20 Episode results for "Frederic"

Frederic Chopin 1: About Frederic Chopin

Classics for Kids

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Frederic Chopin 1: About Frederic Chopin

"I'm Naomi Lewin welcomed at classics for kids. Frederic Chopin was one of the greatest pianists of his day. Every single piece of music. He wrote used the piano. Chopin was born in eighteen ten in town just outside of Warsaw Poland, but his name doesn't sound very polish. That's because Chopin's poverty was born in France. He moved to Poland married, a polish woman and wound up staying for the rest of his life. Frederic Chopin did just the opposite of his father as a young, man. He moved to France and stayed there for the rest of his life. And he never got married. His mother was the one who introduced Chopin to the piano by the time. He was six Chopin not only played phenomenally. Well, he was also starting to compose. So his parents got him a music teacher. But he wasn't a pianist. He was violinist since Chopin's teacher couldn't really show him. How to play his instrument? He showed him what to play instead leading him through all kinds of keyboard music by great composers because he never had an expert piano teacher Chopin came up with his own unique style of playing. Chopin's family moved to Warsaw. And that's where he gave his first concert at the age of eight, but Chopin quickly found out that he didn't enjoy performing in public in spite of the fact that he was so famous he actually gave very few concerts for paying audiences. He preferred playing in private homes for small groups of friends. The time Chopin was twenty he was pretty bored with saw so he set off to seek his musical fortune in other European cities. He was a big hit, Indiana. But when Chopin reached Paris that's where he decided to stay first of all there was the French connection of his father's background also as much as he loved Poland Chopin hated the thought of going home. That's because there had been an unsuccessful revolution against Poland's Russian rulers who were now completely in charge. Chopin was very unhappy thinking of the country he loved being dominated by Russia. There's a story that when Chopin left Poland some friends gave him a silver goblet full of polish soil, which he carried around with him for the rest of his life. That's probably not true, but Chopin did continue to be a passionate polish patriot. Even though he never returned to his native country. Chopin made a big splash in Paris. So even though he didn't like giving concerts. He had no trouble making a living. Lots of people bought the music. He wrote then took very expensive piano lessons from him. While he was in France Chopin had an interesting girlfriend named George actually her name wasn't really George. It was ovo French for Aurora since back, then it wasn't acceptable for a woman to be a writer of oh do devoe wrote under the name Josh song, George sand. Sometimes she even dressed like a, man. Frederic Chopin was never healthy when he was only thirty nine. He died of Burke, yellow sus. He was buried in France and special box of polish earth was imported to sprinkle on his grave, but Chopin ask to have his heart removed put in an urn and sent to Warsaw you can still see it there in the church of the Holy Cross. one kind of piece that polish composer Frederic Chopin. Especially liked writing was the pollen is a polish dance. The military Pullen is by Frederic Chopin. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim Lander at WG UC Cincinnati next time on classics kids more about the Pullin as I hope you can join me then.

Frederic Chopin France Chopin Warsaw Poland Naomi Lewin France Warsaw Paris devoe Tim Lander Indiana Cincinnati Pullen Pullin George sand Aurora writer Josh George
Frederic Chopin 2: The Polonaise

Classics for Kids

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Frederic Chopin 2: The Polonaise

"Hello, welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. That's the beginning of pollen is a dance by Frederic Chopin. When I was a kid. I thought the Polin is might be from Polynesia, but Pullen is is how you say polish in French at the time when the pollen is was fashionable dance in the polish court polish courtiers also thought it was more fashionable to speak French the pollen is a very dignified dance actually more like a procession at first only men did the Pullin as sweeping off their hats or drawing their swords at various points in the music. Later on in history. Women were allowed to join in the pollen as which became the dance that opened every ball since the pollen is involved a procession through all the rooms of a palace. It was a good way for the host to show off his home. The most important person at the ball headed up the pollen as procession he was known as the Lord of the dance. The pollen is caught on all over Europe. And even migrated to America, John Phillips Sousa wrote his presidential Pullen as after president, Chester. A Arthur said he wanted a piece to replace hail to the chief. That's the music's played. Whenever the president makes his entrance needless to say it didn't. Operas especially Russian operas dance. The Pullen as Modesto Zork ski put one into his opera Boris good. No. And in child kofsky opera, Jean-Ann Yagan. There's a wonderful Polonez. After a while composers began to use the slow rhythmic one two three of the nez as as a form for non dancing, instrumental pieces fronts Schubert wrote this poem is for his violinist brother to play. Antonin version. Composed a poem as that he could play at the Pierre. No, along with cellist friend of his. And when they asked unattainable yacht off to write music for the unveiling of a statue at the Saint Petersburg conservatory. Composed Apollon as. Since he was born in Poland Frederic Chopin was probably more passionate about the poem as than most composers. In fact, the very first pieces he wrote were polonaises. Because of the way Frederic Chopin has the piano imitate the sort of drum used to keep soldiers marching in line. Another one of his polonaises is known as the military pollinates. The military pollen as one of sixteen polonaises for solo piano by Frederic Chopin next week on passes for kids more music with a military theme. I'm Naomi Lewin, high right classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at WG UC Cincinnati, please join me again for more classics for kids.

Poland Frederic Chopin Naomi Lewin Pullen president Apollon John Phillips Sousa Europe Saint Petersburg conservatory Boris good Polonez Pullin Polynesia Arthur Antonin Schubert Chester Cincinnati Yagan French Pierre
Musicians Week Morning Quiz (5-3-2021)

Chompers

03:03 min | Last month

Musicians Week Morning Quiz (5-3-2021)

"Good morning it's time for chompers your morning in nineteenth brushing show start brushing on top of your mouth pick a aside and pushing inside the outside shooting side of each to three all right all right all right. Everyone settled down. It's time for a new week on shoppers. It's musicians week this week. We're talking about the people who make music we love and we're starting with a quiz. Here's the question which classical musician wrote this song. Was beethoven mozart or chopin to figure it out. Let's learn more about musical maestro. But i switch rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush the molars in the way back up. Beethoven beethoven was a composer composers. There are people who write music and beethoven was a very busy composer. One of the coolest things about him was that he wrote music even though he was death that means he wrote music without being able to hear it. So did beethoven right. Click or was it. Mozart switch rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep on brushing wolfgang. Amadeus mozart was. What's called a musical child. Which basically means he was a super talented kid. Mozart started writing music when he was just five years old. So was our mystery. Music written by mozart chopin. Frederic francois's chopin was also a musical child prodigy and he wrote one of his most famous pieces when he was seven years. Old switch rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and sped if you need to so now. We know a little bit more about these classical composers. It's time to make a guess. Which classical musician wrote this song. Was it beethoven. Mozart or chopin. You'll have to come back to chompers tonight to find out. Preecha brushing and we'll see you. Tooth brushing prodigies tonight until then jumpers is a production of gimblett media.

beethoven mozart Beethoven beethoven Mozart mozart chopin Frederic francois beethoven Amadeus mozart wolfgang Preecha chopin
Frederic Chopin 3: Military Music

Classics for Kids

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Frederic Chopin 3: Military Music

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin last week. I told you that in Frederic Chopin's military says the composer used the piano to imitate the drums that used to accompany armies marching into battle a lot of composers. Put battle sounds into their music. In that dance by Samuel Scheidt. You can hear trumpet calls rallying the troops. When Andrea Gabrieli wrote battle music, he lined up trumpets and drums from opposing sides. Gabrieli wrote for real trumpets, but other composers used imitation trumpets in their battle pieces. A lot of Hispanic churches have organs with pipes that are shaped like trumpets instead of pointing up to the ceiling the way pipes usually do the Trump pipes stick straight out from the organ composers wrote special battle pieces for them like this one by untorn Okumura Braga. One of the earliest pieces about a battle is by sixteenth century, French composer came oh Janika as the singers. Tell the story of a great victory Janika has their voices imitate. The sounds of the battle including trumpets. There's a really interesting trumpet imitation in a battle sonata for string instruments by Johann Valentine meter. Listen to how the violins do trumpet calls while the lower strings mimic, drums. And then the strings recreate the sound of the battle itself. Klaudia monteverdi. Composed a story about the battle between a Christian Knight and a warrior Princess as a singer tells about clashing swords and shields Monteverdi had both voice and instruments illustrate the sound. Three hundred years later, just before the start of World War Two Russian composer, Sergei Prokofiev wrote music for the movie Alexander Nevsky, it's about a thirteenth century prince who led Russians to victory against invading. Germans. Speaking of invaders who didn't have such a good time in Russia. Napoleon's battles inspired several compositions Zoltan code is operatives. Hurry Yano is about a hung Aaron teller of tall tales claim to have defeated Napoleon. The Duke of Wellington, of course, did defeat Napoleon Beethoven described that battle. But Tchaikovsky probably did battle music best with his eighteen twelve overture. I you hear the sound of the fight. Including a bit of the French national anthem when the cannons come in signaling the Russian victory you hear the old Russian national anthem. Now, we'll retreat from the musical battles and March off with a bit of the military Pullen is by Frederic Chopin. The military pollen is by Frederic Chopin in his day. Chopin was more famous as a pianist than as a composer? I may OMI Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim Lander WG, you see Cincinnati, please. Join me next time for some composer pianists on classics for kids.

Frederic Chopin Napoleon Beethoven Andrea Gabrieli Naomi Lewin Klaudia monteverdi Janika Russia Tim Lander WG Samuel Scheidt untorn Okumura Braga Sergei Prokofiev Johann Valentine Alexander Nevsky Wellington Cincinnati Yano Tchaikovsky Aaron teller Pullen
Frederic Chopin 4: Famous Pianist-Composers

Classics for Kids

00:00 sec | 2 years ago

Frederic Chopin 4: Famous Pianist-Composers

"Hello. I'm Naomi Lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. Since we can't hear Frederic Chopin play. We think mostly as a composer. But from the time Chopin was a child audiences love to hear him play the piano, a lot of composers, I became famous at the keyboard. Johann Sebastian box. First job was a church organist. And that's how many people in his day thought of him an organist and choir director, who did what was expected of him writing music for church services. For awhile box spent time conducting a court orchestra and playing harpsichord for prince plenty of composers played keyboard for royalty like Francois coop around. Coop around Rhode for the harpsichord, an ancestor of the piano, a harpsichord was the instrument that both days Mozart started out playing as a child when he performed for royalty. But by the end of his life Mozart was playing the piano. Mozart could play just about anyone under the keyboard long before people knew what a genius Ludwik fund Beethoven was as a composer. They were thrilled with how he played the piano. It's interesting that today pianist mostly perform using by other people audiences used to expect pianists to play the latest Buzek. They had written fronts list was an amazing showman at the piano. He loved to dazzle people to compose music that showed off his play. Fronts list wrote music that reflected his native country, Hungary, other pianist composers put their roots into their music to like Spaniard Isaq of he made the piano imitate the guitar. Why we're on the subject of PNO's pretending to be other instruments. Louis Moreau Gottschalk the first American pianists to become famous in Europe used his instrument to imitate the banjo. There was a nineteenth century pianist composer who invented the short piece called the knock term Joan field was born in Ireland, but he spent most of his career in Russia. last of the great keenest composers was Circe Rachmaninoff off lived long enough into the twentieth century to make recordings some of them for con Edison. And some of them on paper rolls for player pianos. Some pianists didn't necessarily compose, but they did make arrangements of other people's music when blood Amir Horowitz played his version of the stars and stripes forever. No, most sanded like John Philip Sousa's in Kyler band was on stage. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim Lander at W G UC Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Frederic Chopin Naomi Lewin Mozart Tim Lander Louis Moreau Gottschalk John Philip Sousa Francois coop Spaniard Isaq Johann Sebastian Rhode PNO Amir Horowitz director Cincinnati Circe Rachmaninoff Hungary Joan field prince Europe Beethoven
Boston To Pay $3.1 Million Settlement Over Wrongful Conviction

Radio Boston

03:38 min | 7 months ago

Boston To Pay $3.1 Million Settlement Over Wrongful Conviction

"We turn now to the city of boston. Which will pay three point. One million dollars to frederic clay a man who was wrongfully convicted of murder and imprisoned for nearly four decades while not publicly released. The settlement was reportedly reached in july. So joining us with moore's wbrc alley germanic alley. Welcome back to the show. Hello so i wanna to start with who frederic. Clay is and what happened to him alley. Tell us yeah fred. Clay was sixteen in nineteen seventy nine when he was arrested and charged with the death of a cab driver in boston and he was convicted on the testimony of a witness. Who only identified clay after a boston. Police detective put him under hypnosis. Clay spent thirty eight years in prison until twenty seventeen when his conviction was vacated in prosecutors at the time said clay was clearly innocent. This three point one million dollars from the city of boston is actually the second settlement for clay. He received a million dollars from the state in twenty nineteen under a state law. That compensates those wrongfully convicted. And what's really interesting about the boston. Settlement is at clay. Didn't have to file a lawsuit to get it. Which usually is the case in situations like this. It also struck me alley that when that settlement happened it was in july which was roughly the same time period that we saw protests going on around the country over the minneapolis police. Killing of george. Floyd is there a sense that that may have had an effect on the outcome here. Yeah i reviewed a lot of cases of police misconduct and when a pay is made it's almost always because lawsuit is filed or the city settles or a jury rolls awards. Damages to the person suing. But this case striking because clay never got to the lawsuit filing stage. This was the only case in ten years that i saw. That didn't start with a lawsuit. So i asked claes attorney emma freudenberg Says she thinks the willingness to settle is because cities are increasingly aware of the risk posed by taking cases to trial. Juries recognized i that wrongful convictions. Happen second the wrongful. Convictions happened because of police misconduct. And third that when wrongful. Convictions happen The damage that they do to a person's life as just extraordinary three point one million dollars sounds like a big number alley is it. It's definitely big but it is not the biggest in boston in recent memory. Back in two thousand fourteen. The city paid another wrongfully convicted managed. Sean drum gold. Five million dollars drum gold had spent fifteen years in prison for the killing of twelve year old girl and another man who was wrongfully convicted. James haley was awarded three million dollars in two thousand thirteen after spending thirty four years in prison on a murder charge. Elliot can you give us some context. Let's say in terms of how many times Boston has paid out for claims. Related to police misconduct. How much money. The city has paid out how much we're talking about so over. The last decade. Boston has paid more than fifteen million dollars to deal with police. Misconduct claims and many of those are settlements. Those are before a case to trial but a handful are payments made after a jury found the city responsible in these cases include wrongful convictions. Like clay's excessive force false arrest even defamation in some of those officers accused have since left the force but many are still working. That is wbz. Eleanor manning thanks so much thank you.

boston Clay frederic clay thirty eight years one million dollars One million dollars four decades frederic emma freudenberg moore fred million dollars clay claes Sean drum Five million dollars twelve year Floyd minneapolis James haley
Musicians Week Morning Quiz (5-4-2020)

Chompers

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Musicians Week Morning Quiz (5-4-2020)

"Good morning it's time for Chompers your morning in nineteenth brushing show start brushing on top of your mouth pick a side and push the inside the outside shooting side of each to three all right all right all right. Everyone settled down. It's time for a new week on shoppers. It's musicians week this week. We're talking about the people who make music we love and we're starting with a quiz. Here's the question which classical musician wrote this song. Was Beethoven Mozart or Chopin to figure it out. Let's learn more about musical maestro but I switch rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and brush the molars in the way back up. Beethoven van Beethoven was a composer composers or people who write music and Beethoven was a very busy composer. One of the coolest things about him was that he wrote music even though he was death that means he wrote music without being able to hear it. So did Beethoven right our mystery music or was it. Mozart switch rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep on brushing Wolfgang. Amadeus Mozart was. What's called a musical child? Which basically means he was a super talented kid. Mozart started writing music when he was just five years old. So was our mystery music written by Mozart Chopin. Frederic Francois's Chopin was also a musical child prodigy and he wrote one of his most famous pieces when he was seven years. Old Switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and sped if you need to so now. We know a little bit more about these classical composers. It's time to make a guess. Which classical musician wrote this song? Was it Beethoven Mozart or Chopin? You'll have to come back to chompers tonight to find out. Preecha brushing and we'll see you. Tooth brushing prodigies tonight until then jumpers is a production of Gimblett media.

Beethoven Mozart Mozart Chopin van Beethoven Chompers Old Switzer Gimblett Frederic Francois Wolfgang seven years five years
Youth advocates ask Washington to cancel contract with foster care company

KUOW Newsroom

01:04 min | 8 months ago

Youth advocates ask Washington to cancel contract with foster care company

"Filed advocates in Washington are demanding that governor Jay inslee cancel all contracts with sequel, Youth and Family Services. The Alabama based company operates facilities all over the country that house vulnerable youth. kyw's Austin Jenkins reports. The letter is signed by groups like the disability rights, Washington and the King County Department of Public Defense. It points to the death earlier this year of Michigan Teenager Cornelius Frederic at a sequel facility in that state Frederick who was black died after he was restrained for ten minutes by a group of staff members as of August, the state of Washington had thirteen youth at sequel facilities around the country although not at the one where Frederick died. Now back in two thousand eighteen disability rights. Washington issued a scathing report about the treatment of Washington youth at a sequel facility in. In their letter to the governor, the advocates say inslee should order all state agencies to disassociate from sequel in order to protect children from abuse I'm Austin Jenkins in Olympia.

Washington Austin Jenkins Jay inslee Washington Frederick King County Department of Publ Cornelius Frederic Alabama Olympia Family Services kyw Michigan ten minutes
Franz Schubert 5: Marches Not Written for Bands and Parades

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 4 months ago

Franz Schubert 5: Marches Not Written for Bands and Parades

"Hello welcome to classes for kids. I'm naomi lewin from the name. You think that fronts schubert's marche militaire. The military march should be played by an army band. But schubert didn't write the piece for a band. He wrote it for a pair of pianists. Schubert never really meant for anyone to march to his march. But you're welcome to march along with some more marches that weren't written with bands or uniforms in the prince of denmark's march by jeremiah. Clarke pops up. A lot of weddings usually played by a trumpet. That march was also originally written as a keyboard piece and so was the world's most famous funeral march Frederic chopin stuck his funeral march in the middle of piano sonata. Pretty strange place for composers. Find all kinds of reasons for people to march when they're on stage in the opera. The prophet by giacomo meyerbeer march celebrates the coronation of the title character. A profit being crowned king an onstage march. That sounds exactly like its name is the triumphal march from giuseppe. Verdi's opera aida. The egyptians had just one battle and they're celebrating In the opera ton heiser richard wagner wrote a march for people who are filing into listen to a singing contest and of course the march wagner wrote for an event in his opera low in grin has come down off the stage and our lives Use the march that felix mendelssohn wrote for an onstage wedding. The one in shakespeare's play summer night's dream tchaikovsky. Put a march into his nutcracker ballet under the fantastic symphony or symphonie fantastique by actor. Barely ohs has marched to the scaffold. Where a guillotine is waiting to chop off someone's head movies have some great marches to like the one john williams wrote for raiders of the lost ark. I keep going all day with marches. That weren't necessarily written for people to march two. But i'll just wind up with the mush militar or military march number one by franz schubert The first marche militaire by franz schubert next month is black history month. So we'll be listening to music by the man known as the dean of afro american composers. William grant still. I may me lewin join me next month for more classics for kids.

schubert naomi lewin giacomo meyerbeer Frederic chopin Schubert jeremiah Clarke denmark army richard wagner Verdi giuseppe felix mendelssohn wagner shakespeare franz schubert john williams raiders William grant lewin
From Camelot to Abilene

Inward Empire

1:13:10 hr | 4 years ago

From Camelot to Abilene

"You're listening to inward empire. A podcast about ideas and reality in American history. For more information about the show go inland empire podcast DOT wordpress DOT, com What is it that holds this country of ours together. This is a question that's on my mind and on the minds of a lot of us these days. America is in a lot of ways kind of freak show of country. There's over three, hundred, million of US drawn from every nation and race and ethnicity. You can think of we live across almost four million square miles of territory two, thousand miles from coast to coast. We're divided by all of that plus by region by politics by class by profession by values. And all of those divides getting wider it seems by the day. So, what is it that keeps it all together what gives us a common identity? What does it mean for us all to say we're Americans. There's a lot of different ways to answer that question I. think There's a lot of different components to it, but to my mind the part that's the most interesting is stories. What do we tell ourselves about you know to paraphrase the title of the painting? Where do we come from? Who are we and where are we going? These are important questions for citizens in any country but in one that's as big and diverse as the US racially culturally ideologically religiously and regionally I. Mean You name it we need to be roughly on the same page about these things if the country is going to survive. We need to share some kind of common ground when it comes to the stories, we tell ourselves about ourselves. What I'm talking about here is something that somewhere in the middle ground between history and mythology. I've been doing academic history for the last year or so and one thing that I've really noticed is that what happens in the academy among experts is incredibly important but in some ways, it's not as important as the kind of history that goes on in the world outside. If, you've been paying attention to the news, you know there's this recent case about the removal of confederate monuments in New Orleans and a bunch of other cities around the country and historians have for a long time. Now had a strong consensus that the civil war was about slavery and that the confederacy fought to defend it regular Americans on the other hand. We're still really strongly divided about why that happened. We debate it and fight about every day. And I'd suggest that those diverging ways we Americans understand that event have a pretty big impact. On the way we understand our country and our place in it, and that's just one example. What I want to explore in this episode is. You can think about it as a case study in that middle. Ground Between History and myth that for tile field in our collective imagination where these crucially important stories are grown. One of the things I love about American history is that our myths are national creation stories and epics and tales of heroes and villains. We have the luxury of studying these things in a very different way than we study the myths of say Scandinavia or Greece or China. Because our history is so young and relatively well documented. We can trace these tales back to the source. We know exactly who wrote the first national mythic takes on say George Washington but will never know who was the first Greek to tell a story about Zeus homer certainly wasn't the first person to tell the stories of the Iliad and the Odyssey I mean we're not even sure if homer was real if he was one person or many or at least one historian argues that you know that the authorship of the Greek epics should be attributed to the entire culture. American myths generally don't work like that. We can pinpoint these stories as they unfold one storyteller at a time. So what we're exploring here are the ideas of one of the most important storytellers this country ever produced. You may have never heard of him but I guarantee you know his creative offspring very very well. His name is Owen wister. His time was the late nineteenth and. Th centuries and more than anyone else. He set the terms for how we as a culture as members of this weird conglomerate called America imagine one of the key figures in our Pantheon. That figure is the American cowboy. Now Owen wister was not the first person to write popular stories about cowboys. In fact, by the time, he began publishing short stories about the West in the eighteen ninety s cowboys were all over American culture. They appeared in Buffalo Bill's wild west show starting in eighteen, eighty three, and before that, they were a fixture in these things called dime novels basically cheap and violent pulp fiction. The appeared in popular art and stage plays to. What wister did was to take that stock character. This cowboy is he existed in popular media and put him in a more literary setting one that would be more acceptable especially to middle class readers. The outcome of that was a book called the Virginian it came out in Nineteen ninety-two was a huge success and it really set the terms for how the cowboy would be portrayed really through the present day. The cowboys you see in Western films and novels are almost all variations on whispers version of this character. This might be a good place to sit down and ask why does the cowboy matter? There's really two sides to questions like this. There's the historical side and cowboys were certainly important and fascinating historically. They. Started out after the civil war as dirt poor entrepreneurs, people like Oliver Loving or Charles Goodnight were basically trying to survive and create some order out of chaos and poverty that came out of the war. Basically, there were millions of cattle roaming through the southern plains. The Union army had cut off the access to eastern markets during the war and the cattle just multiplied like crazy. He's early cowboys round them up and Organiz cattle drives to railroad hubs and places like Abilene in Kansas. The original cruise of these cattle drives were a mix of former confederates and former slaves. Historians think that between a quarter and a third of them, where people of color and their lives were not easy or glamorous being a cowboy was dirty dangerous exhausting work as historian heather. Cox Richardson describes quote cowboys often went for days without sleep especially in the first two weeks of the drive when the cattle reliable to stampede Charles Goodnight recalled the men slept on the ground with their horses staked nearby. Sometimes, the demands were so urgent that are boots were not taken off for an entire week. Nerves became so tense that it was a standing rule that no man was to be touched by another when asleep until after he had been spoken to. The man who suddenly aroused a sleeper was liable to be shot as all were thoroughly armed and understood the instant use of the revolver and rifle. Cowboys working in extremes of heat and cold. We're constantly endanger death under the hooves of stampeding cattle in rivers or in battles with hostile Indians. Their pay was low they lived on straight beef. They had no tents, no tarps and damned few slickers Teddy Blue Abbott explained they never kicked because those boys was raised under just the same conditions as there was on the trail corn meal and Bacon for grub dirt floors in the houses and no luxuries. and quote. So that's the historical side of the cowboy. But the other side of this question. The one which today is a lot of ways more important. Has To do with image and the image of the cowboy is important because of the values it represents. The cowboy embodies a whole set of values and ideas and together those constitute a kind of ideal American type. The cowboy is so pervasive and so recognizable that I might not even need to do this but. Let's just run through the ones that for my money or the most important. First and foremost the cowboys stands for rugged independence. He, and it's almost always a he is a strong capable outdoorsman who lives forever out there out on the open range away from the city away from family away from home, and especially away from the government he's self sufficient. He doesn't need much as teddy blue it said he can live on corn meal and Bacon. He's a good worker. He's competent. He's got the endurance to spend the whole day in the saddle and he gets the tough jobs done without complaining. He's plainspoken when he speaks at all, he knows animals especially cattle and especially horses with whom he has a special. Almost, ESP kind of understanding. The cowboys loyal to his friends and his boss. He also understands honor. He has a code in unspoken code about behavior about speech about work and about violence because the cowboy is also always ready for violence he carries at least one gun and he can shoot the hell out of those things. This ties in with the self-sufficiency, he can defend himself against cattle, thiefs, gunslingers, and other bad men especially those who break or threaten his code of honor. He lives an all male society on the trail among men like himself. Consequently he's kind of awkward around women. He might fall in love but rarely if ever does he marry marriage means settling down, it means leaving this whole world of the trail behind. If the cowboy is an animal that world is his natural habitat. And the cowboy even the modern ones who work on ranches and Rodeos are forever tied to the values and imagery of a special time and place. The American west of the late nineteenth and very early twentieth centuries. The cowboy stands for all this but he also stands against things to he stands against the values of the east of Cities Business homelife comfort, and especially softness both physical and mental. This tough weatherbeaten hard-bitten man is like a reproach to other kinds of men who make their money in wage work or white collar pencil-pushing kinds of jobs. He exists in a kind of rugged ideal state out there on the frontier working hard fighting hard and asking nothing of his government. His existence is a reproach against anyone who does. This leaves us with the question of how this whole complex of ideas and values got attached to these dirt poor cattle workers on the southern plains of post civil war. America. How did that happen? Owen wister is right at the center of the answer. We're going to explore this through the Lens of an essay that he wrote in eighteen, ninety five called the evolution of the cow puncher and the essay. He placed these themes about work about government about the manliness language, self sufficiency, and race at the heart of his explanation of who cowboys were and what they stood for. The ideas in this essay formed the basis for his book, the Virginia, his magnum opus of Nineteen ninety-two with as I've said, set the terms for how cowboys would be portrayed up through the present day. So by exploring wister and this work, we're exploring the roots of a key figure in the American imagination. The first thing you need to know about wister is that he came from the world that the cowboy is supposed to stand against. wister was no westerner. He was a sheltered young man from a rich old money Philadelphia family. As his biographer John Cobb puts it quote that the man who created the prototype of the most enduring of American folk heroes. The cowboy was a pedigree Aristocrat, a Harvard educated Philadelphia Boyer, and a Patricia by moral conviction is an irony of such vulgarity that Owen wister himself would have scorned it but it's true. The forces that directed whispers life were those of birth breeding and carefully cultivated gentility. and quote. wister was born in eighteen sixty into a blue blood family heritage. His great great grandfather had signed the Declaration of independence. His Grandmother Fanny Campbell was an international celebrity, the best known Shakespearean actress of her time. She had married and then famously divorced in insanely wealthy plantation owner in the south. Carolina Sea Islands. She then used her celebrity status to advocate for abolition. Stress Father Owen Jones wister, who as we'll see made his son's life. Absolutely miserable was a doctor from an old money Philadelphia merchant family. Whistler's mother Sarah Butler wister was difficult and deeply intelligent woman who wrote anonymous articles about society and politics for the Atlantic monthly. Shall be controlling it often critical towards her son but also encouraging unlike her husband she seems to have realized that her son was a creative person and encouraged him in his endeavors early on. Owen always had to fight to escape his parents influence. But he could never really bring himself to reject them. In fact, he was something of a mother's boy. He wrote her at least one letter a week between eighteen seventy and her death thirty eight years later. Maybe needless to say he had a sheltered childhood. Wealthy families of the gilded age wanted to make sure that their kids would still retain those classic Yankee Values Virtue Discipline Hard work even though they were growing up in an environment that was exploding with money. Whispers parents tried to do this by sending him to the best schools in eighteen seventy at age ten, they sent him to Europe, he stayed in boarding schools in Switzerland and England for three years and learn to speak perfect French in the process. After coming home to the US, he spent five years at the elite Saint Paul School in Concord New Hampshire. After that almost inevitably he went to Harvard. In this childhood wister was really following the classic prescribed course that wealthy families in the northeast laid out for their songs. It was a life spent on a carefully prepared track. It ended in a successful business career, a good marriage and a life of virtuous comfort. It was privileged. It was safe. And it was boring. Just before starting his freshman year of college wister wrote his mother, a letter that shows that he was starting to Chafe at the limits of this life. Crucially important for his future was that he seemed to be looking to the outdoors for a solution. He also seemed to feel shame about the successful but soft man that he was becoming. As he put it. He complained that quote. I have never camped out or gone shooting and lots of boys have and I feel a big desire to do so. I don't WanNa be a houseboy and have tried not to. and quote. He, clearly felt there was something shameful about being what he called a houseboy especially when he compared himself to those other boys, the ones whose parents let them go hunting and shooting. You would expect her to go wild when he got to. Harvard to rebel to really push back against the limits of this life. But Mr spent his years at Harvard Doing Everything but rebelling. In fact, he spent most of his time they're taking part in the life of the elite clubs those Harvard clubs with weird names like the hasty pudding or the porcelain. He was a Phi, Beta Kappa. He became best friends with Teddy Roosevelt. Another young Harvard guy from an old money family who would also go on to play a big role in creating the whole mythology of the nineteenth century West. By, all accounts wister was a great student. He graduated summa cum laude in eighteen eighty two and he was ready to embrace a career in of all things. Composing classical music. That's right folks young Owen wister, the future writer hardcore red blooded American cowboy fiction dreamed of being a composer. He wrote and performed his first big piece, a light opera version of Daito and aeneas during his last year at Harvard. Right after graduating Europe to continue his musical studies. His family connections meant that he studied with the best at the composer Wagner elite studio in Beirut with President played for the composer Franz Liszt another one of the musical titans of the late nineteenth century. List apparently thought wister had some genuine talent. He gave him a lot of encouragement and letters of recommendation. From there Mr took those letters to the Paris Conservatoire, which just like today was one of the top music schools in the world. Music would stay an important part of his life until at least eighteen, eighty nine when wister composed an opera about the Aztec Emperor Montezuma, which was never performed knowing whispers tendency for melodrama `thus might have been for the best. Anyway The musical dream came to a sudden end in eighteen eighty three. Letter came to Paris from Worcester's father demanding that he come home stop this music business and find himself a proper career. What that meant was a job at a bank. As Worcester put it, he went below stairs into the Union safe deposit vaults and sat on a high hard stool computing interest. He hated this job he was desperate to get out of it. After about a year, he switched to clerking in a law. That didn't really do it for him either. He wanted to be a composer and between the stresses of work and feeling depressed about this career. His father had denied him. He was bitter. His creativity and his bitterness all came together to produce a book which he ironically titled a Wise Man Son. The spoke was about a young promising painter whose father forces him to become a businessman following the advice of William Dean howells one of the big authors of the time he never published it. In eighteen, eighty, five wister seems to have suffered a total nervous breakdown. In fact, he suffered his entire life from these chronic health problems. His biographers think that you know along with the constraints of his childhood, his health problems help to explain why he idealized these rugged Freeman of the West. Again as John Cobb explains quote. By the spring of Eighteen, eighty, five, the frustrations of his aborted business career, the unappealing prospect of the law, and perhaps the discouragement over houses. Rejection of his novel were steadily destroying whispers health, which had never been very good as a boy he had suffered from weak is chronic headaches and insomnia and his years at Saint Paul's and Harvard had seen several sieges of vague but distressing nature, the beginning of a series of strange and elusive attacks that were to last throughout whispers life. His mother believed that his urine Switzerland in eighteen seventy one had undermined his health and scarred him emotionally for life. In Eighteen, ninety six, he spent the winter in Europe on advice of doctors and one thousand, nine, hundred he was hospitalized for weeks for a mysterious malady. This was repeated in one, thousand, nine, hundred, four in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty complained of something wrong with my insides that no doctor could name and nineteen o nine, hundred ten he was sick for an entire year mystifying family friends and physicians and quote. Mental health problems and psychosomatic illnesses were kind of epidemic in the upper class. American. World of wister family. Nineteenth Century doctors lumped most of these conditions under the umbrella of NEURASTHENIA NEURASTHENIA covered. So many symptoms as to be basically meaningless, but nonetheless, it was so commonly diagnosed in the US that some people called it American idol. And as a sufferer of this mostly upper-class Disease Wister was prescribed common cure to get out of the city get away from the stresses and pressures of work. Go somewhere with the air was cleaner, the landscape different, the environment healthier. For some this meant in ocean liner or a seaside town or a spa in the BERKSHIRES. For Worcester it meant Wyoming. By the time he went out there in eighteen eighty five, the West was already a place that was increasingly familiar as among other things a tourist spot for rich easterners. The transcontinental railroad lines the first of which was finished in eighteen sixty nine opened the whole region up to people who were hungry for a real taste of country that they thought was more wild more exciting more untamed than the boring old east. At the time going out there took some serious cash. The customers in this early period of Western tourism were almost entirely from the well-heeled, world. As historian. Points out in his excellent book, the Eastern. Establishment and the Western experience. It was ironic that you know when these easterners went out there they imagined this wild and exotic and exciting place. But at the same time, they wanted to make their experience there as cushy and safe as possible. Their trips to the wild west were more like five star luxury vacations. He writes that quote, the pattern of eastern visits to the West, the eighteen seventies and early eighteen eighties was dictated by the types of visitors and the tastes of the. Times. A Coast to coast railroad trip cost approximately three hundred dollars. That's about seventy five hundred dollars today not including meals the celebrated Raymond Tours I organized by a New England railroad magnate in eighteen seventy nine advertised winter trips to California with hotel expenses included for seven hundred fifty dollars. That's over eighteen thousand dollars today. Small wonder that a superior class of easterners traveled westward in this period. It costs too much to get here for the scum of the earth to be among them a California noted. As coast to coast travel increased pullman cars grew more lavish with stained glass windows, carpeted floors, and frescoed ceilings. Some wealthy easterners such as Ronaldo Wealth Emerson who went West in eighteen seventy one rented private cars. One family traveled in a four car train with made several cooks, nurses, porters, and a Pinkerton detective. The exclusive tours such as Raymond's published previous passenger lists and their advertisements, and noted that there tourists were of a refined and cultured class. and. Quote. When they finally got their these tourists spent a lot of their time simply socializing among their own kind opulent. One of the more self-aware visitors to the region said that quote. People go there not to worship nature, but to see and be seen by their kind, they play tennis and golf swim in warm tax drive behind fine horses dress for dinner and do all these things in the conventional and polite way and quote. Even people who did WANNA taste of the authentic life on the prairie often brought their high styling way of life out there with them. That was the case you might remember with the Group of Rich New Yorkers who went hunting with buffalo bill they brought all kinds of stuff with them. They brought wagons full of ice and champagne. They brought Greyhound hunting dogs. They'd eat dinner on tables with White Linen and silver service they'd. Be, served by waiters and jackets and ties. I mean what a site that must have been but Owen wister in this recovery season of his in Wyoming in eighteen, eighty five did not experience the West like most people of his class. In fact, it seems like he had this almost instant revelation about a kind of life in a place that was so alluring because it had nothing to do with the life he had known beforehand. The shelter childhood, the Education in Europe pent at Saint, Paul's and Harvard the elite club is the celebrity relatives. All. That had nothing to do with Wyoming. Remember how just before he went to Harvard, he wrote his mother that letter about how he didn't want to be a houseboy. Will now finally. He got the chance to taste that forbidden fruit. and He loved. And we know this because he wrote it all down as he lived it. Later in life he said that quote. Never. Before had I been able to sustain a diary? No matter. How thrilling my experiences But upon every western expedition, I kept a full faithful realistic diary details about packhorses camps in the mountains camps in the sagebrush nights in town cards with cavalry officers meals with cow punchers, roundups scenery, the yellowstone park trout, fishing hunting with Indians shooting antelope, whitetail deer, black tailed deer, elk bear mountain, sheep I don't know why I wrote it all down. So carefully, I had no purpose in doing so or any suspicion that it was driving Wyoming into my blood and marrow and fixing it there. and quote. The West became an addiction. WISTER would go back again and again fifteen times every year between eighteen, eighty, five, and nineteen hundred. He kept a diary, each and every time. Later on, he would be intentionally hunting for raw materials for his cowboy stories. In the early diaries though there was something else. Pure Liberation Freedom from family in the stuffy society he had been born into. It was all about escape. Escaped from work for one thing as he put it quote. This existence is heavenly in its monotony and sweetness. Risher, we're going to do it every summer. A beginning to be able to feel on something of an animal and not a stinking brain alone the summers in Wyoming. He said were holidays from my perfunctory days at the office the forgetting for a moment of detested occupation, the homecoming and prospect of the office and dribbling legalities was gloomy think. Wyoming. Also meant escape from family especially from the watchful eye of his mother. In some of his letters home you really get a sense that he's reveling even gloating in his from his parents. In that first summer in the West, he wrote a letter to his mother that he probably calculated would make her upset. He said quote when I've been most enjoying myself I've laughed and likewise shudder to think how you would probably have hated every minute. Everything that you most particularly poor in practice no matter how much you think it theoretically end democratically beautiful has happened at least twice. and quote. Really, leaving that last part up to the imagination isn't he? Of course, you have to keep in mind that wister would probably not have written about the West is this kind of wild beautiful land of escape. If he actually had to live and work there, it was vacation land for him. The release he felt was the relief of occasioning outsider. Hints of that Creep through in his diaries sometimes in revealing ways, there's one passage for example, where he's in the middle of describing this raw elemental landscape. And then he says that it reminds him of divall Kyrie referring to the opera by Wagner. The Lens. In which he's seeing the West with still the lens of the elite well educated recently ex composer he was not totally on self-aware about this I mean you see it in his fiction for example, he he usually writes the narrator as some kind of outsider figure someone who is not a Westerner himself someone who's an easterner whose fueling the slant for the first time so you know he's not totally without self awareness. Are. There's something else that he sees in this landscape to he saw something that would become absolutely foundational in his fiction and let's remember that by extension that means part of the foundation of our Western mythology. Let's think about it as a turning of the wheel of civilization. He saw that inevitably this frontier world that land of escape, the land of rugged independence was going to disappear. Even as he watched wister saw this wild west transforming into something that looked an awful lot like the east, the world he was trying to escape from. Life in Wyoming as he put it was quote. A life is strange as any of the country has seen and it will slowly make room for Cheyenne's Chicago's and ultimately inland New York's everything reduced to the same flat prairie like level of utilitarian civilization. Brandon's and beaches will give way to tweeds and Jay Gould's and the stock ticker will replace the rifle and quote. This is important. This idea the West is an unspoiled land and that's something tragic was about to overtake it. It was a tragedy for the west to become the home of inland New York says, he says, the home of that utilitarian civilization just wants to build buy and sell the land of the cowboys, the brandon's beaches. giving. Way To lesser men corrupt politicians like boss Tweed of New York or scheming financiers like Jay Gould. Pay attention to whispers disdain for business disdain for the stock ticker how he contrast that with the pure simpler better world of the cowboys and rifles. He was horrified by the idea of the West becoming on a region wide scale something that was like a combination of his mother's drawing room and his job at the bank. In eighteen ninety, two after seven years of annual Western visits wister decided to become the chronicler of this vanishing world. As he told it in one, thousand, nine, thirty, it happened while he was sitting in a comfy chair in the upscale Tavern Club in Boston quote. One Autumn evening of eighteen, ninety, two fresh from Wyoming and it's wild glories I sat in the club dining with a man as enamored of the West as I was. Why wasn't some Rudyard kipling saving the Sagebrush for American literature. Before the Sagebrush and all that it signified went the way of the California forty nine went the way of the Mississippi steamboat went the way of. Saying. Roosevelt had seen the sagebrush true had felt it's poetry and also Frederic Remington who illustrated his article so well. But what was fiction doing fiction? The only thing that has always outlived fact. According to Worcester, he announced his answer to that question on the spot. He said, I'm going to try myself I'm going to start this minute. And he did. His first stories about the lives of Westerners especially, cowboys began appearing later that year in Harper's monthly. He was on a mission. He said to become the hand that once and for all chronicled and lead bear the virtues of this extraordinary phase of social progress. The year after Mr made a life changing acquaintance in the Wilderness of Yellowstone Park. Frederic Remington was another Ivy League or a yelled graduate and the creator of some of the most stunning and influential Western. Art Ever made. One of the many interesting things about Remington is that he to shared this vision of a vanishing world. He in Wister, you know they weren't the only ones who shared this conception of the West they didn't invent it or anything, but I think given their combined massive influence on the way we think about this time and place in our past it's definitely worth noting. wister and Remington felt that turning of the civilization wheel and they both felt this sense of mission like they had to capture their vision of the West on paper or canvas before it was gone forever. REMINGTON described his wife awakening like this quote. Evening overtook me one night in Montana and I by good luck made the campfire of an old wagon freighter who shared his Bacon and coffee with me. I was nineteen years of age and he was very old man. Over the pipes at developed that he was born in western New York and had gone west at an early age. His West was Iowa Thence, during his long life, he had followed the receding frontiers always further and further west. I knew the railroad was coming. I saw the men already swarming into the land. I knew the wild writers and the vacant land were about to vanish forever. And the more I considered the subject, the bigger the forever loomed. Without knowing exactly how to do it I began to try to record some facts around me and the more I looked the more the panorama unfolded. I saw the living breathing end of three American centuries of smoke. Dust and sweat. and. Quote. So remington is like Worcester in that you know he's looking at the west and he's seeing this grand vision, the the end of an era. This heroic age of the West is ending with the smoke and noise of the railroad and all those swarms of ordinary people over running this perfect wildland. But I find especially interesting how you know they both had this compulsive need to record that vanishing world as they saw it. Each one did it in his preferred medium with in his diaries REMINGTON and drawings and paintings, and eventually sculpture although Remington was also a pretty good writer himself. Needless to say wister and Remington hit off along with Teddy Roosevelt they formed this three way kind of mutual admiration club. REMINGTON would illustrate things that western Roosevelt wrote and together a unit they began to present this vision of the West to a growing audience. In eighteen ninety-five this friendship between whistler and Remington produced a remarkable creation. So remarkable in fact that we're going to spend the rest of the episode talking about it. What they produced was an essay which wister wrote and Remington illustrated. They called it the evolution of the cow puncher and it appeared in the pages of Harper's new monthly magazine and September eighteen ninety five. That word cow puncher was just period slang for cowboy. The name comes from one of their common jobs which was prodding cattle up a ramp onto the trains that would take them from roundup sites like Abilene to slaughter houses in places like Chicago, and what we have in this essay is a kind of mission statement by two crucial national mythmakers about what kind of role they wanted this mythical cowboy to play. And by really digging into this tax I, think we get a lot of invaluable insight into the sometimes dark origins of this national figure. wister starts the essay with an allegory. Far from the West in England, in fact, in the passenger compartment on a railway car, there are two men. One is a well-heeled English aristocrat. The other a rough cut American frontier type. And they sit there staring at one another one despising what he sees in the other man there are too many differences differences in style class nationality, the sources of their wealth. The fact that they both speak English mixed the differences between them seem all the more stark. These two men embody just how far apart America and Britain of grown since independence. In fact, the same year this essay appeared the two countries almost went to war over of all things aboard or dispute in Venezuela. So these two men sitting across from one another in this imaginary train car. The English aristocrat disrespect the American because he's rough, he doesn't have the culture. He doesn't have the breeding he has new money. The American on the other hand hates the British guy for his uptight aristocracy. But according to wister beneath the surface tension. There's something else. There's a common bond based on something deeper than these basic differences. It comes out he says in little things like their language. According to him, they share a drawl. The Englishman's is the piccadilly. TROU- while. The Frontiers Zeman speaks in the Trans Missouri Variety. For wister. This link in the way these men talk underlines one of his most important points, the frontiers Zeman, and the ARISTOCRAT, the American and the Englishman are united by their common racial identity as anglo-saxons. These draws these accents. He says are at bottom one and the same the Anglo Saxons note of attornal contempt for whatever lies outside the beat of his personal experience. So I took an observation of these two anglo-saxons draw one, another the prejudice one, hundred years. And I thought it might come to a row. Somehow, in this allegorical story, the two men don't fight one another. Years After these events the ARISTOCRAT finds himself in Texas in the heart of cattle country. And something happens there. Instead of being a fish out of water instead of being isolated and laughed out of town for his highfalutin ways the English aristocrat finds himself totally at home. It turns out that he shares a surprising amount with the cow punchers of the West. In At heart he's he's really wanted them the two groups, the aristocrats and the cowboys share skills they share values, lifestyles. There's a bond there that spaced half on culture and half on heritage. Let wister take the wheel here out west. He says quote. The noblemen won the western heart. Forthwith. Took it by surprise, democracy had read in the papers so often about the despot in his effectiveness. This despot vaulted into the saddle and stuck to the remarkably ingenious ponies that had been chosen with care to disconcert him. When they showed him pistols, he was found to be already acquainted with that weapon. He quickly learned how to rope a steer. The card habit ran in his noble blood as it did in the cowboys, he could sleep on the ground and rough it with the best of them and with the best of them, he could drink and help make town clamorous. Deep in him. Play virtues and vices course and elemental as there's doubtless the windows of Saint James Street sometimes opened in his memory and he looked into them and desired to speak with those whom he saw inside and the whiskey was not the old stuff the cut glass bottles, but he never said so and in time he died widely esteemed. Texas found no count against him. Save his pronunciation of such words as bath and fancy misfortune lead to the accident of his birth, and you will hear today in that flannel shirt a democracy only good concerning this aristocrat born and bred and quote. So what on Earth is whistler up to here isn't this an essay about cowboys the evolution of the cow puncher. So. Why is he obsessing over this made up English aristocrat. Well, there's a few hints in that quote I, just read. Did your ears. Pick up a little bit when you heard that line about the card playing habit running in the British guys noble blood. Guess we say stuff like that. Sometimes figure of speech right? Well, IT TURNS OUT MR means it literally. Turns out in whispers, mind cowboys and aristocrats are both drawn from the same kind of racial stock. Both groups he says are pure Anglo Saxons and further you aristocrat there's something about the West that reawakens instincts and him. Summing up the point of this allegorical story wister writes quote that is the object lesson that is the gist of the matter. As soon as the English nobleman Smelt Texas, the slumbering Tamed Saxon. Awoke in Him and mindful of the tournament. Of the Hunting field galloped howling after wild cattle aboard horsemen a perfect athlete and in spite of the peerage and Jules Ardent fundamentally kin with the drifting vagabonds who swore and galloped by his side. and quote. Drawing on the racial pseudoscience of the day wister believed that racial groups like the Anglo Saxons had these innate characteristics. These included what we today would think of more like cultural traits, things like favorite pastimes or sports or skills. But for Worcester these are more like unchanging racial characteristics. They stay in the blood sometimes latent waiting for generations until circumstances bring them out once again. This is why the West brings out. This Wild Saxon conqueror, which wister says is like the true original personality of the soft aristocrat and wister says that this is not the first time something like this has happened. In fact, he lays out a whole lineage of anglo-saxons who generation after generation rediscover their essential shoe selves in the pursuit of empire quote. Adventure to be out of doors to find some new place far away from the postman to enjoy independence of spirit or mind body. This is the cardinal surviving fittest instinct that makes the Saxon through the centuries conqueror invader navigator, buccaneer explorer colonists, tiger, shooter. Lifts Pilgrim among the immortals at Plymouth. Rock dangles a pirate from the gallows on the docks of Bristol. At all times when historic conditions or private stress have burst his domestic crust and let him fly out naturally there he is on dairy peak or through Magellan or across the Missouri or up the Columbia, a Hawkins, a boon, a grey or a nameless vagrant. The Same Saxon plowing the sees and carving the forests in every shape of man from preacher to thief and in each shape. Change Leslie untamed. and quote. That figure of the Saxon that whispers talking about here is like an eternal historical type. All these different people through the centuries suggest different faces that pure archetypal figure. We can borrow a phrase from philosopher Joseph Cambell. He's the Anglo Saxon with a thousand faces. From pilgrims to pirates, wister sees this race obeying their blood instincts living out a grand historical epoch of conquest and self-fulfilment. It's all because of that wild independent spirit which drives them to expand and explore and conquer which she treats like a racial trait. Going back to our English aristocrat in our American Frontier Zeman. In that story at the beginning of the essay, you know both of them are just two more faces of this attornal anglo-saxon. When that Aristocrat goes west, he's giving play to his blood instincts on the southern Plains of Texas. As Worcester says quote? This man's outcome typifies the way of his race from the beginning. Hundreds like him have gone to Australia Canada India, and have done likewise, and in our own continent, you may see the thing plainer than anywhere else and quote. So race empire manliness are all interacting in some pretty complex ways here. You can also throw in destiny because why not? After all if this whole thing is based on instinct that removes choice from the matter, doesn't it? It's not about petty things like wealth or fame. It's about pursuing this nameless urge deep inside you. Mr Elaborates on this says quote throughout the Anglo Saxons career. It has been his love to push further into the wilderness and his fate thereby to serve larger causes than his own. In, following his native bent, he furthers unwittingly design outside himself. He cuts the way for the common law and self government and new creeds, policies and nations arise in his wake and quote. And this brings us finally to the cowboy. There's an illustration by Frederic Remington that went along with this text and it describes the cowboys place in this historical scheme. Beautifully. You can see this on the wordpress page by the way, it's called the last cavalier and it's a wonderfully poetic image. We see dozens of men on horseback drawn from centuries past he pox of time stretching back to the fall of Rome. All, except one of them are shrouded in this fog of time, they're disappearing gradually into the passed into history and myth and legend. Barbarian horsemen we can see our three and Knights Crusaders Kings. Courtiers Cavaliers explorers this whole lineage of warriors that connect medieval England to the colonial era. And right in the foreground in full living color a warrior on horseback like his forebears is a cowboy. There in a single image remington beautifully compliments whispers argument. It's a simple one, but it's written in the most touring pros you can imagine. The cowboy in ways that are racial, ideological and cultural. Is the direct descendant of the Medieval Anglo Saxon night? Quote. And as he has ruled the waves with his ship from that. Viking. Time until yesterday at. Samoa. So upon land has the horse been the Anglo Saxons foster brother his ally, his play fellow from the tournament at Camelot to the round up at Abilene. The blood and the sweat of his jousting and all the dirt and stains have faded in the long sunlight of tradition, and in the chronicles of Romance, we hear none of his cursor obscenity, the clash of his armor rings mellow and heroic down through the ages into our modern ears. But. His direct lineal offspring among our western mountains has had no poet to connect him with the eternal no distance to lend him enchantment. Though he has fought single-handed with savages and through skill and daring prevailed but we as made his nightly bed in one thousand miles of snow and loneliness. He has not and never will have the concentration of memory. No doubt Sir Lancelot bore himself with grace and breeding of which our unpolished fellow with the cattle trail has only the latent possibility but in personal daring and in skill as to the Horse, the night and the cowboy are nothing but the same Saxon of different environments for Noblemen in London and the noblemen in Texas and no Hook in Sir Thomas Mallory shakes the crumbling planes with quadrupeds. Sound more valiant than the galloping that his echoed from the Rio Grande to the big horn. Mountains. and. Quote There's so much going on in that passage that I'm not sure where to start. Maybe, a good place would be with the connections draws. You know let's start with the fact that each group is a master of some kind of mount. The night has his horse. So does the cowboy. WISTER even kind of dubiously throws the Scandinavian Vikings in there too with their ships. That's potentially dangerous thing to do if you're trying to argue for this untainted anglo-saxon. Bloodline. There's that equivalency to between the round up and the jousting tournaments. Again, that's bad history considering how differentiated form and function those two institutions are. But that's the thing. Isn't it? We're not dealing with history here we're dealing with myth. And I hope that hearing those supercharged rhythms of whispers pros. You might be starting to get a sense of why wister was such a powerful myth maker. In fact, you can see that Mr is also setting himself up. He setting himself up to be the myth maker the cowboys he's setting himself up to be the Sir Thomas, Mallory of the West. He's saying that you know no one will ever be able to chronicle the experts of these men. There's never going to be sir. Thomas Mallory of the planes. But in the mind of his reader, you can see that he setting up the desire for such a thing for such a person. One of the fun things about this essay is that there's this hidden element of advertising. He's hoping that by the time you're done reading this, you're going to be hungry for whatever this Sir Thomas Mallory of the planes is gonNA produce. Anyway let's go back to this racial thing with whispers insistence that all cowboys were these pure anglo-saxons. I've always wondered about this. You know worcester wasn't someone who just sat at home in Philadelphia and wrote cowboy stories without ever going to the West he went over and over again year after year he saw lot of this region at first hand. And again, as I've mentioned earlier, according to a third of nineteenth century, cowboys were people of Color wister must have seen at least some of them and if he didn't, he must have heard about them. So for a man committed to capturing something of the reality of the West before it disappeared, that's a bit of a conundrum. So what accounts for his obsession with this pure anglo-saxon cowboy? The truth is there's another reason why wister and Remington thought it was so important to portray cowboys as entirely anglo-saxon. It's not just about eighteen, ninety five and the war crisis with Britain and bringing the two countries closer together. The major reason why they did this has to do with immigration. It's not really about black and white. It's actually more about the division between old and new groups of European immigrants. The evolution of the cow puncher is trying to make the cowboy into a mythic symbol of an earlier supposedly racially pure time in America. In the minds of wister and Remington, this was a time that existed before the massive numbers of these. So called new immigrants from southern and Eastern Europe began arriving in the last couple of decades of the nineteenth century. Whispers West at turns out is no place for any of them. This wild environment has no place for non Anglo Saxons because he says, only anglo-saxons have kept the physical and mental virtues that allow them to survive and flourish out there. Is West. Then is this last bastion, a racially pure America standing against the corrupted decaying and increasingly un-american cities quote. No root of modern ground is more debased and Mongrel with its hordes of encroaching alien vermin that turn our cities to Babbel's and our citizenship to a hybrid farce who degrade our Commonwealth from a nation into something half pawnshop half broker's office. But. To survive in the clean cattle, country requires spirit of adventure courage and self sufficiency. You will not find many polls or Hans are Russian Jews in that district. It stands as yet untainted by the benevolence of Baron Hirsch and quote. wister comes down especially hard on Jews. Beyond simple antisemitism, which was kind of big among the upper class Americans of the day wister is also using the Jews as a foil in this mythical story. He contrast them with his heroic anglo-saxons who in his telling conquered the world out of instinct not for profit as he puts it, it is not the dollars that played I fiddle with the Anglo Saxon or else our Hebrew friends pioneered the whole of us. But it goes farther than just lashing out against the new immigrants out of Eastern Europe. Western and northern Europeans he says are also too weak and too unfit to be, cowboys. What he describes as basically a graveyard of failed conqueror races. All these people who were once upon a time strong enough to take on the world. But now for whatever reason they have degenerated quote. Even in the cattle country the respectable Swedes settled chiefly to farming and are seldom horsemen. The Frenchman today is seen at his best inside the house he can paint and he can play comedy, but he seldom climbs a new mountain. The Italian has forgotten Columbus and sells fruit among the Spaniards and Portuguese no cortes or Magellan is found today. Except, in Prussia, the teutonic is too often tame slippered animal with his pedantic mind swaddled in a dressing gown. But the Anglo Saxon is still forever homesick for out of doors. and. Quote. It's worth hitting the pause button here to note that Remington whispers illustrator was even more officiously anti immigrant than wister was in some of his private letters Remington unleashed his disgust at all of these new people who were claiming to be Americans to. In fact, he said that he was looking forward to the day when the country would collapse in some kind of race war and he could finally kill his share of people clearly regarded as subhuman. 1893, he wrote to a friend that quote. You can't glorify a Jew. I am a hero worshipper nasty humans. I've got some winchester's and when the massacring begins, I can get my share of him and what's more I will. Jews engines chinamen hunts the rubbish of the earth I hate. On, the question of open immigration and a kind of counterpoint to the famous Send Me Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free on the Statue of Liberty. Remington wrote this quote. Our race is full of sentiment. We got to thinking so far ahead that we are not always practical and we invite the rinsing 's the scouring 's and the devils leavings to come to us and B. Men something they haven't been most of them these hundreds of years. As short shooting, we will someday reap the reward of our humanitarianism. which is folly. and quote. So that's RIMINGTON's counterpoint to you know send me your huddled masses yearning to breathe. Free. We're getting a sense here of how whispers cowboys stands against a changing America. There's the old racial stock versus the new. There's the unspoiled country versus the degraded cities. There's the rugged cowhand versus the soft white collar worker. I. Think we'd be remiss if we didn't also take a second here to talk about work remember this is the late nineteenth century. A lot of people are industrial wage workers and it's a dark time to be one of those. Strikes happening everywhere all the time thirty, seven, thousand of them give or take between each ninety one and nineteen o five Worcester's riding this again in eighteen ninety five, it's two years into a really bad economic depression. The eighteen ninety s have already seen to massive and violent strikes in some of the nation's most important industries. Most of the biggest strikes of this time or in urban areas and many of the strikers especially, the more radical ones are immigrants. One of the first things I read from wister not in this essay if this someplace else was about cowboys and he said that cowboys work hard play hard and they don't go on strike. I thought that was kind of weird. The first time I read it you know what is the link between cowboys and striking but if you think about the context of the time, it makes perfect sense. Whispers. Cowboys are good workers who were the opposite of those striking immigrants. They get the job done and they never complain no matter how bad the conditions get. As, he wrote in the evolution of the cow puncher quote. When the men lay rolled in his blanket sleeping warm and unconcerned beneath driving storm of snow, his horse pod through to the SAGEBRUSH and subsisted. So it came to be said of such an animal, a meal a day is enough for a man who gets to ride that horse. In reality though cowboys did occasionally go on strike. The big one was a failed attempt in eighteen, eighty, three, two years before wister I went to Wyoming where cowboys tried to organize against changing conditions in the cattle industry. A lot of the western cattle deleted violence in the eighties and nineties was in fact not between cowboys and rustlers but between big ranchers and their former employees, a lot of whom we're just trying to go into business on their own. Many of the so-called Rustler's at the time were really just former cowboys who wanted to continue an older practice called maverick swear where we get the word maverick and it meant simply claiming unbranded calves as your own. Again, though that's a question of history which is complicated and Worcester is dealing and myths which are in a lot of ways much simpler. Let's recap. We've dealt with two major parts of whispers mythical cowboy. The first part is his legendary Anglo Saxon lineage. The second part is his place in American history as a last bastion of race and values in a rapidly changing country. What I want to get into now is a third aspect of this figure it strongly related to the other two. It's the idea that the cowboy is a symbol of unity. According to wister, there's something about the experience of the West the experience of being a cowboy that gives Americans the basis for a new common identity. It breaks down the differences between the Anglo Saxons of America. It breaks down the differences of region of class profession education, even dialect, and it unifies them around the common bonds of race and the shared experience of working and fighting and killing together. It's like another version of classic American Metaphor that I'm sure you've heard before. It's the idea of the melting pot. You know the idea that in this country, all these different groups of people come together they come together from all over the world and they fuse into this new identity called American. It's not quite multi-culturalism. It's more about having one universal identity instead of having all these different cultures existing side by side. whiskers West. is kind of like a melting pot. But it's a melting pot for anglo-saxons only. Quote. The cow punchers playground in those first glorious days of his prosperity included battle and murder and sudden death as everyday matters. From eighteen, sixty, five to eighteen, seventy, eight in Texas. He fought his way with knife and gun and any hour of the twenty four might seem flattened behind the rocks amid the Whiz of bullets and the flight of Arrows were dragged bloody and folded together from some adobe hovel. Seventy five dollars a month and absolute health and strength were his wages and when the news of all this excellence drifted from Texas eastward they came in Scholes Saxon boys of picked courage none but the plucky ones could survive from south north from town and country. Every sort and degree of home tradition came with them from their far birthplaces. Some had known the evening him at one time others could remember no parent or teacher earlier than the street. Some spoke with the gentle accent of Virginia others in the dialect baked beans codfish here, and there was the baccalaureate already beginning to forget his Greek alphabet but still able to repeat the two notable words with which Santa? Fon. Always marches upon the next stage of his journey. Hitherto, the cattle country, they flocked from forty kinds of home each bringing a deadly weapon. and quote. In the West, the distinctions between these men breakdown. All that's left is what wister calls the bottom bond of race along with their shared experience. And that experience is not really about working for wages. It's not about making ends meet in the chaos and poverty of post civil? War. Texas. It's really just about being in this wild environment of reenacting ancient battles of rediscovering racial gifts. WISTER calls the result, a tribe, and it words that evoke wildness and isolation as well as military style discipline and cohesion, and this tribe slash unit is made up entirely of his ideal Americans quote. What Motley, your tribe, what heap of cards shuffled for more various unmatched packs could found. Yet this tribe did not remain motley, but soon grew into a unit to begin with the old spirit burned alike in all the unextinguished fire of adventure and independence, and then the same stress of shifting herself. The same vigorous and peculiar habits of life were forced upon each one watching for Indians guarding huge at night chasing cattle, wild deer over rocks and counties sleeping in the dust and waking in the snow cooking in the open swimming the swollen rivers. Such gymnasium for mind and body develops pattern in the unlike. Thus late in the nineteenth century was the race once again subjected to battles and darkness rain and shine to the fierceness generosity of the desert. Destiny tried her latest experiment upon the Saxon and plucking him from the library, the Haystack and the Gutter set him upon his horse. then. It was that face to face with the eternal simplicity of death. His modern guys fell away and showed once again, the medieval man. It was no new type, no product of the frontier but just the original kernel of the nut with the shell broken. and quote. Can the cowboy this ideal American? Can he be a good citizen? Can he be part of the whole? Whispers answer is emphatically no. He has never made a good citizen he says, but only a good soldier from his tournament days down. That Western experience, the one that lets these Americans rediscover their ancient racial traits and unites them around this new way of life. Gaining. This new identity makes it impossible for them to return to the fold. It alienates them from everyone outside of their tribe, their cowboy unit quote. Such existence. Soon makes a strange man of anyone and the early cow punchers rapidly grew unlike all people each other and the wild superstitious ancestors whose blood was in their veins their hair became long and they're glance rested with serene penetration upon the stranger they laughed seldom and their spirit was in the permanent attitude of war grim lean men a few topics and not many words concerning these comprehending no middle between the poles of brutality and tenderness indifferent to death. But disconcerted by a good woman some with violent. Testament religion some vowing none and all of them uneasy around corpses and the dark. These hermitage horsemen would dismount in camp at nightfall and lie looking at the stars or else squad about the fire conversing with crude. Of brands and horses and cows speaking of humans when they referred to men. and quote. It's an interesting paradox isn't it? This character that we usually think of as a national American type. has this aspect of isolation to him. The cowboy is an ideal American but he's also cut off from the rest of the country living in a tribe that's downright hostile everything else. But. It makes sense if the cowboy experience is about escape from about turning your back on a corrupted and dying nation in favor of the good clean cattle country isolationist require doesn't it? It's the only way to achieve that kind of purity that whistler is describing. And speaking of purity. Let's explore one important aspect of this that we haven't touched on yet. Part of this ideal pure state that whispers describing is sexual purity. Did you notice that line about how the cowboy is indifferent to death but disconcerted by a good woman? These anglo-saxon cowboys can never marry and settle down without losing their warrior outdoorsman kind of edge doing that would put them on the path to those other failed conqueror races. The Swedes who farm the French who just stay indoors instead of climbing mountains the Germans who wear slippers and dressing gowns. Remember. wister said that only the Anglo Saxon is still forever homesick for out of doors that means no marriage that also means that eventually the cowboys are GONNA die out they'll create no children to continue their way of life and beyond that remember the clock of civilization is taking the wild west will not last cities and farmers and stock market are all going to take over and in the meantime as wister writes, these wild men sprang from the loins of no similar father and Bhagat no sons to continue their hardy hood. War? They made in plenty. But not love for the woman they saw was not the woman a man can take into his heart. It's a sexless violent generation. The last generation he says that will know this experience this legendary purity. Already in eighteen ninety-five. He's talking about how the cowboys are dying out. They're limited only to New Mexico which wister calls their last domain. Beyond, that he says that most of these so-called cowboys in eighteen ninety five are already losing their etch. They're slowly becoming corrupted and soft and weak, and whose fault is this. No one's wister says. This is progress. This is what progress means. It means civilization it means comfort. It means everything that the country was becoming at that time urban industrial packed with all of these new Americans from new places. But that meant was the death of this briefly flourishing race of anglo-saxon cowboys quote. And what has become of them. Where is this last outcropping of the Saxon gone except where he lingers in the mountains of New Mexico, he has been dispersed as the elk as the buffalo as all wild animals must inevitably be dispersed. Three things swept him away the exhausting of virgin pastures, the coming of the wire fence and Mr Armour of Chicago who set the price of beef to suit himself. But all this may be summed up in the word progress. When the bankrupt cow puncher felt progress dispersing him he seized whatever plank floated nearest him and the wreck. He went to town for job. He got a position on the railroad he set up a saloon he married and fenced in a little farm and he turned rustler and stole the cattle from the men for whom he had once worked. In these capacities, will you find him today the X. Cowboy who set himself to some new way of wage earning is all over the west and his old courage and frankness still stick to him. But his peculiar independence is of necessity dimmed the only man who has retained that holy is the outlaw, the horse and cattle thief on whose grim face hostility to progress forever sits. and quote. Who is it that we worship in our past? Why do we choose these figures? What is it that we see in them does our image of these heroes have anything to do with reality. Reading. Owen wister forces us to think about these questions about how and why are national heroes are created. It reminds us that there's a difference between history and myth. and. It reminds us how frequently we blur the line between the two. And finally, it reminds us of the power of mythmakers of the power of a good story compellingly told. To, rewrite the past in our imagination. Inward. Empire. is a proud member of the dark myths podcast collective. What does that mean? It means this show belongs to a group of incredibly talented and hardworking podcasters, thirty four shows, and counting that bring you everything from history to science to true crime to some truly bizarre and inspired sci fi and fantasy with your tastes are podcasts. You're GonNa find something you like our lineup. This episode, I'd like to recommend one in particular. It's called a new winter by Sami. Gasic. Thinking about it as a stranger darker, very British take on cereal. It's a murder mystery set in a tiny town in the UK in the middle of winter. It's creepy is compelling and I promise. It's worth your time for this and for the rest of our shows, go to www dot dark myths dot org. This show is made possible in part by donations from listeners if you like what you've been hearing and want to contribute a dollar or two by way of appreciation you can do. So at Patriotair dot com slash inward empire. If you don't have the cash to spare, please consider taking a few minutes to write a review itunes or wherever you get your podcasts from. For updates on the show or just to say, hi, you can follow me on twitter at I e podcast. And finally, you can view companion posts for this and every other episode on my wordpress page at inward empire podcast. Dot wordpress DOT COM. The companion posts include pictures of the places, people, events, and things mentioned in the episodes as well as a reading list. In case, you'd like to know more about the topics covered here. As always thank you for listening.

Owen wister cowboys wister Worcester Frederic Remington America US Wyoming Harvard wister Europe ARISTOCRAT Teddy Roosevelt Mr Elaborates Texas Disease Wister Abilene REMINGTON
Jimi Hendrix And George Frideric Handel Were Neighbors Across The Centuries

World Cafe

10:04 min | 1 year ago

Jimi Hendrix And George Frideric Handel Were Neighbors Across The Centuries

"Support for n._p._r. And the following message come from the showtime documentary film hicksville the making of motown discover how the soul of a city defined the rhythm of a nation in this love letter to the music that took the country by storm hits the bill the making of motown now streaming only on showtime. Hey you're listening to world cafe. I'm talia shlenker with another dispatch from our recent trips to london. It's an incredibly historic city and in many special spots you can see see these famous circular blue plaques on the sides of important buildings. We made a pilgrimage to one blue plaque in particular and fancy neighborhood called mayfair are on brickstreet at number twenty five it reads george. Frederic handel composer lived in this house from seventeen twenty three and died here. You know handle handle you wrote this and and right next door at twenty three st there's another historic blue plaque marking the former home of another musician. Jimi hendrix guitarist and songwriter moved in here in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and then found out that the composer lived in building. That's sean dougherty who works at the handle and hendrix house. A museum created in the spot. Both musicians used to live or so hendrix thought he he felt saint-gobain next door but he thought it was the same building and kind of really into the idea of a composer nipping in the same building and kind of could feel it'll be spirit and even went out and bought a couple of hundred records. The record store i could hendrix was influenced by classical music walk. If handling hendrix lived at the same time they would have been next door neighbors on breck street and they would've had a lot more in common than just the address which you can really tell when you visit the museum. Some very clever historians and artists have recreated some of the rooms handle. Oh and hendrix would've lived in and you walk around. You can feel the history under your feet in the floorboards. Some of them are original so yeah and that's one of the most distinctive things about the houses he will crown with these creaking local. Everyday sean walks across the creaky floors through handles writing room where there's this big wooden bookcase. A small desk couple of grand rand paintings one of handle himself and one of charles jennings who wrote the libretto for messiah. There's a spin it which is sort of like mini harpsichord and whole lot of creative greenest energy in this room is where he composed the music. You've had of handle so he lived here for the last cost thirty six years of his life so nice of his operas and over tori is the messiah everything would have been thought of and written in this program really interesting house because it's one of the first times that that musician into his house in handles day most musicians didn't earn a lot of the money so they would have lived with dukes. Lords patrons not handle. This house was built in seventeen twenty. Three and handle was the first resident. It's legit shows you how successful and independent he was. He didn't live with a rich patron. He moved his place while handel was the first resident at twenty five brook street hendrix's place next door represented a different kind of first he said it was the first real time of his own matching it come from neil as this concrete much penniless musician and constantly staying people's houses sustain hotels or on the road and this is the first place where he felt like it was his own place where he was living and he managed to have a little bit of a private private domestic life even if just a few months and then it was back to touring the craziness of rock and roll as for what private domestic life looked like different than you might think based on jimi hendrix this public persona luckily the museum had some help putting it all together collected archival photographs that showed what hindrances room looked like and they talked to somebody who was actually there kathy etchingham with his girlfriend who lives with him here so she was an adviser to awesome this whole project safe. She was really key to us. Gang all the details of the spot so for instance instance it was made really messy because it was just to see that hendrix with this hippie that he wouldn't have been neat but she came in then she said oh no no no. I got up and made the bed every morning and misreading nate tidy. It's funny in some ways this bedroom from nineteen sixty nine echoes handles bedroom from seventeen forty one both both the guys have these square tapestries hanging over their beds creating cozy canopy look during handel's time photography had yet to be invented so the historians who recreated handles room had to rely on other evidence according to handle and hendrix house volunteer claire the bedroom has been recreated from unlisted handles furniture. Now the list was compiled when hundred died because of cruces finish to be valued and sold and the list is very very excited indeed it explains what color the curtains were a more fabric made off color and fabric. The betting mousse made off with confident. This is the right color and this is the right fabric. Yes clearly a lot of care has been taken to select the right shade of crimson back in jimmy's room. They also took great care with detail. There are ashtrays with just the right kind of cigarette butts benson and hedges secrets. Even the brand phase smile and there are tons of persian rugs. Some of them are rolled out on the floor around the bed. Some still rolled up. Hendrix was a big fan. There's a story that he bought some new rugs because if you see there's like five persian rugs and then it's even some sped by the side of the bed they just bought say many the they had too many even fit in the room and he was like apparently he became known as a rug by and so that the textile merchants would kind of be county store selling rugs. There's a ringing phone in the background. You might have noticed that's on purpose. Put there by the museum to show off one of hendrix's quirks. Apparently he would give his phone number out to pretty much. Anybody in the phone in his bedroom would ring off the hook all the day. Most of the things in jimmy's room at the museum are re-creations of what would have been there except for one mirror that hangs over the fireplace about mira is dr arne original peace we have his america would have been hendrix's which is quite covy gets an era that you uh-huh thanks in fact what a trip yeah and interesting me. He apparently saw the ghost of handle one night in this flat in the mirror cakes well handled did die next door seventeen fifty nine he kind of lost his sight and then had a stroke and got worse and worse health and then yeah we think we died. He died in this very room all of our here's just how come you didn't lead with more than two hundred and fifty years later. It's important to the people at handle andraos to keep the musicians memory alive and to make sure space is filled with sound. They let students and artists use the rooms to practise own instruments are played regularly so we're not like replace that keeps everything under lock in case you know everything is from the nineteen th century but can still be played as a matter of fact just as we were leaving the handle and hendrix south three talented guys were warming up filling the room with the purple haze <music> there you have it if you are in london. Go checkout handle handle and hendrix in london really cool. Thanks so much to sean dougherty for being a wonderful and generous tour guide. Thanks also to clear the volunteer whose voice you heard in the segment. Thanks for senior producer. Kimberly do nod for amazing work on putting this all together and organizing our sense of place trip to london and thanks to the wind coat foundation for making it possible. I'm talia slinger and i will catch you next time on the world cafe from n._p._r.

Jimi hendrix hendrix house sean dougherty Frederic handel london n._p._r talia shlenker motown jimmy george talia slinger charles jennings producer tori Lords nate cruces benson Kimberly
Wisdom for the future

Checking in with Susan David

24:33 min | 1 year ago

Wisdom for the future

"A couple of EPA ago, we explored the idea of birth nece. People die while the sun is shining. Forest burn while the birds sing. Difficult emotions like anger or anxiety can be tough to experience. And it's when we moved to that discomfort that we must learn and grow. We can feel angry with our spouse end while noticing that anger with compassion, we can reach out and give the person a hug because the relationship matters. That both nece the dialectic is I think at the core of wisdom? It is the recognition that life is all tenuously beautiful and fragile. That we are young, and then we are not. That we are healthy until the diagnosis brings us to our knees. That, we are both small and insignificant in the context of the universe. And we have enormous power and agency to create change. Today is our last episode of the season. I'm so excited to share it with you, and in the spirit of both nece I'm so sad that our time together is nearly over. It's a season over which we've explored the journey. That covert has invited us into. Or forced us into. And I think that there is no better clothes than to experience the wisdom that comes about through the dialectic. The appreciation of both nece. This is checking in with Susan. David. What's likely come through over? Our time together is that I love to bring in the arts music poetry, because these are preps, the epitome of both nece. Listening to gorgeous piece of music both grounds us in the moment. And reminds us of how humans can transcend the moment through creativity, connection and contribution. It is missing then to invite onto the show. A special guest friend Richard Kogan. Richard is a clinical professor of psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New, York, city. And he's also Julia trained concert pianist. Repaired will be exploring with us the both -ness of one of the lives of the greatest composers in history. The complex personality of Frederic Chopin. Retired I'm so delighted to be with you today. Thanks you for inviting me to join you. So Richard One theme that we've explored on the cost is how values are not abstract how they are qualities of action and that even when so much can out of our control? We can keep acting in ways that enable us to contribute and you know I know with show. Pens left despite so many experiences of trauma, separation and illness. He seemed to be able to keep hold of what was important to him his creativity his lover's home pearland. I'm wondering if you could explore what that looked like for him. Canes Eighteen Thirty Chopin's twenty years old in spiring young musician. He leaves his home in Warsaw to go on an international concert tour while he's away. A war breaks out. Polish. Patriots fight a war of independence. They want to liberate the country from rule by the Russians Czars. Chopin wants to return home in join the fighting, but he winds up living his entire adult life as an exile in Paris. When Chopin gets, the news Polish rebellion was crushed by a massive Russian troop presence. He's devastated. So many friends died in the war, and he feels intensive survivor guilt, but he thinks to himself. I'm a musician. How can I make a contribution? Chopin decided that even though Poland had been obliterated politically militarily, he was certain that the world would not forget Poland if it heard distinctly nationalistic Polish music. POLONAISES, Missouri's or the Polish national dances. The, pollen as dance with a characteristic rhythm that goes like this. So Chopin took this rhythm, and he transformed the pollen days into a stirring tribute to the bravery. Of the Polish freedom fighters. The circus earth, different character, you should folk dances in triple beat. This was the music of Chopin heard during trips to the countryside as a youngster. And the MAZURKAS that Chopin composed while in Paris it conveying aching sense of walking. For his homeland. It's so beautiful Richard. You can hear the emotion as it comes through and the longing, and the grieving and one of the things that I think of when I hear that piece is. This idea that chopin is experiencing such intense emotions, and he was in this context of having grown up in a really happy household. And then went on to be separated from the people that he loved most in the world. I'm wondering if you might speak a little bit to that and how that shows through in his music. You know unlike so many creative artists who use their unhappy childhoods sources of creative inspiration. SHILPA had blissfully happy home life. He was bathed in love as nurturing parents. He was adored indulged by his three sisters. After he was forced into exile. Quarantined in lockdown as it were in Paris, he was desperately homesick. At the voluminous correspondence with his parents and siblings, but he noted that each time he got a letter from home. He missed them even more. It. She'll beheaded dramatic a personality transformation after he became an exile in France. The sociable engaging youngster growing up in Warsaw. Developed into a reserved, guarded secretive young man in Paris. But this changed years later when he met George Saunders, brilliant novelist, who is determined to forge an intimate romantic relationship with a man that she considered to be your artistic soulmate. was initially reluctant, explained to her the reason for his reticence in reserve, his health was poor. He had limited energy. He wanted to preserve all of for his music making. Sure. Sean persuaded him that the pursuit of an intimate relationship with lead dot to depletion a rather nourishment for his art. And she was right. Chopin became a greater more productive composure during your years together. I'M GONNA play prelude that he composed in her presence. okay. Reached thank you for sharing that with us so beautiful. Thank you sue. Over the past couple of months, it feels like they've been so many emotions. Grief, loss, loneliness depletion. And of course in many parts of the world, and particularly in the US, the past couple of weeks in particular, has been for many an experience of anger. and. We've explored on the show. How growth! Comes not through denial, supressing difficulty motions, but rather engaging with them, learning from them, and using them as a source of inspiration or even action in our life. Energy reminded me that even when he was in the shadow of death. Chopin seemed to be able to catalyze emotional suffering. What was his experience? And how did he convert the suffering to creative inspiration? Chopin dealt with serious medical mrs entire life. He chronic respiratory problems steig notes with tuberculosis while in exile. In his final years. He was unable to dress himself to be carried up and down stairs. He described himself is more dead than alive. If he was terribly frustrated by his illness, but he refused to be defeated by. In seemed almost to be inspired by it. I don't think it's a coincidence that a man who spent so many years being deathly ill would compose the most famous funeral march. Ever written. Uh. Chopin died at age thirty. He was buried in Perlis in metairie in Paris, but at his request his heart was cut out of his body and brought back in earn to polling. We're releasing the state of the Church of the Holy Cross in Warsaw. Richard, it's such A. Incredible expression of this idea of both. Miss that we talking about this idea that. In suffering, there is contribution and you know in suffering for so many is often the experience that coexist alongside of of growth or insight that might come about. Richard you are both a musician, but you also a psychiatrist and I'm wondering if you could speak a little bit to what you've seen. You've seen people who have suffered and experienced difficulty in so many forms. What insights that you can share as to what you think best enables people to continue to adapt and grow even in the midst of struggle. One is the need to foster nurse. Interpersonal connections even within the constraints of quarantine is social distancing. I've consistently observed how nursing can be to reach out. To others during times of Struggle. They, another key sustained gauge, not only with people with activities that can confer a sense of meaning, and purpose is also useful to kind of emphasize the importance of. Routine even when? Much in life has been disrupted from me for Chopin's. All the composing that he did, it didn't just happen. Because Chopin was inspired, he was adamant about keeping to a daily routine or to do because he was sickly at fluctuations in his health, but he was really insistent on adhering to the same schedule of composing practicing teaches on a daily basis. But I think it is also important to keep in mind that some frustration is inevitable. Limitations are inevitable. During this period, people should extend themselves some measure. Of, self compassion. I want if I can make one more point. Oh, sue I just like to make a special case for the importance of artistic expression during this pandemic, it really actually impossible to overstate the value of the arts. During Times of stress I think the importance of what just said about. The art applies to all speak in particular about music. The art form that I know best. Music promotes social cohesion, really a sense of community and belonging a sense of harmony. He just witness. For the spontaneous singing from the balconies in Italy early in the krona virus. Pandemic. Music has a universality which is so valuable in times of strife in societal disunity. Everybody from every diverse cultural feel pretty much the same emotion when hearing for instance Chopin's funeral. March Sonata. It? We're justifiably celebrating healthcare workers during this pandemic. I think it's imperative for everybody in the healthcare community. Not to Lucite Music's extraordinary capacity. To Sooth anxiety to reduce pain. To lift spirits. Richard you've previously described Chopin as being an example of the triumph of the human spirit. And I. Certainly think he's music helps us to experience that sense of triumph, connection and contribution creativity the universality that you speak oath. But I'm curious as to why you use that specific language of him being an example of the triumph of the human spirit. Can you expand a little bit on that sure? I'm I'm going to answer that by focusing on one particular piece that he wrote a his pollination, which has been nicknamed the heroic pollen. As now this glorious work is fully embodies music's potential for communicating. Vibrancy determination in resilience in the context of adversity. This piece is a handful even for physically healthy Janice. unimaginably challenging for a frail sickly man, who, at his peak, we ninety five pounds. Chopin may have targeted this piece to his fellow `exiles. But. I believe that it stands. Today is a compelling universal expression. Of the triumph of the human spirit. Richard that is absolutely beautiful, it just brings tears to my eyes. And I think it's such a gorgeous demonstration really of this idea of both nece. What you've conveyed in this music and in your language is the ability to have connection in loneliness. The ability to experience life even in the shadow of death. And the beauty and fragility that are interwoven. I can't thank you enough for being headed. It's just really really gorgeous. Thanks that's perfect description of the juxtaposition of beauty and fragility I think that actually is a perfect description of Chopin, actually this frail sickly men who created such extraordinary. Both nece when I think about it, it's the expansion for all of us. Listening for single person, it's the expansion of a hotson minds to internalize the reality that the Ernie certain t is uncertainty. That tough emotions are part of our contract with life, and while this feels scary. In practice it's the gentle acceptance of the spoiledness that allows us to integrated and whole and healthy, and to move forward both individually, but also in our society, recognizing how we can step into the future that we want to create. A look back at the first episode of the show. It was such a scary moment for all of us. A moment that life had invited us into. One with so many changes emotions in questions. I've so appreciated the opportunity to share these lost twelve weeks with you. Some of my deepest values, those of community and connection. And I hope that these episodes have given us some comfort a sense of togetherness, and maybe some practical emotional agility tools that you can use in your life. Emotional agility is the ability to be compassionate and curious with ourselves. And to be courageous, as we continue to bring the best of ourselves forward in how we love live. Care for ourselves and others and lead our communities. Tough emotions are part of our contract with life. And while the time hid is still uncertain. It is my hope that these ideas will continue to be value until we meet a game. I'm so said to be saying goodbye for the season. But we'll be back for another season, so please stay subscribed. I'm so grateful that you've shared this time with me and that we've been able to practice this experience together. and. I think that all of us life is asking us. Who Do you want to be? Who Do you want to be in the moment. Even in the context of situation that can feel challenging. Or a future that can feel uncertain. We all get to ask ourselves this question. Even in the context of challenge. Who Do I choose to be. Thank you and goodbye for now.

Frederic Chopin Richard Paris Warsaw EPA Richard One Richard Kogan Susan pearland Warsaw US George Saunders Missouri France Poland Lucite Music Julia David Pandemic Pens
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 4: The Bees and the Birds

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 1 year ago

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov 4: The Bees and the Birds

"Hello welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. Nikolai rimsky-korsakov is hardly the only composer to have painted a musical portrait of an animal with wings. In fact he's not even the only one who wrote a piece about a b that piece called the B. is by Franz Schubert but not the Franz Schubert believe it or not. There was a father and son pair of German composers with exactly the same name as the famous Austrian composer. Franz Schubert one of the German Franz Schubert's got very annoyed when people confused him with the Austrian Franz Schubert because he thought he wrote better music. There's a whole swarm of stinging insects in an overture. By English composer Rape Vaughan Williams one Williams wrote his overture for a play called the wasps but the play isn't really about insects. It's about lawyers composers may like to write pieces that imitate the sounds of insects wings but they love to use instruments to imitate bird calls. Here's a Solo Violin. Doing the of a hand. They're of a rooster. That's a whole Sonata. Different animal sounds by German composer with one of my favorite musician. Maze Heinrich Ignites Franz Bieber. You Want Great Violin Music. Leave it to beaver. Speaking of great names. How about Italian composer Marco Chellaney which translates to mark little birds? Kuhn's not the ones that live in clocks but real ones that live in trees are easy targets for composers because they sing on Pitch Twentieth Century. Italian composer arena respect e took a whole set of pieces by composers from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and put them together in a suite called the birds. Here's a Kuku composition for violin by German composer Johann Baltar. There's also Kuku call in an organ concerto by George Frederic Handle in fact handle put two birds in their the CUCKOO and the nightingale. You can hear them both Of course do great bird. Imitations just listen to this flute. Concerto by Antonio Baldi called the Goldfinch and you probably already know a famous flute bird. The one Sergei Prokofiev put into Peter and the wolf and of course Peter and the wolf also has a duck played by the oboe. Now back to what got me started on all these birds and bees. The flight of the Bumblebee by Nikolai Room. Ski Korsakov in addition to writing music. Nikolai Rams Ski Korsakov totted next week famous composer teachers and their students. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim. Linter at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

Franz Schubert Nikolai rimsky-korsakov Naomi Lewin Nikolai Rams Ski Korsakov Franz Bieber Ski Korsakov Nikolai Room Vaughan Williams Antonio Baldi Cincinnati George Frederic Handle Marco Chellaney Sergei Prokofiev Rape Johann Baltar Kuhn Kuku Tim Heinrich Peter
George Frederick Handel 2: The Story of Handel's Water Music

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 1 year ago

George Frederick Handel 2: The Story of Handel's Water Music

"Hello, welcome to classics for kids. I'm Naomi Lewin. On Wednesday evening it's about eight the king, and bought to Dwight Hall in Large Open Barge, in which were also the Duchess of Bolton the Duchess of Newcastle. The Countess Godolphin Lady Kilns Egg and the Earl of Orkney, and he proceeded up the river towards Chelsea. Many other barges with persons of quality attended so great a number of boats. The whole river was covered. That's from July nineteenth. Seventeen seventeen edition of a London newspaper called the daily current. It's a description of the Royal Party for which George Frederic Handel composed water music. When handle landed a job as a court composer to a German prince, he kept taking off for England when the German prince only became King George of England handle was a little embarrassed to show his face at the British court. Some people think Campbell wrote music for the King's Party to get back on his good side. But King George didn't stay mad at handle that long. The king actually arrived in England a couple of years before he threw the river party. Since he was not very bright, and he didn't even try to speak English king. George was not popular in London, so it's more likely that he was trying to make friends and influence people by throwing a huge party on the River Thames. To make sure that he really impressed his guests with the entertainment for the Party. King George got handled to write music especially for the occasion. The party was a big success. Everyone said so even the Prussian ambassador who sent a top secret report back home, describing it in great detail next to the king, whilst that of the musicians about fifty in number who played on all kinds of instruments, trumpets, horns, buffoons, elbows German, fluids English fluids, violence and basis, but there were no singers. His Majesty approved of it so Creighton that he caused it to be repeated three times in all. The king might have had the music repeated three times, or maybe the Prussian embassador couldn't tell handle actually wrote three different suites of water music. Two of them use instruments like horns and trumpets good for outdoors on the water. The other sweet is much softer with flute Sandra quarters. That quieter music may have been played while people eight. How the newspaper description of the Royal Party continues as eleven o'clock, His Majesty disembark to Chelsea where supper was prepared, and there was another very agreeable concert which ended two o'clock. After to that His Majesty return to his badge and came back by the same route, the music still playing until he landed once more. If, they didn't start for home until two in the morning. They probably didn't get back into. It was already light out the next day. WHAT A PARTY! Can you imagine floating down a river with musicians playing in a boat next to you? Next time on classics for Kids Watery, music by some other composers. I'm Naomi Lewin I. write classics, Kids and produce it with Tim Linter at Wgn. Say Cincinnati please join me for more water music next time on classics for kids.

King George Party Royal Party King's Party Naomi Lewin England George Frederic Handel Countess Godolphin Lady Kilns London Chelsea River Thames Earl of Orkney Dwight Hall Sandra quarters Large Open Barge Bolton Tim Linter Campbell Creighton British court
Handel

5 Minutes in Church History

04:59 min | 8 months ago

Handel

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people events and even the places that have shaped the story of Christianity. This is our story family history. Let's get started. Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode, we're talking about a composer George, Frederic Handel and I resist the urge to have upon here and say that we going to get a handle on handle. But let's get a handle on hindle. He was born in sixteen, Eighty five in Hallo- Germany the importance of that year is it was the same year as the birth of Johann Sebastian Bach sixteen eighty five was a great year for the birth of composers apparently, and now Bach to handle and I promise. I'm done with punts. Well handle was originally set to be a lawyer but he loved music and he quickly showed his prowess as an organist and at composing, and so he said off to be a musician. He spent some time traveling around Italy and then he was musician for the elector of Hanover. Now, the importance of the elector of Hanover was that he was the heir to the throne of England and when Queen and died childless the elector of Hanover became King George the. First of England handle moved with him to London and the year was seventeen off and from then on hand spent the rest of his life in Britain, and he's while born in Germany and German descent is known as an English composer under George. The first t founded the Royal Academy of Music, which he directed for fifteen years early on in London Handel composed for King George the first his famous water music or as in handles beloved German Tongue vassar music. The first time it was performed for King George loved it so much. He ordered it played again and then he ordered it played again. So debuted three times in a row in seventeen seventeen. After. He finished his time handle finished his time at the Royal Academy of Music. He spent much of the Seventeenth Thirties writing operas, and then he said about to write what might be considered his magnum opus the Messiah. Handel. was by all accounts obsessed with work. We would say today a workaholic and he poured himself into his work as a composer as a musician. Sadly in seventeen fifty one he went blind and then in seventeen, fifty, nine, the age of seventy four he died in, London? He was buried in Westminster Abbey and of course, the grand organ of the Abbey and the choir played his beloved. Messiah. Handel one said I should be very sorry if I only entertained them referring to the people who listen to his music, he wanted people to not only be entertained but to beat moved by his music and that was certainly the case with the Messiah. The Messiah was first performed in Dublin on April thirteen, seventeen, forty two it was performed the next year in London and King George the second was in the audience attending and when he got to the chorus for part to the Hallelujah Chorus King George, the second was moved that he stood up, and of course, when the king stands everyone else stands in. So the whole theater stood alongside of the king and that started tradition of standing during the Hallelujah course. The Messiah is in three parts. Part one begins with prophecies of the. Coming Messiah from Isaiah and Psalms, and takes us right to the shepherds watching their flock at night on Bethlehem's hillsides. Then part two covers the passion, the suffering in-depth of Christ and ends with that Hallelujah course part three picks up with Christ's resurrection and continues with his ascension and what theologians call his present session in glory, and then it ends with the day of judgement to come as the Messiah the king comes in glory. Well, that is Handel's Messiah and when he was finished writing the musical score, he signed it s D. G. Solely Dale Gloria. I'm Steve Nichols, thanks for joining us for five minutes and Church history. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in Church history dot com.

King George Frederic Handel Royal Academy of Music London London Handel Hallo- Germany Hanover Hallelujah Dr Stephen Nicholson Johann Sebastian Bach Westminster Abbey Steve Nichols England Seventeenth Thirties Isaiah Italy Bethlehem Dale Gloria Handel. Queen
Johannes Brahms 4: Classical Music Featuring Dances from European Countries

Classics for Kids

06:00 min | 3 months ago

Johannes Brahms 4: Classical Music Featuring Dances from European Countries

"Hello welcome to classics for kids. I'm naomi lewin. It's like asking. Who's buried in grant's tomb to ask on what countries dance music did. Yohannes brahms base. His hungarian dances rams wasn't actually from hungary. But bela bartok was bartok. Spent a lot of time collecting folk music from all over his country. The eastern part of hungary transylvania gone back and forth between belonging to hungary and romania. Barbeque gathered some great dance. Music there for half a century romania hungary and most of central europe all belong to one country the austro-hungarian empire in austria. They danced the lender like this one by franz schubert. A what is now. The czech republic was also part of the austro-hungarian empire. Back when antonin dvorak was around. Four shock wrote a whole set of slavonic dances on dance forms from his country. Composer bedrick smith on a wrote the first check national opera and he loved to dance. Smetana borrowed some czech folk music for his set of check. Dances smitten wasn't the only one to borrow that stepping dance. So did franscio haydn. He put it in the last movement of his last symphony. Just north of the czech republic is poland where they dance the mazurkas polish composer frederic chopin wrote lots of mazurkas german philosopher by the name of friedrich. Nietzsche is famous for having written the book. As oc- pa tara tara tara thus speak zarathoustra which composer. Richard strauss turned into a famous tone poem. But nietzsche didn't just write words. He wrote some music to like. This polish mazurkas In russia they dance the whole packed. But because there's no letter with h sound in russian. They call it the go pack. This go pack is from the opera. Sarah chintzy fair by modesto zork speech me so many of these dances have voting names but the german dances by ludwig. Von beethoven are just called german dances. Here's another dance by beethoven. A contra dance. Ooh nato and obviously like that dance because he recycled it in his ballet the creatures up permit theus and in his third symphony called the aurora. Pretty amazing what a composer like beethoven can do with a little dance isn't it. I may me when. I write classics for kids. Which is produced at wg uc cincinnati. With tim lantern. And bruce l. Please join me again for more classics for kids.

hungary naomi lewin Yohannes brahms bela bartok romania antonin dvorak bedrick smith Smetana czech republic bartok franscio haydn franz schubert transylvania rams tara tara tara frederic chopin austria poland Sarah chintzy modesto zork
Will David Pastrnak Last Next to David Krejci & This is the Toughest Team of the Bruce Cassidy Era | Conor Ryan | Bruins Beat w/ Evan Marinofsky

Bruins Beat

26:12 min | 4 months ago

Will David Pastrnak Last Next to David Krejci & This is the Toughest Team of the Bruce Cassidy Era | Conor Ryan | Bruins Beat w/ Evan Marinofsky

"This is February 16th. And this is the Bruins beat on clns media. And welcome back to the Bruins speed on ceiling Us Media. My name is Evan marinoff scared because we're having a great week a great day. Hopefully yearning for for warmer weather. But I guess we'll take it here. It's funny actually after last episode when I told people to message me or tweeted me their location where they listen to if they're outside the Northeast. I got a lot of good responses from people which was cool to hear what people are listening from and wage. They want to continue if you listen from outside of the Northeast. Let me know. I'd love to hear there's some California ones Saskatchewan so good to hear that. We're all over the map. I like that always a good thing. It's fun. I'm in Boston. So I love to dream about other places. Even if it is cold Saskatchewan or Northern California, which very nice place obviously. So continue that always fun to hear them and so on this episode, I'd gotten Ryan on and we got into David pastrnak moving down with David. Krejci what that means what to expect how fast is Cassie pull the trigger on Thursday. Egg pasta back up with the first line we get into that. We also got into a huge development with this team that we saw Friday night against the Rangers took a game that I think has a lot of big meaning going forward and it was turning point game and we get into why that was so big and how this Bruins team looks a bit different from Bruins teams in the past, Bruce Cassidy Bruins team. So we got him to all that stuff in this episode before we getting the episode first. I want to say thank you for the support on the on the Bruins ringside YouTube channel continue to go subscribe and support the channel. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate it. It's grown very very quickly in a short amount of time. So let's continue that that has been awesome that has been awesome. It's so fun. Also just interacting with you guys in the comments off you guys have some great points. So it's great to be able to see here in reply to those. And then also I got a tell you a little bit about that online. A Jeep I don't mind is dead. Fastest and easiest way to bet on all your Sports Action football might be over but NBA college basketball in the NHL are in full swing been online even covers Awards TV shows and reality T V real time updated odds and project almost anything almost anything you can imagine but online has you covered for all the news scoresandodds. It's the best way to place your bets and it's free to sign up head to the website or use your mobile device to sign up today and receive your 50% Welcome bonus on your first deposit, but online your online Sports Experts again, don't sit on the sidelines anymore. Get on the action. Don't forget that promo code. So you want us fifty to receive that 50% Welcome bonus cash deposit, but online as I said your online sports with experts shut out to me. Actually I used about online for the Super Bowl. I mean, I always use about online, but I bet more than I normally would because it was a Super Bowl. I went six-for-six on Beth's shout-out me pretty good. Not too bad. So go to bed online now use that promo code CLA250 to get that 50% Welcome bonus without firm. Do here's my conversation? With Conor Ryan and we're here with Conor Ryan Conor. What is up a oven? Nothing much what's going on with you? And the much I'm feeling you know, I'm feeling 22 big deal turn 22 on Saturday. So feel happy birthday to me. I just think when we first started doing these PODS of felt like you were twelve and it's time as time has just flown by right I'm fourteen now, I've grown up. I think I know I covered my first Bruins game at nineteen. I was young. I was I mean, I still look pretty young. I actually just shaved before I came on so people who were watching on YouTube or like wow, you still look really young so many with a beard obviously look look like I'm forty-seven. But yeah, of course, of course, of course, you know just it's just it's the light it's the lighting but yes fun fun birthday on Saturday was a good time happy to be back, you know, so yeah. It was it was a fun day, you know pretty quiet, you know, obviously Cove and stuff. So nothing nothing too major but nothing too outlandish. No, no nothing to outlandish. Well behaved very well behaved but at any rate Bruins don't play until Thursday, which is a while from now obviously Tuesday. So this is not one of those episodes where you have to say. Oh, you know this game Monday night. We may be recorded before it. So we don't know what happened. It's none of that. We've got one until Thursday. So but on Mondays at Monday's Practice cast the moved pastrnak with krejci and debrusk up with marshana Bergeron for the top six. Now we have been saying this for a while that this is something that they should do for an extended period of time maybe not forever. But at least for you know, a couple of games see what comes of it. The second line is not producing is this going to work? I mean at this point, I think it's probably the best a delay at this point. It's harmless you can just to try it for a few games. Like we've seen it happening pass for Cassidy is switch plug in the middle of a game. We had seen it before where it's like. All right, we're going to see them in practice. We're going to test it out and go into a game with politics gaining exclusive with crazy. So that in itself is a step forward, you know, in terms of like real life to see how they look hopefully for a full game and go from there. And when you look at it, right like, you know, you maybe you sacrifice some of the assured offense you would get from mashing version impossible. But if this is just a short-term thing where potentially you get Jake debrusk going where he's with what he's with Bergeron and in my shins you get pasta not going a little bit with crates. Just getting both those guys want a little bit more crazy. You know, it's funny is I think like 11 assists hundred eleven fourteen games, but it seems like it's going to go quiet kind of offensive production for a great job. And passionate for his heart as he was astounded has been pretty quiet the last four games and he has a goal in full games, which actually just how popular Mike is. He hasn't doesn't have a goal football games need to learn a bugging out a better but pray do not remember exactly. So I mean, yeah, I think for just the short-term. What do you really have to lose in a situation like the the best, you know, best case scenario you get depressed going to create you going pops when it gets on a roll. It's not like you're losing pastrnak with Martian and Bergeron when they're on the power play so long as it's a short-term fix and just go for it. Cuz right now I don't know who else really spot in on that right side. I mean you put Craig Smith up there before and he's been okay with crazy, but I think they really want to keep him a voice Charlie Coyle and kind of go from there and With Honor cash out and still not really having a set time on when he's going to be back then why not, you know slot in debrusk there with Bergeron and woke. Kind of go from there. Cuz if it doesn't work out doesn't work out but at least you're exploring all your options before doing what they usually do, which is keep that first line which is a buzz saw and then the second lines kind of jobs lost in the the mix where you're not getting a lot of 5.5 traction. So get hurt them to do it. Even if it's just for a couple of games. Yeah. What's what's the hurt in this like your your your records great you're doing well. Obviously, you're coming off that one loss Burns right now cannot beat the Islanders to save their lives which tough but it's Thai Anderson said, you know, if that means going undefeated against the rest of the division then I guess you went in a way. Yeah, but God, but you know, I do think that that this is, you know creation Posh like have a good history together. Bergeron and Marshawn have a good history of of working with different types of Wingers Riley Smith. They Brett Connolly for a little while a few years ago, you know that they they can they can work with these other guys wage and especially with a guy like depressed who back up there to start the year. He was up there at the beginning of the year a little bit and I don't think it wasn't, you know, this crazy great experiment didn't go amazing. But at least it got depressed more involved because like, you know, one of the big consistence to the start of the season is, you know, stop me if you've heard this before but that creates you second line is not kind of standing out in any way. They're not having they haven't had a game yet where they have a bunch of points or been these like big producers or or like will the team to a win and I do think that that, you know, a profile shot down there like what we've always said this. What's the big deal with that what it you know, the worst is you spread out the scoring a little bit which is something that they would like to do a job. Yes, I'm excited to see how that works out. And I think it's also great that they're going to have three practice days before to get kind of guys those guys acclimated together and then they have Tahoe as well. So having them, you know again cast just needs to not be so trigger-happy, you know, just just let them be let him stay together for a game or two maybe even three for feeling feeling frisky and put them together and and and I think that that will work itself out another thing. I want to get to and this came from Saturdays crazy game against the Rangers which was just an old school all the time off type thing. I mean I was I was pressed I thought Trent Frederic was about a hop in the stands and you know betta there was no fans. You have to be like a security guard with a shoe just just punching the seats the cardboard cutout. Yeah, Just letting wouldn't have it. You know, just beat it up, but there was a big my biggest take away from that game cuz I think that's a game that will look back on at the end of every season or Every Good Seasons always a one-off Games in the regular season we look back and you go that's where it all began. Now. I'm not saying that that like if they win the cup I'm gonna look back at that night and go. Oh that was the night that they won the cup but I will say for the first time and maybe Bruce Cassidy's time as coach unless I'm forgetting a game. Actually. I'll start I'll start like this there was a game last year against the capitals right before Christmas. If you remember there are many brawls. There are many fights many guys were targeted groups like left with an injury. I think crew got injured as well not come back up a crushed pause Wilson when it pastrnak it was a whole big thing. And I remember the big take away from that game was nobody stood up for anybody. I mean, they were like fights but no one there was no way we could properly stand up for another person and it was clear and I think that was one of the games that made them go out and get a guy like Nick Ritchie and I remember I don't know Brett Ritchie played in that game, but I don't remember him doing a thing if he was dead. In the lineup someone can probably remind us on Twitter. I don't really remember just like a deal don't go looking through line up sheets. But for the first time they looked like they could stand up for themselves because you remember that night on Saturday Sabor gets head up high. Korali got hit from behind. There were some borderline plays and you had loads and up to boot Davidge you had you had Trent Frederic growing. It's Brendan Lemieux and even after getting jumped being able to you know, fend for himself. Yes and that cord but he's going to go for round two years to get out of the box. That was I bet Frederick probably would have wanted it. But yeah, that was the thing. I was surprised that that didn't come to Fortune. They were on the ice together a bunch after 2, and they didn't do it, but maybe that's for a long time and they play each other enough, you know, you had McEvoy standing up for against true, but it wasn't really a fight but still did They look. Bigger and they look stronger and tougher than they maybe have it all during Cassidy's time as coach. This team looks pretty good. Yeah, I mean, I think one of the more encouraging things about it too is that you you're you're getting other guys injected into the lineup who taking on those roles. Like I look at home. You know that that Capitals game last year is a good example, but also that game against Columbus where Raska can cost really early in that game to get elbow down low and I'm think there was a really a huge response like I I feel like maybe the Bruins are trying to like initiate some fights for the the Blue Jackets weren't doing anything but they caught I remember after the game they caught a lot of flak for it right that The standing up for you know their teammates and all that and I think the next game they play was against the Penguins. I think that's a game where I think crude fought hornqvist. Yeah same so that's also a situation where like, yeah, of course like you got like Tori's tour groups kind of stand up as a veteran guy and kind of protect his teammates, but also I think so the Bruins you don't want your stock guys to be the guy just dropped from the gloves, right? You don't want black Marsh and to be fighting Lizella or you don't want oh my God, you know, if you don't you don't want to prove to be, you know, fighting a guy catch a conquest. So I think you're seeing this year, especially where some of these younger bodies are these new additions are stepping in and taking on those roles. So, of course, you've got, you know got like McAvoy you're set up for teammate but adding the guy like lausanne who who leaves his own got like Frederick who's both quite a reputation already Nick Ritchie, you know, you sprinkle those guys across the line of who were all started as your guys that it's not like you're you're adding these like dead. You know fourth line goons who come in every once in a while to fight guys like you have just guys who are playing consistent minutes every night who can step in and take on that role and not have to ask for, you know, a stop playing, you know, scrap down low or do anything like that. So I think that's the biggest difference you just have guys injected in the lineup all OVA that can kind of Step In, you know, it's not like, you know, when they signed Kevin, I think we all won were skeptical he was going to even play but two or like all right, he's just going to be the guy that's going to go in there and beat the shit out of everyone and he said one fight but it's not like he's a guy who's going to be the guy that answers for everyone like you're seeing lausanne and Richie and all these other guys step up which is encouraging to see cuz you can't just have the same guy drop the gloves every night, right? I guess not been Sonic the eighties and nineties with these goons were just the calls upon guy. You're seeing a whole bunch of guys step. And I think that's why the collective identity the Bruins has been encouraging this year in terms of you know, they're they still play stingy defense, Georgia. They've got a lot of guys buying in on you know, protecting each other and you know answering, you know with physicality when necessary and I think that's probably the most encouraging thing so far Kevin Miller off the tone from the beginning with the miles would stuff went right out from the next game first shift. I think that you know, and you're Trent Frederic against PK Subban kind of goading him that whole time was also nice to hear back tonight. When I think it was after the Rangers game Cassidy was asked you if you ever have to rain Frederick in a little bit you have to tell them like a dude like chill out and gassed he was just gave a stern. Oh, yeah know the dudes. He is home. He has discipline he is fine and it's I think it's encouraging to see the Bruins kind of you know, we always make fun of the Bruins need another enforcer type crowd, but it was never know like we always, you know, you didn't want them to go out and get like a Shawn Thornton or like a sack Renault. Obviously Thornton was great. But I mean in today's NHL right? I got like Thornton really wouldn't last or like a sack Reynaldo there was pointless but wage. But a guy who can stand up for himself Trent Frederic Jeremy lausanne, I mean Jesus you can fight, you know, there's there's a few of these guys sprinkled throughout the lineup who can vote themselves and go after this you can agitate Nick Ritchie if you need him to when she was actually not involved really at all in any of the fights the other night but he's no problem, you know, dropping the gloves so to speak but this is a bigger point, you know, you look at them against the Blues in in 2019. The big thing was they got pushed around you look at them again song lightning in 2018. And then this past summer in 2020. They got pushed around they were too small. They weren't, you know, they couldn't keep the lightning out of the middle of the ice. They couldn't get to the middle of the ice against the Lightning's defense. I saw Cortland tweet this and I just tried to find the Tweet just now while you were talking I freaking couldn't find it. But whatever. He treated something to the effect of this is the best way this team is built better than the 2019 team that went to the cup and it got me thinking. Is this better than the team that when are they built better? You know, what is it off better or they not better? I know it's true. It's very early, but like low-key might have a point there. I mean, I think if you get overall depth maybe but I think else you need to see guys take off continued steps forward. Like I think lausanne is a good example of guy who I think has gotten better and better as the year has gone on. So if he keeps on building his game to being you know, a shutdown guy a peacock, I if Trent Frederic who I think spend one of the bigger surprises here, if he continues to build his game where he adds more offense to supplement all the other things positive things he brings birth. It's toughness or drawing penalties or just educating guys like it's great that he's doing that right now. But if he adds, you know, if this let's say it's a full 82-game season if he added like 25 points on top of what he brings the massive, right? You know, you look at his concert going to come back healthy if it comes back healthy, like there's a lot of different factors that way it but if God, you know the way these this Ross is assembled like do they need probably one more guy and maybe on the blue line, I would say so like I think they probably have to take a look at who's out there ahead of the deadline but wage elsewhere like It's funny. You say now on a day where they're breaking up the top line to balance up the scoring but this team has more depth than ones in previous years where you know, I, you know guys aren't capitalizing right now. You really seeing like the pieces in place that hopefully you are turning like you look back at that team in 2018 nineteen, so they had coil like that third line like it's hilarious watching like just the first three months of the year and just set their line, which is a black hole. You had nothing driving that line any single time. So yeah, I think probably this seems than that team it just whether these you know, these new pieces you to build on their games cuz if they do none of that you got something cooking there because this team has the Personnel that Catholics in place, you know, there's no reason to think this team can't have a top-five defense the top five power-play top five p k and have like a at least effective wage. Middle six grouping like there's no reason not to think that a guy like oil and Smith can do well together that crazy weather. It's pastrnak or debrusk Richie that what they still can't you know score points that are worth double click during even strength play. Like there's you find out where the piece is kind of fit and like you have reason to be encouraged to just one of those guys all kind of get on the same page which so far hasn't exactly been in a situation you had on a few things. They're they're deeper which is something we say going to the season on the wings, especially on defense, you know, obviously you lost Charlie lost crew, but you know McEvoy M to sort of Blossom in a sense without Char next you're having to make up for some of his, you know, his foot speed and things like that haven't got my gloves on next to him. So I think if you want to make a real run at the at the cup it hinges on guys close on the Borel holding up on the third pairing Nick Ritchie continuing to finish chances in front of the net on the power play Craig Smith scoring a little bit more Charlie Coyle scoring more debrusk, Fredericksburg. Then putting up more numbers which I'll just hits on you need more secondary scoring that like that. That is really that's what wins Stanley Cups people kind of forget. A lot of times that like you can have the greatest first sign in the world, but it doesn't matter if you're second and Thursday are not producing they would not go to the Stanley Cup, but I don't think early sort of been a hell of a lot harder road. If you didn't have the cold online playing like it was a couple of rounds it would allow us to Columbus. So like that sort of thing and I think that that is you know, you're right besides are in place that you know, sometimes soon these guys are going to start scoring more goals Craig Smith Charlie Coyle, hopefully dabros, you know again that's been a little different that's been a little tougher to see I mean, he scored and against the Rangers and they called it off. So I guess there's that but you're going to need to see more from him, but I think a big thing too and I as I mentioned they're tougher they seem tougher they see more, you know willing to to go and I think maybe it's a little more hatred with these teams cuz the rivalries cuz you're playing these teams so much in such a short amount of time wage. They they look they don't look to be getting tossed around as much as they as they did in past years. Maybe that's cuz you know smaller guys are the line up as much and you have bigger guys going in but I'm still and you're right. I think they absolutely have to make a you know, a deal at the deadline for a left shot defense, but I think you have to do that, you know, maybe add another forward as well, you know, cuz you don't know what the deal with cash is, even if she comes back and scores ten points in 14 games. The injuries are still an issue like you still don't know what the deal is with that. So I think they need they need they need more but overall I do think that this might be the best all-around built team right now in a season with Cassidy a bath home. I do I think that there is a legitimate chance that that's the case and that was not something I expected saying going in the season. I mean there was like legitimate talk. Like are they going to make the playoffs? I remember after the first podcast. We did it a sea of the season after the devil dog. The Islanders game we were like are they good or are they is this team? They might they might never score a five-on-five goal the entire you might never but yes, I do think ultimately that this is a very well-built team and it's funny beginning of the Season. You know, we both said we had them in second. I think there's a legitimate chance they do finish in first, um, just given the rest of the division and given how well they're playing but again, they have to keep it up and not need that secondary scoring which as we have learned in in past seasons can be quite pesky. Another thing that I just remember talking with this part Lindholm is going back to Sweden think we should mention that as well. So the par Arab in Boston is over. Unfortunately. It was not on par with how I thought it would end. That was terrible. I free. I appreciate the efforts but I tried I know I travelled and saved accounts right by the way. Nice thing to see with Steven kampfer back in was that his first practice on Monday. I think it was wasn't it? I want to say so yeah, they had a couple of like the taxi Squad guys off. Mccaig was up there bleed if you guys but I think that was the first time I recall seeing camper, which is good cuz he left at the beginning of the season for a family emergency and now it seems to be back so that guy again you can plug in and you know, you know, you're you know, you're getting out of him. And as long as I see him back, yeah back in the lineup good guy great great great guy. It's it's also encouraging the fact that I think even with the amount of injuries, you're dealing with on the blue line. They've done pretty well against this team that going to the are we worried about the depth of their defense, especially the status like Clifton's filled in pretty well-off playing the game that you expect and I mean, I thought more was fine like like again, I think people are worried. Yeah push by to when you when John Moore played. Well, yeah, it's like Nik Richie when he's going to the start of the end. We'd be like, we're not Richie fans. Well, you have to like had a at a qualifier to anything he said but he was good on Saturday. I mean when you're playing with v d I think he ended up. Skate and I think it was like 2345 of ice time. Do you get a bunch of shifts but beside out there so again for an area that I think we're all worried about even the seventh or eighth guys brought into the line of holding their own. So it's encouraging to see and again campers probably the night sky right now, but we seem camper was in the lineup like you you saw him. What what you know what he brings you. So yeah, and that's the thing again, like there's been no need for guys to sit on defense like except for maintenance games or nights off. Like there hasn't been a real need to like pull a guy at like they don't be gross morals liability want him in a lineup but he's they've they've been fine. They they've been they've been totally fine so credit to them. I mean they they've shut all us up so good for them. I guess before we go Connor. Is there anything that that the people should look out for? Yeah. We're going to be breaking down on to see the decision to split up that Top Line. We'll be looking at you know, how long Impacts debrusk how crazy and Passyunk have looked over the years which might surprise you they look pretty good. So I think there's some reason for optimism there. Obviously, we got a couple of days off. So we working on a couple of features and some more Deep dive stuff. We did a deep dive last week on Charlie McAvoy and his potential candidacy for the Norris Trophy, which is building a pretty strong case law so far through the first quarter of the year, so we'll have a whole bunch of other fun products will be dropping pretty soon. So subscribe over at Boston Sports channel, cam you want to follow me on Twitter. You can do that at Connor Ryan underscore 93, you mentioned the McEvoy thing. I think that's the topic will use for future episodes. And another interesting thing. The biggest trade of the week in Boston actually was Brian Rob from a straight-A MassLive for Jean Corrales people. That's a big strategist, but it was 14114 one was he was like a Bob McKenzie tweet. Yes, just boom like Shea Weber for for Pikachu. Exactly, but you can look forward to to Jon corelis over at b s j as well, and that is it. That is all the Bruins for the week for Bruins mean. I'm Aronofsky you Bruins be listeners have an amazing rest of your week.

Bruins Trent Frederic Nick Ritchie Bergeron Bruce Cassidy Charlie Coyle Evan marinoff David pastrnak Cassidy Krejci Rangers Saskatchewan Conor Ryan Conor Ryan Conor krejci debrusk marshana Bergeron Jake debrusk Craig Smith
Friday, August 14, 2020

NBC Nightly News

21:15 min | 10 months ago

Friday, August 14, 2020

"Tonight the escalating battle over the US post office forty-six states now have been warned their mail in ballots may be delivered too late to be counted in the November election president trump even as he attacks mail in voting, requesting his own absentee ballot the postmaster general he appointed under fire and Barack Obama weighing in accusing president trump trying to kneecap the post office. Also the president adding fuel to a baseless birther conspiracy theory about Coppola Harris a US citizen. Born in America the campaign firing back the struggle to reopen schools the one county where eighty students and staff tested positive for covid. Just this week the GRA milestone California, the first state to search pass six, hundred, thousand cases, and the new warning about covert and heart damage wildfire emergency in California hundreds evacuated multiple homes destroyed thousands more at risk shocking video a teen restrained by six staffers at a youth home later, dying what our NBC News Investigation Hesp. found. The Ivy League college accused of admissions discrimination, what it could mean for the future of affirmative action and the special delivery. That's inspiring. America. This is NBC nightly news with Lester Holt. Good evening there something terribly wrong tonight the US postal. Service now, warning dozens of states that it can't guarantee mail in ballots for the presidential election will be processed in time to be counted. We're talking potentially you're vote at risk as the pandemic drives interest in mail in voting president trump continues to resist emergency funding to the cash-strapped agency while undermining the process tonight former. President Obama accusing trump. Of, knee-capping the Postal Service Kristen welker has the story tonight the US Postal Service, sending out an urgent warning writing letters to dozens of states and the District of Columbia saying it cannot guarantee all ballots cast by mail will arrive in time to be counted with some states anticipating ten times. The normal volume of election mail because of the pandemic in critical battleground states like Pennsylvania the secretary of. State is working to ensure county send out ballots early in New Jersey election officials are sending out ballots to every voter. Other key states are also working to adjust from Michigan Florida and Minnesota it's about applying for your vote from home ballot early, it's about sending it back as early as you feel comfortable it comes amid intensifying scrutiny on the Postmaster General, Louis Joy? A longtime trump ally and. Republican, fundraiser who met with the President in the Oval Office last week to joy has faced bipartisan criticism for implementing changes, including eliminating overtime for many workers and deactivating hundreds of mail sorting machines in an internal memo. Thursday. Joy acknowledged. There have been unintended consequences to service, but also insisted the cuts were necessary to address dire financial condition president trump pressed on the matter by NBC News late Thursday. The postmaster general reversal of the policy. Changes. Area in order to prevent the late snow, I wouldn't do that at all. No. I want to post office to run properly for his part president trump who along with the first lady has registered for absentee ballots for the second time is Florida residents has railed against vote by mail for weeks arguing leads to widespread fraud despite little evidence of that the president has refused Democrats demands for billions of dollars for the postal service and other covert relief measures. But today signaled he may be willing to compromise. and. So what I want is what the American people want Democrats outraged former President Obama accusing president trump of voter suppression. What we've never seen before is. A president's say I'm going to try to actively kneecap the postal service. To. Encourage voting and we'll be explicit about the reason I'm doing it that sort of unheard of. Voters across the country are watching closely with worry. Concerned if I mail it that it's GonNa get lost in the system and never get there I like the old way with machines and they were melting connected to the Internet. Chris Joints Kristen we're learning. There's a new investigation into the postal service now. Let's that's right. NBC News has confirmed the internal watchdog at the United States. Postal Service is reviewing those controversial policy changes by the postmaster general it comes after union leaders bipartisan lawmakers expressed concerns over the months, Lester. Kristen Welker the White House. Thanks to the firestorm over that false and racist conspiracy theory fuelled by President Trump. That Senator Kala Harris is not eligible to run for Vice President Andrea, Mitchell tonight on how the Lai emerged in Harris's response. Communist Harris born, in Oakland California in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, four, the daughter of immigrants and legally qualified to run for president or vice president that now horizon to run with Joe Biden is being challenged by a racist birther conspiracy starting with a flurry of memes and fringe websites amplified by Newsweek column from a conservative lawyer who has long argued against the constitutional guarantee of birthright citizenship. When I started night president, trump praised the column instead of knocking down the false theory I heard it. Today That she doesn't meet the requirements. And by the way, the lawyer wrote that pieces of very highly qualified very talented lawyer I have no idea that's right. I would've thought would've assumed the Democrats would have checked out before she gets chosen to run for vice president for years Donald. Trump question barack. Obama's birthplace even demanding at birth certificate seen as a racist attempt to undermine Obama's credibility. Today Harris signing documents with Biden for the democratic. Convention defected when asked about attacks from the president who has called her angry often used as a racist trope to diminish black women I'm signing this I in this race to win and with that guy right there later she praised Biden for what she called the density to choose a black woman with Aaron Hanes of the nineteenth by Joe asking me to be his running mate he has pushed forward. something. That might have otherwise taken decades. The campaign has called birtherism poor aunt had Biden said they are going to have Harris's. Has AIDS promise. They will respond aggressively to racist and sexist attacks against the first woman of color on a national ticket lesser. Tonight. Thank you. Let's turn to the COVID pandemic and wrenching decisions being made about reopening schools or not for the nation's largest district back to in person classes and a few weeks. But around the country, the debate rages on. Here's gave Gutierrez. Tonight as deadline expires New York state is reviewing newly submitted school reopening plans. I would say the regression has been at least. Definitely. A Year of Work Donald Duarte. Lad has a son with autism. She wants him to go back to class this fall in person is online learning possible. It's not really I just can't imagine I mean he doesn't even sit in fifteen minutes with eighteen hundred schools and more than a million students at stake. New York. City's reopening plan is the most ambitious in the country random temperature checks a nursing, every building and fourteen day quarantine for anyone who tests positive. But the Teachers Union says there is not enough ventilation. A lot of times. Which is why we should open up phases instead of just opening up in September in Georgia perhaps a cautionary tale two weeks ago. The Cherokee County School district opened at schools. This week it reported eighty confirmed Cova cases and more than eleven, hundred students and staff quarantine from coast to coast mounting anxiety, it was pretty difficult to engage students. Because in online, they just don't have the same level of engagement. I. Am overwhelmed with frustration and apprehension of unknown variables in Chicago. Kindergarten teacher Charlotte Owens's wondering how remote learning will work long term. The things that we learn are like how to hold a pencil and how to write your name, how to wash our hands. and. So there's a lot of that that just won't be the same doing it over video chat today virtual courtroom. A Florida judge denied the state's request to dismiss a teacher Union lawsuit over reopening in Hillsborough. County, the superintendent just announced in person classes would start sooner following pressure from state officials. We're GONNA rip open the doors and put masks on kids and hope for the best. Doesn't seem like it's GonNa work out. Here, in New York, the percentage of positive Kobe tests has dropped one percent for a week. Now, a key factor in the push to reopen schools buster. Gay beautyrest tonight. Thanks for California an astonishing milestone. The Nation's most populous state surpassing six hundred thousand cases despite signs of progress. There is continuing concern about large gatherings as we head into another warm summer weekend. Here's Miguel Almaguer. As, California becomes the first state in the nation to surpass six hundred thousand confirmed covert. Like every other state the true number of infections is without a doubt much higher for months lines at testing sites across the nation have stretched for blocks only eclipsed by the even longer wait for results. I don't may test. I'm delight I and I didn't get the results. Twenty. Experts say testing delays in at least thirty four states lead to more infections as the sick unknowingly spread the virus awaiting their results six seven months a pandemic the fact that we can't test people reliably. Shameful alarmed by the trend tonight, the American Medical Association is pushing for federal guidelines to fast-track testing. The move to prioritize those with symptoms and known exposure could limit the viruses spread. Tonight the American Heart Association sounding the alarm warning that the virus commonly causes heart inflammation and damage in is a contributing factor to forty percent of those who die. Amid the race to find a vaccine government scientists are now working to engineer a strain of the virus to be used on volunteers willing to knowingly be in fact, a rare step not yet taken as pressure builds to protect the public tonight with signs of progress. In some states, there are limited plans to safely reopen movie theaters, bowling alleys and museums, but it comes amid a warning for every step forward, the virus to take the country two steps back. And B. C. News. Also in California and other emergency the battle against too intense wildfires outside Los Angeles amid a heat way that could make things even worse. Steve. Patterson tonight on the front lines. Firefighters racing to contain a ferocious whirlwind of flames wing into a fire tornado barreling toward homes. fast-moving Lake Fire exploding more than eleven thousand acres sparking two hundred, fifty evacuations devouring at least five structures threatening fifty four, hundred more towering flames shooting into the air the fire fueled by low humidity and is century of overgrown vegetation is primed like a blast furnace by high temperatures at the beginning of a scorching weekend. The Sun beating down on the brush, it makes it more flammable and ignites more quickly. Crews have made progress gaining some containment on this blaze but that may change as these temperatures keep rising in resources or pulled battle other fires less than fifty miles away. The smaller book powerful ranch to fire burn perilously close to hillside. Triggering more evacuations, firefighters setting backfires creating line pushing the fire back in saving holds back at the lake fire, a show of spirit in the middle of a firestorm. Crews managing to save the Stars and Stripes from smoking flames. Two nasty need well into the weekend as this heat-driven blades rages on Steve Patterson. NBC News Lake Hughes California in sixty seconds shocking scenes inside a home for at risk kids a teen physically restrained and later dying charges of manslaughter in child abuse the company already reported for past violations. Tonight we investigate. We're back now with our NBC News investigation into the shocking death of a sixteen year old at a youth facility run by a company we've investigated before for past violations. We want to warn you some of the video you're about to see is disturbing. Here's Kate Snow. You're looking at video of sixteen year, old Cornelius Frederic having lunch at Lakeside Academy, a home for at risk youth. In Kalamazoo Michigan, there's no audio but cornelius seen throwing food to staff members intervene. But when Cornelius throws another item, he's pushed down to men become three then six on top of him after at least ten minutes of restraint Cornelius lifted up limp and then watch what happens staff members including a nurse stand around for another twelve minutes. Then the nurse calls nine one one. Thing that he was in a restraint and now he's unresponsive. Two days later, Cornelius was dead drawing a Sam. You don't suffocate children for throwing a sandwich that's murder. As you view the video, what do you see see the killing of a child for no reason whatsoever attorney Jeffrey Feiger is representing Cornelius his family suing the for profit company that operated lakeside and dozens like it nationwide called Sequel Youth and Family Services. This was a regular occurrence they instill fear Shoulder Cornelius wanted to be a therapist. Because he knew that tears needed help. We'll wait worked at another youth facility where he got to know corn as they call them corn, he loves to play chess. He loved Manchester he tried to teach. Maybe for a week straight born and raised in Michigan Cornelius his mom died when he was twelve, his father was in prison and Cornelius became a ward of the state we want it to be loved and accepted. So he did it by needs necessary sometimes acting out. Yes. The police report shows Cornelius had been physically restrained at lakeside ten times before once in January for thirty six minutes and NBC News found records showing since two thousand, Eighteen Michigan substantiated fifty six violations at lakeside including multiple instances of inappropriate physical restraints. Three former employees have been charged with manslaughter and child abuse in Cornelius death. All pleading not guilty does your client that what they did in that room was what they were trained to do that they did it properly mark line thinks what he did was absolutely proper Donald Sopranos the defense. Attorney Zachary. So lease says his client was given just two hours of training on using restraints. Barrier. In rank employees standing around in nobody said anything that any of the boys that my client? Is Far as move down move get off his chest in a statement on this incident sequel says in part Cornelius death is heartbreaking and the restraint used was in violation of our policies and training adding it fired those involved quickly and is cooperating with law enforcement. Tonight we reported a school in Iowa, but it's not the first time. NBC News has found evidence of improper restraints used at a sequel facility into reports last year former residents and staff described what happened at Clorinda Academy in Iowa Betas Cab. Slamming my but. Against the floor. And my head was hitting them before. It routine practice to do restraints that are more painful than what they should be after we asked questions more than a year ago sequel announced a new restraint, free behavior management program, but a full year. Later, it's only been implemented at ten of the more than forty facilities at lakeside sequel. Says Employees had completed the new training by March and yet one month later, this is how they were treating Cornelius sequel. Now, take NBC News. We have accelerated the work that was already underway to move to a restraint free model of Care Weinstein anybody protecting why isn't anybody trying to say? Could this? In a civilized environment. Michigan. Shutdown. Lakeside. Academy but Sequel continues to operate dozens of other facilities across the US. Lester. Kate snow tonight. Thank you. We'll take a break up next one of America's top universities accused of discrimination. Yale University is under fire the Justice Department accusing the Ivy League School of Discrimination. Here's Kristen Dogwood. Tonight, the clock is ticking for Yale University after the Justice Department. Gave it until August twenty seven just stop using race in its undergraduate admissions accusing the Ivy League School of discriminating against Asian American white applicants, the assistant attorney general for civil rights writing. There is no such thing as a nice form of race discrimination the university fighting back calling departments claims meritless saying in a statement looks at the whole person when selecting whom to admit critics say the Justice Department's four page letter offered few details of its two year investigation. If you'RE GONNA come out with decision was intended to have some force than show me the facts. As they say. and. Those are clearly missing here Swan Lee Co founder of the Asian. American. Coalition for education who filed the original complaint against Yale says race shouldn't play into admissions that -versities Mac better achieved way social status concentration not the race. Based approach. The Supreme Court has ruled several times that race can be narrowly used as one of the many factors in college admissions. But the DOJ says Yale is wing race too heavily and next month. The Department is set toback Asian American students appealing a ruling in favour of Harvard's admissions process to schools. Now, in the spotlight amid accusations that could impact the future of affirmative action in higher education, Kristen, Dahlgren NBC, News, New York of next delivering packages and inspiration. Finally the unlikely friendship between little boy and an everyday hero in this pandemic here's Katie back. In one Charlotte North Carolina neighborhood these too often arrive as a package deal helix likes going around and playing deliveryman with the neighbors and bringing packages and become something that everyone on the street joys three year old Asher found something to look forward to and someone to look up to during the homebound days of the Pandemic Daryl his ups driver it. Become part of our daily routine it includes astor's own ups uniform complete with ups, socks gifted from Daryl and a modified delivery truck. Have you heard anything from ups in terms of Acre they offering him a job yet I think we're making a strong case even before mask mandate, there was no masking their bond is becoming a role model for the smiler's. His name. Is. GonNa. Human. Humans life lesson a new friend found feet from the front door. Katie Beck NBC News. Those to delivering smiles too. That's it for us. Tonight please take care of yourself and each other good night everyone. I'm sure mainly host of into America a podcast from MSNBC. Join me as we go into the roots of inequality and economic injustice and a racial injustice, and then when you add health is a health injustice into what's at stake people are going to be voting not for a person but for stability and into what comes next into America, a podcast about who we are as Americans, and who we want to become new episodes, every Monday Wednesday and Thursday subscribe now.

NBC News president trump president President Obama Shoulder Cornelius United States NBC California Cornelius Frederic America Senator Kala Harris New York Lester Holt Postal Service Kristen welker Louis Joy Kate Snow Steve Patterson US Postal Service Joe Biden
Podcast: Tim and Julie Harris' 2021 Real Estate Predictions - Part 3 | Tim and Julie Harris

Real Estate Coaching Radio

32:14 min | 5 months ago

Podcast: Tim and Julie Harris' 2021 Real Estate Predictions - Part 3 | Tim and Julie Harris

"Welcome to real estate. Coaching radio starring award-winning real estate coaches and number one international bestselling authors. Tim and julie harris real estate coaching radio is the nation's number one daily radio show for realtors who demand authentic real time. Coaching get ready for flood. Free unfiltered full-strength honesty about what's working to get you into action helping others and making money now in today's real estate market or hosts tim and julie hairs three to one. And we're back we're going to pick Continually left off yesterday. We're talking about two thousand and twenty one predictions and these are the predictions and jillian are trying to do a little bit of a different types of predictions. Podcast here. a lot of folks will just focus on. Maybe the obvious low hanging fruit type predictions jillian. I really trying to expand our thinking hopefully expand your thinking as well. We're trying to integrate a lot of micro trends but also macro trends as relates to real estate and we're integrating alive technological trends to that. Maybe some of which you are aware of most of which i bet you are not and so. We've not listened to the past podcasts. In the past couple days On predictions for twenty twenty one. Please go back and listen to those shows. I think the one yesterday a lot of people. We had great feedback on it but the predictions we did. It was would have been last week. That had been the first part of the series of this is part three and so today we're going to be picking up point number nine but before we get to that. Julie actually received sort of an avalanche of positive feedback on an interview. That i did with a gentleman named jean frederic. That's also available for your replay listening enjoyment at any time and show. Julie you actually wanted to point out why they should listen to that interview. Yeah and you guys can find that. I think he did that just before christmas. So make sure you click on all episodes and you should be able to find that in the podcast lineup. This is with jean jean-frederic and you know yesterday. The premier coaching clients especially pointed that out. Because we're coming back from the break. They'd been binging on podcasts. And this was one of their favorites. And i wrote down some of the points that they brought up particularly amongst some Either agents that are. I don't want to release on the older end of the spectrum but more experienced you know serve most of them were saying really resonates that you and jean talked about. You had a big part of that podcast specifically that people you know once you're fifty fifty five sixty somewhere in there. A lot of people just figure it like you know. I've done what i'm gonna do. I'm gonna kick back especially if you're fairly well off financially. Got most your stuff paid off. You know you mostly haven't figured out it's easy to kick back and retire semi retire. Take a break. You know that sort of thing. It's easy to basically start giving up on these late and that was actually appreciate discussion about complacency. I appreciate the fact that they were. Your listener feedback was that they were really drilled down on that particular perspective of the interview. Because frankly that's really what i wanted to focus on. Yeah because to me. That's what's most motivational about gene. He was essentially fifty nine aunt. Or maybe sixty and he was effectively retired him and his wife were living the good life and had worked their butts off their whole lives owned a bunch of keller williams market centers and just they'd set themselves up perfectly and then they stumbled across the x. p. and the xp realty and you guys you gotta listen to this podcast. Because i'm julie said the feedback was really wonderful but the amazing thing about gene is. He has his desire to essentially. You know frankly worked directly with real estate agents helping to improve their lives. That's the thing that i think. Really re radiates from this podcast. That i did with him but he then decided to go back and start over again and put himself back in a position where he was effectively starting with a brokerage with only at the time they had less than five hundred agents and so in the last six years that genes been associated with the xp. It's gone from five hundred agents to over forty thousand agents. And i'm sorry six years and this year it's probably gonna go one hundred thousand agents and i think a lot of people inside. Xp royalty will attribute you know the essentially the rapid growth the past six years. Not just obviously the the founder glenn sanford and the ceo jason gassing and all the other great managers and what not from the recruiting perspective jeanne definitely was the igniter for a lot of people's involvement with the xp. What were the you were hearing specifically. Yes they liked to your discussion with gene about the concept of being out of balance at times. When you're really pursuing something and most like you're giving permission for that to be okay. Not you know. It's not that you're going to be out about your whole life but for temporarily while you're pursuing something. I think it was extra powerful. Hearing it from somebody like jean. That didn't have you know he. He didn't absolutely have to pursue this. He chose to pursue it. So i think the that discussion about balanced resonated with them he And you talked about you know Conceptually when you're being of service you are in the right place doing helping the people you were supposed to help versus. When are you gonna check out. When are you going to retire when you know if you remember that part of the dodd cast but that that you constantly get the question. When isn't this enough rea- when you when are you gonna kick back when you're gonna take a break and you and jean talked about that when you're already doing what you wanna do when you wanna do it with who you wanna do it with. He added that little piece. Which i appreciate then. Aren't you already where you're supposed to be. I those interesting perspective. That i think if you remember for the podcast that made it so that he was Saying what he was saying. It's unlike work itself is supposed to be pleasurable really. It's not most time what you're doing is what you want doing what. You're doing what you have to do when you don't want to do it because you have bills to pay. But what he was saying once you get past the having to worry about money perspective then. It makes the work pleasurable. Because you're not doing it for money. You're doing it because you wanna do it. And you end up doing it at a higher level and naturally what's We try to convey that people but unfortunately most people have never even experienced anything remotely like that. They're so used to having nine thousand pound financial grow on their back and did not have that there anymore. They can't even fathom what how that changes every single aspect of their lives. And that's what gene. And i were discussing on this podcast rally. I mean we're talking about the xp realty obviously. It's made a lot of people very wealthy. Frankly it's great a lot of opportunities expanding all over the world. I mean. I don't see that's in its infancy right. I mean this is going to be. This is just the start of the rapid growth. And i actually you touched on something. He and i actually were sort of joking about the fact that some people say well the best essentially the big opportunity for xp will remember he. Expertise only got forty thousand agents. There's two point over two million agents of the united states and i'll even know how many agents are globally. It has to be over ten million agents any xp now got forty two thousand agents plenty of plenty of roadway. So it's kinda funny to realize that the opportunity is actually just getting started for people to get involved with the speech. What other feedback. They kind of what i wrote down was the resistance to the idea of retirement because once you get that financial burden off your back and things become more pleasurable than that thought of retirement being the finish line somehow is replaced with What what would happen if you were making so much money. They never even had to think about your bills. Those an interesting part of the podcast and for a lot of our listeners and our coaching members that is a new thought because the previous thought had been pale of your crap off reduce your monthly overhead and live on. Whatever you're talking about cash flow argument right. Yeah and i thought that was interesting because again that flies in the face of certainly what. Our philosophy has been personal group. A business perspective makes an excellent point. Yeah he does. I mean when you have hundreds of thousands of dollars coming in every month off. Xp revenue share. You don't really have to worry about a payment on say houses. I mean it's not really anything or anything right. And so his his perspective was if you've got massive cash flow you don't need to worry about having your debt paid off because of the fact that obviously the cash was going to more than make up for the payments and considering interest rates are so low nowadays while the heck would you have your stuff paid off because you can then take cash reinvest it in an area. We talked about this yesterday. In an era where interest rates are less than three percent in inflation's gonna kick in and make assets appreciate to the point where they're gonna pay for the interest on the loan but that's a pretty damn good point absolutely it is and i thought that this was a great next mindset or next iteration. It's kind of i feel like and getting agents to the point where they're very profitable and they had predictable income. They understand things like the magic number. All of that is like our core calling to get them profitable in gene men. Interesting point that you know like dave ramsey we all like dave ramsey financial responsibility ability paying off your crap off cetera. But even dave says tell me what you earn and if somebody says i'm earning five grand a month and i owe fifty thousand even dave ramsey's like there's not a lot i can do for you. Evenly have so much to work with so jeans. Point was make your cash flow skyrocket to the point where you have something to work with right. You've got to make the income. I you've got to have that predictability before you can do all the other fun stuff yeah. I thought that was an interesting combination of skill set. I then like you're always saying you know it's not your individual commission transactional stuff that matters. It's what you do with it and then creating that passive cash flow in addition to that. That's the mind bender for people with regards realty truthfully well and that's what a lot of people don't understand about it because they don't understand the model. They haven't actually studied it beyond just knowing that he. Xp has some other brokerage. That might be an option. It is another records. That might be an option but really what we're talking about now or what happens when you employ two of the greatest a lever. Don't you always like to use the term real estate. God's i hope we're not offending anybody. When i say that but there are probably two of the greatest ideas ever created for real estate agents by glenn sanford and the xp the first one is going to be obviously revenue share not profit share revenue share and the other one. Is glenn basically set the company up so the agents truly are the owners. There's you get awarded effectively stock in the company. It's not diluted. shares is not these goofy. I was reading this morning. Juliane comp that compasses giving agents. They're not giving like giving him asia's b-share see shares so essentially deluded shares. Glenn doesn't do that. You get the same shares. Glenn ask so that's really exceptional. The different things that he's done but like look at the x. P. for example. Okay i got an email. I actually got a text. I'm going to this you know. We're not gonna talk about predictions today right so excited i well. This is a really good topic to attack. So let me find. This guy's this is worth waiting for me. So you'll like oh here. It is easy okay. I'm reid this to you okay. Hold on i gotta read the part. That's not personal. By the way. Two hundred and twenty four house. This is from a coaching client. By the way two hundred and twenty four houses sold this year counting my pending fifty. Three point three million in production average sales price one hundred eighty nine thousand over five hundred thousand made in xp stock. Wow right there. I know he did not buy any of that. Xp stock those were all stock words and this gentleman's involved with xp for maybe a year and a half so he's already earned five hundred thousand dollars in xp stock rep share. His revenue share is five thousand dollars per month. He said i made a million dollars more this year with the xp. I did with my my last three years with his previous broker which was called chessen real estate. That's pretty increased his net income by a million dollars. I happen to know what he did with that money. What's that you bought a lake house awesome. I've seen it so let me. I got another. I'm thinking is like how long would it take. Let's say you were super disciplined with your commission's right and you you save ten percent off the top of everything right and let's say you're like chuck you average sale price of two hundred ish. How long would it take to to make that same savings that he got from. xp awards. And then the what you and i always talk about. How money rental properties. You have to own to to get to that point where you can save that. Well five thousand dollars. A month is an equivalent to basically having five paid off rental properties worth on average about two hundred thousand dollars each paid off my paid off so you need over a million dollars. Basically in cash to produce five thousand dollars and that's a five percent return that's net that's really what properties but it's not even really net because they're going to leak. They're going to break they're going to. They're going to have all kinds of mickey mouse. You will turn on you like we had two houses with basements are. Here's another text. i got one. I'm going to share this. Because i don't think they'd care if you guys do care. I apologize michael and robin gordon. These are longtime coaching clients. I think they probably are coaching client for us number one. Yeah okay so happy new year. Robin gordon group. Two hundred and twenty numbers get this listeners. Two hundred thirty three million gross commission of five million eight hundred thirty one thousand dollars net income of i will just say it's almost it's Well hell for a million dollars total. You is two hundred and fifty three point. Five and i received tons and tons of texts. Like this people that are congratulating There thankful for basically their involvement. So guys here's the bottom line with all of this and listen to that jean-frederic interview what you need to do is wrap your mind around making income from multiple sources. And that's what we talk about on the real estate treasurer by the way if you haven't downloaded you real estate map just tax twenty twenty one texts twenty twenty one eight five five six eight five ten forty five text twenty twenty one eight five five six eight five ten forty five and we'll text you back linked to download your real estate treasure map one of the things we're gonna have you work on the treasury mapra creating multiple sources of income until x. Xp realty the multiple sources of income to create were really difficult for example buying rental properties. And having those rental properties paid off and it was a slow path dude gut creating passive income and. that's the reason. Why delete bell. Frankly when i finally had it clicked in my head two years ago when an opportunity. xp royalties for agents. I couldn't say no because it just made sense. You can sell houses like you've always been selling houses in drew the transactions people you'll sponsor agency you can create revenue share that way. But even if you never sponsor a recruited agent you still will make probably more money than you're making now because the commission splits but in addition to that you're gonna have the benefit of the stock. The you're going to be awarded and there's monkey business stock like some other. People are trying to basically pedal to agents. This is real stock traded on nasdaq. It started last year. I think at six eight bucks and think the high point last year was by last jeremy. Twenty twenty was over eighty dollars. That's how these i mean. Call that she made like three hundred and fifty grand off the stock that she didn't by any of now. And i wanted to pause for second. Because i have had some agents say. Hey i'm not really familiar with stock at all. I've never even bought a stock. What does it mean to be awarded. It literally means it's given to you. You didn't check for that. You know and you can buy it at a discount with your closings as well if you choose to issues dishes and chuck wasn't doing that but call it was. Yeah yeah so. You have lots of different opportunities. And i think that you know. I do feel strongly that if we didn't talk about he explained. I know people like. Oh god they're talking about espn someone's spiral feedback thing on i tunes right. But our responsibility as your podcast. Host as your coaches are future coaches is to expose you to this because if we knew about it and we didn't i mean how moronic is that we we would just be so out of roddick for us. Not you guys right. We would be out of integrity because we teach you to have multiple spokes of income and this is one of the least painful ways to make that. And that's why we make. The comparisons rental properties are just saving your ten percents or whatever so i think you're unaccountable If you look at this all right so moving forward. Here's what we're going to be talking about moving back towards the real estate predictions for twenty twenty one. I want you guys to open your mind so by the way. If you want to talk me directly. Yes obviously julian are involved in the xp and yes julie and i would love to sponsor you at xp and yes. We'd love to have a direct conversation with you about that. Just text me directly at five one. Two seven five eight zero two zero six five one two seven five eight zero two zero six. So if you're ready to join xp texts me at five one two seven five eight zero two zero six all right mrs harris. Yes okay so moving it back into our predictions. I think the next one which is number nine get caught up if you missed the previous two. Podcasts is related. Again to something you and jean. We're talking about the untethered. Real estate agent covid finally ended the conversation about brick and mortar real estate offices. The reality is that a productive agent rarely actually goes into their office. I mean you guys wanted about four or five months. Not even being allowed to go to your office. Everything can be done online. You now know that clearly with far more efficiency and massive cost savings consumers. Don't care if you have a physical office. They never wanted to go there anyway. Agents soon won't care if there's no physical real estate office. Anyone miss going to blockbuster to rent a movie. I think that's a great analogy. But i think that covert really moved that conversation forward and now agents are more confident and more clear that it's okay. So here's where the reason. I wrote this point. So i was thinking about brokers mostly and i was thinking because we get lots of brokers that are basically wanting to hire basic to help them scale up their brooklyn and we used to do that and nowadays if someone calls us up one of my email right now. The wants to have that very conversation. I talk him out of it. Because i've had so many conversations with so many brokers have come to us after they've had their brokerages in business for a long time and a lot of these people are really smart knocked. October neural and the prophet out of a traditional broker. Just terrible it's less than three percent and people don't know that they have romantic notions of what it'd be like to be a brokerage they don't understand the financial ramifications of it. The the old joke about this is a joke from my before iron real estate. But it's so true now archery now being a broker just makes you broker. And so when. I was writing that point. Point number nine i was thinking in terms of all the brokers and agents out there. They're thinking opening up space and praying. The why are you doing it. Is it because it's some sort of like social experiment or are you doing it for some sort of creative endeavor or you're doing it to help people make money ego. That's kind of what i'm saying and if it were if it's you know if you're willing to come to terms with it's not for financial reasons then you better think you better check in with future self rate your future version of you so the you and three to five years looking back to you now about opening up a brokerage and say financially. Your situation has not changed for the better into the future. is that future. Version yourself kindly of the current version of yourself starting to basically take this little ego quest probably not and if your goal is to have a large real estate team or whatnot do it under xp realty and have none of the expenses and have multiple streams of income that are created for you along the way you selling houses and helping people. That's the beauty of what glenn created so just keep these things in mind you do get all the freedom that you would running your own show anyway. You know we do baggage that goes with absolutely do and remember if you have an existing brokerage. It's tim and julie harris real estate brokerage or whatever you can just keep your name the same and you then basically will have it be brokered by esp your existing name existing logo your legacy brand whatever the heck. It is your team. Name your team logo. It doesn't change it. Stays the same. Your colors stay the same your sign. If you choose to have say the same it just needs to say brokered by the xp state laws obviously will overrule any of those types of things. Like we're jillian. I sold real estate in ohio. There were restrictive laws with regards to prominence so accordingly. But if you're out in california you can have your sign. Marketing and whatnot look like you went. Whatever you want to. You can have the brokerage name really small every state's different all right. Mrs harris point number ten number ten. Xp will continue its historic rise unabated we predict xp royalty will expand to over twelve new countries and have well over one hundred thousand agents by the end of two thousand twenty one the x. p. story truly starts in twenty twenty one e. Xp will be the real estate. That zillow has become in other words. People are in use the name zillow as a replacement for the world real word real estate expect the same for xp yes so and that's kind of an interesting phenomenon. That happened was though i didn't think about. I read that and it is true people when searching for a home won't say i'm going to search for home i'm going to google. They don't certainly say i'm going to go. Roller dot com. They say i'm gonna zoa. So zillow is become almost like an adjective. It's become all kinds of you. Guys get how it's changed. That's something that zoe's been able to do since two thousand and seven and two thousand eight that's exceptional the same thing that's going to happen with. Xp realty with regards to the vernacular that agents and brokerages us. It's going to spread that fast and be that powerful if the train has already left the station the old legacy brokerage brokerages especially the bricks and mortar ones especially the franchise models. Those guys are going to have to start pivoting towards a model like xp because agents are obviously embracing it new agents middle of the road agents and certainly agents in different countries and my prediction that they're opening twelve new countries. That's an addition to the eight countries. France india canada portugal. No i don't think they're actually opened there yet. Mexico mexic- mexico just opened in mexico late last year. And i know people are going to tell me that our countries are opening. don't forget they also have opened commercial. That's some yeah. Yeah and all right so point number. Where are we eleven. Yes okay. Point number eleven. Xp will create a zillow and roller dot com. Rivaling search portal. I think this is super exciting. Because expertise puerto will be designed around giving the consumer content that they want versus overt and often confusingly generation. Who's the listing agent for example. Right i mean. I get that question on peace premier all the time when somebody says are you. The listing agent. And i'm not what's the script overcome i want. But don't you think that just a neatly towing agents to basically be unethical way. Play all those the prophet models of those websites where essentially predicated on basically abating and switching of the consumer taking him from base. When you and i searched for properties we only want to deal with the listing agent because the assumption is the listing agent knows the property better than anybody else would one would hope and it is really hard especially using zillow to find out who the listing agent is. Yes i mean when we bought our house north carolina at least fifty percent of our time when we were doing our search was trying to figure out who we're supposed to call who actually knows the property so not so the xp portal xp the. Let's see where i'm coining. I don't know the names going to be. But i'm coining x. P. home you know who knows what the name will actually be but e xp home. We'll make it clear who the listing agent is won't create a site for the sole intention of selling byerly. It's it's going to be a different approach to national search portal. That is going to put consumer. And i know everyone says this. But no one really. Does it know if you guys ever noticed this. Like zillow alexa. Talk about how they created. This sort of consumer centric experience haberdasher. That's how true that is right at the end of the day. What did they try to create again. A nice consumer trap where they're trying to generate leads to sell back to agents and now that they're in the brokerage business now that zillow brokerage zoa will be opening up a brokerage and they are right now across the country. Are you guys still gonna pile on your cash to basically support your competitor. Are you really going to do that. I mean have you thought about the insanity of it all of it. Now when you're with the exceed. Xp they bought company that has a national search as already a national search portal. And then if you look to see how frankly glenn and his team implement a big ideas you know. They bought success magazine and they're acquiring other assets like that their vision for xp reality is that it's going to sue sir pass certainly zillow and it's going to do it with the idea that they're not going to do abating and switching type site agents with list things that are. Xp agents are obviously going to you know essentially have a uninsured vange in the future marketplace. And that's true for all agents right. The future definitely is going to be held by listing agents and not buyer's agents then again. I know that offense some of you. But we're going to get to that point number twelve but for now. Just remember what. I'm telling you is creating its national search portal. It's not an idea that is going to be on something they're going to do in the next ten years They already have got the technology in place. I suspect they're going to be launching this national national search portal sometime this year. It's not going to be just like a brokerage site it's like most brokers have with idex speed. This is going to be a site designed from day. One to essentially take the best. Usp's from zillow and from realtor dot com and essentially redo it and so that it's something that consumers prefer to use and it's going to be free. I would imagine i'm not. I'm just guessing. It's going to be free for x. P. agents so that's something you've got to keep in mind those of you that are spending money on generating leads off paid lead generation off the portals. Julius going to premier coaching so those are in the premier coaching program. Which is most of you make. Sure juliette the other door. Make sure that you attend. julie's lives. Coaching sessions owned by the way we are moving to facebook. Live for the premiere. Coaching sessions starting next monday. I know we've been promising that for a year and the reason we haven't done it for the lamest of reasons are activity here in puerto. Rico is not the most reliable but we've got it fixed so we are moving to live facebook mirror coaching sessions. Which means all of you will. Essentially that are in premier. Who are in part of the private facebook group. We'll be notified when the session starts. And you can you know using your mobile or obviously your desktop. Not you can than jump on. And you know there's julie there are other coaches that. Are there answering your questions. And then we're going to further expand the services we provide for you. We know that this year is going to present a lot of challenges that many of you have an experienced before and on. It's not challenges on the downsides challenges on the upside in order for you to embrace them. You're gonna have to move fast. In some cases. I know this is true. Your brokers and office managers aren't going to know how to help you with the challenges. You're going to face. Chances are we can cause an by we. I mean our entire organization. We've all been in the real estate industry without about. I think what thirty people that work for us. And we have coaches that have been selling real estate for longer than jillian. I so we definitely have the experience to back you up so that you can essentially had your best year ever and as we've been saying we said this on the actually said to previous predictions podcast. It's been three. This is number four. The the reality of it is is that the market now in overall market conditions for you are going to create a runway of probably at least three years but as many as five years of unbelievable opportunity like the best opportunity in real estate search. Certainly since julie. And i have been in the industry and again we talked about this yesterday. We'll talk about this more a little bit tomorrow but really the takeaway is you are in the right place at the right time now. It's urgently important that you take the right. Actions reflect back on that interview. I did with jean frederic. I love the fact that so many guys enjoyed that by the way one of our most listened to podcasts. Which tells me that we hit the nail on the head. And i really appreciate the fact that he was really transparent and honest about you know essentially deciding to restart not at destitute or hardship but restarting. Because he wanted to get back in alignment with the thing that made him feel most alive which is being of service to agents. And that's certainly how we feel. And i think that's how you feel with regards to your real estate clients but in the interim you've got to be taking care of yourself financially remember. Put your mask on. I don't be fooled into thinking that. Don't do this for awards recognition as an owner business. You are business owners your entrepreneurs do your your sell real estate real estate entrepreneur. But you've got to remember. You've got to be putting your own mask on first financially. The easiest way i've seen to do that is to align with the xp because they're by. No glenn. sanford said this best actually. I don't remember exact quote but the gist of it was is he created. Xp royalty with the idea that most agents will never be able to have a retirement. Most ages will never be able to save so he put a system in place. That if you just do what you're doing now you're going to have far more financial security than you otherwise would have had you put your attention towards the stock your attention towards agent attraction andrew state. Then you're going to create a completely different financial trajectory something. You could never frankly even imagined for yourself. That's what jean did so. Make sure you listen to podcasts. Available and i tuned stitcher spotify everywhere. You could possibly find a podcast. Our podcast is there. It's called real estate coaching radio. If you want to google search for it you'll find it on on all the different syndication sites in the interim if you guys wanna talk to me about johnny. Xp royalty yes. We want to sponsor you. Yes julie and i wanted to be part of our xp realty group text me directly at five one two seven five eight zero two zero six five one two seven five eight zero two zero six in the meantime if you guys would like to give us any shows show. Suggestions are areas to improve. We do thank you for your feedback and we are always looking for ways to improve the services we provide to you if you have again. I really am interested in any show. Ideas you guys have any topics that you think would be right in our house that we are thinking of aren't covering to your satisfaction. Please do text me directly those show ideas five one two seven five eight zero two zero six. And if you're a little bit you know upset that i talked about xp realty today. And i know some of you are going to be at always happens. I once you just ask yourself why i mean. Why would you be offended that we're talking about what might be perceived as a competing brokerage. Why why does that bother. You gotta really ask yourself that. And i'm gonna tell you for my perspective. Bothered me to there. It is so two years ago two and a years ago. It bothered me and jill. That's the reason for years and our coaching business. Julie and i were always brokerage agnostic. But then s julie touched on the fact is is that we were out of alignment with really what we claim to be. If we weren't telling you guys about xp realty because we know and i've read you just a couple of my recent tax that the changes it can make in your life financially are far beyond what most agents will ever be able to create without something like this so do the smart thing set-aside your biases set aside. I mean all that. Have an open mind. Take a take a real good look. Xp realty because chances are especially this time of year as you're entering into the year this is going to be one of the smartest things and things will be most thankful for having done by the end of the year and the entry of if you guys want to get hold of me and talk about the xp royalty text me directly at five hundred seven five zero two zero six. And the meantime have a fantastic day. We'll talk with. This program has been a presentation by tim. And julie harris real estate. Coaching for more information on real estate coaching and training programs. Visit our website at tim. And julie harris dot com. Remember to tune in weekdays at noon for upcoming shows until next. I thank you for listening to real estate. Coaching radio with tim and julie harris.

glenn sanford jean jillian dave ramsey julie jean frederic julie harris jean jean jason gassing frederic Julie zillow Juliane comp chessen robin gordon
8-18-20 What's News

The Nicole Sandler Show

07:47 min | 10 months ago

8-18-20 What's News

"It's time for New Coal Sandler's what's news from Nicole Sandler Dot Com and the progressive voices network and Monday night the. Kicked off the first night of the first, ever almost entirely virtual democratic national convention themed. We the people the opening night focused on the United States response to the covid nineteen pandemic access to mail in Voting Racial Justice Antonin for unity. We are certainly in uncharted territory here, and the reaction is on social media was definitely mixed I was surprised to read many comments from people saying this type of presentation as opposed to the pact Arena party atmosphere was exactly the correct tone to strike during these very strange days. My ears perked up strains of Bruce. SPRINGSTEEN's the rising, which he recorded as an anthem of strength rebuilding and perseverance following nine eleven. The old story goes that he was driving a New Jersey after the towers came down a fan noticed him loudly and clearly said, bruce we need you now. Own. The video that went along with the song was full of powerful imagery of the horrible hits. We've endured as a nation under this administration with a definite nod toward a much better future once we all rise up. In her keynote speech former first lady Michelle Obama said that trump had left the strong economy he inherited from former President Barack Obama. In shambles and emboldened torch bearing white supremacists with his divisive rhetoric led me be as honest and clear as I possibly can donald trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head he cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is. Michelle Obama said Americans. Quote must vote for Joe Biden like our lives depend on it a theme that carried throughout the night. Senator Bernie Sanders said exactly what he needed to say to his millions of supporters my friends I say to you. To everyone who supported other candidates in the primary and to those who may have voted for Donald Trump. In the last election, the future our democracy is at stake. The future of our economy is at stake. The future of our planet is at stake we must come together the. Donald Trump and elect Joe Biden. And Kamala Harris as our next president and vice president my friends the price of failure is just too great to imagine sanders added that while he and Biden have fundamental disagreements on how to Change Policies Biden is the right candidate for this moment. So what's on tap for Tuesday night day to well although I have no idea how they'll do it. It's the roll call of states to formally nominate. Joe. Biden for the Democratic Bid for the presidency speakers Tuesday night include former president. Bill Clinton Future First Lady Dr Jill Biden Former Secretary of state. John. Kerry and Congresswoman Alexandria accosts cortes who will likely pack a huge punch into the sixty seconds she's been allotted. In other news. Tuesday August eighteenth twenty twenty or the one hundredth anniversary of the ratification of the nineteenth amendment when women officially won the right to vote. A long way baby it's also primary day here in Florida. So now more than a dozen states have stepped up in planned to sue the trump administration as early as this week over cutbacks of the US Postal Service that could delay mail in voting in November. This according to Maryland's Attorney General Brian Frosh Frostad that fifteen to twenty democratic attorneys general are reviewing legal arguments under consideration in one or more lawsuits. Trump said last week that he opposes agreeing to Democrats demand for postal service funding in corona virus relief package because he said they wanted to pay for universal mail in voting trump denied his position amounted to election tampering and voter. Disenfranchisement Fox News quote new were tampering. WE WANNA make it run for less money much better always taking care of our postal workers thankfully, Nancy Pelosi appears to have heard our outrage in called the house back from recess postmaster general. Louis Joy has agreed to testify before the House oversight and Reform Committee this coming Monday August twenty fourth two joy who trump appointed in May is a top republican donor who was reportedly given more than two million dollars to the trump campaign. The trump administration on Monday finalized its plan to let energy companies drill for oil and gas in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge the government is paving the way to issue. As long leases in the Pristine Wilderness area before the end of trump's term, the energy industry and Alaska. Governor Michael Dunleavy. Said allowing drilling in the refuge will create jobs and benefit the economy of state dependent on the industry. Environmental Organization slammed the plan as a gift to oil companies that would devastate the unique ecosystem and harm native people. Interior. Secretary David Bernhardt said the government could start selling oil and gas leases by the end of the year and production in Anwar could start in eight years. and. Thankfully, US District Judge Frederic Block on Monday rejected a trump administration push to roll back protections for transgender patients against discrimination by health care providers and health insurance companies blocks at a rule due to take effect on Tuesday that was finalized by the Department of Health and Human Services Office for civil rights in June appear to be incompatible with a subsequent. Supreme Court ruling that says employers cannot discriminate against transgender people. Judge Block wrote quote when the Supreme Court announces a major decision, it seems a sensible thing to pause and reflect on the decision's impact since health and Human Services has been unwilling to take that path voluntarily the court now imposes it. A spokesperson for health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights said the agency was disappointed in the judge's decision. And that's just a bit of what's news for now on the coal sampler if you're appreciate these reports and the Nicole Sandler show I hope you'll consider making a contribution. My work is one hundred percent listener supported and I can't do it without your help find out more Nicole sampler dot com, and click on that donate button.

Donald Trump Joe Biden president United States Nicole Sandler Michelle Obama Senator Bernie Sanders New Coal Sandler Bruce Judge Frederic Block Dr Jill Biden health and Human Services Offi Barack Obama Supreme Court SPRINGSTEEN New Jersey Secretary David Bernhardt Fox News