilemma we've seen in our own lifetime we've seen in our twentieth century history over and over and over how do you sustain a political persuasion a party loyalty when that definition of that party changes over time professor bite the the subtitle of the book as you just referred to is profit of freedom and you're right the Douglases words among many other things captured the multiple meanings of freedom and I'm curious what you mean by multiple meanings of freedom according to Frederick Douglass well what I mean by that is in his writings his voluminous writings and you wrote millions of words he he talked about the meaning of freedom of the mind of the body and of the soul and spirit he wrote endlessly about what slavery actually could do to a human being what it could do to your body physically but especially what it could do to your mind what humiliation can do to the soul how old the constant denigration of slavery could in effect ruin the spirit there's a little line in his first autobiography where he's remembering being a child because he's writing this is a twenty seven year old adult bodies remember being a child and he remembers standing out under the trees of the wye plantation or when he's in Baltimore and and just asking himself why am I a slave when these other little white children or not why am I a slave and then he goes on to reflect what that what that means for his mind body and soul and in one one reads that there's a reason why that first autobiography the narrative has become a worldwide tax there's a universality in that because anyone can read that from where ever they sit on the planet and say well it's no different than why those people in that other valley hate us or why those people of that other.

New York times David blight director gilder Lehrman center Frederick Douglass seventy seven years twenty seven year nineteen century ninety percent thirty years fifty years thirty year
"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"frederick douglass" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"About Frederick Douglass maybe don't realize what a superstar speaker on on every night on cable television telling the country what he thought about this policy that policy heat oven to media he was a star in the nineteenth century David blight author of this year's Pulitzer Prize winning biography of Frederick Douglass Michael join us on the next plane there show also discussing cannabis with your kids the Brian Lehrer show at ten AM on WNYC welcome back to all of I see I'm Jennifer Flanagan filling in for Alison Stewart it's been a decade since Linda Ronstadt last saying on stage the ten time Grammy winner and twenty six time nominee first emerged in the late sixties as a folk and pop artist with a uniquely powerful voice she going to record hits like you're no good when will I be loved and blue by you as well as recording don't know much with Aaron Neville and releasing two albums with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris later in life she lent her voice to the jazz standards operettas and Mexican folk music that you've grown up listening to in Arizona but beginning in the nineteen nineties Ronstadt began to feel her voice deteriorating later she would receive a Parkinson's diagnosis and she stopped performing in two thousand and nine she's been awarded the Latin Grammy lifetime achievement award been inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame and received the national medal of arts and humanities from president Obama in twenty fourteen and now her life and career are documented in the film Linda Ronstadt the sound of my voice which features interviews with the likes of Dolly Parton Emmylou Harris Jackson Browne Bonnie Raitt and even Ronstadt herself here's a clip.

Arizona Dolly Parton Emmylou Harris Ja Obama Grammy Brian Lehrer David Bonnie Raitt president lifetime achievement award Frederick Douglass Emmylou Harris Dolly Parton Aaron Neville Linda Ronstadt Alison Stewart Jennifer Flanagan cannabis Frederick Douglass Michael