29 Burst results for "Freddie Gray"

The Case for Police Abolition

The Nod

05:29 min | 3 weeks ago

The Case for Police Abolition

"At. The time of this recording one thousand seventeen people in the US have been shot and killed by police this past year, and as the numbers continue to grow. It's got meany questioning why we're even need cops in the first place, but the question of polishing the police also makes a lot of people nervous so today we're going straight to the source in talking to an actual abolitionist. Bill Fina Y'all on. It's an important conversation that you don't want to miss. This is the nod. We've heard it all before. Give Cops Body Cams hold them accountable, cautious need diversity and bias training. We need community policing black police. We need Brown police, but as the years roll by an efforts at reform are showing no signs of stopping the brutal violence against black people in this country, a different call gaining traction is the call to abolish the prison industrial complex, which is made up of prisons, policing and surveillance all forms contrary to what a lot of. Of people believe this isn't a new school. Of Thought, it's been around since the eighties, and it's been embraced by people all over the world. Much of what we know about it. Today has been studied practice and built upon three black women. We have to mention Angela Davis Ruth Wilson, Gilmore and Mariam Kaba Today. We're joined by bill. Fina Y'all want a Baltimore based restorative justice practitioner. Who writes about abolition and how to practice it in our community? It'll pheno. Thank, you so much for being here today. It's awesome. Have you thank you? Thank you for having me so abolition. Is Abolition essentially what we talk about admission we're saying is that a world cannot just without the physical presence of police in prisons, but a world where we all have, our needs met in a way that we do not have to commit the crimes that laid us in prison, and with policing right, and so abolition forces us to complete your frame how we think about the concept of prisons and lease, and to be honest about the history of it prisons. Prisons were created as an alternative to slavery. It says so and the thirteen th amendment, and so when we look if that that violence and genocide history of policing prisons, abolition says it's not possible for us to have world rabies dynamics exist so I'm sure we've all seen a lot of the back and forth in the media, and even just an online conversations about what's reformist versus what is abolitionist. What sorts of things are absolutely out of the question or Believed that we can have rover prisons and policing exist. We just have to make it better. And abolitionist believed that is not possible behalf to completely get rid of it and create new systems and structures. How did you come to fruition? Personally had become part of your life identified. The woman is came to woman is during college was definitely my sophomore. Year of college and I thought begins to stand what it means to exist as A. A black woman in this world I understood this system is structured. That are against US I think a lot of people don't understand that the reform to slavery with prisons. The reform to slave catchers was police, and so when you have stopped with that truth as a woman as as a former refugee as an immigrant to this country will hold, I, experience, it was not possible for me to say I love blackness and not become an abolitionist. Something else. That's near and dear to your heart, and also the work that you do is the story of Keith Davis Junior talked to us a little bit about Keith and his story so keep Davis Junior. Is a twenty eight year old black man for Baltimore, who was shot at? Times by the Baltimore Police Department in June of Twenty fifteen. He's being accused and they're saying that it gun was founded in Keith was connected to a murder. In March he was sentenced to fifty years, and after five years in five rows, Amish. It's been an ongoing case that five years WWLTV's dedicated to. Always bring her into the space. Kelly Davis has four beautiful children and Khloe Amari and Jaden and his case is so connected to what was happening in Baltimore after Twenty fifteen after the murder of Freddie Gray talk to me a bit about how keeps life and story relates specifically to your Abolition Work Keith case is connected to abolition one, if forces us to see kids humanity beyond what he did as a child chief, interaction with the criminal justice system started very early, and what we know is that it was a result of all of the conditions that came with Keith birth his stories parents. Parents his poverty, and so forth, and so as a result of that chief found himself funneled into a system. That once you've been in there. It's easier to keep coming back. If Selah commits a crime, we have to ask ourselves if the necessities of somebody is not being met, and instead were thrown them in a cage cage is actually more violent and transformed into a even more violent person with Keith case what we've seen has been a blatant disregard for any kind of laws, any kind of good faith and what we saw for the past five years is lies and lies and lies and confirms. That meet cannot possibly rehabilitate a system that has no

Keith Davis Bill Fina Baltimore United States Baltimore Police Department Angela Davis Ruth Wilson Kelly Davis Murder Brown Selah Davis Freddie Gray Mariam Kaba Wwltv Khloe Amari Jaden Gilmore
Washington D.C. Protests Continue Over The Death Of George Floyd

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:45 min | 2 months ago

Washington D.C. Protests Continue Over The Death Of George Floyd

"Demonstrations are taking place across America this weekend protesters are chanting the name of George Floyd and the names of others who have died at the hands of police Eric garner Tamir rice Freddie gray and Brianna Taylor who would have celebrated her twenty seventh birthday yesterday she was shot and killed by police insider Louisville home this mark it will be heard those chants outside the White House last night she's with us this morning that a thanks for being with us it's my pleasure these protests have been going on for well over a week what did you see last night well when I got there it yesterday evening it was incredibly wet the rain was super intense I probably dissuaded everyone but the most hardcore protesters that said there are still hundreds of people very soggy people outside the White House I talked to a group of women pediatricians who come from all over the United States to offer first aid to protesters and a young man who just walked up and started spray painting a building right next to me right yeah that's right he was kind enough to introduce himself and described his work I go by resist V. as an on Instagram this is that how I protest this is the DC flag upside down he was painting an upside down flag of the district of Columbia that is correct and I asked resist because then that what he'd say to anyone who might confront him about the destruction of property he says he only tags boarded up buildings which honestly describes most of the buildings in downtown DC right now I specifically had only ply wood because I know that it's going to be gone and yeah I just want people to ask questions and I want people to like think and see like what does it mean Kerstetter there was it what I'll call from state sanctioned painting yesterday his well the DC government paid for a giant mural right there on sixteenth street near the White House that reads black lives matter right basically the words black lives matter are painted in giant yellow lettering on the street instructions for about two blocks this is a real statement from DC mayor Muriel Bowser has officially named this entire area out black lives matter plaza it's very eye catching and I met a young woman taking selfie of front of it Erica DSS she lost a friend police brutality if you got a radically passionate as we talked and warning also explicit her language about the movement happening right now you know it starts with black lives matter because it's so blue eight and the disrespect and it's just like stop it just needs to stop in as a people will come together will become strong were enlightened world wake and it's just the most beautiful thing I've ever seen in life in there was no way in hell I was going to sit at home when I could bring my here is Greenwood give my last breath I'd rather die on the streets but for my children at home got the one my couch and it sounds like Erica D. as is is going to be back out on the streets today along with many as a hundred thousand other people here in Washington DC that estimate comes from the city's fire chief and of course our protest taking place all over the country every place from Akron Ohio to Sacramento California Garden City Kansas scores of cities all over the country what are you hearing about the deployment of law enforcement that's been interesting here in Washington DC more than a thousand active duty soldiers who are on standby near the city were ordered home last night according to army secretary Ryan McCarthy these days there has been very clear about asking the president to remove all extraordinary federal law enforcement from DC he says this he knows how to have a large demonstrations she says all the extra military that was out there was messing with the chain of command and she says it's been confusing have officers out on the streets that black insignia last night I saw almost no police officers maybe that was because of the rain maybe it's because the protests have been extremely peaceful there was just not a significant presence of people in uniform unlike the other times and never will be thanks so

America George Floyd
A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Short Wave

05:54 min | 2 months ago

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

"Family of Kentucky Woman, shot and killed by police is demanding answers. The former, his son both white are accused of killing the unarmed black man again with the breaking news for Minneapolis violent protests raged for a second straight night, following the death of George Floyd after being arrested by a Minneapolis police officer last night, protesters turned their attention to the city's. The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news stories about police killing black people. And what is sick is that these stories have become the kind of news that we in the business call evergreen their stories that are always relevant and always in season, these calamities are so familiar. This point they're details have begun to echo each other July. Twenty fourteen, a cell phone video captured some of Eric Garner's final words as New York City Police officers sat on his head and pinned him to the ground on a city sidewalk. I can't breathe. Or May twenty fifth of this year those same words were spoken by George Floyd. Just before he died, he pleaded for release, as an officer kneeled on his neck in pins of the ground on a Minneapolis City Street, so we're at the point with verbiage, people used to plead for their lives can be re purposed as shorthand for completely different stories and part of our job here coast, which is to conceptualize and make sense of news like this. But genus is hard to come up with something new to say you know things we haven't already said or things we have already recorded protesters saying when we were both in Ferguson in August of twenty fourteen after Michael. Brown was killed by the police or when we were in Baltimore after Freddie Gray's death. I spent the day with junior. High school kids in West. Baltimore where Freddie Gray was from on the first day. Let kids return to school after all the protests and I will never forget the eighth grade boy who raised his hand to ask. Why have white people been killing us in slavery and they're still killing us. He said that on Wednesday April Twenty Ninth Twenty fifteen. Since it's so hard to come up with any fresh insights about this phenomenon. We thought we would look back to another time. When the nation turned collective attention to this perpetual problem. Jamile Smith Senior Writer for Rolling Stone magazine. In when I was at the new republic. wrote an article entitled. What does seeing black men die? Do for you. It was published on April Thirteenth Two Thousand Fifteen. We get to see black men tortured or killed by police a lot more often these days. So, it's worth recalling why a generation ago. It mattered so much to see what happened to Rodney King. Now the story that might never have surfaced if someone hadn't picked up his home video camera. We've all seen. We have certainly seen the black and white photographs and videos depicting police abuse of African Americans. And we'd seen the grainy images of lynchings passed. But the conventional ignorance was that this wasn't the America. We lived in now. Officers beating a man they had just pulled over. This was the early nineties after all. This was in America that viewed law enforcement in the context of the popular reality, show cops, and were Morton Downey Junior tabloid television style made uncensored aggression a form of entertainment. But when George Holidays video surface chuck him with batons of between fifty three and fifty six times signal to a lot of citizens, just how bad police violence visited upon marginalized communities, actually was six kicks and one officer one kick people either didn't know what was happening. or willfully ignorant of it. They needed to wake up. Say The Los. Angeles Police Department has a history of brutality and misconduct that goes back a quarter of a century day. We are not sure that the police is there to protect us. The fear of becoming the next Rodney King is still here. But what has changed is how often we are viewing that fear being realized. Jamal goes on to write that the ubiquity of cell phone cameras and dashboard cameras means this uncensored horror has become available on demand. He says he watched twenty two year old Oscar grant get shot and killed by a police officer on Youtube before it made it to broadcast news. That happened in Oakland in two thousand, nine on New Year's Day. And it really marked the beginning of this grim genre, in which the slain become memorialized as Hashtags Hashtag justice for Oscar grant and remember Walters Gun Eric Harris, Jomo rights videos of them, being killed became public almost back to back in two thousand fifteen. Both men were running away when the shots were fired. Walter Scott Fifty was trying to escape North Charleston police officer Michael slager. Who Shot him eight times in the back? Before planning evidence near his body to support a false account of the incident. Eric Harris was running from a team of Tulsa County deputies when Elderly Insurance Executive Robert Bates. WHO's donations to the SHERIFF'S OFFICE IN MODICUM? Training earned him the title of Reserve Deputy. Shot him dead.

Officer Rodney King George Floyd Minneapolis Michael Slager Angeles Police Department Eric Garner America New York City Freddie Gray Kentucky White Walter Scott Fifty Baltimore Rolling Stone Magazine Eric Harris Oscar Ferguson Morton Downey Sheriff's Office
"freddie gray" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:06 min | 2 months ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Held no down to be responsible for this, because that was oftentimes the history of what up happening, where even if you look at a look at just the twenty four months before, Freddie Gray there was tyrone west and there was Chris. Brown and there was Anthony Anderson. So you had names of people where you saw this long line of people who had similar situations as Freddie on arms, or or people who you know where where the what happened to them was nowhere near equal the threat. That was posed. That gone themselves dying in police custody. and. Nobody was convicted for those prime. Dole's indicted for those crimes. There were some financial payout, but that was it and so I. Think for many people in Baltimore. They just assumed that was going to be the case with Freddie Gray. And so when the attorney actually announced charges against the officers. It didn't just it didn't just no I think take a lot of air out of the protests and back made approaches that were plan for the next day. We're exit canceled after those charges were filed. I think for many Baltimoreans. There was this sense of hope that that you're could be as level of accountability. Board improper. Police action. Now we know fast forward is as you mentioned earlier. There were no convictions for for any of the officers on that, but I do think that that moment that time when she announced those charges, something changed in Baltimore, and and hope for measure of accountability for improper police action. I think really feel the air and a sense that people hear us being heard. That's exactly right. Is that what we're screaming out? Is Not just simply going to be dismissed as hyperbole or exaggeration, where where oftentimes the is when people hear about levels of misconduct or or or improper engine rations with with law enforcement, the first immediate reaction is is to the person is say well. What did you do? Or what are how did you provoke it? or where there's there's a there's a a a a blaming of the individual that oftentimes take place, or in in in other cases that we've seen as well, there is the well let's now. We want to learn about their back story, or no, did they have? Do they have something in their system or whatever the case is, and we see this repeatedly especially when it comes to cases of of a of a of a policing and policing challenges in our society, and so when those charges were announced. It was, it was very much a case where I think for many of the protesters, maybe the People Baltimore. It was very much a feeling of. We're seeing and we're heard and we're not being dismissed, and these aren't just being played all exaggerations. Let, me reintroduce you here if you're just joining us. My guest is West more his new book. Five days is about Freddie Gray whose neck was broken in police custody and died a week later. The book is about the five.

Freddie Gray Baltimoreans Dole Anthony Anderson Chris Brown attorney West
"freddie gray" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:45 min | 2 months ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Another man made contact with police and then a few minutes later, he was caught and arrested at the seventeen hundred block of Prestbury street over in West Baltimore. And a few minutes later he abandons requested. He was put into leg irons in place into the back of the van an hour after he was placed in the back of that Van after hearing calls for patient care He was then sent to shot trauma at the University of Maryland, medical, center and was actually. They found that that he was in a coma. A day later he went he under underwent a double surgery at shock trauma, and determined that he had three broken vertebrae and an injured voice box. All from that arrest days later he remained in a coma and on April nineteenth, two, thousand, fifteen at seven o'clock in the morning, he was declared dead. Why was he taken into custody? He was taken into custody because after making eye contact with police, he ran and and when the police chased him, and and usually some people might say will what's. Making eye contact the crime well, actually at that time, making contact with the police was enough of a justification for the police to chase you the police chase him on now on an on him. They found what they were they were. They found be a according to the legal legal pocket knife of because it was larger than even the this sort of allowable size when they actually caught him patent and searched him, but that's why he was arrested because he made eye contact with the police in read. After his death. What were the protests like in Baltimore? You know the protests were actually were peaceful in Baltimore. Initially I think once word began to spread. That that Freddie Gray I was in a coma but then specifically once word spread that he had died. There were protests where you saw thousands of people marching the streets, in Baltimore, but again really all peaceful protests. And never really took a different type of time. The only the first time that you saw a different type of turned, the protests was actually. On a Saturday evening, and that was a few days before his actual. And on bad one you saw where some of the protests turned into there were violent directions between some of the protesters, and then also some of the people who were who were outside of Oriole. Stadium, or Parker Baseball. Game was being played at that time was the Baltimore, Orioles replacing the the Boston the Boston. Red Sox and actually during that game, the game was finishing up the protests for taking place outside the stadium, and and the people inside the stadium were asked to stay in the stadium just because they wanted to be able to clear the streets before everyone flooded out the stadium to go back to their cars back to their. the only other the second time that we really saw violence erupts in very serious violence that was really documented all over all over the world was the Monday, and that was the evening of Freddie Gray's funeral. where, even on that day you know the family asked for peace in astronaut protesting that day, because that was a day that they were gonNA late Freddie. Not late Freddie to rest But that was really the night that everything's sparked off and what happened then. What happened then was was a few hours after the funeral ended their start up to be a confrontation between it really start off between police and students, where where one of the larger high schools in West Baltimore School called off Frederick Douglass in Douglas High School right across.

Van Baltimore Freddie Gray coma West Baltimore School University of Maryland Frederick Douglass Baseball Red Sox Boston Oriole Douglas High School Orioles
Police can track protesters even after the demonstrations end

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:00 min | 2 months ago

Police can track protesters even after the demonstrations end

"What surveillance tools police departments across the country are using to identify protesters or Lueders in the past week, but we know there are a lot of them from widespread camera. Technology drones to license plate readers, not to mention the facial recognition tool known as clearview AI, which has been used by dozens, if not hundreds of law enforcement agencies. Civil rights activists say these tools can be used to track protests in some cases to keep the peace, but they can also be used to find organizers and even arrest protesters after the fact and there aren't a lot of rules about how they get used Siwa. Hussein is a lawyer for the electronic frontier. Foundation law enforcement has access to things like CICI TV networks gunshot detection. Stingrays more commonly known as cell site. Simulators face recognition possible aerial surveillance, oftentimes law enforcement also has the ability to access private networks like ring to law enforcement agencies. Many times are acquiring these technologies without sort of any sort of public process where the public may not even be aware that they're using it, and because courts haven't necessarily caught up to the. The use of these various technologies, oftentimes, the constitutional protections aren't put in place either. We've heard a lot of reporting about clearview specifically. How much to your knowledge is that in use now? We're talking about face recognition. We know that it is proliferating across the country that there are many law enforcement agencies that already have the in us and we know that. The whole clearview Stan scandal came to light that some law enforcement agencies decided to stop their partnership, but others haven't. clearview is the subject of active litigation. Some law enforcement agencies continue to partner with them in the context of protest. How are these tools used sort of before during and after so in the moment there are technologies being used things like cell site simulators as well that can then identify where the locations of these of these devices are individuals who? Who posted on facebook or twitter were identified after the fact. Baltimore is one of the most prevalent examples that we have seen where we actually know that that law enforcement uses tool called Gio Fida which looked at public feeds for social media to try to identify people's locations during the Twenty fifteen protests in Baltimore to protest the death of Freddie Gray and many people were arrested on on completely unrelated charges because they were in the vicinity of the protests Sort of mass surveillance in that form, is incredibly problematic, but also knowing that. When we're talking about face recognition, they can always look at the footage of the fact and connect you through. You know the readers that they have the face recognition. I think that it's really important for people to know that we're not just talking about in the moment, but also after the fact that this technology can possibly be used by law enforcement. Sira?

Lueders AI Hussein Cici Tv Sira Baltimore Facebook Gio Fida Stan Partner Twitter Freddie Gray
Our Nation is Burning

Black Girl Nerds

06:18 min | 2 months ago

Our Nation is Burning

"My name is Jamie and I'm host. And I'm here with my co-host Ryan. Say Hello to our audience Ryan Lou everybody. I can't say the way ANJELICA, says it, but hey I'm trying to master too, and it just didn't work. You know just. A So this episode is a little different. It's not going to be as peppy as are other episodes where we talk about. Geeky pop culture staff. 'cause we hear black girl nerds always liked to talk about things that are relevant in the news, and really that's relevant in popular culture and right now it's very relevant is what's happening in America, and that's these recent protests that. are happening really all over the nation. It started in Minnesota surrounding the events that happen to Oh my goodness George Floyd. Yeah a lot of names. Yes, a just like pollen on twitter. It's gotta get straight yeah. Thank you, thank you for for helping me with that. One surrounding the events of the death of George Floyd and then these protests have expanded to several cities donation in New York. people have gone to our nation's capital in DC. really going straight to the White House quite frankly Los Angeles. Atlanta, which we'll talk about that. CNN was vandalized on national television storming the front doors of of that building, so it's been a very Very interesting weekend. To put it mildly We were here to really to talk about that to unpack it to also unpacked the history of why this all occurred. Because even though a lot of people are talking about words like riots and looting and wives, all of these things happening, or you know kind of talking about the actions behind. These events were not really talking about why people feel the need to do what they're doing. And again it has to do with the deaths of people like George Floyd also a Aubrey Brown. Wailer and and so many people even before them which unfortunately? Oh my God. You can't even name them all I. Mean it goes back to names like Eric Garner, Freddie Gray. Allow. It's just like people you don't even. You. Would that happen because you know, there's just certain ones. Unfortunately that are going to get the media attention, but there's just so many like the scare me. I was like I have to back away from Google for minute 'cause there's this is such a long Liz. It's such a long list. Exactly I mean and again think about the names of people even before social media yet where? The benefit of twitter. They didn't have the benefit of facebook to get the amplification or even to get there. I mean God to be able to have their execution filmed on a camera phone to to get their story out there No, no, you know, they will never get to hear about their stories. But there there's certainly a longlist of black men and women and children children yet. Who who have. been killed You know by hit by gunfire through state-sanctioned. Murders. By police officers, so yeah, we're. We're going to talk about that in this episode. It's a you know. Trigger warning for anybody WHO's been a victim of. Gun Violence Um who've been a victim of police brutality This is going to be a pretty heavy episode. We will try to Kinda. Talk about some moments of levity with. The F. of of twitter, and some of the crazy things that celebrities who had said you know to kind of balance things out, but also we really do want to respect the seriousness of this conversation, so I just want to give that trigger warning before we start. So let's dive into this Joey Yeah. Let's do it. So. Where do we even begin with this conversation? I just go with like how are feeling like so what like you know waking up this warning like the past week? Just like because I know a lot of people are I. Guess they're doing it by posting. You know whatever randomly comes with him on twitter and Instagram 'cause you know with some of US still at Kinda streak. Stay at home orders. Sometimes. You can't really go where you WANNA go or get out a little bit. So that's kind of how there vending so just like I. Guess just a simple. How you filling in just your your thoughts off the top about how you've been dealing with it. So the way I'm dealing with it as I'm avoiding emerging myself too deeply into social media, which for a while now I would say probably for the last couple of years to be quite honest with you I've not gotten to connected with social media and. you know especially now with what's going on because when I look at my time line whether it's twitter or facebook. Yeah, everything talking about this not look yeah. I've not looked at the full video. I felt like I had to look at it for four and a half hours, and it was the most miserable day. Ever I might not look your. Do not yeah, that's right because you work in television, so I didn't like just look away from it. And I was just like and I, and I repeatedly was dislike. Why are we continue to do this? You know you WANNA. Get the message out there, but I guess for me the thing where it's. Is it necessary to keep showing you know certain parts over and over again

Twitter George Floyd Joey Yeah United States Ryan Lou Facebook Freddie Gray Anjelica Jamie CNN Atlanta America Google Wailer Minnesota Los Angeles Eric Garner White House
ContraPoints with Natalie Wynn

Unladylike

06:30 min | 4 months ago

ContraPoints with Natalie Wynn

"I've always kind of liked YouTube. I like the chaos of it. I don't even mostly watch politics. I watch a lot of makeup videos. I watch cooking videos. I WATCH VIDEOS OF COMPETITIVE EATING. I just I. I like the kind of like the way that it's so. Diy in the way that these personalities that would never make it not not any chance of making it in conventional media to cut millions of followers on Youtube. Natalie is joked that she failed her way into youtube stardom after dabbling as a musician dropping out of philosophy. Phd Program and attempting to make it as a fiction writer. Natalie pivoted to video this was in two thousand fifteen soon after she moved to Baltimore and the same year. The city's black lives matter. Movement rose up in response to police killing Freddie Gray and online gamer gate. Trolling and harassment was in full. Swing watching that situation and the black lives matter movement also just incredibly ignorant response from most people on the Internet. That kind of sparks. I think my early interest in trying to talk about these topics on Youtube especially once I saw that a lot of the politics that was going on youtube was like ignorant at best and like Senator Fascist propaganda at worst no things to the power of algorithms the more videos Natalie watched on youtube about things like feminism racism et Cetera. The more crazy shit she saw and the deeper she got into the radicalized rabbit holes of Youtube. My recommended videos feed on Youtube was suddenly full of these videos. Titles like feminism is cancer. Black lives matter is a racist terrorist organization. You know Like these are the talking points that were sort of growing on Youtube in two thousand fifteen. I knew enough to know that was bad. Natalie decided to launch her own YouTube channel. Contra points as a new wants to entertain encounter to all the right wing propaganda. She was seeing on the Internet and as a way to understand why these movements were bubbling up in the first place. Her first video was on in. Cells Aka involuntary celebrates and it's been watched more than three million times and this video. I don't WanNa mock insoles or lecture them or even sympathize with them. I just want to understand who they are. And why they're like this to start with. Sometimes the over thirty five minutes Natalie. Deconstructs in Selma Sajjan step by step grappling with their ideas and even offering some empathy. And that's the key to our videos and a real part of her success. So in your videos you confront a lot of toxic ideas around things. Like in sells for instance. So what is your goal? And how do you approach? Debunking these arguments while it is anthropological. I guess in some sense that is. I'm making a video to inform like a general public about this unusual online subculture. Most very aware that the people from that subculture are going to watch the video. So I I TRY TO MAKE VIDEO. That has like an escape hatch or like a life. Preserver a rope thrown whatever metaphor. I WANNA use that basically allows someone who's watching videos as an incentive to not feel like I'm simply just antagonizing them but also the at least making the effort to understand where they're coming from but my natural inclination when I'm reading this stuff is to be like. Oh Wow this is like these. People are horrible. Impossible to get along with their credit misogynistic but they're also like really really lonely and unhappy and I can try to make a video that doesn't just caricature them but 'cause that's pointless to me so. I try to give people three dimensions what I'm describing them when I'm describing these toxic online subcultures. Do you get the kinds of comments along the lines of like Yeah I mean Natalie. One's pretty liberal. But she's not like all those other liberals like I feel like that's a common trope among lake. I don't know in my conservative comment culture. Oh definitely like that's not not like other liberals is definitely kind of part of the brands like the one I hear the most actually is people say they don't feel judged by me They don't feel like I got a call from someone who said like I was only like transgender person. Could stand to watch Because I didn't make feel a dirty word during that. They would claim that about myself. But I'm glad they feel that way because that is exactly what I sort of go for. I guess WanNa make the videos. I mean I noticed early on that. If you're gonNA talk about especially the social justice kinds of issues. People are so defensive about it. And if you'RE GONNA get through to them you have to make a lot of rhetorical concessions. That might seem totally unreasonable. Like you just can't say the word transphobia most of the time it's just it's just people hate it. People hate accused of anything phobia. Just shut their brains. Doubted Shits shut their ears down. They stop listening to you and same with like calling calling. People Racist Sexist misogynist. There's a turn the time and a place for life using these words But it's not when you're trying to persuade general audience. In my opinion it just causes people to shut down. I think that's such a interesting in really important point in terms of like making the rhetorical concessions and it comes up a lot even just in terms of like you know questions we get of like. Should I call myself a feminist? Well that'd be to alienate. I mean just like basic is that. Is it more valuable to make some rhetorical concessions? If you are going to get through to a person versus using the kinds of words that will to use a term trigger trigger a lot of like hybrid conservative or like. Red Pill types. Well it's always it's always a give and take it's a question of. I mean you lose something when you make the rhetorical concessions often but for me it's about I guess I tried to start a strategize. I'm writing a script like how I can make rhetorical concessions without making ideological concessions to of my own

Youtube Natalie Baltimore Selma Sajjan Harassment Freddie Gray Writer Senator Shits
Baltimore Nears Record per-Capita Homicide Rate After a Week of Relentless Violence

Phil's Gang

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Baltimore Nears Record per-Capita Homicide Rate After a Week of Relentless Violence

"Charm city can list another dubious distinction Baltimore has broken its per capita homicide record the city reached three hundred forty two killings on Friday bringing the homicide rate to a historical high of about fifty seven per one hundred thousand people Baltimore as just over six hundred thousand residents after years of saying a population accidents the new rate eclipse that of nineteen ninety three when the city had a record three hundred fifty three killings but was much more populous this is the fifth year in a row the Baltimore has reported over three hundred killings before two thousand fifteen that number had generally been on a decline but reversed after civil unrest following the death in police custody of a young black man Freddie gray Keith Peters

Baltimore Keith Peters Freddie Gray
Former Baltimore mayor charged with wire fraud over self-published book deal

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

04:18 min | 9 months ago

Former Baltimore mayor charged with wire fraud over self-published book deal

"Former Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh resigned in disgrace charge now with all Levin counts of fraud and tax evasion because of that old healthy Holly scandal healthy healthy always been anything but healthy for Catherine fused career member that children's book series she wrote about healthy Holly and how to eat vegetables and all of those things it was self published top either so let's copies sold lots of copies because of apparently mayor pues corrupt arrangements region had local charities and organizations with business before the city and the city itself just buying all of her books then either keeping them in warehouses or making purchases that were never even full failed and she pocketed according to prosecutors hundreds of thousands of dollars some of which was applied to her campaign other parts of that money applied to sprucing up her home how nice she wrote a great book and she made money on it but she can spend it as she likes right The New York Times reports that the Catherine Pugh has been indicted on these corruption charges connected to money she received for a series of children's books she wrote from companies that had business ties to the city prosecutor's making this public today I missed you she resigned as mayor back in may amid all of these investigations member the F. B. I. rating her home and these warehouses it's all over that healthy Holly book series she's multiple charges she's facing wire fraud conspiracy to defraud the United States government and tax evasion the healthy Hollister is promoted healthy eating and exercise habits which is nice but it was never actually given to the children in many cases at one point the hospital says an implicit in Baltimore had paid her two hundred thousand dollars to donate these books to needy children she took the money never print the books if you get two hundred thousand dollars for it how was it a donation well the book itself would have been donated to the kids right but she got paid for the box yeah right so so they bought the books for the kids right there wasn't a donation on her part no but on their part on their part of the hospital yeah you see what what we're she went horribly awry here she never learned the lesson of alcohol they're going to get you a tax evasion Uncle Sam wants his money that's where you're going down every time that's really make a big mistake she sometimes do pull is sold the same exact books to two different buyers is all this arrangement was not very intelligent no France is they have titles like exercising is fun and vegetables are not just green fun facts there she sold them to two different buyers which enabled her to be paid twice and then she would promise a certain number of books at a given price and she was actually keep the money and not provide the books as promised it's like a Ponzi scheme we promise people if you invest you know you but you buy this in you're going to get this then they never get that niche gets other people to buy and then they don't they don't get it and it's you can't do that how it was bound to come crashing down now I'm more insult to the fact that this was a very smart now is poorly done is very poorly done and companies who had sit business for the city kept buying the books from her and then she would not recuse herself from voting or decision making on issues related to those companies so they were purchasing her favor by giving her cash you think the people Baltimore would wise up somewhere along the line the mayor before her was Stephanie Rawlings Blake track she was the one who gave gave the people room to destroy stuff after the death of Freddie gray yeah you know just given like a day or two to just burn down private businesses and you know destroy in stealing robin get it out of their system yeah yet she's out of politics now sure which is I think was probably a very smart choice it probably was not for her need to find a nother another venue I Sheila Dixon was the mayor before Stephanie Rawlings Blake she was investigated for theft fraud embezzlement and perjury right after she took office in eight the mode as she most famous for the theft of donated gift cards intended for needy families and she use to purchase offer codes and designer shoes she was indicted on twelve counts by a federal grand jury she did not serve jail time as part of a plea deal and she resigned in twenty ten with a promise to not seek political office for the term of her probation but Hey Baltimore if you're lucky she can come

Catherine Pugh Fraud Baltimore Levin Two Hundred Thousand Dollars
"freddie gray" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

10:39 min | 11 months ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on Post Reports

"And being poor just uses terms interchangeably as he did here and then and you have this you know he's being asked about the legacy of slavery and about his views on that and then he immediately turned it to sort of blaming black people for their their failure to parent properly yeah it was a it was definitely a an uneasy segue into something that maybe he'd probably didn't. WanNa talk about but this is also part of what Joe Biden is Joe. Biden does meander. He talks a lot and sometimes he says things that get him in trouble. In this case I think he reverted to a talking pinpoint. That was a little bit dated in also didn't really have to do with the question that he was being asked. I thought there were a few interesting moments from the debate where you who found candidates feeling more confident in taking quite left positions even when compared to like the first debate and specifically that came up when former Congressman O'Rourke mark was being asked about gun control gun reform and specifically whether he would take away people's AK47's and he said Oh yeah we're gonNA take your fifteen or AK forty seven. How did that moment shake you. We talked talked before about desperate. Candidates or candidates who are low in the polls tend to do things to try things to get register with people. This was definitely one of those moments. Beto has been talking about this for a couple of weeks ever since the tragedy Paso but this is the kind of position that the Democratic Party has been trying to avoid like the plague for years and years even as they have moved left on on gun control talking about assault weapons bans the idea of mandatory buybacks of any guns whether they be assault weapons or anything else is not what they talk about now when Republicans accuse them of saying you know we're going to take your guns away. Democrats always say no. That's not what we're doing well. That's what Iraq said. He wanted to do on Thursday night so I think the question for Democrats is are they going to move in that direction because he's now set up that position on the left flank and at least one candidate who has has specifically about that proposal. Selimi Klobuchar decided not to go there. She said she did not support that kind of proposal I would be Kinda surprised if the rest of the Democrat Party goes in that direction has just want to talk about a candidate that we haven't talked about a lot yet Elizabeth Warren who is you know one of one of the top three leading candidates in the polls but seemed to kind of fly under the radar during this debate she had a lot of smart answers for things that she was asked but considering the fact that a lot of people were hyping up to this would be the first time that Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren would be together on stage did they didn't really come at each other a lot and nobody really came after Elizabeth Warren and I'm wondering if that's a good thing or is it a bad thing you know I think at that given she has shown demonstrated and sustained momentum in this race. She's the one candidate who has been steadily rising in the polls throughout. I think fade waiting to the background. A little bit is probably okay for her. There's this interesting thing about her. Though which is that she for some reason is very difficult to attack and nobody seems to know what to do with with that so she's already pretty much tied for second place with Bernie Sanders in most of these polls. She's taking lead even in some of the early states according to the polls that we've seen the New Hampshire and she's so studied in all of her policy proposals. I think it's a really difficult thing for the other candidates to contend with almost the Teflon woman of this debate primary every stage so far so this was the third democratic debate. Even that's sort of almost like the fifth because the first year round actually two debates and then we're going to have another another one in October potentially that one will be split up into two separate debates if more candidates qualify it just seems like a lot of these candidates are getting a lot of exposure on the debate stage and is that working like do you feel like people are getting the answers that they need to know who they're going to be voting for it or is it creating more confusion. I think that if we are at the end of the Democratic primary process and we look back on the debates. I'm not sure that this is one one that we're necessarily going to remember a whole lot. Polls show that enthusiasm for the twenty twenty election is higher than it's ever been before even higher than generally is on the eve of the election which I think is remarkable but I don't think that we necessarily see that reflected in people tuning in at this point. I don't think we necessarily see it in and fluctuations in the polls which have been pretty steady generally speaking there have been kind of slight shifts in a couple of jumps like hamal Harris after the first debate but this is a long slog. They're going to be lots of debates. They're going to be many candidate forums and things like that and I think a lot of people are are not fully tuned in until we actually start getting adding towards the votes and the debates are certainly a good place to take stock of where the candidates are and how sharp they are and whether they've got their stuff down for people who really care about these things like donors and more passionate supporters but it's really part of a process and we're still very early in that process Aaron Blake Blake is a senior political reporter for the fix. What's on your list of financial goals buying the new house strengthening your retirement plan all of the above whatever you're saving for fidelity personalized planning and advice can help you reach those goals with digital planning thing plus one on one personal coaching all with low transparent pricing to learn more visit fidelity dot com slash your goals or call one eight hundred three four three three five four eight advisory services offered for a fee by fidelity personal and workplace advisors. LLC and brokerage services provided by FIDELITY BROKERAGE SERVICES LLC. I've been writing about Maryland for twelve years and Baltimore is one of the most fascinating and complex and heart breaking places you could ever encounter president. Trump was in Baltimore on Thursday which was awkward because as earlier this summer he was tweeting that the city of Baltimore was rat infested and filthy and someplace where no human being would want to lip and those things were painful for Baltimore residents to here because they have faced so many challenges since two thousand fifteen when a man named Freddie Gray died while on the custody of police Freddie Gray's death happened and then there was this rush to help and that's not the end of the story right right. The landscape keeps shifting underneath your feet so what happened. Aaron Cox covers Maryland Politics for the post. She's been reporting on how even now now after tens of millions of dollars poured into Baltimore. The city is still struggling to heal from the wounds laid bare by Freddie gray so Freddie Gray was a twenty five year old young man from West Baltimore and he grew up in one of the impoverished areas and he was one of many many black people in Baltimore subject questionable police practices so he was out in one of the housing projects in Baltimore made eye contact with police started started sprinting away. Please ran after him arrested him and you know neighbors started videotaping that boy look ultimately van and by the time they opened the van up. He'd had a neck injury but she let he later died. There was weeks of peaceful protests and there was all of this built up antipathy about how how police in Baltimore Henry to the black community and erupted on the day Freddie Gray's funeral the peaceful protest turned into looting and riots and arson and the national guard rolled in with tanks and took over the city for a week with tire you okay. We have houses plots to they. Don't give a damn about us for rail what I think. The people of Baltimore want more anything else is truth so if anything that could be considered a silver lining here it was that it was an impetus for change that it reverberated up to the Obama China White House Congressman Senators role having these both public and private meeting saying. We've got to fix this. See Justice Cannon and we'll be done. We'll let let that process process work every one of us. We've watched Baltimore be torn apart. Our hearts break. All of us who love Baltimore are deeply saddened by the death of Freddie Gray. I I hope that we can move forward to a productive peace and not just the relationship with police kind of then equity that this situation. Shen laid bare the inequity in education and health disparities in everything that kind of suppressing black people in Baltimore and kind of trapping trapping them in generational poverty the way that Freddie Gray had been trapped in generational poverty and so there was this rush of people at every level of government and community deciding they were going to help finally address the stomach issues of poverty and racism and that kind of coalesced in this organization called one Baltimore. What was that that was Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake effort to kind of coordinate all of that goodwill in one place and so they picked this local business consultant a guy who has from Baltimore grew up Baltimore had a lot of credibility and he was put in charge of kind of creating a long term plan. Who who was that person? His name is Michael Cryer. My dream is that we reach a point where racing class where the kinds of inequity and inequality that we've experienced arranged for so many years no longer defines what we are. Michael Cryer like a lot of people I talked to in Baltimore saw this as a moment where everybody's attention and was focused in the same place to go in a single direction and where was all this money coming from it came from all over the place places like Johns Hopkins the United United Way Private people think at some point Jay Z. donated money the federal government was steering grant money that was discretionary into summer summer jobs programs. Prince came to Baltimore and had this concert for hope.

Baltimore Freddie Gray Joe Biden Maryland Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake Elizabeth Warren Congressman O'Rourke mark Bernie Sanders Aaron Blake Blake Democratic Party New Hampshire FIDELITY BROKERAGE SERVICES LL Iraq Aaron Cox Selimi Klobuchar Michael Cryer hamal Harris Democrat Party assault
"freddie gray" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:08 min | 11 months ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on Post Reports

"Has been narrowed for one night. Only the top ten candidates are here our democratic. Primary debate starts right now. I don't think that this was necessarily a resounding sounding performance by all ten people on stage by any means. Erin Blake is a senior reporter for the Post Politics blog the fix I do think it was an improvement upon upon what we've seen in the first two debates and he was watching Thursday nights Democratic primary debate which aired on ABC Senator Sanders go ahead. You know why they're going back up because a terrible disease Houston. We have a problem we know. Donald Trump's a racist but there is no. Oh Red Badge of courage for calling that that was a smaller field of candidates. This was the cream of the crop that ten people who qualified we didn't have the kind of one percent or candidates who are throwing bombs trying to get people to pay attention to them. It was more of a substantive debate. The second thing is I think that the job Aydin probably cleared the low bar that he set for himself in previous debates. He did a little bit better and we didn't really see any candidates have really awful awful moments like we have seen in some of these debates and so. I think if you're the Democrat Party and you're worried about how your opponent to President trump might shape up in the general election in debates. This was a step in the right direction so obviously this was a debate where we had a lot of is on former vice president Joe Biden on Senator Sanders under on Senator Warren and one of the issues where a lot of the differences came out was in discussions about healthcare. What were those conversations like. What were the moment moment that stuck out to you about how they were thinking about and debating over health care? Will this has been the most popular topic at pretty much every debate that we've had. I thought what was interesting on Thursday. They night is that we saw more of kind of a united pushback on the idea of Medicare for all and more specifically when it comes to getting rid of private insurance altogether which is something that of course Senator Bernie Sanders supports and Elizabeth Warren supports the problem Senator Sanders with that Damn Bill All the Euro Senator Warren backs is that it doesn't trust the American we saw Pete Buddha judge pretty impassioned case that you know basically if we want people to do the public option. Let's offer them. Both guy proposed Medicare for all who wanted we take and then have people migrate to that public option if it's going to be so good good and if we're right as progressives that that public alternative is better than the American people will figure that out for themselves. Amy Klobuchar was making that argument. I thought Joe Joe Biden made better arguments against that and in defense of obamacare and kind of his more incremental approach. I know that the senator says she's for Bernie well. I'm Eh Barack. I think the obamacare worked. I think the way we add to replace everything that's been cut at a public option guaranteed that everyone will be able to to have affordable assurance number one it was maybe a little bit of course correction for a Democratic Party or at least the part of the party that is wary of looking like they're going after pie in the sky a thirty trillion dollar overhaul the American healthcare system and so I think that debate is shifting ever so slightly in a more pragmatic direction though of of course some of the conversation about that question of Medicare for all or not Medicare for all and who's on which side got confused when Houlihan Castro jumped Iraq Obama's vision was not to leave ten million people on covered wanted every single person in this country covered my plan would do that your plan with do not have to buy okay and how did you see that. Everybody watched that moment and they thought this is the second big moment that we've had these debates. The first was Kamla Harris going after Joe Biden the bussing and in this case we looked back after that whole exchange went down and you know the the initial reaction was. Oh holy and Castro has spotlighting Joe Biden in his old and maybe not very sharp and do not have to buy. You just said that you just said that two minutes ago. You said two minutes ago that they would have to buy. You said they would have to qualify you. Forgetting what you said is important. What you said just two minutes ago. It was difficult not to attach that to the age issue which of course is hovering over Joe Biden throughout this entire campaign but we looked back actually Joe Biden in his answer had not not said that people would have to opt in to his program he said specifically anyone who can't afford it gets automatically enrolled in in in the Medicare type option option we have is it would automatically enrolled people in the program. You know it's one thing to get these moments optically right which who in Castro probably did in this instance but the the substance of his attack was just not on point and he picked the wrong moment to try and land this punch and I don't even know if optically it really worked because because I think when we get to this stage in the campaign and candidates are trying to come at each other more forcefully at least in in Hawaiian caches case it reminded me of like in middle school when people decided that they needed to start being mean to each other but some people are just bad at being mean and feel Kuan Castro is someone for whom it doesn't come off as a good look for him when he is really trying to hammer into Joe Biden and basically calling him old. This is always the risk when you're at one percent or two percent in the polls. You need to try something and you know when you try hard when you really go after somebody. The downside of that is sometimes. You're not GonNa have your facts down. It's not going to go like you hoped. A lot of the zingers on Thursday night didn't exactly land like maybe the candidates had hoped. I'm the only person on the stage that finds Trudeau's hair very menacing donald trump in office on trade policy. You know he reminds is me that guy in the wizard of Oz. You know when you pull back the curtain. It's a really small dude and so that kind of desperation can sometimes look at like exactly what it is which is desperation to have an impact that maybe you don't wind up having the impact that you wanted. I WanNa talk about one other moment having to do with Joe Biden when he was asked about the legacy of slavery and his answer to that I think struck people in a lot of different ways and can you describe what he was saying yeah so basically Joe Biden was confronted with an answer that he gave in nineteen seventy-five about this issue where he said I don't feel responsible for or the sins of my father and grandfather feel responsible for what our situation is today for the sins of my own generation and I'll be damned if I feel responsible to pay for what happened the three hundred years ago. You said that some forty years ago but as you stand here tonight. What responsibility do you think that Americans need to take to repair the legacy of slavery in our country well? They have to deal with the look. There's institutional segregation in this country in his answer after kind of talking around it for rely on Joe Biden eventually kind of went back to the idea and this is something he's talked about before that there is a role in failure. Perhaps I have parents in dealing dealing with certain issues with their children. He said we bring social workers in homes and parents to help them deal with how to raise their children. It's not that they don't WANNA help they. Don't I know quite what to do. We bring social workers into homes appears to help them deal with how to raise their children. It's not that don't WANNA help. They don't want they don't know quite what what to do. Play the radio basically the radio. Make sure that television have the record player on record player on at night. Make sure the kids here. Words urged a kid coming from a very poor school are very poor background. We'll hear four million words fewer spoken by the time they get there. It's like what yeah the record player you know. Obviously we're getting back into the age thing but I think there are certain people who feel that this answer was somewhat racial is that he was kind of casting aspersions on an entire entire race of people well because it does two things right like he often draws this equivalence between being black.

Joe Joe Biden Senator Bernie Sanders Donald Trump Houlihan Castro Medicare Elizabeth Warren senator ABC Houston Democratic Party Amy Klobuchar Erin Blake Democrat Party Aydin reporter Eh Barack obamacare vice president President Kamla Harris
FBI ranks biggest cities by 2017 homicide rate

John Batchelor

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

FBI ranks biggest cities by 2017 homicide rate

"Maryland's charm city has a big problem with homicides detail from Sierra Crawford new FBI crime says please Baltimore's homicide rate last year above any other American city with more than five hundred thousand people the three hundred and forty two killings Nahshon Maryland's biggest city produce grueling homicide rate of fifty six per one hundred thousand. People in. That was followed by Detroit myth is it in Chicago experts. Say Baltimore's had a problem with violent crime for years, but there's been an increase of two thousand fifteen death of Freddie, gray who suffered a fatal injury in police custody and that eventually set a new per capita high in two thousand

Baltimore Maryland Sierra Crawford FBI Detroit Freddie Chicago Gray
Baltimore cop suspended after viral video shows him punching, kicking man

WBZ Morning News

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Baltimore cop suspended after viral video shows him punching, kicking man

"Who is a testing was handcuffed, by, a, school resource officer. ABC's areo Rousseff has that story Child seen screaming as the officer forces into the ground eventually. Putting him in handcuffs several times Relaxes the restraints removes this staff claiming. For much of the time inside that. Room they sat quietly with Thomas trying. To settle him the school says they were. Following protocol the state is standing by the officer the Baltimore officer is placed on paid leave after a

Officer Baltimore Israel Sweden Dead Sea Thomas Israel Chemicals Linda Gradstein ABC Areo Rousseff Texas CBS Freddie Gray Jerusalem State Department Mark Remillard Jordan River Japan Germany Greece United States
Baltimore cop suspended after viral video shows him punching, kicking man

News, Traffic and Weather

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Baltimore cop suspended after viral video shows him punching, kicking man

"A Baltimore police officer suspended after video surfaces on social media showing him punching and tackling a man is ABC's Mark Remillard. Video shows. A Baltimore police officer punching a man numerous times in the face before taking him to the ground Baltimore police in a statement said the incident escalated after. Officers asked the man for his ID cities mayor calling the video disturbing in a statement demanded answers and, accountability police say the officer has been suspended and, the department is investigating it's the latest controversy for Baltimore. Police which has been the subject of several high-profile incidents including the death of Freddie, gray in two thousand

Richard Lanes Officer Baltimore Mark Remillard Seattle ABC Seattle Bainbridge Island Nebraska Lane Fred Ashley Pill Chuck River United States Bremerton Snohomish County ID Chuck Freddie Komo Elaine
Rare strain of flesh-eating bacteria kills Virginia man

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

02:27 min | 2 years ago

Rare strain of flesh-eating bacteria kills Virginia man

"Everyone, I'm John Matthews the, attorney who represented the family of Freddie, gray after he died, in police custody in Baltimore is taking on a new client the family of. University of Maryland football player who died after collapsing during a team workout back in may We're looking for Justice put it in a nutshell They want The case to be judged by the. Actual facts They want a fair outcome Jordan McNair family believes he died of heatstroke universities hired an outside firm to review whether it. Followed all of the proper safety protocols and attorney Billy Murphy says he'll wait for that review. To be completed before he considers filing a lawsuit flesh-eating bacteria has claimed the. Wife of someone in the eastern half of Virginia health, officials won't be more specific because of privacy laws but they say the death was caused by. Vibrio a naturally occurring bacteria found in warm saltwater Twenty-three people have, contracted infections from the bacteria so far this. Year but the fatal strain was a rare variety one found. More commonly in the Gulf states than in. Virginia Amanda New, Jersey also died from vibrio infection earlier this month severe weather is likely to, blame for a fatal duck boating accident in Missouri at least eleven people are dead dart teams in Missouri. Work deep into the night searching table rock lake they were looking for people, aboard a duck boat. When it capsized multiple fatalities have already been confirmed some Some of whom are children Trent bear survived. The accident out of this world I don't even know how to describe it, it's just I don't. Know Officials believe severe weather likely caused the accident I'm John, Lawrence reporting Russia's ambassador to the United States says his government is ready to discuss another meeting between Vladimir. Putin and President Trump at the White House but says it's important to deal with. The results, of their first summit before moving ahead with another meeting Anatolian town, antonoff says that includes discussion of a possible referendum. To settle the conflict in Ukraine the president has tweeted that Ukraine was brought up in the. Talks but he has not mentioned anything about a referendum the candidate holding the short end of the stick in the democratic primary for Montgomery County. Executive David Blair has asked for a partial recount lair says he decided to ask for the recount faith on. Some of the nominees that we've seen I'm gonna feedback that we've heard from individual voters and the fact that the certified election results have Blair trailing Mark l.. Rich by only seventy nine. Votes Blair's asking for all provisional absentee ballots to. Be recounted along.

David Blair Billy Murphy John Matthews Virginia Attorney University Of Maryland Antonoff Jordan Mcnair Heatstroke Missouri Freddie Baltimore Ukraine Justice Trent United States Russia Putin Amanda New
"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Five number four were shot at maryland's wakeup call coming up this hour the trump putin meeting is still ongoing santa report no tweets from the president yet also a new usa today article confirming what many had thought that the baltimore pd stop noticing crime after the freddie gray riots we'll get into that and a apology from steve cohen over the purple heart for peter struck and coming up in thirty minutes to a former bowl miami dade metro police officer and she now of course it's got a new book out called trump divine intervention or not we'll talk with the cc ferrari in about thirty minutes but a remarkable article in usa today confirming what many of us had thought and now we've got some numbers to back it up the immediately following the baltimore race riots that ensued after the freddie gray incident that baltimore police began to quote stop noticing crime they still responded swiftly to calls for help but police force turned a blind eye to crimes being committed right in front of them according to analysis done by usa today this was donald norris who am artist professor at the university of maryland baltimore county who were reviewed this analysis and the outcome he concludes of that change in policing has been a lot more crime in baltimore specially murders people are getting away with those murders police officials have acknowledged the change here's interim commissioner kerrey.

kerrey commissioner university of maryland baltimo donald norris freddie gray trump miami baltimore santa putin maryland professor usa ferrari officer dade peter steve cohen president thirty minutes
"freddie gray" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Could you imagine brown university is such a fake school and there's got to be around listening now and i will back that up all day long no greats ivy league school you get in there are no grades i thought so the idea of being a lawyer is you just have to pass the bar right yet say all day care almost with the law school i can almost kind of see it it's like a different environment it's small okay it's a really i just use that as a way to make fun of brown no grades could you imagine to college with no great dot granted i didn't care about my grades but no grades what does that what what are you gonna do not yet you feel if you're getting charged like that you feel like you should at least be evaluated performance right can you great how am i doing no nothing anyway that's not my point what was it oh yeah so these kids these alumni law so their kids anymore so privileged talking about how this cavenaugh guy it's an emergency and you need to rebuke him yell law school as an alumni because he's a threat to our safety at all this this silliness right they just live in their bubble they don't even know how ridiculous they look so i wanna talk about just outside that privileged bubble for just a minute go to baltimore after freddie gray for freddie gray he was the guy who was in the back of the police van died of injuries on the way to the police station tons of protests for a long time calls for this police are awful and all right so in response in short police officer stopped policing they did with the black lives matter protesters wanted they questioned fewer people on the street they stopped fewer cars one former detective said what officers are doing is they're just driving looking forward they've got horse blinders on so what's the result of less policing deadliest large city in america murder rate all time high three hundred forty two people killed and some neighborhoods the murder rate has tripled because the cops are not right the number of actions initiated by police it's the technical term for that actions initiated by police dropped seventy percent pre freddie gray post friday this is the professor at university of maryland immediately upon the riot and all the all the riots right around that'll policing changed in baltimore.

brown university officer professor baltimore freddie gray america murder university of maryland seventy percent
"freddie gray" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on KPCC

"Freddie gray he was the latest of those and so it wasn't just his death baltimore was reacting to most of us are not here because we knew freddie gray but we all here because we know lax of pretty greens baltimore was reacting to years of questionable tactics by the police to what had started as a zero tolerance approach to policing but had gotten out of control racial profiling unlawful stops and searches excessive force reports of institutional corruption freddie gray stood for the experiences of so many black men in baltimore people were fed up without police department we'll be reformed so that that blue wall of justice the beliefs gets torn down you know the blue wall i'm talking about the one that says right or wrong we're going to cover for you toned down moment to show who really really are so after his funeral that's been thanks surgical arrive they will kids at the mall and they started to throw rocks at the police more coming up here you got you could you healed on therefore there in route right now.

Freddie gray baltimore
"freddie gray" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on KPCC

"See you have to understand the context in which i i spoke to develop parker the last time the country had paid attention to baltimore was right after the killing of freddie gray and he was a twenty five year old man who was arrested in early april of two thousand fifteen and police in baltimore chased him down and put him in handcuffs we record dragged him to a police van shortly after they taste out i'm like that he was screaming in pain i've been recording his body appeared to be limp at the time someone took a cell phone video of him you wonder why can't use his legs police put him in the van and shackled his hands and feet and drove him to jail without a seatbelt on in what prosecutors later described as a rough ride so they blew through a stop sign may turns really suddenly and a week later freddie gray died of severe injuries including a severed spinal cord and that of course came after a string of high profile police killings.

parker baltimore freddie gray twenty five year
"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

"Must be hiding something they must have done something terribly wrong they still won't let me know of the nine everybody else in the city built my found only that me that does that make no he he no he will all be a hero they would tell who he is and when be skied so why are you skiing if he's such a haven while you ski 'cause if he was a big hugo you would tell who he is most hey would you know that names and then as a hero you've his accomplishment in cops nothing sf he's in hatton and it's also about a city where three years after the death of freddie gray the homicide rate is higher and the trust in the police is worse they cut up everything that they want we pull black that's all they think we pour that we ain't gonna do about it i'm i'm not one stupid i'm not too high i'm not at all i know i worked with the city over forty years so i know what the deal is and just angry just so damn angry it's possible that what happened was not police misconduct realized with a lack of information people are going to assume the worst there's a black box people in baltimore or going to soon the very worst what's behind it and what you learn what's been happening in baltimore it's easy to understand why they'd think that.

hatton baltimore freddie gray forty years three years
"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

"And that's exactly what the doj found the results of its investigation in august two thousand sixteen little more than a year after the death of freddie gray was that the baltimore police department had routinely violated civil rights that it had been policing unconstitutionally and in doing so the doj found it had quote exacerbated community distrust of police particularly in the african american community every black ball city is that department is the most racist in corrupt organizations out here so this is no kids no older people know it everybody knows you don't get that way overnight freddie gray was just a flash point see and the problem is no one trusts us you know how can you do your job if you don't have the community's trust you know four months after that report police in baltimore killed deta parker's grandson older back hi it's michael borrow daily listeners often ask how they can support this show the answer is through a subscription to the times it's the journalistic engine that powers the daily times reporting is what makes the daily daily for those who already subscribe thank you for daily listeners who don't get subscribed the times is now offering fifty percent off your first year plus your first month free it's a good deal to learn more visit ny times dot com slash the daily offer that's ny times dot com slash the daily offer and thank you.

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"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

"That's the real streets that's the truth the real narrative that people are scared to death this good to go outside their houses they wanna be at a certain time they don't wanna go in certain neighborhoods they don't wanna move in certain able they don't want to be in certain locations because dangerous people get killed in this city people arrived in this city that's real life why does the murder rate go up so we talked to a lot of people in baltimore about that police officers former and current residents adults and kids even drug dealers everybody had a theory everybody's got everybody's everybody's bad remember you don't have any places for young people to go when you don't proper release these kids drinking or smoking for getting high things are gonna happen one serey was this kind of socioeconomic explanation that this was really about generational poverty drug addiction but the six hasn't changed baltimore wasn't any poor after freddie gray than had been before the cups definitely pulled back nobody wanted to be the next cop that makes an arrest the arrests goes roll come on the cops pullback other people thought it was because the police had pulled back that maybe they were just sort of reticent to make arrests with federal investigation going on all hourly ramona's around really with no police.

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"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

"We all know that ultimate continues to have a fractured relationship between the police in the community and recent events continue to demonstrate the need to press forward with these reforms so the city started making promises it said it would prosecute the police involved in freddie gray's death said it would change the police department we have to get it right failure is not an option the mayor even asked the federal government to come in and investigate the baltimore police and its practices this investigation will begin immediately and will focus on allegations that baltimore police department officers use excessive force including deadly force conduct unlawful searches seizures arrests and engage in discriminatory policing and around that same time the city's top prosecutor maryland moesby announces that she's charging the six officers involved in freddie gray's death well each of these officers are presumed innocent until proven guilty we have brought the following charges officer caesar goodson is being charged with second degree depraved heart murder officer william porter is being charged with involuntary manslaughter officer edward nero is being charged with assault in the second lieutenant brian rice is being charged with involuntary manslaughter sergeant alicia white involuntary manslaughter garrett miller intentional so in the second degree to all of this together was highly unusual for the first time in a very long time there was this real expectation that policing in baltimore might actually change that something was actually going to happen this time last but certainly not least to the youth of this city i will seek justice on your behalf this is a moment this is your moment let's.

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"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on The Daily

"So you have to understand the context in which i i spoke to develop parker the last time the country had paid attention to baltimore with right after the killing of freddie gray and he was a twenty five year old man who was arrested in early april of two thousand fifteen and police in baltimore chased him down and put him in handcuffs we recorded dragged him to a police fan short the out i'm like that he was screaming in pain coordination i've been recording his body appeared to be limb at the time someone took a cellphone video of him wonder why can't use his legs police put him in the van and shackled his hands and feet and drove him to jail without a seatbelt on in what prosecutors leader described as a rough ride so they blew through a stop sign made turns really suddenly and a week later freddie gray died of severe injuries including severed spinal cord and that of course came after a string of high profile police killings joe.

parker baltimore freddie gray twenty five year
"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Felt an enormous responsibility to live up to the promises i made as a candidate for this office but i felt an even greater pressure to get it right i had to get it right not only for freddie gray but for the communities that feel like justice for their loved ones typically an afterthought i was determined to see freddie gray and the scores of young boys like him he was a man who struggle daily to navigate their existence in a society that doesn't see their humanity freddie gray had no pedigree was poisoned by lead paint early on in life that's the common excuse now i think it was i can't say for sure so i'm not gonna speculate had limited education and bleak career prospects still he was a man what you just said he was a boy and then the same paragraph says he was a man deserve to be seen by those of us who have the ability and responsibility to ensure equal protection of justice under the law she says i never met freddie grave but i am proud to be associated with his legacy with all due respect ms must be let me tell you what freddie gray's legacy is distributing poison to the neighborhoods of west baltimore in the form of heroin is a drug dealer a dope peddler and a criminal now no one designed deserves to die the way freddie gray did but that's what you're proud to be associated with the legacy of that over the police department so well you know what voters in baltimore city you get what you deserve the police killed friday it was basically great there's criminal activity has running from the crops cops rather has refused he wouldn't have been thrown in that paddy wagon had had not been doing part of the you know the legacy they'll find the evidence pointed to him being unprompted usually a right time for traffic and weather first year where the update is chuck whitaker we chuck.

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"freddie gray" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

WBAL 1090AM

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on WBAL 1090AM

"They had the luxury of what i do every day which is talking on the radio weren't able to express my views freely all the time and even during this meeting i start gain the ishwar because it's in my nature and i was just being a listener last night but a lot of people like to go and ask questions and then really get on a soapbox going on and on and on and on run but even last night it surprised me freddie gray would come up in this particular meeting and certainly wasn't something i was expecting but my point is what happened three years ago is on the minds of so many and the reality of the crime situation town is just a fact in our post riots and freddie gray world and last night random meeting in town i don't know maybe one hundred people there boom there it was right in front of you again and in that case lowered the discourse and i think kind of got our eye off the ball but we're actually talking about last night but approval a point that what happened three years ago we haven't come close i mean forget moving on from its right in front of us every day let's go to joanna county joanna on wbal good afternoon my comment is that i feel that stephanie rawlings blake is the one that set the tone when she had her press conference and said give the protesters space to destroy i think that was basically giving them court 'blanche to do whatever they want which they did and i also feel that from what we occurred that commissioner batts was also told that they are to stand down so the police had to stand there and have creeks turn them bottles turn them and they basically were victims themselves and i remember also governor hogan had offered help in the very beginning which the mayor and that was declined so i feel that her comment about letting them give them room to to destroy was disaster if you could write a book about how not to lead and what to do in a terrible situation or crises you would point to the leadership and baltimore in that moment and particularly the mayor i think i think that's very fair hard to say power the council has at that moment so you know i all actually give them.

batts governor hogan baltimore freddie gray wbal stephanie rawlings blake commissioner three years
"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"To bruce a wcbmcom and of course if you've downloaded the wcbm mobile phone out you can text us right here in studio as well of this information can ellicott city bruce i just saw we're sean suitors gofundme page pages now up to sixty thousand dollars the family of freddie gray received six million dollars from the taxpayers are we to accept the fact of the city feels they owe more to a career criminal who died through no fault of the city received substantially were compensation that an eighteen year police veteran who fought to the death his whole life to rid the streets of this kind of trash it has been proven that the six officers were not guilty of any criminal or civil charges yet the taxpayers in the city remains silent about where their money is going and to whom is going where is the six million dollars for xi'an's wife and five kids worth it are the waiting for the investigation to be concluded interesting freddie's family didn't have to wait for any investigation to be over in baltimore city crime does pay doesn't it the good mayor can ponder that as she receives her next pay raise along with the highest paid employee in baltimore ms moseley and eat telephone over here is four one zero wcbm sex eighty i'll harvey and the hillsdale starts us off good morning good morning grave wine i want to talk about three of her a moment a couple of other things too but i share but won a case i'm sure that has been the case that she's one i haven't heard publicized uh there's a will to be clear i believe was a case of nettie bo why it back to vote on i like i say the daily disappointment is never talked much about it and talking about doubling their what's your face i can't use the word uh she makes one hundred eight like you said you stole some of my thunder she makes more than a governor and she's not nearly as intelligence and the governor point to a series of compliments and say earning my money but when the baltimore city flareups decide that in light of executive badly they're running.

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"freddie gray" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"freddie gray" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Riots that broke out after this is that where the real germination is of the car johnston violence in baltimore for does go back even further it goes way tony and kentucky it goes back a little bit earlier because look for trading gray in that year murder or up fairly significantly but it was early on eight april when freddie gray was arrested it there there is not a whole lot of track record with things were definitely trending up it's just one of those things could it could perfect sort of door a bad policy and i would say frightened police coach outlay became triggered sharply that's a bad analogy but they know that after freddie gray the police the the quality only won't have their back at the politicians will be gunning for them if god forbid something goes wrong in you know as well as anybody at a better traffic stop you never know what's going to happen so quickly sort of decided we're going to do what we have to do nothing or renew required will go out you call but and let the call it made we're not going to do leafing through the politicians now we're going to have our back we're going to throw under the bus that gay that emboldened politicians are eight criminals i guess cook already and quick break area close to up but it emboldened criminals and from there it began to become a swirling spiral out of control now we're we tung gray and with some an april term april 2015 it's been two years after those riots you had the mayor at the time stephanie rolling blake who was this this darling of the left but what she basically did is when those protests happened those violent riots happen told the police to stand down in in some cases and that has led to as you're discussing there whether or not police really feel that anybody is is on their side but this this ceasefire that we hear about who who initiated this idea how is it supposed to work and how did it work it was it.

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