17 Burst results for "Franz Schubert"

"franz schubert" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

04:53 min | 3 months ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"When Beethoven wrote his 9 symphony, somebody said, this is the day the music died because you can't write anything better than this. The perfect symphony has been composed and becoming 9s. So number one, I'm so glad she comes hard enough in others who lived with the Beethoven. Did not get the message because we would have been missed out on a lot of other beautiful music. But also think about actually, we will never know the impact bit of head and classical music because how many composers like Franz schubert wrote beautiful music, but never published it. So it's a why am I telling you this? Here's why. If you are in any profession, they will always going to be somebody who considered to be the greatest whatever. Like in our case, we have a the greatest investor of all time, Warren Buffett. And it's so easy for us to just copy Warren Buffett. And first of all, it's all just to blindly copy Warren Buffett. Instead, what we should be doing, we shouldn't be looking to be looking at how Warren Buffett is thinking. Also, we should not be afraid to think on our own. And but you know, because we may actually be impacted and constrained by Warren Buffett's thinking. Okay, let me give you an example. For a long time, Warren Buffett was saying that I don't invest in technology companies because I don't understand them. And I would argue it's a case for Warren Buffett to say this when he was 70 or 80 or 90 years old. Okay? Because he did not understand that well. Well, there are several lessons. Number one, what you should learn is not as an investor, not that you should not invest in technology companies that what you should learn is you need to be in a circle of competence. And your stock of competence may be very different than Warren Buffett's circle of competence. That's number one. Number two is that even Warren Buffett pushed his soccer off competence and invest in invested billions of dollars into Apple. Because which is a technology company and by the way, I understand that has been the most successful trade investment ever based on the billions of dollars bresh hire made. But also, you could look at how the way Buffett invests, and you can actually build your own path. Right, that's the important part, isn't it? That's right..

Warren Buffett Franz schubert Beethoven soccer Apple Buffett
"franz schubert" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"Of the book while I was kind of editing the book. So that's called the book is came about. So if you want to just give you kind of the main topics, it's about parenting, classical music, self improvement. There's a huge section, like probably one third of the book about stoic philosophy. There is spent a lot of time talking about minimum life, creativity, and that's kind of the weirdest book in the world, but it works. Let's just take a couple of these. We won't be able to get to everything, obviously, but why write about classical music? What could you possibly, I mean, I know because I've read some of the book and quite a bit of the book, and your pieces, when you publish them originally, but tell us why classical music, because this topic is never treated in any book by any financial person. Well, this stuff is this. First of all, I love classical music, right? So any opportunity I get to write about it, I get to learn about it. Because it's something for me to write about. I have to spend a lot of time reading and researching it. So that's why I wrote it. So original intent was just kind of very selfish. Just for me to learn. But as I wrote more about this, I mean as I learned more and more about classical music composers, I learned there are so many lessons. We just talked about Chekhov's pain of writing to his peaceful violin for violence. So that's one example. Let me give you a few examples and let me actually draw a parallel between that example and value investing. How's that? So let me take you back to early 19th century in Vienna. Like 1800s. And at that time, Beethoven was the most famous composer in the world. Like he was like Michael Jackson or Frank Sinatra who are not composers, but artists, but on steroids. He was known everywhere around the world. And if you lived in Vienna and you were composing music, you would have had a very miserable existence because everything you write would be compared to Beethoven. And that just imagine that. And so there was this composer who lived there, Franz schubert, who lived like a few blocks away from Beethoven. Imagine being Franz shubert because everything that's composed, you know, he composes people say, well, Bitcoin did it better, or you get accused of trying to copy her. And et cetera. So for that reason, Franz schubert wrote almost 6000 pieces of music, published almost nothing. He was supported by his friends and died in a world in a very early age. Early authorities, destitute. And the irony of this, if you listen to today when we listen to Franz schubert or we listen to Beethoven, we don't say Bitcoin as bad as Fran sober. Van schubert is has incredible music that, by the way, personally, I can relate to more super music than at the bitcoins. But that's me. And there are beautiful and different ways. But I also wanted to think about a couple.

Franz schubert Beethoven Vienna Chekhov Frank Sinatra Michael Jackson Van schubert Fran
"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:11 min | 5 months ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Say polish in French. At the time when the pollen is was a fashionable dance in the Polish court, Polish courtiers also thought it was more fashionable to speak French. The polonaise is a very dignified dance, actually, more like a procession. At first, only men did the polonaise, sweeping off their hats or drawing their swords at various points in the music. Later on in history, women were allowed to join in the polonaise, which became the dance that opened every ball. Since the polonaise involved a procession through all the rooms of a palace, it was a good way for the host to show off his home. The most important person at the ball headed up the polonaise procession. He was known as the lord of the dance. The pollen is caught on all over Europe, and even migrated to America. John Philip Sousa wrote his presidential polonaise after president Chester A. Arthur said he wanted a piece to replace hail to the chief. That's the music that's played whenever the president makes his entrance. Needless to say, it didn't. People in operas, especially Russian operas, dance the polonaise. Modest musorgsky put one into his opera Boris Godunov. And in tchaikovsky's opera Eugene on jagan, there's a wonderful poem is. After a while, composers began to use the slow rhythmic one, two, three of the polonaise as a form for non dancing instrumental pieces. Franz schubert wrote this polonaise for his violinist brother to play. Antonin dvorak composed a polonaise that he could play at the piano along with a cellist friend of his. And when they asked Anatolia to write music for the unveiling of a statue at the St. Petersburg conservatory, he composed a polonez. Since he was born in Poland, Frederick Chopin was probably more passionate about the polonaise than most composers. In fact, the very first pieces he wrote were polones. Because of the way Frederick Chopin has the piano imitate the sort of drum used to keep soldiers marching in line, another one of his polonaises is known as the military polonaise. The military polonaise, one of 16 polonaises for solo piano by Frederic Chopin. Next week on classics for kids, more music with a military theme. I'm Naomi Lewin, I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at WGU C Cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for.

Polish court Chester A. Arthur John Philip Sousa Frederic Chopin Antonin dvorak Boris Godunov jagan St. Petersburg conservatory tchaikovsky Franz schubert Eugene Europe America Anatolia Poland Naomi Lewin Tim lantern WGU Cincinnati
"franz schubert" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

04:34 min | 8 months ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"You listen to Earl sweatshirt, but I mean, also still got it. All right. I gotta check that out now. Check out the new Earl. Let's round out the rope report with story number 7. Sony Pictures, classic, or Sony Pictures, classics, picks up Alex hell, French animated movie, a winter's journey. I know this doesn't sound like a gaming news story, but we'll get there in a second. This is from Anthony Dallas sandro at deadline. Set in Bavaria in 1812. A winner's journey follows an itinerant lovelorn poet who undertakes a hazardous walk across mountains, ice and snow, a journey, which will bring either light either death or a new life. Painted by the animation artist behind the Oscar nominated loving Vincent. I went to his journey is a romantic and epic tale, which blends live action with CG and painted animation. The world of the film is the first to be built using PlayStations dreams developed by PlayStation studios multiple BAFTA winning game studio media molecule. The pick is an adaptation of Franz schubert's timeless masterpiece, winter Reese, the most performed classical song in the world, or song cycle in the world. Quote, especially in these times, says health rich in tidal. We feel a need to escape into a different world filled with beauty and timeless music. We're lucky to be working with some of the world's greatest actors, artists, and musicians, and can think of a better partner than Sony Pictures, classics, to bring our film to diverse audiences and quote, that's cool. Dreams being made to use an actual movie. Yeah. That's absolutely wild. I wouldn't have expected this, especially now, like maybe being like a tight end marketing thing around the release of dreams, but that's kind of cool. The dreams is out there doing its thing. You know, I do think this kind of expands the worldview of what's possible in terms of movie creation and all of that, you know. Yeah, this is one of the things that I would have thought about happening before dreams came out. When we speculate about what's the power of dreams, what can dreams can do. Before that game came out, I feel like we had, we had hopes for dreams even to do everything. People are going to be able to make movies, make albums and make games, games don't come out on the PlayStation store and all these things, in dreams. And now that dreams has been out for a couple of years, it came out was impressive, but also didn't really I don't think lived up to the potential that it had in terms of people taking it and making wild things with it that existed outside of dreams. And for us getting this news, this, I feel like is the first one of the first times where I'm like, oh shit, yeah, dreams is like a really good the tools are great. I don't think people are really arguing the tools. But this is the first time where I'm looking at this and I'm like, shit, man, like, dreams might have it in the tank. If we start seeing more stuff like this, more projects like this. And of course, like, totally. Sony picks it up as a way to boost it, obviously, but you know, that's still huge that they're picking up a film and putting in that work and I'm sure this will come out and have like Oscar nominated if their track record is anything to go by, and that's gonna be huge for them. And so, yeah, I wonder what this means for the actual potential that dreams has even beyond this. Do we start seeing more stuff like this out of dreams? Yeah. I mean, people have made entire YouTube videos and dreams. People have, yeah, even on YouTube dot com slash kind of funny games. Maybe check out the blessing show where I'm hosting it from dreams and talking about dreams. I had nothing I was going to mention about this. Is that the most popular episode? No, it's not. It was fucking Greg Miller, talking about Greg Miller talking about angels. Yeah, it's like the worst part about it is that every time the dreams video is about to catch up on it, Avengers drops some content. And then The Avengers video gets thousands of more views. And I'm like, fuck man, almost like you almost catch it every single time. So go check out that dreams episode. Yeah, watch it. Give it the views. If you already watched it, watch it again. Once the thing I was going to say about dreams, I feel is going to see my dreams. Anyway, I want to go check dreams out again, because I did that last year around this time for that video. And I was super impressed by the dreams that I came across. The games and stuff that people were making in there. And I forget if I mentioned this one in the dreams video, I must have, right? There was a dream. There's a dream called luck, which is a first person puzzle game where you go through a house and you are solving puzzles and is basically the witness, but with words. And it is to this day, one of the most impressive things I've seen in a creation tool like that, to the point where if they release that, just on the PlayStation store and sold it for ten bucks, it would have I think that's the thing you could have done and it would have popped up. Now I remember I was gonna say, I was gonna say bring dreams to PC. I don't understand why dreams is on PC. That's what I was gonna say. More people will need to get their hands on dreams..

Sony Pictures Anthony Dallas sandro winter Reese Earl sweatshirt Franz schubert Oscar Sony Bavaria PlayStation store Greg Miller Vincent Alex YouTube angels
"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

04:50 min | 9 months ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"The third movement of francios of haydn's symphony number 45 is a minuet, a dance that was a favorite of French kings and queens in the 1700s. The minuet is a very elegant dance performed by couples with music in three, four time. That is, you can count one, two, three, one, two, three, as you listen to it. Feel free to dance along with today's show. After a while, minuets weren't just for dancing anymore. Haydn and many other composers started using the minuet form as the third movement or section of a four movement piece. Haydn put minuets into a lot of his symphonies and Luigi boccolini put this one into a string quintet, a piece for 5 instruments. Minuets found their way onto the stage, too, in operas, plays and ballets. When 20th century composer Sergei Prokofiev wrote a ballet based on William Shakespeare's play Romeo and Juliet, which takes place way before the 20th century, he had the characters dance him Inuit. There's a play called lale xien or the woman from arles, in which the title character never appears on stage. Georges Bizet wrote music for that play, including a minuet. Back in the days when people actually danced the minuet, volkan Amadeus Mozart put one into a party scene in his opera Don Giovanni. As they dance, Mozart has the characters in the opera sing about what they're thinking. Father. And English. Some composers wrote minuets for family use. Johann Sebastian Bach put several of them into an exercise book he wrote for his children to practice their keyboard instruments. Because he and his father and brothers all played string instruments and liked to sit around, making beautiful music together, Franz schubert composed a whole group of minuets for the family to play. The minuet stayed popular for quite a while. In the 19th century, Czech composer Bedrich Smetana wrote one for a ball in his country. But the minuet was an antique by the time French composer Maurice Ravel got around to writing one, so he called it just that. Minuet antique. The antique minuet was the first piece of ravels to get published. He originally wrote it for piano and then made an arrangement.

Haydn Luigi boccolini lale xien haydn Georges Bizet volkan Amadeus Mozart Sergei Prokofiev William Shakespeare arles Juliet Romeo Don Giovanni Johann Sebastian Bach Mozart Bedrich Smetana Franz schubert Maurice Ravel Czech
"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Right? Incidental music illustrates the action or creates a mood for what's going on in a movie or play. For thousands of years all the way back to the earliest theater in ancient Greece, people have been using music to spice up what's happening on stage. The first time someone composed incidental music for a particular play may have been in 1664 for the first performance of John dryden's play the Indian Queen. But that music is lost now. A bit later, Henry Purcell wrote that music for another production of the Indian Queen. I have a composer friend who writes incidental music for plays and jokingly refers to it as accidental music, but since he and other composers spend hours getting the music just right, it's anything but an accident how music is used in the theater. That's some of the incidental music Felix mendelssohn wrote to set the mood for the fairies and magic in William Shakespeare's comedy amid summer night's dream. One of the human characters in a midsummer night's dream, bottom the weaver spends a good part of the play wearing a donkey's head instead of his own. In another piece of mendelssohn's incidental music for the play, you can hear the donkey going, he ha. He ha. The braying donkey is just one way that mendelssohn lets you know that amid summer night's dream is funny. Good composers use their music to show whether a play is a comedy or a tragedy. Definitely not funny, right? Ludwig van Beethoven wrote very noble music for the play egmont about a noble man who stands up to the Spanish inquisition. It's hard to stand up to the Spanish inquisition without losing your head, or getting hanged, which is what happens to egmont. The tragedy egmont is by the German poet Goethe, who really knew how to put words together. Unfortunately, Goethe had nothing to do with the German play rosamunde, which was so terrible that both the author and the play have pretty much been forgotten, but not the wonderful incidental music that Franz schubert wrote for rosamunde. If people like Beethoven and mendelssohn were composing today, they'd probably be writing music for the movies. Lots of classical composers have written film music like Erin Copeland, who sets just the right tone for the movie version of Thornton wilder's play our town. Of course, movie music has only been around since the mid 20th century, so all the composers who lived before then, like edvard grieg wrote their incidental music for plays. You can tell just by the sound of it that something very creepy is going on in the hall of the mountain king. In the hall of the mountain king is just one part of the incidental music that edvard grieg composed for the play peer gynt. Next week I'll let grieg's incidental music tell you the story of the play. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim lantern at wgc, Cincinnati. I hope you can join me again for more classics for kids..

mendelssohn John dryden Henry Purcell Felix mendelssohn Goethe William Shakespeare Greece Ludwig van Beethoven Erin Copeland Franz schubert edvard grieg Thornton wilder Beethoven Naomi Lewin grieg Tim lantern Cincinnati
"franz schubert" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on WBUR

"Consciousness in it, not the least avant garde. It's music for everybody, and it's uplifting. It really is uplifting. That's beautiful. I think that's true. The business of this hours, the spout the evolution of a reputation or our own hearing more than 40 years after the man died, he was always rated genius. Where does one go beyond genius? I'm not sure Sainthood baby. Remember Duke Ellington? New York Big club with his orchestra. Errol Garner quietly came in, probably with Martha Glaser. And he stopped and he said a real piano player has entered the room. And l you've got you've got to play for the people, which he did. But so many Frank Sinatra, for example, used to have him out to Palm Springs to play. I'm sure he taught Frank's matter how to sing. Teach me tonight. I decided long ago he was closer to Franz Schubert than to Teddy Wilson or anybody in the And the Jazz cast you say Ravel WC. It's somewhere in that zone. Right? Yeah, he's he's been compared to live out and the B C. And what's interesting in also quite disturbing in some ways that some of the same critics who will describe him that way will also in the same breath. Treat him as a kind of naive or witless person who, because he is chronicled, self titled, That's Not exactly True. We can get into that. He's kind of an idiot savant. And so when you read, I'll give you example. You know, Saturday evening Post It has spread 1958 the guy Dean Jennings. He has this one line that I could never forget. Said actually my memory, where he describes Garner as a genius who cannot read music who has never taken a lesson in quote until recently thought Bach was a kind of beer. Oh, God, This is simply not true. It makes good press. But it's what happens to so many great artists. And dare I say, specifically African American artists who They'll come out of traditions that are both oral and literal and who is very familiar with these classical traditions. But for him, these are just tools for him to build his own repertoire. I mean, you know when Jennings says he does know how to use foot pedals. Of course, he knows how to use foot pounds money when asking a question like, why don't we know more about Errol Garner? If you turn an artist into a caricature, the same thing would happen to Monk. And it's very easy to dismiss them and not really pay attention. Take them seriously. And then the anecdotes around Eric Garner sitting on the phone book, for example. Take precedent.

Teddy Wilson Eric Garner Errol Garner Martha Glaser Franz Schubert Jennings Frank Sinatra Dean Jennings Frank Duke Ellington Palm Springs Bach 1958 tonight Garner Saturday evening both York more than 40 years one line
"franz schubert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:28 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Listen to man is about to say yeah. Let's everybody listen. The usa radio network presents the greatest radio programs of all time. The cbs shop dedicated to man's immagination. The theater of the mind. This is classic. Radio theatre wanted to get away from it all. Fbi in peace and war among the unexpected. The unexpected the unexpected. Now here's your host why it talks evening friend lori. Thorpe starring in an episode of broadly is my beat from seventy one years ago january thirty first nineteen fifty the roberto sagarra murder cates. And we thank you for tuning in on this sunday. Thirty first day of january thirty first day of the year. Three hundred thirty four days remaining until we get to twenty twenty two confederate general robert e lee became general in chief of the confederate forces on this date in eighteen sixty five three and marketed. Scotch tape for the first time on this date in one thousand nine hundred forty. The green hornet radio show debuted on this date in nineteen thirty six in one thousand nine hundred forty five army private eddie. Smoke executed the first american soldiers since the civil war to be executed for desertion president. Truman announced program to develop the hydrogen bomb on this date. In one thousand nine hundred fifty three students a junior high school playground in picacoma california among the eight persons killed on this date in nineteen fifty seven following the mid air collision between the douglas dc seven airliner and northrop f eighty nine scorpion fighter jet above the san fernando valley section of la the first successful launch of an american satellite into orbit on this date in one thousand nine hundred fifty eight cape canaveral florida and a final checkup for the seventy foot. Jupiter about to put the explorer into orbit around the the success of the russian sputnik and the failure of medical van. God projects must have been in. The minds of all consent is the moment for firing live. United states is ready to play in place. Its first satellite into orbit. Ask first plane. We can see the way. Maybe a great sigh of relief accompanied the explorer as it saw way into space. Exactly according to plan excerpt from bbc radio. James van allen discovered the van allen radiation belt on this date in one thousand nine hundred. Fifty eight ham. The chimp traveled into outer space on a mercury redstone rocket on this date in one thousand nine hundred sixty one. After thirty seven day. Pause president johnson ordered the resumption of airstrikes in vietnam in nineteen sixty six on this monday morning and vietnam at my direction actor complete and thorough consultation and agreement with the government of south vietnam. United states aircraft have resumed action in north vietnam was on this date in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight president reagan spoke at a memorial service honoring the crew of the space shuttle challenger who were killed. Lift up three days earlier. Sometimes when we reach for the stars we fall short but we must pick ourselves up again in press on despite the pain. Nation is indeed fortunate that we can still draw on immense reservoirs are courage and character and fortitude that. We're still blessed with heroes like those of the space shuttle challenger dating mike judy l. ron. Greg kristen's families in your country and more new passing. We vigil goodbye and we will never forget you over ten thousand more on hand for the ceremony. The first russian. Mcdonald's opened in moscow on this date in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine and it was on this date in nineteen ninety-two howard cosell retired by after cosell's wipe died of heart attack. Two years earlier the sportscasters health began to fail. He would die of cardiac. Embolism three years later. At the age of seventy seven president clinton authorized a twenty billion dollar loan to mexico on this date. In nineteen ninety-five to stabilize its economy in the netherlands a scottish court convicted libyan and acquitted another for their part in the bombing of pan. Am flight. one. Oh three which crashed into lockerbie scotland in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight in two thousand four mystery science theater three thousand ended. Its run on the sci-fi channel. It's still around today. Though in reruns particularly on puto the child molestation trial of superstar. Michael jackson began in california on this date. In two thousand five jackson himself would appeal to the public for a fair trial and the last few weeks. A large amount of malicious information has been released into the media about me. Apparently this information was leaked through transcripts in a grand jury proceeding. Were neither my lawyers in her. I ever appeared. The information is disgusting and false and in two thousand. Six samuel alito assumed office as the one hundred tenth supreme court justice of the us among those passing away on this date the inventor of fm radio edwin armstrong author aa mill. Me from the winnie the pooh series samuel goldwyn the movie executive and jazz drummer cozy cole. This is the birth date of composer. Franz schubert writer zane grey actor singer. Eddie cantor actress. Talulah bankhead hauling. Who has a much lower voice and mine had mature voice in mind. Comedian gary moore singer. Mario lanza actress. Carol channing writer journalist. Norman mailer actor james franciscus and actress. Suzanne push it from the airplane. And beverly hills cop series. Jonathan banks is seventy four. Casey of casey and the sunshine band seventy years old today the sex pistols johnny rotten is sixty four fit finlay pro wrestler sixty three. His son is active in new japan pro wrestling and doing quite well. Thank you from cocktail. And roadhouse kelly lynch sixty two actress minnie. Driver is fifty one from scandal. Kerry washington is forty. Four and justin. Timberlake is forty. Though some of the people who celebrate the thirty first day of january is their birthday. If this happens to be your birthday. We're the four freshmen. And we just wanna say from seventy one years ago january thirty first. Nineteen fifty broadway is my beat on this sunday edition classic radio theater. Here's some great news if you missed the deadline to sign up for insurance or more importantly if you sign up for a plan that you're just not happy with you still have a choice. It's called medishare and medishare's a christian healthcare sharing program. It's been around for twenty five years. They have more than four hundred thousand members now around the country and get this over the years meta share members of shared more than two billion dollars of each other's medical bills so they could help. Share your needs to and best of all. You could save a lot of money with meta share. The typical savings for family is around five hundred bucks a month. Your savings could be more or less but think about what you could do with that extra money every month. So if you think you're stuck with a high cost health plan that doesn't have much to offer think again. You can join medishare anytime so call them today and check it out. There's no pressure they're super easy to talk to eight three three thirty four. That's eight three three thirty four bible eight.

samuel goldwyn James van allen Michael jackson james franciscus Kerry washington vietnam Timberlake johnny rotten california Suzanne justin minnie lori Mcdonald Truman Jonathan banks two thousand Franz schubert eight persons one thousand
"franz schubert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"And listen to man is about to say yeah. Let's everybody listen. The usa radio network presents the greatest radio programs of all time. The cbs radio workshop dedicated to men's immagination. The theater of the mind this is classic radio theatre want to get away from it. All the fbi and peace and war mcghee among the unexpected. The unexpected the unexpected. Now here's your host. Why cops friend larry. Thorne starring in an episode of broadway is my beat from seventy one years ago january thirty first nineteen fifty the robot tosa gera merck eights. And we thank you for tuning in on this sunday. Thirty first day of january thirty first day of the year. Three hundred thirty four days remaining until we get to twenty twenty two confederate general robert e lee became general in chief of the confederate forces on this date in one thousand nine hundred sixty five three m marketed scotch tape for the first time on this date in one thousand nine hundred forty. The green hornet radio show debuted on this date in one thousand nine hundred thirty six in nineteen forty-five army private eddie. Smoke executed the first american soldiers since the civil war to be executed for desertion president. Truman announced a program to develop the hydrogen bomb on this state. In one thousand nine hundred fifty three students on a heist junior high school playground in picacoma california among the eight persons killed on this date in nineteen fifty seven following the mid air collision between the douglas dc seven airliner and a northrop f eighty nine scorpion fighter jet above the san fernando valley section of la the first successful launch of an american satellite into orbit on this date in one thousand nine fifty eight cape canaveral florida and a final. Check out for the seventy foot. Jupiter c about to put the escora into orbit around the success of the russians but knicks and the failure of a medical van. God projects must have been in. The minds of all consent is the moment for firing. A united states is ready to play in place. Its first satellite into orbit. I flame we can see the way maybe showed. Great sigh of relief accompanied the explorer as it saw away into space. Exactly according to plan excerpt from bbc. Radio james van alen discovered the van allen radiation belt on this date in nineteen fifty eight chip traveled into outer space on a mercury redstone rocket on this date in one thousand nine hundred sixty one after thirty seven day. Pause president johnson ordered the resumption of airstrikes vietnam in nineteen sixty. Six or ms monday morning vietnam at my direction actor complete and thorough consultation and agreement with the government of south vietnam. United states aircraft have resumed. Action in north vietnam was on this date. In nineteen eighty. Eight president reagan's spoke a memorial service honoring the crew of the space shuttle challenger who were killed. Lift up three days earlier. Sometimes when we reach for the stars we fall short but we must pick ourselves up again. Press on despite the pain. Nation is indeed fortunate that we can still draw on immense reservoirs courage character and fortitude that. We're still blessed with euros. Like those of the space shuttle challenger. Dating mike judy l. Ron greg kristen your families in your country in more new passing in we bid you goodbye and we will never forget you over ten thousand more on hand for the ceremony. The first russian. Mcdonald's opened in moscow on this date in nineteen ninety nine and it was on this date in one thousand nine hundred ninety. Two howard cosell retired after cosell's wipe died of heart attack. Two years earlier the sportscasters health began to fail. He would die of a cardiac. Embolism three years later. At the age of seventy seven president clinton authorized a twenty billion dollar loan to mexico on this date. In nineteen ninety five to stabilize its economy in the netherlands a scottish court convicted libyan and acquitted another for their part in the bombing of pan. Am flight one. Oh three which crashed into lockerbie scotland in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight in two thousand four mystery science theater three thousand ended. Its run on the scifi channel. It's still around today. Though in reruns particularly on puto the child molestation trial of superstar. Michael jackson began in california on the state. In two thousand and five jackson himself would appeal to the public for a fair trial and the last few weeks a large amount of ugly militias information has been released into the media about me. Apparently this information was leaked through transcripts in a grand jury proceeding where neither my lawyers dinner. I ever appeared. The information is disgusting and false and in two thousand. Six samuel alito assumed office as the one hundred tenth supreme court justice of the us among most passing away on this date the inventor of fm radio edwin armstrong author. A a milne me from the winnie the pooh series samuel goldwyn the movie executive and jazz drummer cozy cole. This is the birth date of composer. Franz schubert writer zane grey actor singer. Eddie cantor actress. Talulah bankhead hauling. Who has a much lower voice than mine had mature voice and mind. Comedian gary moore singer. Mario lanza actress. Carol channing writer journalist. Norman mailer actor james friends cisco and actress. Suzanne push it from the airplane. A beverly hills cop series. Jonathan banks is seventy four. Casey of casey and the sunshine band seventy years old today the sex pistols johnny rotten is sixty four fit. Finlay prowrestler is sixty three. His son is active in new japan pro wrestling doing quite well. Thank you from cocktail. And roadhouse kelly lynch sixty two actress minnie. Driver is fifty one from scandal. Kerry washington is forty. Four and justin. Timberlake is forty though some of the people who celebrate the thirty first day of his birthday. If this happens to be your birthday high the four and we just wanted to say from seventy one years ago january thirty first one thousand nine hundred ninety broadway is my beat on this sunday dish. Classic radio theater. Here's some great news if you missed the deadline to sign up for health insurance or more importantly if you sign for a plan that you're just not happy with you still have choice. It's called meta share and medishare's a christian healthcare sharing program. It's been around for twenty five years. They have more than four hundred thousand members now around the country and get this over the years medishare members of shared more than two billion dollars of each other's medical bills. So they could help share your needs to and best of all. You could save a lot of money with meta share. The typical savings for family is around five hundred bucks a month. Your savings could be more or less but think about what you can do with that extra money every month. So if you think you're stuck with a high cost health plan that doesn't have much to offer think again. You can join medishare anytime so call them today and check it out. There's no pressure they're super easy to talk to eight three three thirty four bible. That's eight thirty three thirty four bible eight.

Michael jackson samuel goldwyn Kerry washington Jonathan banks minnie california Timberlake Truman seventy foot johnny rotten Mcdonald Suzanne zane grey justin Franz schubert two thousand one thousand nineteen north vietnam twenty five years
"franz schubert" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let me hold you. Let me kiss you tomorrow. Your ground Wait. Me feel you breathing. Now that's leaving. I'm here to stay. One day he'll come so come along the one you love. You're wrong to break your heart. You will feel the pain not felt when love for free. Don't make me Oh, yes. Hi. These next two songs are based on the same theme by Franz Schubert. The fantasy in F minor for four hands when piano with the opening theme that goes So we changed the key. We added some African rhythms as well as some string lines from the disco anthem. I will survive. That was great..

"franz schubert" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The American Revolution. France formerly recognized the United States. 18 35. The second Great Fire of New York destroyed 50 acres 200,000 square meters of New York City's financial district. 18 65, the first performance of the Unfinished Symphony by Franz Schubert. 18 92. The first issue of Vogue is published. They still print that. Yeah, I believe so. Yeah, I think I've seen it. It's in vogue in 1903. The Wright brothers made the first controlled powered heavier than air flight. In the right flyer. At Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 19. I think that one's in the air and space Museum up in New York near Dulles Airport. 1933 the first NFL championship game was played. It was at Wrigley Field. Natalie, who played in that game. Say they get Jack. What was it again? The first NFL championship game. 1933 regularly feel who played in Alice. You're asking who? Oh, I think played in it in the 1933 NFL championship game. The don't know, e really don't know. I don't know. I just love that Natalie looked at me for the answer is if I was gonna know I don't know anything else. The Tigers in the Bronx, the bears the bears weighing it. Really field in Chicago. What? Don't give her some credit, Jack. I didn't even know that. I don't even know that. Put the piece that together. I just can't be named a baseball team. You did She name the Broncos and I think the pirates in the Bronco is something that But you said a baseball team. I don't think I did. We got to go back and rest. Well, there was a baseball team name that play that the New York Giants that's true. On the Bears won 23 to 21. Yeah. E need that. Yeah. Baseball team. Never one to their football team Did, uh, 1935 1st flight of the Douglas DC three. Well, I got a lot of hours and one of those in Vietnam. That was our big Airplane there for our group. 1938 Auto on discovers the nuclear fission. The heavy element uranium. Which was the scientific and technological basis of nuclear energy. That was all the way back in 1938 1943 all Chinese air again permitted to become citizens of the United States. Upon the repeal of the active 18 82 and the introduction of the Magnuson Act. Now we're in a little bit of conflict with China. 1947 the first flight of the Boeing B 47 straight Oh jets strategic bomber took place. By the way, Katie said tigers were gonna can listen. That's a baseball team. This tiger's exist. They're intended. Very nice. Memphis Tigers of College football. Yeah, 1957. The U. S successfully launched the first Atlas Intercontinental ballistic missile at Cape Canaveral. Brother. We've got a way Gotta launch this morning at 9 25. Is that right? Katie, our expert I think. Oh, you're.

Tigers Natalie New York City NFL Baseball Bears Jack Katie New York Giants Wrigley Field Memphis Tigers of College Broncos Franz Schubert. Cape Canaveral Kitty Hawk North Carolina France United States Chicago
"franz schubert" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

04:02 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"They can still purchase a ticket and receive the link and watching it at a later time that works for them. A lot of people like to be there at the moment. It's happening, though. So they have those two options. What have you guys learned real quickly here before I let you go? What have you learned? Ah, from this time it's lives dreaming that when we come back to life concerts hopefully like light spring summertime like that. When vaccines take effect that you can apply, you can apply going back up to the chapel and Well, you'll be doing live streaming and you think live shows in the chapel. Well, I think it will be in the future for all performing arts groups. It would be a combination of life performing and live streaming. Okay, There's no reason why we can't live stream everything that we do. Now we have to do it. Now You have to write a live audience. But in the future we can pick and choose and say, Well, this one we could do just live and not live stream it. But since we went through the process of purchasing equipment, including a good video camera and all that sort of thing, what would probably do is keep recording these things and In our YouTube channel, So we'll have a huge archive, sweetheart. That'd be wonderful. You know, I guess the one challenge would be how good is the Internet? Which is not all that great, especially sometimes the Santa Fe to many people the same time jump on On then the delay. You know you're doing a live show and then a slight delay for the live stream might be distracted. Well, it's interesting that you mentioned that because one of the things that we had to do Before this concert is fixed that very problem. The fact that the video would freeze the audio would continue. Okay, but the video in the trees and the reason that was happening. Is in the chapel where we perform. We were using WiFi to connect and the signal wasn't strong enough. So we got an Ethernet cable, a 200 ft Ethernet cable and strong it from the office up there into the area. All right problem. We did a tech rehearsal yesterday to try out the whole system and it It really worked very well, cause you know, give you It takes so much more bandwidth. An audio dusty Leonard Bernstein never had to do any of this. You know, he would have liked it, though. He would have loved that. He was probably what happened. You probably wouldn't love them here. The guy when we had it. We have his daughter on the show it Joe's dining. With the book coming out with the anniversary of West Side story, and she talked about how he loved to go to the Fillmore East and just throw himself to the rock roll concerts and he just loved it, You know? You know, he was a very area diet, educated classical music and Broadway. Composer and conductor and all that but also loved. He loved a modern music as well. All right, so once again Linda, the website where people can buy a ticket or the phone over and or the phone number Yes, The website is n m P A s, like sam dot org's or calls Hold my ticket at 8774663404. Once again. It is Saturday at 7 P.m. Franz Schubert. I got that right, but I'll screw up the title of the music so Franz, the name of The entire set of songs. It's Zinter Riser Winters journey Okay, with front vote on piano and Tim Wilson. Doing the vocals? Yes, All right, correct. And they they've known each other for many years because both of them worked at the Metropolitan Opera Chinese in early two thousands. And so they have a long history together. This is wonderful collaboration. Very nice. Franz we ever ever or Linda ever. I guess. Honored to meet the great Dietrich feature disco. No, I have never met him. No, we've never met him. Personally, We didn't. But, you know, there's the really interesting story of one of our singers in an M P. A s named Jacqueline Sander Wall. Actually studied with him in Germany when she.

Franz Schubert Joe Linda Jacqueline Sander Wall YouTube Leonard Bernstein Santa Fe Dietrich Metropolitan Opera Chinese Tim Wilson Germany
"franz schubert" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"It's called of Enterprise ER, which in German means winter journey. And, um, it's based poems by Heinrich China. Was very beloved poet for all of the romantic period in Germany. Every German had kind of poems, memorized and ready to go at any moment. He was a real folk poet. He wrote about nature and about Children and families and very, very beloved and unfortunately during World War two, he was Jewish. And so they tried to destroy all of the literature, which works on Lee. For a time he's back. We're doing him, okay? So he wrote the poems and and then super decided to set the poems to music. Yes, Yes, Okay. Schubert was at a party I think or at a friend's house, and he wasn't depressed enough. He found this volume of poems and things said these air really depressing. I've got to run home and set them right away. Which is basically what he did. All right. Well, you played a little excerpt when, with your introduction of Dietrich Fischer Dieskau. Probably the best known German baritone in our lifetimes. We're singing the first song, which sets the mood for all 24 songs that follow And he's saying I arrived. In this town as a stranger and as a stranger I leave and that tells the whole story because it's about jilted love. He fell in love with the girl who lived in this house. And things were going along fine. And finally she said to her, I money so I'm gonna marry somebody rich, and so she did, And that set it off the whole syriza of songs, which described The depths of despair. The poet wanderer, the journey er went into so he's brokenhearted. Yes, Uh And you can only have a truly broken heart in the romantic sense where it's broken but pulverized and splintered and tortured, right? And there are 24 opportunities in this song cycle to do that. Does she become she becoming well, if he ran off to bury somebody with money did she become kind of the Villain in in the in the poems well, only in the sense in his month, and in a way, Freud would have had a lot of fun with this analysis of this particular song cycle because Poor man literally goes through a nervous breakdown and degeneration. I've been there. Finally, The final song is so desolate that audience are they are non plus, They don't really know what to do when it ends and frequently they don't applaud for a minute. It's it's It's so dark and so despairing. Lot of sniffling going on. I don't want to. I don't want to discourage people from tuning in because in spite of the fact of its subject matter with tragic the music is Descriptive, full and So beloved and well known. This song cycle is probably the best known work of front. Schubert. Well, All right, so the post name again is Heinrich Heine it and he was so depressing, but he was German and the Germans started all the kids. Everybody in Germany needs to know his poems. So he said everybody about other things other than this, Okay? How many poems were there? And how many songs are there? There are 24 Will you perform two dozen We perform one dozen and Tim Wilson will take a little break, and Linda will give some announcements and thank people for viewing and them will perform the last 12. All right, the state of the audience at the end in Santa Fe, the city of the audience online, I should say, because you know people from around the world That's the cool thing about what you're doing now. With live streaming, you could have a huge audience. Um Complete mental and emotional breakdown. You mean from the audience? Yeah. Are we gonna be like in tears and tunnels? Hope they're able to appreciate it artistically and in the spirit that it was written, you know, positive. I was not aware from that You were a piano player. I thought you just a conductor. But you also you're gonna put your gonna be the accompanist on this. Well, let me give you let me give you a little plug for conducting. In my opinion, the greatest because they're those who set for your Kano and played for singers. All of the great ones that we know. Uh No voter all of the ones from the earliest century in their younger years in an opera house and played, that's where you learn after it's a true apprenticeship. And yes, I did. I made my living and I spent my early years at the keyboard. And for those that don't know Franz was was the conductor may be the greatest opera houses. On planet Earth. Now he and Linda leave here in Santa Fe. All right. Well, it's going to be amazing. All of this performed in German, correct? Yes. Yes, okay. There is an English translation in the program, though, and that's very, very important People can download a copy of the program on the N M. P. A s website. There's a downloads page. And that they can print it out and follow along with the German and then the English translation side by side and yours truly actually did the translation from German take English. To make sure that it has the right feel and conveys the underlying emotions expressed in the original language. Well, I mean, they are. They are very Uplifting pieces. I searched the snow in vain for traces of her steps where she arm in arm with me cross the Green Meadow. In German. That would be what Linda Oh, well, actually, I'd have to be reading it in order to be able to tell you that for sure, because you know the language is poetic, and that's what we're trying to capture in. The translation is is the feeling it's not just the words of the literal meaning of the words, but really Underlying aesthetic that the poet is conveying in the original language. It's It's the art of translation. There is rhyme as far as it can tell in the German frozen tears, frozen droplets cast a down my cheeks have ended. It escaped me that I had been crying. Yes. All right, So the man is completely pulverized. Brokenhearted had a mental breakdown. A complete emotional Brooke breakdown and then Franz Schubert comes along that well, that would make a great some great text for some beautiful music while you do have to go. I have got to make a buck off this guy's pressure, right? Sure you don't Richard. It's from it's the romantic era ends. Every emotion compared to you know, from our contemporary perspective is exaggerated and with large compared to how we look at things today, so you kind of have to take it within that context as well. Well, it was the German German romantic period is also the other was the height of the English romantic poetry as well, Absolutely, and they were very well connected and very similar. Despair. Heartbreak tragedy, jilting All of those topics that we're here is we know nothing about from the Renaissance Tonto. You know Shakespeare. I mean, it's just it's you know it, Zzyzx, same old story down through time. Woman. Destroys man destroys into an entire being. I mean, can you set it continues to this day. Uh, all right, you two Esso. Linda, you you are. You're the page Turner. He is helping me with the pages this time, because my hands get a little busy during this piece. Are they fast pieces? Are they difficult pieces on the piano? Well, they are, but they're actually more difficulty because unfortunately or I shouldn't say, unfortunately, But our singer Is a bass baritone, and he's singing them in lower keys than they were originally written, which means that a lot of the sound is lower in the piano, and it gets a little dark and muddy. So it's a real challenge for the pianist, too. Figure out a way to get around that it's not an easy task. Interesting. All the things you've got to put up with. You should just stick to being the conductor. I know. I know. Once again, it will take place live Saturday at 7 P.m. Santa Fe time. That's correct, and the other thing it's important for people to know is that if they're really interested in this performance, it's so cool. We broadcast from our YouTube channel, and you will save the performance after it takes place. So if someone wants to listen in, but they can't be there this Saturday at 7 P.m.. They can still purchase a ticket and receive the link and watching it at a later time that works for them. A lot of people like to be there at the moment. It's happening, though. So they have those two.

Franz Schubert Linda Oh Germany Santa Fe Heinrich China Heinrich Heine Lee Dietrich Fischer Dieskau YouTube Freud Tim Wilson N M. P. A Green Meadow Renaissance Tonto Richard Turner Brooke
"franz schubert" Discussed on Band Ranting

Band Ranting

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Band Ranting

"Say about his ability to recognize and point to the need to change that spot that we need to adjust but That started the journey That kinda lead through The beginning of wind Got to see him work with professionals. And then you spent time out. We brought him out in two thousand fourteen for the complete responsible. And and has it's funny. We're all world directors and you see person do clinic and we all have stick We've seen in and had watching him. Work was just always so Energizing you just wanted to go and rehearsal. You wanted to go study a score. You just wanted to just want her to hit the energy and put it in a bottle and just they just use it And i remember thinking How special it was seen him. Work But we all have experiences that the fun was the driving greg around And i think i was. That was probably two thousand seven with such a young guy. I had hair then And i would drive him places and pick up his sandwich you get just the pure clear version of his thoughts and it was always That blunt on his way of communicating but that learning experience of getting. I'd rather looking back. I'd rather get the truth of then. this shined you know fallacy so You know the things that stand out In my journey through watching him conduct. You know the the moment we did like is fourth with With watching prepare work and convince professional musician And get them on board and get them to buy it and i remember him saying after the first rehearsal like they're getting they're getting and neither amazing musician yet you still had. He could tell. Yeah that That meter that that you're inner out And i remember him working with a student and it always say you know. Oh what did you do the students. It was like i get engaged. Huge they get engage. You know become a part of this musical. Thought he'd always right at you. You didn't beat around the bush and my my time. Just driving him around and and having meals and that those are the things that i cherish. And i remember and i just the one thing is one of you guys were talking and i just remember. The way he spoke about. Music and recordings was just fascinating inspiring. I remember them always saying it was Something like simply exquisite and. That's something a wines. You know somalia with and here he is so over the this head over heels in love with music and that was My experience grade was is so constantly reminded of the power of music and meaningful expression and of the things that Really challenged me as a director in the state through In my work. That i do and i am constantly challenged to live up to some of the big heavy moments and heavy quote that he i don't know gave us and then when he came to visit you know like he's gonna say this you know new common But i just cherish those those moments but that's kind of my journey through And then we all spirits. I think it was the twenty eight t know. The fifteen was his retirement. How i soon as the day. I i heard That he had passed i Immediately saw and. I think someone even posted the picture But i remember the bull the program that was a lake and he said you know the franz schubert some people come into what lies the footsteps on heart and we are never the same. And i just like i went like that was. That's all i could think like. Yeah that's that's the best way to say it. So yeah that was my experience and cherish those experiences with greg and so on thank you. Yes for walking us. Through that. I think in a great hero and person who aspired to was leonard bernstein and he had. He was always watching documentaries. And i would send him books. and and He lived and bernstein's motto that he sort of adopted at the end of his life was Music and people. And that's that's what he thought his life was about. At least in greater. I would repeat that all the time that's life is about. It's about music in people. And i feel like that's his legacy is that He had such incredible musical integrity. I mean he would not he would not I remember it was one of the things i was could be. Tough about american. I used to talk about how demoralizing it could be to bring him in. Because you'd you'd feel like man. My my group is sounding good. I can't wait to have greg. And i'm going to show this this time and then greg would come in and just you would feel so stupid by hours. You'd be like what is wrong with me. Why did i hear that. Why did i fix that. And he could be tremendously. blunt. Sometimes. i remember. One time i was i had just started working Candied sweet was my group and He came into clinton gus and we were doing the make our garden grow and remember. He told me he stopped and he goes. You know. I think you really have a superficial understanding of this music. But that's what i mean about his integrity. He he did. Not but but i wanna say the thing. It made me have such tremendous respect for him because he never bullshitted he never lied to you. He never blue smoke up. Your you know what he he told you exactly what he thought and that meant that meant his compliment strike so much deeper. You know what i mean. I remember when i had my college do the seventh symphony by david and i sent him the recording in and he was blown away. I can't believe you've got that group to do that. That's amazing and You did it and it like it felt so much more real and lasting. Because i knew he would tell and he adult dolby many. I've four when i messed it up. And so i feel like where i'm going with this by the way is an That was his legacy as his his musical integrity. His musical compliments his musical excellence but then also i don't think he would have been able to pull that off if there wasn't this palpable love for other people. You know what i mean. I don't think he could say that. The those kinds of things those kinds of blunt things if it wasn't understood that underneath that he cared about you and i know We talked in podcast several times about Ravelli and the impact really had had on him and how he thought in the early years he had to be this. You know really mean over the top scary person to get things done and over his career. stopped me necessary and he was still able to get the results with with love instead of fear. And so where i'm going. I know he had a huge impact on all of us on a personal level and russia. That's okay. I thought might make sense to start you Because i know when he met you. This this was a time of it was a huge transition in your life and it was really important moment in. He played really really important role in that. Is that.

greg franz schubert somalia leonard bernstein bush bernstein clinton Ravelli david russia
"franz schubert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm married the weeds. Kelly Life right now is a lot of things unsettled, Scary, Quiet rush hour traffic, mostly gone. The thrum of our daily routines suspended for concert pianist Simona dinner Steen that has meant no touring, no concerts. Instead, she has recorded a new album at home during quarantine and chosen music that speaks to a sense of the world slowing down. It's called a character of Quiet and Simona Dinerstein joins us now from New York Welcome. Thanks for having me I'm told you gave a piano the first few months of the pandemic. So let me start there. Why? Well, I I struggled with it. I tried to play. I tried to practice. I thought I should. You know, attempt to learn all sorts of music. But I felt really Distanced from music. I felt that for the first time in my life music couldn't really express what I was feeling. And I didn't feel creative. I just felt Frozen, and that seemed meaningless to me to be playing the piano. I can so relate to that. I do not play the piano. But I'm a writer journalist, obviously an irate fiction and I've struggled these last few months feeling there's nothing I can write that remotely captures everything going on in the world right now. Sounds like you were in a similar place. Yes, Yes, I felt that I couldn't process what was what was happening, and Music wasn't getting me any closer to it. So what changed under you back to the piano? Well, I was having a talk with my friend and producer Adam Apes House and I said to him, I can't play like I don't know. I'm feeling really disconnected. I don't know what to do. And He said. You should record on. I thought, how on earth am I going to do that? You know, every place is closed, and he said I could come to your house and we could record in your room. I've never thought that I could do that. Like in Brooklyn. You know the amount of street noise and and my room is a small room and I have an enormous piano in this small room and He said. We'll deal with it. We'll get over it and he really encouraged me to do this. And I tried to think about what music would really speak to me right now. Because I couldn't find any music that I related. Teo and I thought about music by Franz Schubert and Philip Glass and I I thought that that music was absolutely perfect because The music has a kind of ruminative quality. That is both very reflective and introspective and also Painful. Give me an example from one of the pieces that are not on this new album, the opening of Schubert Sonata and B flat. This is the last piano sonata that he wrote, and he wrote it while he was dying. And it starts off with this very, very beautiful theme. It.

Simona Dinerstein Simona dinner Steen Philip Glass Schubert Sonata Sasha Pfeiffer NPR Kelly Life Franz Schubert New York Teo writer Brooklyn producer Adam
"franz schubert" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on KCRW

"You know that the amount of street noise and and my room is a small room and I have an enormous piano in this small room and He said. We'll deal with it. We'll get over it and he really encouraged me to do this. And I tried to think about what music would really speak to me right now. Because I couldn't find any music that I related. Teo and I thought about music by Franz Schubert and Philip Glass and I I thought that that music was absolutely perfect because The music has a kind of ruminative quality. That is both very reflective and introspective and also painful. Give me an example from one of the pieces that are not on this new album. The opening of Schubert's Sonata and B flat. This is the last piano sonata that he wrote, and he wrote it while he was dying, and it starts off with this very, very beautiful theme. It has a very deep sadness to it, and that kind of sense of longing of memory. It's not straightforwardly happy. And then there's this kind of rumbling trill and in the left hand very, very low down on the piano on the base. And it just It's like this kind of unrest that's underneath this beautiful melody. And so it's neither. One thing nor another. I think it's just the most stunning opening to a piece of music. And then what about the glass? Tell me more about why? That seemed to be the right choice in this moment in these particular et tubes. There's a feeling to them that you could imagine that it's almost like a meditation when you're listening to it. But also there's a feeling of unease. The first eight to that I record, which is a tube number 16. It's a kind of dance rhythm, which is syncopated, and it repeats quite a few times this this for them over and over again. And even though the notes sometimes just remain the same feeling evolves and it sometimes it feels like Just a beautiful dance and other times it feels like something really, really quite sad has come to pass. His music forces you to listen in the moment while you're playing it because Though it seems at first glance that it's about repetition. Actually, it's about constant change. And so though you maybe playing the same pattern, something is happening as you repeat that pattern that is transforming it. And you have to be open to it. You have to be listening while you're playing and as a listener, If you're not playing, you have to be open to hearing those changes. So right now, this seems to be a period of time when we're I almost caught in this sense of repetition each day, not knowing where we're going, You know, there's there's not the sense of forward momentum that we normally have in our lives. And I think that that feeling that I get playing glasses, music. It is almost a mirror to what we're feeling right now. That's beautifully put. Let me ask this did how you play these pieces change these. These air works you've performed before? Yes, I was really struck by how my playing had changed. When I listened to the recording. I mean, as I said, I had not been practicing. I You know, I would be lucky if I practiced for an hour a day on normally, I practice for about six hours a day, so I didn't know Have the recording would come out? It was very nervous about it. And I I had these two nights where we recorded it where I decided not to listen to anything that I did. I didn't go in and listen to playbacks. I just played for five hours each night without much pause. And so then, when I went Tio edit the recording, and I listened to what had happened. I was really surprised because My playing during those months of not plain seemed to have grown tremendously. Yeah, it was really strange and I think that this may be my best recording so far on DH. It's so surprising and also very reassuring for me because I thought that I was all dried out and doing nothing and it turns out that something was happening to me when I wasn't playing. I guess that's a good lesson to learn..

Franz Schubert Philip Glass Teo
"franz schubert" Discussed on Podium Time

Podium Time

12:41 min | 3 years ago

"franz schubert" Discussed on Podium Time

"I mean I was getting better results for the community. Ensembles that I was working with so it's like well. What is this now if you look at any job posting? That's in higher. Ed You know they want you to have a DNA. You know it's Diem. They want you to conduct the orchestra. They want you to teach string methods. They want you to teach private lessons on strings music appreciation and keyboard or music theory or you know music for the for the masses or whatever it is and it's like you know you give an interview and they make it clear and you say yes. Of course I can do all of those things and it's it's still a crap shoot and then they want to offer you. You know thirty five thousand dollars for the job and it's like okay. It's a good way to get your foot in the door. But as as again as the landscape of Higher Ed changes not all of the the full time tenure track things are drying up for us I got offered a job at the beginning of this school. Year with lie won't say words with but It it was essentially what I just described conducting the second band conducting the Orchestra Teaching Applied Lessons Teaching conducting to undergrads who had essentially completed the sequence and we're pursuing additional study music appreciation and Intro to theory and it was for thirty five thousand dollars and I got offered the job kind of at the last minute. It would have meant Relocating essentially in the middle of August and I had already programmed seasons I had guest soloist lined up in contract signed and other people that I was way more accountable to And so I had to turn it down. But it's like you know it wasn't tenure track. There was no security accepts. Yoon of the word of the committee that you know this is the way that this position has always been you know. It's very unlikely that anything would happen to at ROM that it is but you know so yeah. I'm not sure if a DNA is next for me or not. I do you know with the way the landscape looks right now. I don't know how interested I am jumping back into higher. At at the moment that could change. I mean you know I think I think there are a lot of things about the job security aspect that we we find higher Ed really appealing. But it ain't the same as it used to be. I'm there's there's plenty of other people shooting for it also new up well and that's the thing too i. I had a conversation with a friend of mine. Cameron Lee choose a percussionist over on his podcast. Not Long Ago. Essentially about the same thing you know. It's like if you if you finish a master's degree in performance in a weather instrumental. Vocal conducting whatever. It is by the time. You've finished your master's degree. You should essentially have all of the skills that you need to be able to further. Develop your artistry once you leave and I think that anybody pursuing a doctorate degree. I mean it's largely in academic degree. You sure there's a lot of performance opportunities and other things that you should. You should glean from it. But it's largely an academic degree and really the only purpose of getting GM is you're eligible for the faculty positions. That I just. I don't know if that's where it's at. I would rather go like create the arts and worry about lead. The academics the academics at this point. I don't know it's all up in here. Who knows I might turn around and apply for the AMA in the next year or two. I'm just you know I think and I think that's another good point. I think as conductors. We spend a lot of time trying to figure out what the first step is. How do we get? How do we get our foot in? And then we get our foot in and we landed and it's like okay. Where do I go from here? It's like almost as soon as we take the podium for the first time it's like okay. What's next Allen? It's and I think it's I think. In a lot of ways. We kind of bogged down trying to plan the architecture of what our career looks like. You know I'm going to spend three years with this orchestra that I'm GonNa have a minute be able to move into what's next and you know. I think you know for me right now. I've got enough things. In both groups that are creating some momentum to them that. I'm not necessarily in a hurry to pull away from them because I own a follow these things through but also because I think if I if I do it right. Data create some momentum for me. Personally you know when when when you move on then you have that that base of evidence that yes I can. I can build us. I can sustain the yeah anymore. It's not just you know this is what I did while I was on the podium but this is what I did you know for. Grant writing for fundraising. This is what you know. And the whole bit Yeah one of our one of our conducted that Luke and I have both worked with. Before he is at his first one of his earlier big jobs he liked doubled the size of the orchestra and moved them from a one due to performance for concerts. And I was like yeah. That's the kind of stuff that hiring committee definitely wants to say. Yeah I mean you know the thing about I think and the I mean I'm like so torn right now with hiring committees. I mean everybody has their own way of going about how they approach the process. Right some people look at the resumes. I some people read the cover letters. Some people go right for the video and so it really. I mean you can. You can have some really awesome video. But you know if half of the ensemble are paid ringers. Then you should have a good recording you should. You should have some pretty good stuff to work with. But you know if you can show that you know. The regular makeup of the ensemble has grown rescues retained and built in audience. If you've Rowden X. number of dollars in grant and fundraising money here. That's that's more difficult to fudge Yeah and consists streak to show the bets. You know. It's not just a one time thing. Yeah so let's talk about. Let's talk about your current groups You've got the euclid than you have. The Band is will and Orchestra. Nineteen that would. It's yeah. Yeah that was. So that's my baby and the baby's kind of stalled at the moment because we're in this In the whole nonprofit waiting for the government to approve paperwork getting numbers in place. We've done a couple of kind of pick up performances. But now we're trying to get things a little more formalized so we can go after the grant money and and really kind of get some projects funded Dot Org Innovation. Kind of really came out of nowhere when I was with the POPs. There's a guy named JC Sherman who was doing development work for them and I found out that he plays serpent Anchin Bosso and really star things we got to talking and we said you know we should get a group together and do something and then he left the orchestra and when I took over doing the personnel for them a couple of years later. The first the first thing that I had to do when I was hired was get an orchestra sixty together to do some run out gigs in Cincinnati in Buffalo and JC was one of the people who played and we ended up sitting next to each other on the Boston. We were just kinda messing around and it's like well you know if we were going to do this. Who WOULD WE? Ask who get involved. What would we do where we do it and then little did I know that it just turned into this huge snowball? And we've got another historical group in town called Apollo's fire who's been around for a while But I really had no idea how many historical players we had in town and I mean once people found out that we were doing this I mean they were just crawling out of the woodwork. Which was which was really cool to not have to like beg and plead with performers to to do stuff. So it's it's Kinda snowballed like. I said it's it's stalled with the moment but it's only stalled because of the government's not stalled because air so so so why nineteenth century music. It's a you know for me. It's always been the stuff that I've really enjoyed studying and listening to and we could get away with a lot of instrumental. That's the right word. The the actual physical properties of the instruments were in a great period of change during the nineteenth century and so we had a flute player. Who had a simple system flute? You know even though that might not be appropriate for some of the later nineteenth century works. It's fair to say that there were people who were still playing on them in some of the small villages in Europe. You know so we could get away with kind of creating that sound I think there's a lot more leeway with a lot of the historical practice stuff like that But really I think you know it's it's what it's the repertoire. Orchestras are still capitalizing. Off of you know and so if we can bring a new voice to it. That's that was my interest but you know of course anytime that he could get his hands on a serpent part or CIMH Bosso a substitute to I mean yeah. There were just out of possibilities and it didn't pigeonhole and plus Apollo fires technically a baroque orchestra. So I WANNA step on any toes as far as that goes to because there's no need to create any enemies here I was gonna get like broke. Classical is usually what we what we think of performance practice but there. There is a lot in the in the romantic nineteenth century that we don't think about yeah and like I said there was so much change that happen during that period. I mean the possibilities are really endless and with as many Higher Ed institutions that we have in northeastern Ohio. There are a lot of places who can loan us equipment and hosts concerts so we're really pretty fortunate to be where we are and what were. What were the early concerts looking like? Was this something that you you said. You were scraping together players. But they're still coming out of the woodworks. Yeah I mean I. I was fortunate because I had made a lot of connections being personnel manager at POPs and having a relationship the musicians union and So I had really strong cool of people to pull from for the first concert. Did Beethoven seven and a flute concerto by Franz Not Franz Schubert Yosef Schubert's with John Rottenburg who was the foremost former associate principal the Cleveland Orchestra. And then we did The mendelssohn overture calm sea and prosperous voyage. That's such a great overture.

Franz Schubert Yosef Schubert Diem Cleveland Orchestra Ohio CIMH Bosso Yoon Cameron Lee Europe GM AMA personnel manager Apollo Allen Dot Org Innovation JC Sherman Luke Anchin Bosso Cincinnati Boston Beethoven