24 Burst results for "Fred Hampton"

"fred hampton" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

06:26 min | 3 months ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WCPT 820

"A move to make Fred Hampton's home a historical landmark. One of the people involved in that effort is his son Fred Hampton Jr. Who joins us now. Thank you so much. Okay. Um, we've had a little bit of a technical problem. Um, we are Reaching out to Fred, who we haven't connected with quite yet, So I'll just tell you a little bit more about what's going on. There has been a petition created just this last weekend. Um, to recognize his house. The house that Fred Hampton senior grew up in To be recognized as a historical landmark by the city of Maywood. Congressman Bobby Rush has signed on to this effort. Congressman Danny Davis has signed on to this effort. Remember Bobby Rush was part of the Black Panther Party. Back in the day when he was Morad Ical activist as opposed to being a radical activist congressman, Um the Hampton family moved into the house in 1958. When Fred was 10 years old. And that's where he grew up. But that is where he became political. Um, And there is an effort now to make that historic site a place not only to honor Fred Hampton, but a place where a different works by the Black Panther Party can be displayed and what they were about and what they were. Trying to accomplish. Um, we are going to talk to Fred Jr about that, Um, the if you saw the movie Judas and the Black Messiah that is a retelling. Of the whole story of how the Black Panther Party was betrayed by one of their members who was working. Working with the FBI. Um you know what? Let's take. Let's take a real quick. Oh, we got him. Okay, great. Um, friendly with us now. Okay, Zach. I don't hear him. Hello. Hi, Fred. How are you? I'm willing to say, how are you doing? I'm joined. I'm doing great. I tried to give our listeners a little bit of background here on on what's going on with the Hampton House. But before you and I talk about that, can you tell me a little bit about what you're doing? What? What It's been like for you growing up in the in the shadow of such a famous father and the work that you've taken on Yes, indeed. Well, let me let me promise with this. Um, I'm still on cloud 1000 from this past week Weekends event which you have marches City third birthday. But my father chairman Fred had had not been assassinated before, along with the Mark Clark this annual event that we do Every August 30th the chamber for his streets party, Um this this year in particular key Well before I want you to you and talk about that later, but I'm president. I'm honored. Humbled by the international chairman of the Black Panther Party Cubs that the organization is Canada Legacy, The Black Panther Party, We say it's a tough act to follow, but we try our best to walk in their footsteps, but also that the Panther Post steps. Uh lot of the programs the Black Panther Party had the free purpose program we have. Today We have the triple sees as the Children, community and clubs. Which every Saturday in particular throughout the world. Standinin friends, Um Sao Paulo, Brazil. Gary, Indiana, Chicago, Oakland, California We not just providing food, uh, charitable sense. But also, you know, in this one with the political Uh um, Education of Black Panther party we have, who are the Cubs? The Cubs. The Cubs are the ideological offspring of blacks in department people here that time anything, we'll let me too young. The other's know exactly. I'm 51 years old, but it's the biological offspring of the Black Panther Party. And this international organization is again can carry on the work in the legacy like the Children, and the grandchildren. Is that what you're talking about? Was not not not just a biological we have We have some people in a biological choice of 11 point was issued the, uh move the organizations that are a lot biological All spring of the Black Panther Party. Uh, And have you? I know that Congressman Bobby Rush. Congressman Danny Davis have written letters of support for this issue about making Hampton House a landmark. Have you talked to them about this? So we just did. I think this past weekend we did, um, prior to the event, uh, for the chamber, Fred's birthday. We did two interviews together, and it's uh, this to them. Other other less official state represents the sound forward. Others are coming on board with it, Uh, it's growing. In fact, representatives Throughout the country throughout the world, you know, lying with it, So it's the only way it's ongoing campaign, And sometimes some people have asked why we would either have a petition drive and the reason being that we were like People to beat intertwined with this effort, because that's not necessary Part you have to petition draft. We want the people to be involved from all walks of life. Molecular officials, the truly parishioners to people in a barbershop, the pool halls you name everyone to be involved with this campaign. And correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this October, the 55th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party. Exactly two or 15 would be the Yes indeed. And this year in particular is going to be, um I guess I'm kind of cat out the bag, but, uh, the thing we're going to push for this one is one party. One legacy will be, um, speaking having events in Philadelphia, October 14 back to Chicago, October 15th October 22nd in Oakland, California, which is the birthplace of Black Panther Party. We'll be revealing the bust statue from Minister Yuri P. Newton and, um, so there's no strategic that. Well, maybe you know something..

Philadelphia Danny Davis 1958 Fred Black Panther Party Bobby Rush FBI Judas and the Black Messiah Zach Fred Jr Sao Paulo October 14 Maywood Mark Clark Canada Legacy Fred Hampton Today Chicago Fred Hampton Jr. Indiana
"fred hampton" Discussed on Over the Shoulder

Over the Shoulder

08:28 min | 8 months ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Over the Shoulder

"And we're back with more over the showed a podcast. That was my main man yards coming. Right out of mount rainier and the dmv. With his song. Purple sage from the dylan josh. Mix tape the drop over. The summer makes y'all go check him out. And hey i'm yards on instagram. Tell most situ fellas go vibes republican women. I like it cool take it. I'm working with the keenum. Which china cool things on the brand new records. But that's for another podcast when another day. The y'all mind. If i go to play as a concentrator i find it. Pivotal to constantly investigate that which inspires confounded disrupt creativity each week. I'm going to support one creative concept because they analyze it to its to. Its adams in hopes of expanding the creative process this week. I think times a new blueprints fellas while we were gone samaria rice. The mother of tamir rice called out. Ben crump sean kane to make mallory little baby another famous others who have used the trauma inflicted on black bodies to garner attention for their cause. Which makes me question is actually a really good series of tweets that she put out Familiarize is a list of demands to individuals. And at the end of this at the end of this man. She basically said keep my baby mouth now as activist as a black creator as revolutionary. I have two choices moment. I could say you know what black mom fuck off. Or i listen to what she got to say. What makes it begs the question. Why do we use trauma inflicted on black bodies bar. Why do we use trauma inflicted on black bodies to garner attention towards our marginalisation oppression etc. That answer that question is simple. It worked right. It's been sixty six years. Says momma immaterial the casket open and get nichols. Who never saw that. Jet cover never smelled the remains on that chicago. Some afternoon are using the same strategy in on other people's behalf without proper tribute sixty six years. We've been using the same blueprint. And as i think about mercer which we talked about earlier. Her stance black pain. I reminded that the sixteen year old could pull sesame titan mike. I said earlier. She could have eighty years of black joy header. So then what is next for the black narrative. I really feel like in times like these digs are slave to the narrative of this trauma. Porn is like the say. This is lena weights specialty to queen and slim them. If you will so in the past years we've seen black broadway burned down twice on. Hbo meaning why folks has caught up to our trauma narrative tropes and are trying to manipulate us through those narratives. Sound like the white man said this white man said sat. But let's see chairman frame billie holiday of you want the truth right. Oh blueprints build buildings. And i think it's time for new blueprints who sketches them. No and that's be more goes to. What are your thoughts vows. It's perfect back to. You're just discussing like we write those. We discuss those blueprints. Now would never be part of that is if we're going to do it in full fidelity of what we want every once again. Blackness is not a monolith so everybody's How they display their their vision is going to be different than what we might all agree on. There's no consensus but if we can have as much of the funding behind these projects you know. Dad gives us the the strongest and most pure voice. But you know as we go back to right now. We're still in the air where big big meeting. Entertainment corporations are additional big bags now for that drama right so at this point. It's nothing wrong with that. That's a dope day. I'm right. I mean but you know it has its place it has its place but what we really going to do with that. What i'm saying like I was watching Juice black messiah interviews right with the for now with them the kugler as an executive producer and a director over in kugler said that you know judas black messiah would not have even been a thing unless of with had it not been for the wide in major successive black panther really. That's i could definitely see. That can see that you. While they were filming black panther that's when he told Damn kalou light young trying to get you to do this so for real right. So i think the pieces are still building now coming people getting the play where they have more and more power and influence and influence over by putting out. These works in them. Continue to build such a high profile on black radars right. I think it's headed in the right direction. Where ultimately will turn things on his head where we're Trauma porn will truly have. Its place what i'm saying as where where Sorry of fred hampton film. Sorry to cut you off. Tops of fred hampton film can be said can be can be done in a more Focused way instead of having to do it in duality with william o'neil looking through his is is host to exactly does that make sense. It does it does. Oh no like for me i have. I suppose the principal of view of the situation like if we speaking going further with the black trauma if we are trying to make sure they remember the names and advocate for different basic elements to be held true. You have to respect the origins of the door. The origins of the situation. So like you have to respect the mom you have to create these the blueprints that we speaking of a and or like the forms like we have to make sure that we honor them like this. Is you have to have their blessings going right home in their case name right. That's just that's just meteo. No i mean i feel like. That's just a respectful thing to do right. I think with the cross come in is as we are. Tommy just kind of touched on this as we are trying to remember. Brianna taylor and bring justice for briana taylor. Is it possible for us to do that without saying her name. I mean if we're saying. I mean they're there's their representatives of a larger issue in the first place riots. Not just about brianna taylor. You know saying. It's not just about george floyd even those who profiled instances that happened really gained national worldwide traction but those are supposed to be proxies for a larger set of Injustices says that have been bestowed upon us are people who longer here to speak for themselves in many families. The mothers of slaying Black bodies who don't have that platform so that's why now more than ever. We got to defend the mothers who do have these platforms Trayvon martin's mother. Sabrina fulton never get last night You know continue to highlight. The mothers of parents siblings. Who are running for office public off public public office like we gotta do it across the board them up the right way. Yeah i liked it though. Let them instead of instead of just depending strictly on the trauma the let's push past the trauma push past that point and get to a point of like justice where we can see and today instead of still depending on sadness to push us through le. Let this such an. We're leveraging the trauma you have to do something with but we can't just leverage that shit into temporary marches and shit right rappers Coopting movement since draft that really. They didn't put in the leg work to do but they have somewhat of a profile infrastructure already established to get that megaphone out and it's like cool but at the end of the day foundation has to be the most solid foundation with the constant people who were directly impacted by these injustices agree right matt. You got something to bagman see below. That was going through some wall street journal articles on my.

dylan josh keenum samaria rice tamir rice Ben crump sean kane mallory little kugler mount rainier fred hampton instagram brianna taylor Damn kalou william o nichols adams mercer Hbo china chicago
Actors of Color Sweep Sag Awards for the First Time

NPR News Now

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

Actors of Color Sweep Sag Awards for the First Time

"The screen actors guild has announced the winners of its sag awards. Npr's bob mondello reports. They could possibly up an oscar calculations for the first time at the sag awards performers of color one in all four acting categories viola davis and the late chadwick. Boseman won best actress and best actor as blues musicians in marinas black bottom daniel polluters fire return as activist. Fred hampton took best supporting actor in judas and the black messiah and as minorities feisty korean grandmother us young yoon won best supporting actress because the screen actors guild represents so many voters at the academy awards. The sags are often regarded as predictors of oscar success last year. The guild awarded best acting ensemble parasite beginning that films march to a best picture. Win at the oscars. This year's award for acting on samba went to trial of the chicago. Seven

Sag Awards Bob Mondello Boseman Viola Davis Oscar NPR Fred Hampton Chadwick Marinas Yoon Daniel Academy Awards Oscars Samba Chicago
Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

04:58 min | 10 months ago

Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

"Walk to popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a movie now called judas and the black mesa. That's so good that will you can watch it now. You need to finish watching me. Daniel speak but when you see it you're going to see something extraordinary and you're going to see my guest today. Daniel columbia in a really amazing performance where he brings the spirit of someone to life and that someone is fred hampton. So congratulations to you. Then on i think most markets in what. I realized this is the very months for years ago. That get out opened yeah. I'm glad humphry as of that black comfort. Low two years a year off. The gal black pants came out in february has very much every year. You're just working in working in doing this. And you've got that oscar nomination after we last talked to. Are you just impossible. Now had you become A complete tyrant on the set. I think i was always a tyrant allowed. This kind of spaceman allowed me to be more tyrant. So i just i just like you know. I liked ice cubes. In one cup blueberries in another and then some soda in. And i don't even like soda but i just wanna be ir like a roman tyrant. I don't wanna be like a new. I on the roman like the old that that's own. You know what. I mean when something like that happens and of course you had done so much work you know in england theater. You scanned you. Were doing all of this stuff. But get out was a kind of a breakthrough that changed your life. Didn't it change my life. You changed my life a lot to catch up to that or with me. Like only think eli lawshield. Go up to happen with go in all that time in an all the things you've done whether you're did black panther whether you did queen it slam whether you were in widows this working with the most amazing people and doing incredible things and in this case of with judas and the black messiah. You're playing this real person. Fred hampton so fred hampton. We know and i think here in america to it was yes. He was the guy that led the black panther party in chicago and new annoy. He was the head of it and died. Tragically young. and that's what we know. We know those two things and finally. There's a movie that says he had and he had a spear any had something that was happening. How did you get attached to it. That's the on on the set of a powerful on reshoots ryan and zinzi kuebler Produces film to decide and say. Oh we we're making a film about fred hamilton. Love to be bothered a mess. Chairman fred keith is is in it as well Unshackle king is directed. Just feel alive. Kim i really their intentions and reasons really spoke to and so it was that i was like i just felt really on that the full of me in that way and they will let y'all send your treatment. They sent me a toothpaste treatment. Which is incredible and i met with shock in new york during the get out. What's he's not. You may have one of the tricks. setting on with you on that same trip. I sat down with shackle. So like i said that masako spoke on. I loved him as a person. I loved his reasons than would season off the oscars the first script i read judas nabet messiah and then i would say less. So what do you do. When you're playing this guy who we know of as a more of a symbol than a human being and that you have to create him as he is. How do you go about doing that. Which you do so brilliantly. Thank you solo work on the web but was kind of taken As a as a man you know and finding finding why felt he loved understanding why he loved him loudly loved and who loved him Of him you know the humanity politics is is like he has to have so much love so much karen in one food actualization black people in the black community in order to say these things in these ways like the speeches. I just felt like this identity in a remarkable man Amanda is to be remarked upon. But he is. He's a man. And i feel like brandon him. His humanity kind of puts into context his muddle

Fred Hampton Daniel Columbia Eli Lawshield Humphry Mesa Zinzi Kuebler Fred Hamilton Chairman Fred Keith Unshackle King Daniel Oscar Black Panther Party Masako Judas Nabet England Chicago Ryan America KIM
The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

90.3 KAZU Programming

05:28 min | 10 months ago

The Lucas Bros, Using Humor 'To Shake Folk Woke'

"Kenny and Keith Lucas are stand up comedians and identical twins. People don't have to react when I see twins. No. Okay, they go crazy like we were in the supermarket looking for some Jell O. Yeah. And we're just about to pick it out. And then some dude came out of nowhere. It was like, you know, you guys have a stick of Doublemint gum. That's from their 2017. Netflix special Lucas brothers were having a moment right now they're writing and starring in a remake of Revenge of the Nerds, But they also wrote the story for the new movie Judas and the Black Messiah. The film premieres today in theaters and on HBO. Max NPR's Elizabeth Blair has this profile. The Lucas brothers are best known for a kind of stoner humor. And here's a rule of thumb You should never do. Shrooms wouldn't do Who looks like you, man. I'm telling you. But underneath the jokes, there's a serious side that draws heavily on their childhood in the housing projects of Newark, New Jersey, called the Garden spires is you always, you know, broken elevators infested with rats and rotten Drug dealing violence everywhere, But you know, there's a community that is people that there's families is my family When they were six years old there, Dad went to prison. My father actually is out of prison. He's not in prison anymore, and it sucks that he's out. I wish he was still there. Oh, yeah. I wanted to go back because all he wants to do is father's sight. Don't like do we pay rent? Now it's over. The Lucas Brothers connection to Newark got the attention of New Jersey Senator Cory Booker in 1999, then a Newark City councilman, Booker went on a hunger strike in front of the Garden spires. He also served as the city's mayor. Here's Booker talking to the Lucas brothers on his instagram. I love your insightful, hard hitting humor and the sort of the Eddie Murphy and S O. My great heroes Coming up, you know, were uncompromising how they used humor to shake folks woke like book arm. Keith and Kenny Lucas went to law school and why you and Duke, But unlike Booker, they dropped out. It was weird Tonto Study law and and kind of be poor and black because it's like, Oh, I see what The consequences of policy and law are like on a daily basis, and especially when it in relation to African Americans and the notion of criminality and how it's projected onto blacks and I see that process. I found myself sort of disengaged very early. I always said, you know what I want to do something that has a direct impact on people. From an emotional standpoint, Judas and the Black Messiah is very emotional. Lucas brothers were in college when they first learned about Fred Hampton, the charismatic leader of the Illinois Black Panther Party in the 19 sixties in the movie he's played by Daniel Cholula, Mother Liberating You can't Murder Liberation is another revolutionary, but you can't murder a revolution for murder Freedom fighter, but you get amount of freedom. He's the Black Messiah. Judas is William O'Neal, an African American who was arrested for interstate car theft and Impersonating a federal officer in the movie. We see how the FBI recruited O'Neill to avoid jail time and earn some money. He was instructed to infiltrate the Black Panther Party. And provide the FBI with information about Hampton O'Neill is played by like Keith Stanfield Target You Like some good information, some nobody else No. Is it some kind of bonuses? I'm I'm counting on it. Bill O'Neill became so much of a Panther insider. He was put in charge of security. He provided the FBI with a floor plan of Hampton's apartment in 1969. The Chicago police raided the apartment and killed two Black Panther leaders, including Hampton for the Lucas Brothers. It was essential to tell the story of how the FBI recruited informants in the black community. I think it's important to see just how insidious The system has been in turning young African Americans against one another. Now they Essentially used poor black people against poor black people to execute their goals of minimizing the threat of black messiah is like we just felt it was important to see both sides of the coin. Whether it's a historical drama or its stand up comedy for the Lucas Brothers. It all comes from the same source in a big thing about our act is that we we always try to ground it and stuff that we've gone through, and it's always been Important for us to talk about these systemic issues and a variety of ways. Now they're writing and will star in Seth McFarland reimagining of 1980 four's Revenge of the Nerds Practice a bunch after school. They called US nerds. So one cool. The Lucas brothers promise that their movie will be almost nothing like the original because times have changed. It's like the juxtaposition of being a bully and a nerd is so different from what it was like in the eighties, where you had this one, a stark dichotomy between what it was bullying what it was to be a nerd. Now that's been fused together, and I think That's why the time is right to make a story about that. The Lucas brothers say it's hard to watch the original revenge of the nerds. Even though the movie was a childhood staple. They're excited to give it an update and to make it personal. Elizabeth Blair. NPR news

Lucas Lucas Brothers Keith Lucas Booker Elizabeth Blair Max Npr Senator Cory Booker Newark City Newark Kenny Lucas Revenge Of The Nerds FBI New Jersey Illinois Black Panther Party Daniel Cholula Judas William O'neal Kenny Netflix HBO
"fred hampton" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:45 min | 10 months ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WTOP

"First is Judas and the Black Messiah of biographical drama about the betrayal of a Black Panther party leader in the 19 sixties. By an FBI informant. Goodbye. Best performing a rainbow coalition of oppressed brothers and sisters have average color. Their aim is to sow hatred and inspired terror. Here. There is also mine aria touching film about the struggles that a Korean American family faces in rural America in the 19 eighties. Joining us live now with every faults on both eyes. Vulture critic Jen Chaney, who joins us on Skype, Jen, Judas and the Black Messiah Day viewing on HBO, Max. And also in some theaters. Tell us what you thought of this. This is a terrific movie. As you said, it's It's a look at, uh Fred Hampton, who was the chairman of the Chicago chapter of the Black Panthers and William O'Neal, who was in the party but turned out to be an FBI informant who was feeding information about what was going on within the party. And it really plays out like a suspense thriller. Even though if you know your history, you know what happens. In the end, and it's anchored by some just terrific performances like Keith Stanfield as William O'Neal is terrific, but Daniel Cholula as Fred Hampton Is just so powerful. You know, you've seen him and get out. You've seen him and and widows. This actor just has such incredible range and I'm I expect him to get nominated for an Academy Award for this performance, agreed. I only watch the trailer, but he was amazing. All right, Let's talk about Minori because that trailer looks like this is a sweet, funny and really sort of tug at your heartstrings kind of movie. Tell us more about Minori and how we can see it. You're exactly right. This is just a lovely, lovely movie. As you said it's about a Korean American family in the 19 eighties who decides to move toe Arkansas and try to start a farm there struggling to make ends meet, and they also wanted their son. Their young son has a heart condition that they're also very concerned about, and he's played by Alan Kim, who was just Delightful little boy. It's such an American story, and it isn't some theaters, but a 24 the studio behind it. If you go to their website, they're selling tickets, quote unquote tickets on demand so that you can get a link and watch it at home. I will caution you that I noticed that some of the upcoming dates are already sold out. I'm not sure how you sold out sell out of a virtual link. But But do you go take a look at that? Because that's a wonderful way to be able to watch it. If you're not comfortable going to theaters yet sounds good jam. Thank you on Skype. That's vulture critic Jen Chaney, the time to say it is now a model furniture's president's Day.

William O'Neal Daniel Cholula Keith Stanfield Fred Hampton Alan Kim Jen Chaney Black Panther Arkansas FBI HBO 19 eighties Chicago Black Panthers 19 sixties Jen both eyes Academy Award America Skype First
"fred hampton" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:15 min | 10 months ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It's 8 23 Entertainment news with Dean Richards and this is kind of dangerous to try to remake The Wizard of Oz. Do Eunice. I'm already a little bit scared of the story, but they announced yesterday that a remake is definitely coming to the big screen. It's going to be directed by Nicole Cassell, who has done lots of TV projects. Probably most notably, was the executive producer and one of the directors of the HBO series Watchmen Shut, did a couple of movies But she says that she knows she's dealing with a classic. She's exhilarated and humbled. By re imagining such a legendary tale, Esso. It sounds like this is going to beam or taken from the original source material. The L. Frank bomb novel. That was published in 1900. Well, they did say that it is not going to be a musical this time, so this isn't going to be like the Wiz. This is not going to be like wicked. That are offshoots of the Wizard of Oz story. It's going to be more like the original novel, so we'll see what we'll see. You know what's gonna happen with this? Yes, we will. And all will also see how this movie about Fred Hampton turns out. Tell us about this. This is really interesting Film. Called Judas and the Black Messiah. Many of you will remember when Fred Hampton was murdered in 1969 by AH unit of the Cook County state's attorney's office. Back in the day. Fred Hampton was the chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party. And the story is, uh, from my memory of it, Uh, pretty accurate of how the party started What they did, uh, both positive and negative. On the murder of Fred Hampton in his own bed. Daniel Cholula stars as Fred Hampton on this movie, Daniel was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance in the movie. Get out. He was in Black Panther and number of other movies. Talk to him on a zoom call about the movie, but I pretty much just asking everybody what they've been doing during the pandemic in the quarantine. And Daniel had the most interesting thing that he told me that he learned that to write with my left hand was interested. Really, everybody all right, Mother. This the first time I've been able to sit down, you know, I've been kind of nonstop to 16 years old. Got to back you up to reading with your left hand. That's just something that you wanted to do. You want it to our eyes there a reason that you did that just want to do it then, And I didn't realize at the time was just like, remember, Like 34 months into it. I saw kept the first pig. I still got the paper with the first day I wrote No. And I just really puts a perspective like yeah. You're not gonna be great first time and I just got there. You know, I mean, a year later, I'll come just backing right. Wow. That's that's amazing because I am naturally left handed. And when I was a kid, they forced me to write with my right hand. They say there's that thing where you kind of like you should do things that challenge the way you usually do. Think so, then you can always look differently. I'm always like, right with my genuine stuff of my right hand and do all that stuff. And then when I go back to my left hand, just challenge is how I do things so that when I'm out in the world, I keep challenging and thinking about my mom. Not sure if I'm gonna do like that. I don't do like that. Isn't that interesting Way of challenging your Breen? Because I remember literally when I was in third grade. They took all the left handed students and we had a go into a special class They literally tied are left hands behind our backs. And forced us to write with our right hand which you know I couldn't do. And you know, I tried and tried and tried and, you know, just finally just gave up. Uh, it happened somewhere. It's so weird that they tried to force kids to not be left handed. Yeah, it was the left hand of stigma, right? Especially back then. And there. Sure. What baseball over the southpaws. Uh, you know, are a little nutty. And I like I like to write with my left hand. Unfortunately, my handwriting is so horrible that it's the same. So raise both hands easily. There's that, But I do like the idea and I mean I may May try it like Daniel said. To just, you know, do a little bit each day with my non dominant town, And he said that in a year you couldn't tell the difference over Maybe I'll try it is, you know it's kind of like exercising your brain. Right? It is. I decide I'm writing and I won season in 16 or softball. I decided to bat lefty and I felt very comfortable and I was just a bad hitting from that side. So there you go. I'll talk to you tomorrow. Thank you, Dean. We have a big time mystery guest coming up after the 30 news and if you identify The mystery guest..

Daniel Cholula Fred Hampton Dean Richards Nicole Cassell Illinois Black Panther Party HBO L. Frank Black Messiah executive producer Cook County softball murder Judas baseball chairman attorney
Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

Morning Edition

07:02 min | 10 months ago

Finding the Judas in Judas and the Black Messiah

"The 19 sixties, Fred Hampton was chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party. He was a rising leader, organizing disparate multi racial groups in Chicago. Until police shot and killed him and another Black Panther member in an early morning raid. There's a new movie about Fred Hampton out this week, it is called Judas and the Black Messiah. It's not a question of ball. It's a non violence is a question of resistance to fascism or non existence within fascism Film got rave reviews after its premiere at the Sundance Film Festival last week. It's the second feature from director Shaka King who, until this project came along, was on the verge of giving up making feature films altogether. MPR's Andrew Lyne bonked takes it from here. Yes, Judas and the Black Messiah is about Fred Hampton and how he led the Black Panthers in Chicago. But it's also about William O'Neill, the man who infiltrated the Black Panthers in spied on Hampton on behalf of the FBI. Shaka King told me that the Lucas Brothers who co wrote the story, sold the idea to him like this. Their pitch that they laid out was we want to make a movie about Fred Hampton and William O'Neal. That's kind of like the departed the 2006 Martin Scorsese movie Inside the World of Cointelpro, or Counterintelligence program, the 19 sixties project where the FBI infiltrated and disrupted groups like the Black Panthers, and I was like I see it. I'm done. I'm in Judas is a tight, intense movie. Yes, like the departed and other Scorsese type crime movies. It's a long way, though, from King's first feature film newly weeds from 2013. So what you got here? Newly weeds tells the story of a young couple in Brooklyn who smoke a lot of weed where Judas is loud and fast. Really? Weeds is quiet and tender. I'm done. I'm done online. Won't want Wanna hang out. We hang up. Yeah. How are we supposed to go to the Galapagos? If you mind the bag every two minutes. It hits similar beats as movies by other indie darling directors like Joe Swanberg or the Duplass Brothers. The film Independent Spirit Awards even gave King the Someone to watch award after it came out, which came with a $25,000 grant. Not bad for someone fresh out of N Y. U film school. But after that initial fanfare, I was so depressed after making newly weeds and my expectations for the release just not coming to fruition. The movie didn't get much attention outside the festival circuit from agents and distributors, largely because it was a movie with black actors who no one knew on at that time that was deemed worthless. The film's release in 2013 wasn't that long ago, but it was just before what a friend of Kings jokingly dubbed. The Black Excellence Industrial Complex. You're Selma's and Moon Lights and Black Panthers when movie studios realized they could make a lot of money by releasing films by and starring black people. Nearly weeds. Loss of momentum burnt king out on the idea of making another feature film, But he did have an idea for a short rolling around in his head. It was kind of silly kind of outrageous, sweetheart. Lips. Excuse me, miss. It's called Moon Yang's after the Italian slur for black people want heard on the streets of Brooklyn in it, King and two others play these three black guys who talk like they're in the mom movies. King has such a fondness for It was somewhat inspired by King's experience growing up in a mostly black part of Brooklyn, but going to high school in South Brooklyn, where everyone the Irish Americans, Greek Americans, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, all talks like the Italian American kids, and those kids were Hilarious. They were profane. They were quick witted, and we were not friends put like I could appreciate their sense of humor. The movie is a concise examination of race, gender gentrification. As King's character gets into an argument with his sister over a MetroCard, you did not have a dime. Put 1000 until the white guy comes by and says hi to the sister. Hi. How you doing? How are you? You guys just don't know what both outta here. Oh, Polluted the movie is fun and poignant, and the process reminded King how much he loved making movies. That movie saved me. You saved me. I didn't see that or know that about Shaka. But I could understand, and I could see how that could happen. Charles de King, no relation to director Shocking is the CEO and founder of Macro which since its founding in 2015 has produced movies and TV shows featuring non white people, including Judas and the Black Messiah. It was before the oscarssowhite moment. Of 2015. There's a lot that's happened since then. There is much more of an openness and I think an understanding of the business opportunity there. Which brings us to King today, making a movie about an anti capitalist black radical at a very capitalist Hollywood studio without watering down the politics. The deal is to respect the authenticity. Fred Hampton Jr is the current chairman of the Black Panther Party, Cubs and son of Fred Hampton. He says he and the other Panthers had their guards up when they were approached about this film. The Panthers have long been subjected to propaganda campaigns and misrepresentations. But he says King and the rest of the cast and crew definitely navigated the crossroads between their creative goals and the Panthers. Political ones. Well enough, anyway. Revolutionaries never satisfied. You know, I wish there was more political cartoon. We could've pushed. In a certain point, However, I'll put the people's need before before my needs my wants and desires. For instance, the relationship between Fred Hampton and his partner, Deborah Johnson, was a tricky thing to get right. The poet.

Fred Hampton Shaka King Black Panthers Illinois Black Panther Party Andrew Lyne William O'neill Lucas Brothers King William O'neal FBI Joe Swanberg Duplass Brothers Film Independent Spirit Awards Brooklyn Chicago Black Excellence Industrial Co Sundance Film Festival Moon Yang Martin Scorsese
"fred hampton" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:45 min | 10 months ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Just after coming out of prison being in the moment and saying his words seeing everyone being in cleveland. Everyone's faces it'll just felt like he was in the room. If i'm if i'm being honest and agent is something's going on for you and your vessel and it was just. I don't really on being honest. I don't really remember the takes like i don't. I watched the train. Those oury remember. I usually remember. Taste thou remember. Remember remember that. But i just kind of left me left and go inbetween takes like the the background french french his life he was in the room. It was him you know. Because it was his words it was his energy was his his his purpose. His message is ideas. That was coming through all of us in the room. Nets daniel columbia of get out. Fame starring as fred hampton shock. I was watching you and quest love whose phone was also premiering the summer of soul at sundance having conversation and you talked about this moment that you filmed fred hampton. Of course daniel giving this speech and what that was like. Can you bring us behind the scenes. What he just got off a plane he'd been doing press for queen and slim for a week and so he'd been away from this week. I haven't played the week. And you know he. He woke up late of the only time he will of late in not no. He was nervous in the in the walked into the church. And we just i mean. I can't breast how that days really. We got a lot of moments onset where you know we kind kinda felt confirmation that we were doing the right thing But none quite like that day because it almost felt like everyone who's traffic at time one and everyone is treating him like like fred that day i mean the i take. He came those steps And just the way that the crowd greeted him. It really do feel like you know. Fred hampton just came out of prison was welcomed. You know with open the hose by the community that loves them And the energy that they gave him he fed off of and it just became a it ceased to become a performance Specifically that seen it really became you know just a very real thing it's an astounding moment. I also want to go to keith. Stanfield two plays william o'neil the fbi informant judas to send the black messiah speaking in qna with saga after there's nuance to characters. So our there was some loving even though he may have done things. We don't understand it had to find a love and it wasn't always easy. No i'll be crying Like y'all know what is new especially when we got down to the scene where i had to make a decision to poison bread. Wherever about that. I couldn't even keep it together is because i'll just like everything just fell so so real so i decided to bond bennett charter moving. Just email okay. Th- played william. O'neil what you want people to take away from this film shock in a significance of getting it out to this mass audience. Number things I think one of the reasons to make o.'neil central characters to me a lot of ways terms of history latin above about the dangers of being political on. And you know not only how it can lead to you know d- manipulation and you know one destabilizing movement but you know women neil's like came to a bitter end You know because of the decisions he made. It didn't hurt other people. They openly him even though the made them in a very self serve You know i think there's also obviously the desire to make it. Clear that the panthers you know were largely motivated by love. Love each other love of the community level that people You know and to kind of caribbean store record. You know these weren't like terrorists You know Just individuals interested in targeting likely inhaled by people just a total fictive You know i think In regards to roy mitchell who's a primary cocoon the film and waymo o'neil's hammer. You know. I the reason why we kinda tried to make him complex as well. Because i think that a lot of ways you know is character. Highlights the dangers of being white centrist Especially you know when you a white person who you know works for the white power structure An and it doesn't get more. You don't find anyone who does that even more so than an fbi agent so we have five things to to take away from it but because this summer checking. I wanna thank you so much for being with us. Congratulations on this epic work. The film is judas in the black messiah premieres tonight at the sundance film festival out february twelfth on. Hbo max that does it for our broadcast. I made me goodman with juan gonzalez. Stay safe where mass where to..

juan gonzalez Fred hampton roy mitchell cleveland william fred hampton daniel february twelfth o.'neil waymo o'neil william o'neil sundance film festival O'neil judas tonight this week fred two Stanfield this summer
"fred hampton" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Somehow we're back for a second entertainment segment with Dean Richards. Despite public demand Exactly Tiger King. You know, the president issued a bunch of pardons yesterday. Tiger King's name was not on the Is this really a possibility? He's looking into it. He is Joe Exotic is trying his best t get something to happen. He had says that he's been in contact with the president. Oh, my gosh, that was Donald Trump. You know, he has filed all the appropriate paperwork TMZ dot com as confirmed that the paperwork is on the president's desk. President Trump has said that he would look at the case and, you know, take a look. He's in the first year of a 22 year. Sentence for trying to arrange the murder of animal rights activist Carole Baskin. So whether or not it's going to happen or not, I mean, you know, he's handing out pardons like you know, like Lifesavers Yesterday s O, You know, who knows Some stranger things have happened. I know that a lot of people say, you know, how would you do? Why would he do it and nothing. I mean, he is a master of look over here. And he's an entertainer. The president he obviously had a show for a long time. I could see it politically as cover for some other ones, because the news will go crazy for a Joe exotic parted and some other ones could slip under. Yeah, I guess I guess that might be the motivation. I mean, you know, people are saying That the pardons that have come down so far can all be linked to something to benefit Donald Trump later on. I can't imagine what Joe exotic could possibly add to that list. I don't know. Except you know some some distraction because it certainly will make headlines if if it happened, maybe the way to the countdown. It's the last 10 seconds of 2020 that would seemingly fit. With how the years gone. I want to skip ahead to Ah, this movie about Fred Hampton being delayed again, which is a real bummer, if nothing else, because I still think I think a lot of people know the story of Fred Hampton. But I think a lot of people don't and the sooner that that's trinkets told, I think the better for all of us. Yeah, I've seen this movie. Already. It's super super intense, called Judas and the Black Messiah. That chronicles the rise and fall on the murder of Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton. Here in Chicago was supposed to have come out be before the end of the year. Then it was indefinitely postponed and now they're saying they're going to release it on February 12th. In theaters If they're back open again, and also on HBO. Max Daniel Kalou. He was the star of the movie. Get out! He was in Black Panther. He actually got Oscar nomination for Get out. He's the one that plays Fred Hampton in this movie does a spectacular job. But even with this delayed release now into February It still could be up for Oscar consideration. Really? All the deadlines for the Academy Awards have been pushed back this year because the Oscars are not even gonna happen. Until April. 25th. Wow, something like that. I mean, it's gonna be a really late Oscar so because of the pandemic and movies coming out late, they pushed the deadlines for all of that stuff back, but This one. If you've been waiting to see it, it's definitely worth seeing a real incredible piece of Chicago history. On will be out on February 12th. Yeah, Hopefully, people see it read more because it's a It's a harrowing, horrible story in our in our city's history coming to America, Boy, everyone. We got the pictures last week of our CEO and Eddie. Yes. Watch the trailer. Did it looks fun? Yeah, it looks pretty funny. Eddie Murphy. And our Ciccio and James Earl Jones returning from the 1988 original. We've got Tracy Morgan, Leslie Jones, Wesley Snipes, among many others joining the cast. They're bringing back a lot of familiar things from The original movie. If you want to see it w G and t v dot com we've got that posted up for you. There's also some footage that just came out from Ah lifetime documentary on the life of Whitney Houston and her daughter. Bobbi Kristina Brown. This new documentary is supposed to parallel the their two lives there, their lives, their dedication to each other and cryptically how they both died. The same way I found in a bathtub, so that's going to be on The lifetime channel on that is going to be on February the sixth E Eddie Murphy movie. It's going to be on Amazon Prime, by the way on March 5th Alright and Wonder Woman. Obviously, the talk of Ah lot of people and you had a chance to sit down with a star in the director. Yeah, Gal Goudeau and Patty Jenkins to resume chat with them last week. I guess it was and we just No, we We compared the original movie from 2017 with this one that will be coming out on Christmas Day. Patty Jenkins starts off here. What would you say is the biggest difference just in terms of the movie making of this one? And the first wonder Woman movie. I think I really let loose with this one. The first one it was, you know you're trying to. You're trying to bring something to life and be very careful on this one. I was like, Let's go for it, man. Let's make the greatest most massive movie in every way emotionally. Systematically and and visually, and so I am toward the stars with every aspect of it, and that made it a very difficult for me to make, but also wonderful because it allowed us to aim that way emotionally, you know, to try to make something really, really, really. Profound hopefully and have some other. You know, Joy. I hope for all of those things. So you know, you never know how far you get to the mark. But that's what we were allowed to. And for What kind of paces did you go through for this? It was just a lot of work and still recovering. It was allowed after two years. You're still recovery? No. Yeah, it was. Look, I think that made a point about wanting to have is less You know, C g I s possible which is great, and I'm super hurt. I'm super happy about it, and I'm extremely happy with the result. However, it meant that we had to do so much more by ourselves. And that means you gotta learn it. Rehearse it, Um, be be hanged up in the air in the harnessed on wires being dunk into water acting while doing so much of the stands by herself. It was a lot, but it's worth it because at the end of the movie, you get to see the difference. It's like you see it in the weight and then the speed and in our expressions. You see that it's not computers. So so it was worth it. But it was very, very laborious. I love anyone who uses the word laborious. Oh, yeah, a conversation. Uh, the movie will open on Christmas Day in theaters. Were there open and also on HBO, Max. Tomorrow I'm gonna have all of the Christmas Day release is give you my reviews of that in the new Tom Hanks movie. The New Disney Pixar movie and Many, many more. I believe that you will not be here. No, it's a Mr Plier will be here with you, but we'll pick it up again next week, and we can postulate on plenty more. Well, Merry Christmas to you and your family, John. It's really fun talking to you, as always had 9 30 on TV this morning. I'm cooking from home this morning doing some Christmas appetizers. Would say the danger factor is about eight or 10. Okay, using an air friar, there's a really good chance I could wind up in the emergency room, 10. Well, we look forward to that broadcast from there to Dean. You know,.

Fred Hampton President Trump president Joe Exotic Eddie Murphy murder Chicago Oscar Tiger King Whitney Houston Patty Jenkins Dean Richards Carole Baskin James Earl Jones HBO Black Messiah Academy Awards Lifesavers
"fred hampton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It is not to just have one or two or three leaders and You know, Patrice and Opal and I don't call ourselves the leaders of the movement because we're not and actually and nobody's going to give that to us, right? They'll say you are you are a leader that you are not the leader and y'all are not leaders and I agree 100% and I Deeply appreciate that. That that that caution because ultimately you're right. It is reproducing old paradigms that are really dangerous for us. I mean, if you look at this president right now, he wants to be the leader forever. That is not how this system is supposed to work even as deeply flawed as it is. And even as much as it was developed for like old white dudes, That's not how it was supposed to function. In fact, the whole purpose of building this democracy supposedly was to do it differently than the monarchy that people were escaping from. But that's what's at stake for us right now. So I talk in the book about How we develop leaders right and how we should have that as front of mind Always and I talk about how we develop leaders that have been denied leadership even inside of our own movements, and this is one of the things that I really want to come across in this book. I make a lot of arguments for how we sometimes adopt Right wing talking points, but we don't even realize it like around identity politics, For example, it is important to me to help build the leadership and capacity of people who have been left out and left behind intentionally. So that means I have to pay attention to how my developing the leadership of black trans folks how my developing the leadership of black, queer and non binary folks how my developing the leadership of Black women, right? You know, we have to think about this and even further We don't have the luxury of being neutral about those things way live them every single day. But part of the problem in terms of the way things are organized right now is that they're designed to keep us out. But they're also designed to be led by people who are not us, So we have to figure out how we create the kinds of movements how we build the kinds of movements. It literally trapped, transformed the way that power functions but also transforms the way that we practice leadership in our communities In the book I talked about Common kind of misconception about this movement, which is that it has no leaders, like occupy Wall Street. People always say Oh, yeah, you guys like occupy wall So you don't have leaders? I'm like. No, no, no. There's so many leaders know, and that's the point and every time in history that we've had designated one leader right, think about Martin Luther King. When Martin Luther King was assassinated, it shook and destabilized in a lot of ways. The civil rights movement When Malcolm X was was assassinated, it shook and destabilized in a lot of ways. And the growing black power movement and then on and on. Fred Hampton, Huey Newton, right, So many folks who when you consolidate power in that way, you also make yourselves incredibly vulnerable as targets. And we know that this government has a long history right of Disrupting ascents and when they couldn't disrupt rates one way to say it. Yeah, when they couldn't disrupt what they did was they got rid of people, So we've got to think more. Intentionally write about how we're growing our movement but also how we're practicing and living in the world that we're trying to create. But it's not here yet. I see that, too, as as as treating the sort of movement as a monolithic, which is obviously something that we do a lot in this country with anything that is other than the one thing that this country was built around, which is basically just white men on Dwight people in general. So if you have the one person that's the monolithic movement, and then, of course, if you take out that one person it, it's as you just said it D. Destabilizes. But it also goes back to what we're saying about just creating the exact same systems that were already living in that we that we know doesn't really work. I think that You know, with the amount of people that we have in this country, it's like the fact that we just have one president is it's kind of wild. You know, like we just have this like one person, and I think you know, prior to trump everyone like, well, I mean, how much Howard says the president really do and we're like, Well, actually, it does a lot or or not. He doesn't do anything. But I love that idea of the sort of delineation of power. Among people and going back to that point of what you said about cracking that open within people and understanding. Where did you get that from? I know you write a lot about your mother in the book in your relationship with your mother. I also have just a wild ass crazy Amazing Mom who I feel like She still is. She's like I'm still kind of conservative. Are you think you are? I think this is like you are you seem to be living in a very progressive way. But she taught me so many things about that Once I had the language I was like, Okay, this is what that is. Talk to me about your relationship with your mom and dad. She sort of like cracked that power opened and you She did You know Mom's air. Amazing and Miss mind so much, But I know that she is walking with me every step You know, my mom taught me what's important in life. And you know, she really have this ethos about her that We're all each other's responsibility..

president Martin Luther King Patrice Fred Hampton Opal Malcolm X Huey Newton Dwight D. Destabilizes Howard
"fred hampton" Discussed on Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Discover Music Channel (Discover Music Channel)

"Black Panther but not, Fred Hampton. In the Hampton. Won't T Kim. George Kill Twenty big about it. Two thousand. Could go into Wendy. Quarter Burger in did in motor by Brianna pain above. The pile. Long. Off Basketball. The man minded expects your solid. Platform. For combats without the is not the science. Of Two thousand. Airport. Is it the long in for Finger Brain Sciences at Austin assault? Really want to know why you also scared cut the promised land we almost here but look I think. In. October examples like the. Salutes the panther too I saw. My cute braces amid the cancer black. Back. For the kitchen. And she got. I got money. Yeah. I don't. Get a chick. One. Choice. We need. Good. Everybody will seek south. Wash it dotty saw. Chain Marine. Folks. J. Pop. Guy Game with me and ain't got. Gain. Because They Go Down Yeah, Minh arranged. arranged. She got. EXCI-. I got done. But she. Is She. Good.

Fred Hampton Finger Brain Sciences Kim Basketball George Minh assault J. Pop Austin
"fred hampton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Next song I would like to dedicate to Fred Hampton for happened. I'm from Chicago. Fred Hampton was a black pack Black Panther from Chicago who was killed at the age of 21. He was such a leader such a forth such a strong man for us. People always fighting for freedom. And he's been a hero of mine. Since I was a kid I learned so much about so we don't dedicate this next one. To Fred Hampton. This car hurt leaves, which are not cursed. Your brother. Your brother Don't freedom is the line even if it's long keep it on the soles. Fucking cold brother stories about you about chicken love with what I got open, especially those that were not enough started from the bottom that way, Brother heart while you try to book a photoshopped, particularly stuff down, stuck up. They want a couple of really It's just that that's what we just did. What what? Like what? What? What other crews Show flat like Wait, wait, wait. We like Virgil Way. Move about this. Well, me like.

Fred Hampton Chicago Virgil Way
"fred hampton" Discussed on V103

V103

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on V103

"With the public Enemy fight the power 2020 performance with Chuck D. Not Rhapsody. Black thought and why G if you missed it, take a listen. But 2020 information got him seeing what's really wrong with race. I have a strong opinion that we your thoughts, Run your life. Be careful what you say, Francis Sister 17 to saw indefinitely and I do love friends know what I mean? It's a system of talking. Nobody's agree. They say it's suicide. When dead by swinging cat was 100 black men. That's what I'm seeing. How many doses have been burnt down and one Central park was a thriving black down Chuck in the palace right now. Thank you, Flavia. Put your life on the last water right now. The next race is still singing fight, pal. Power power power. Give me along to the boys in the back. But not Fred Hampton was in Eddie's hand watching George killed for 20. Think about it. They had 2000 pennies. 24 for a Burger didn't fight for Briana and pain of power generation along with mine. Back. Your solid evidence is what women off flat for combat without not change off thoughts about you report back here to visit the moon. Fingerprint sciences that off. I really want to know why. You also stated that the problems we almost think images that ruffled examples like.

Chuck D. Briana Francis Sister Fred Hampton Flavia Central park Burger Eddie George
White People Talking About Whiteness

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:52 min | 1 year ago

White People Talking About Whiteness

"Guys many, if not most white people don't think of themselves as racialist race, we might tell ourselves is a reality for people who have different skin colors than ours Black People Hispanic people, Asian people, Indigenous People, etc, but of course white is a race. Quick important side note here. Race is not a biological thing. It is socially constructed. Sadly the white people who seem to have most clearly grasped that white is race or white nationalists. But now it is time for the rest of US white people to actually see whiteness and to talk to each other about it. This many people in the racial justice world would argue. Is the key first step toward white people engaging fully in creating a more equitable society. My guest today is Eleanor Hancock. She's the executive director of group called White, awake which employs and I'm quoting here educational resources and spiritual practices. To engage white people and I'm quoting here again in the creation of just and sustainable society an quote. Eleanor was recommended to me by seven Selassie, who's one of the court teachers on the ten percent happier APP, and was on the show last week, and really powerful episode which I recommend you check out. In this episode Eleanor, and I talk about why this work is so important. Why so many white people resist it? The barriers white people face when they actually do begin the work. The role of meditation, and the problematic aspects of white woke kness in the discussions here we go eleanor Hancock. Nice to meet you virtually. Thanks again for doing this absolutely. So I'd be curious to hear how you came to this work. How and why you can't? I would star with just a little bit about my background and the different stages in my life that have led up to it. I grew up in West Texas. kind of a mid sized city very conservative environments. I'm solid GENENTECH's so I, didn't I was we had an integrated public school system? But that said there's I think a lot of kind of just default segregation that happens socially so I developed awareness of the differences that folks of color the differences of their experiences in the united. States in particular verses, my experience as a white person that began to happen for me in graduate school. It was a variety of different circumstances that led to that. One of them like. Having a roommate that was reading the autobiography of Asada Shukor, and just realizing I, knew about I knew about Amnesty International and that there could be folks who are imprisoned for political reasons, but I it was shocking to me to realize that was something that happened here in the United States, and then the other thing is very influential to me to jump in I. Hate interrupting my guest, but it might be worth explaining a little bit of a Sasha core in that back story just oh! So she's. Part of the Black Panthers and during this entire time period where the FBI. was, targeting civilians through their coin tell pro program and a lot of just extreme aggression on many different levels, including the outright murder of Fred Hampton while he was sleeping in his bed at night, and it was a really it was a political assassination, and during that time period they were able to capture Asada and create these charges against her that kept her in prison for a long time and. She escaped to Cuba. All of that history I would really encourage people to read about that. You can look up quantel pro and the FBI and understand. The destruction that occurred to a lot of the movements that brought a so much during the sixties, the fifties, sixties and seventies the ways that they were destroyed. And part of what happens when you infiltrate and destroy a movement from within is. All only harm it. Externally you create so much paranoia and violence within that then people also began to destroy one another in different ways, so in terms of my own. You know just how I came to this work I try not to Belabor the story too much, but I was in a series of classes and graduate school with a Chicano professor who was teaching performance our, and this was in the late nineties and I really. Learned a lot about what at the time we would have simply called identity politics through art. So. Yeah, being part of those performance art classes for the entire time. I was in graduate school, was really an eye opener that was also during this apetit Easter rebellion, and so we were all just starting to get online, and that was part of it was incredible about that time period. APETIT ZAPPA of southern Mexico, who are indigenous people who had risen up against their own governments specifically in response to Nafta the North American. Free Trade Agreement. And there are a lot of aspects of my world view that developed during that time period, and then as I lived in my life. You know I have a biracial daughter. Her father's African American during the time that we were married I had the privilege of spending a lot of time with his family and developing strong relationships with them, and experiencing myself as the minority I think that that's a unique experience that not every a lot of people don't have that opportunity to be inside of somebody else's space racially speaking and have to understand their norms and their experience and adapt to that. I think that's a really valuable experience.

Eleanor Hancock White United States Apetit Zappa Asada Shukor Genentech Black Panthers FBI Quantel Executive Director West Texas. Selassie Mexico Fred Hampton Cuba Amnesty International Professor Murder
"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Considered myself a writer for the movement but not necessarily of the movement the word revolutionary stuck in my throat again Fred repeated I am and the audience responded in kind this this time when he said a revolutionary response was louder by the third or fourth time I hesitantly joined and by the seventh or eighth time I was starting as loudly and enthusiastically as everyone else I am a revolutionary it was a fresh cells which read took me and countless others I felt the level of my commitment palpably wrapping and then Fred said I believe I was not born to die in a car wreck slipping on a piece of ice of a bad heart but I'm going to die to be able to doing the things I was born for I believe I'm going to dive off the people I believe and I believe letting go I'm going to be able to die as a revolutionary and the international proletarian struggle and I hope that each of you will be able to die in a struggle or you'll be able to live in it and I think that struggles going to come wanted to live for the people wanted to struggle for the people when it should die for the people and that was August of that's how we and then that was August of nineteen sixty nine three months before the raid on December fourth and of course we didn't know the prophecy in his words we chanted free Fred Hampton so that when I woke up one fifty years ago this December fourth my partner skip banjo knocked on my door and said the chairman was dad it was like the person who had made us feel alive that we could do anything it was bigger than life and to be told that he was dead it was just I I I couldn't believe it I was shocked I didn't know what to do fortunately.

writer Fred Hampton chairman partner
"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Things quieted down there was a hush a moment later Fred emerge from the fat and strode to the pulpit everyone stood up and clapped the words wall shook with the thunder of three hundred voices chanting free Fred Hampton unlike in other panther Vance Fred was not surrounded by Panthers in leather jackets and black berets he stood alone dressed in a button down shirt with the pullover sweater he was twenty years old was smooth youthful skin and a boyish smile Fred Hampton how the microphone I'm free he began to push out of their approval his voice got softer I went down to the prisoner Minard thinking we were the vanguard but down there I got down on my knees and listened and learned from the people I went down in the valley and picked up to be to the people a drumbeat started and everyone clapped to the rhythm Frank chan and a cross between a Baptist preacher and sly and the family stone hi may eat high into a two syllable word he sang hi I'm high AF the people and then change and then chanted the words again it was impossible for me not to join in and soon I clapped and stamped with everyone else when the framers over things quieted down and Fred said if you ever think about me anyway kind of doing a revolutionary act forget about me I don't want myself on your mind if you're not going to work for the people if you have to make a commitment at the age of twenty and you say I don't want to make a commitment at the age of twenty only because of the reason that I'm too young to die I want to live a little longer then you're dead already you have to understand that people have to pay a price for peace if you dare to struggle you dare to win if you cannot struggle the damage you don't deserve to win let me say peace to you if you're willing to fight for it Jennifer had a solid stand up it says stand up and raise your hand and he said repeat after me and he said I am and I repeat it and everybody else three hundred people repeat it for an hour among the relatively few white people there Anne said a revolutionary and I.

Fred Hampton Vance Fred Minard Frank chan Jennifer Anne
"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"He requirement filed along brief summarizing the evidence and its power to the people we were sort of an attitude of nothing left to lose and we had an opinion that basically vindicated what we've been saying that there was more than enough evidence to go to the jury on the federal state and city and county conspiracy I went I had both been held in contempt many times those were overturned and it led to of actually to a new trial and a settlement of one point eight five million dollars for some thirteen years after we had filed suit just a magnificent piece of legal perseverance and and skill Jeff hostage to wonder what you did but I wanted to ask you to please talk about Fred Hampton maybe you could read a portion of your book the assassination of Fred Hampton for us well I I I thank you Fred Hampton was framed up on it I screamed Pentium bark of ice cream to the local kids and he ended up with a sense of two to five years and went down the monarch penitentiary we got him out on appeal by then he came back out and gave a speech and this was in the summer August of nineteen sixty nine and Clint and I were both present there and I just want a and I sat there and freight came out my colleague flint Taylor found an opening in a row about halfway back after a few minutes things quieted down there was a hush a moment later Fred emerge from the fat and strode to the pulpit everyone stood up and clapped the words wall shook with the thunder.

Fred Hampton Clint Jeff flint Taylor
"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Attorney Jeff Haas was in a police lock up in Chicago interviewing the fiance of Fred Hampton she was telling him how the police pulled her from the room as Fred Hampton lay unconscious on their bad she heard one officer say he still alive she then heard two shots a second officer said she's good and dead now she looks at Jeff and asks what can you do the assassination of Fred Hampton is Haas's personal account of how he and people's law office partner flint Taylor went after Hamptons assassins they ultimately prevailed over unlimited government resources and an FBI conspiracy his book however isn't just a story of justice delivered it also portrays Hampton in a new light as a dynamic community leader and an inspiration in the fight against injustice Jeff Haas is a long time member of the national lawyers guild who has dedicated his career to working for social justice in nineteen sixty nine he and three other lawyer set up the people's law office in Chicago their clients included the black Panthers SPS members and many other political activist Haas went on to handle cases involving prisoners' rights police torture and the wrongfully accused Jeff welcome back to law and disorder glad to be here glad to be with you you have we both read and love your book I tell us how you came to write it it's really not just only about Fred Hampton's murder but it's also a personal and political biography of sorts well I started to write like a lawyer like you know it's going to prove what happened and bill Ayers talked me into going to graduate school and get an MFA in.

Jeff Haas Chicago Fred Hampton officer community leader murder bill Ayers Attorney partner flint Taylor FBI black Panthers
Dr. Aldon D. Morris Discuss History of Sociology Pertaining to Black America

In Black America

09:08 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Aldon D. Morris Discuss History of Sociology Pertaining to Black America

"John Leo Hinton Junior and welcome to another edition up in black miracle on news leaks program Doctor Alden. Moore's professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Northwestern University and president elect of the American Sociological Issue Logical Association in Black America. Many of the early white sociologists were actually quite racist and they preached that that in in many ways that black people were inferior and therefore they deserve to be at the bottom of the society because of their meager talents and intellect. So they did not pay much attention to the horrific Jim Crow period period of slavery. And so on. And so what that means is that the factors like oppression and Discrimination and Terence fourth and not bigger into their now about why black people face so much why they were and why they were at the bottom of society and And and this might be interesting you but the first to sociology books were actually written all race actually written by two I believe they were white. Mississippi and established in one thousand nine hundred. Five small group led by Lester. Ward William Grand something to Franklin Jennings and Albion small at a meeting any of the American Economic Association. The American Sociological Association held his first meeting the following year in Providence Rhode Island the membership in in one thousand nine hundred sixty two at one hundred fifteen for the first several decades the activities of the society or sending on publishing a journal holding an annual annual meeting and performing various administrative functions. Such as record keeping sending out communications and so forth and forty nine the first executive executive officer was appointed on a part time basis and in one thousand nine hundred sixty three. The Association established permanent headquarters in Washington. DC since the organization was founded. There has only been three African American presidents PRYATTA. More selection. Dr Al and Moore's will be the one hundred twelfth president of the American Sociological Association. He was served one year as president-elect and then become president of the Association in August Twenty Twenty he has taught at northwestern university. Since one thousand nine hundred ninety eight I was born and raised and Wyler Mississippi. Then I left and when I was twelve thirteen years old to and moved to Chicago and has lived in Chicago most of my life. I'm currently in in Chicago. Oh went to school and Peoria Illinois then I don't Long Island New York first job with the University of Michigan which has stayed about eight years and then I moved to North Western University. And I've been there ever since came to North Western in nineteen eighty eight idea about your childhood. Oh my childhood well. I was born in Jim Crow Mississippi. And I remember that I was just a boy I was six years old. When Emmett till was lynched He was lynched only about twenty miles. From where we we live. live with my grandparents and it had a tremendous impact on me and my generation. Some of us now refer to it as the Emmett till generation and I I remember going to the Colored School Having to sit on the back of buses Drink from Colored Water Fountains and do be be insulted and all kinds of ways especially my grandparents Were very strong people and I as a boy. I didn't understand why they were being called a boy aunt. And all of this kind of stuff so I experienced Jim Crow Racism in the heart of the South and Rural Mississippi. And then of course we were my mother and her siblings. Almost all of them have been part of the great migration and so they always lived in Chicago. Saint Louis and Milwaukee Detroit other places and so I as a little boy. I thought that The North was really really the promised land that they were really gold streets and milk and honey and all of that and so I also knew that I was going to come to Chicago once my elderly grandparents. It's passed and when they did. I was shocked with a double dose of new racism the the northern version. And so I you know I went to finished elementary school in Chicago. A went to community college and Chicago worked in factories in Chicago and And experienced a great deal love Racism and so on and Chicago of course This was the early seventy they sixties. The civil rights movement was still going on on the black power movement in particular was raging and so Also would assist that. They're the change could happen because I wouldn't have those movements and when I saw on television what was happening in the civil rights movement and all I. I grew up with a lot of hope. I thought we were going to change this thing. I had no idea that we would be where we are here. In the twenty thirty first century now you grew up in Chicago doing the radio station. WBO winds high days and allies Mohammed. And Jesse Jackson Operation Pushing Russian mayor. Daley tell us about that experience. It was a very A very rich rich experience by the time I was in Chicago. UGH Oh well I. I witnessed these a lot of the civil rights movement. The march on Washington and The Birmingham confrontation on television. 'cause I was in Chicago. Oh I was deeply influenced by Martin Luther King Junior and And then of course here in Chicago Jesse Jackson was his protege and so ooh I participated in protests and marches and so on that involved him and many many others Chicago was a very very Rich kind of Environment Like now it has some of the best and the worst tendencies of America and I went to a predominantly Lee White High School Where we were not as like people like students we were not considered to be smart? We were not considered to be college materials and so we weren't prepared appeared to they. They did not teach us to be those things and But yes I mean on on. You could drive down one street and park in front of me. Elijah Muhammad's house and you can go on a little bit east and you'll be at Jesse Jackson's headquarters and and so you know operation breadbasket is getting all of that. I do vaguely remember when Dr King about the Movement to Chicago in nineteen sixty six and there were marches for fair a housing and there was some of the most racist outpouring that the nation has ever seen When in one of those margins Dr King was hit upside the head with a brick and he said Ed that you know? I've been in Birmingham and I've been Montgomery. I've been in Mississippi but I've never seen the kind of racism that I'm experiencing here in Chicago so it was a mixed bag growing up here. I mean on the one hand. It was a vibrant strong rich black community. You know we had ebony and jet and all of the Black businesses the one that we had so many movements going on and and leaders both young and old. I was in community college when Fred Hampton and Mark Clark where fascinated they were black panthers and And that was the first time I saw Jesse Jackson in person. He came to my community college. I'll southeast junior colleges. In the end he spoke to us and And and I was like wow man. This is one of the most powerful individualism was ever heard so I remain active on movements but also You know Had never no one in my immediate family. That never gone to college so I didn't have any plans to go to college and And then the Vietnam war start raging and and I was working in Spiegel's warehouse and And I knew I didn't want to go to Vietnam and I ended up going to a community. Unity College us. Because then you could get for with the ferment. Kept you out of the service for a little while so so I did that and that was. That was the very beginning. Some of my college experience I in fact With somewhat afraid to go to community college because you know Com being a first generation student. I thought that everybody was going to be so much smarter than me. And then I was GonNa say things get laughed at it and all of that but I I went on. There was still more appealing. Attractive to meet and go into Vietnam and so I went. I went to a community college and I started reading. Do Boards and Margaret Walker and David Walker Peel. And all that kind of

Chicago Mississippi Jesse Jackson Jim Crow North Western University American Sociological Associat American Sociological Issue Lo Jim Crow Mississippi President Trump Terence Birmingham Moore Black America John Leo Hinton American Economic Association August Twenty Twenty Unity College Lester
"fred hampton" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Song I would like to dedicate to Fred Hampton Fred Hampton I'm from Chicago Fred Hampton was a black cat black can't the from Chicago who was killed at the age of twenty one he was such a leader such a force such a strong man first people always fight for freedom and he's been a hero of mine since I was a kid and I learned so much about so we don't dedicate this next one to Fred Hampton this service call Hercules which I love because well the yeah yeah we get a hold well there's no then later in the floral well.

"fred hampton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This next song I would like to dedicate to Fred Hampton Fred Hampton I'm from Chicago Fred Hampton was a black cat Black Panther from Chicago who was killed at the age of twenty one he was such a leader such a fourth such a strong man for us people always fight for freedom and he's been a hero of mine since I was a kid I learned so much about so we don't dedicate this next one to Fred Hampton this is Kerr Hercules which I love because what the it's like is that what you yeah we get a hold living in the field longer.

"fred hampton" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"fred hampton" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Now, why did you name your book the torture machine? Well, thank you, Amy and one it's a pleasure to be back with you. I named it the torture machine for two different, but related reasons first of all is rather obvious on the cover the torture machine. That was the electric shock box that the notorious commander, Jon Burge and his men used on many African American suspects over that twenty year period that you just mentioned, but also the torture machine refers to Chicago's machine the notorious political machine often known as the Daley machine and the democratic machine here in the city, which not only countenance this torture, covered it up, but also was involved at the highest levels of the police department, and yes, the state's attorney's office when Richard m Daley was the state's attorney of Cook County were involved in this conspiracy this scandal. Oh that has gone on for so many decades in this city. Well, Flint I congratulate you on the book is really a riveting account. It's almost forensic analysis of decades of collusion between judges politicians prosecutors and the police to basically engage in systemic human rights violation. But you start the book with an incident that for many young people today Matt even part of history, but it's it's not often covered history. And you make the you make the statement that the killing of Fred Hampton, and Mark Clark really was a seminal moment in the development of Chicago in the modern history of Chicago. And I'm wondering if you could I. Give us a sense of why you believe that. So and then we when we're going to do a clip of documentary on from the weather underground about the about that the house where where Fred Hampton was killed. Yes. On December fourth nineteen sixty-nine fourteen. Chicago police officers working under the control of the state's attorney of Cook County at that time Edward Hanrahan rated a west side apartment where Black Panthers were sleeping and one of those Black Panthers was the chairman of the Black Panther party. Fred Hampton, charismatic young leader who was targeted not only by the police. But by it turns out, the FBI and that raid, which was covered up was claimed to be at first shootout was later shown to be total shoot in. And then over the years as we and others were able to litigate case in federal court. We were able to show not only that this was a vicious racist attack on the Panthers in its leadership where two men were killed and many others wounded. But it was part and parcel of the FBI's Cohen tell pro program the counterintelligence program devised and implemented by j GRA Hoover over the years, which in the late sixties targeted the Black Panther party. And specifically of Fred Hampton in Chicago. And in fact, that the raid on the apartment was part of this Cohen, tell pro program, and of course, you make the point in your book that that was the beginning of the resistance masters of the black community that eventually led to the election of Harold Washington as the first black mayor of Chicago, but I wanna turn to the clip from the documentary. The weather underground about the murder of Black Panther. Fred Hampton, fifty years ago on December fourth nineteen sixty-nine this clip begins with Fred Hampton..

Fred Hampton Black Panthers Chicago Cook County FBI attorney Richard m Daley Amy Jon Burge Flint Cohen Edward Hanrahan Harold Washington Matt commander murder GRA Hoover Mark Clark
Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

Democracy Now! Audio

27:28 min | 3 years ago

Bobby Seale, Bill Ayers & Bernardine Dohrn on Police Repression, Fred Hampton Murder & Prison Strike

"Sir. This is democracy. Now democracy now or the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman with one gun solace with part two of today's edition of fifty years ago that right fifty years ago this week, the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention in Chicago became a national spectacle as a major political event turned into chaos that culminated with a police riot, much of it unfolding on live national television. While Hubert Humphrey was nominated as the democratic candidate in nineteen sixty eight inside despite the fact he didn't run in any primaries outside was where the news was where police were clubbing teargassing thousands of protesters. For more. We continue our interviews with Bobby Seale founding chairman, Black Panther party was in the protests at the beginning in Chicago. Bill Ayers was arrested on August twenty seven fifty years ago and Bernardine Dohrn both Bernardine and Bill longtime activists for peace and racial Justice, former SDS that students for a democratic society and whether underground members. I mean, he Goodman with Juan Gonzalez one? Yes. Yes. With Bobby Seale again to follow up a Bobby on the conversation. We were having that the end of our previous segment when you were talking about how once Richard Nixon was elected president, he ordered. His aides to begin immediate eradication of the Black Panther party. One of the interesting things that most people are not aware of is that years later report came out in the New York Times that the f. b. i. had conducted a CPR secret poll among black Americans and found that more than twenty five percent of African Americans were supporters of the Black Panther party felt that the Black Panther party was fighting. Their interest is significant portion of the America of the African American population of this country was supportive of of your revolutionary organization. And yet as you were saying Nixon immediately ordered that you be crushed, could you talk about what happened in that first few years of the Nixon administration to the panther party. Exactly the year of nineteen sixty nine is the year. Now, remember I said he had a meeting with j. Edgar Hoover and Jade ago who were in the December the first week of December stated nationally on television that we were threat to the internal, the blackout, the party is a threat to the internal security of America. Come come. What was February seventeenth seventeenth. John a buddy Carter and John Huggins will murdered at UCLA. They were the leaders of the black path to party and loss Angeles California now. But she Carter really had gotten out of his gang group. 'cause he, he ran a three thousand member gang and he created a political organization call wretched of the earth delay to become and he later became rub. They headed up to southern California chapter the black part in the Los Angeles community. Eric, the what I'm trying to say here is that. That was the first attack on the part of the power structure using the us organization, etcetera. In a conflict situation to kill and murder. The leaders of the Los Angeles chapter, the blackout, the party do that process in the next three or four months. They attack more than twenty two offices I'm talking about in Indiana. I'm talking about the, they blew up the office and demands. I will literally got the crew Clinton of blew up that blow up that building. And I'm telling you. In San Diego brother. Bell was opening up to San Diego office at eight AM in the morning, and the police and FBI came jumped out of cars and came into place and shot him dead killing murdering. So I'm just says that period of tacking by the end of that year with the murder of Fred Hampton and then the shootout in Los Angeles, four days later after that cetera I have in my organization, I had twenty eight dead blackout to party members sixty nine wounded and defending ourselves. We defended ourselves and many of these attacks. By the end of that year, fourteen police were kill because we shot back when they came in shooting in us. We did not play. We shot back

Bobby Seale Black Panther Party Chicago Oakland Bill Ayers Senator John Mccain Angela Davis United States California Panthers Attica Prison Retha Franklin Barack Obama National Association Of Black Elvin Howard Bernardine Dohrn Sammy Davis Illinois Bill Bill