26 Burst results for "Franz Liszt"

"franz liszt" Discussed on Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Rotten Tomatoes is Wrong (A Podcast from Rotten Tomatoes)

"Ten all right. I'm gonna give you a list of some stuff right now. Franz liszt frank sinatra elvis presley the beatles the rolling stones and the jackson five. What are they all have in. Common teenage girls. Were right about them before everybody else. The same thing is happening with k pop as we speak you know what else. Teenage girls were right about the movies. It's hard to imagine now in a world where everything seems catered teenage boys but the earliest and most passionate fans of films in the nineteen hundreds nineteen. Ten's were teenage girls. And young women and there was much tut-tutting and finger-wagging among the pundit class about how silly those teenage girls young women were that they were absorbing the images on the screen on an emotional service level without having any deeper analysis which is obviously nonsense and at the same time some of that was true for twilight which is why some of the culture wide snickering. That was directed at it. Didn't really sit all that. Well with me. I mean if edward cullen was good for anything he'd be an expert eyewitness for all of this stuff given that he was a teenager for a hundred years but even if some of the knox twilight were unfair that doesn't invalidate any criticism of it and the general feeling among the critics. Was that while kristen. Stewart and robert pattinson had genuine chemistry. It was all a little bit too self serious to work as a whole. It's at forty nine percent on the tomato meter with two hundred twenty two reviews but it does have a seventy-three percent audience score. So what did the critics have to say in a rotten review. Genevieve polski of the av club wrote while the movie attempts to find a compelling middle ground between gothic supernatural ism and teenage romance usually winds up stumbling into the name territory implied by both descriptions however in fresh review. Kim joiner movie city. News wrote stewart is a fine talented actress and she ups the ante considerably here. Her strong performance makes twilight far better film than it would have been with a lesser actress in the part the rotten tomatoes critics consensus reads having lost much of its bite. Transitioning to the big screen..

Franz liszt frank sinatra elvis presley jackson edward cullen Genevieve polski av club robert pattinson kristen Stewart Kim joiner stewart
"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

01:50 min | 2 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Julie yohannes bronze wrote rhapsody for voices his alto rhapsody the rhapsody on a theme of panini by russian composer. Sergei rachmaninoff takes a little violin piece by niccolo paganini and turns it into a much bigger piece for piano and orchestra. I could go on waxing. Rhapsodic about rhapsodies but i'll end with a bit of the most famous one by franz liszt. His hungarian rhapsody number two. I'm naomi lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with him. Lander at wg uc cincinnati. Please join me again for more classics for kids..

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

03:40 min | 2 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"That's a swedish rhapsody by hugo alphand. But the word rhapsody is greek. It means songs stitched together. Ancient greeks told stories about their heroes in huge long epic poems. And they took parts of those poems and recited them using lots of vocal ups and downs for emphasis. The sing song recitation of poem pieces was called a rhapsody in music. Rhapsody is a free form composition that stitches different huhne's together lots of rhapsodies us popular or folk melodies from a particular country like the romanian rhapsody number one by georgian enescu and. That's actually got annoyed that his first rhapsody became so popular audiences never wanted to hear any of his other music. Franz liszt was born in hungary in spite of the fact that he spent very little of his life their list composed twenty. Hungarian rhapsodies anyone. Who's at bugs. Bunny fan knows the list. Hungarian rhapsody number. Two charles stanford only composed six rhapsodies about his native country. This is stanford's irish. Rhapsody number. Five french composer camille sounds souls based his rhapsody van on folk songs from a region of france. Another frenchman got inspired by a trip. To southern spain emmanuel shabri called his rhapsody espana which is spanish for spain. Not all rhapsodies are about foreign countries. The second rhapsody for piano and orchestra by george gershwin describes a walk through manhattan one of the five boroughs of new york city because gershwin used music to imitate the sound of skyscrapers being built. His second. rhapsody is sometimes called rhapsody. In in rivets rivets are what hold the metal beams of a building together. There are also rhapsodies than don't really have anything to do with a place as a wedding present for robert and clara schumann daughter..

hugo alphand charles stanford huhne camille sounds Franz liszt emmanuel shabri hungary spain stanford george gershwin france gershwin manhattan new york city clara schumann robert
"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:31 min | 3 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I'm naomi lewin. Welcome to classics for kids. We think of franz list as a composer but in his day he was really famous as a pianist. So were mozart. Beethoven chopin and rachmaninoff and a lot of others. You may or may not have heard of domenico. Scarlatti played one of the earliest keyboard instruments that we would recognize as a piano. Scarlatti was born in italy but he spent most of his life working for royalty in spain and portugal he composed five hundred fifty five keyboard sonatas. Luzio clementi was born in italy too but he moved to london. India's buried in westminster abbey with a tombstone that reads father of the piano forte. Which is the full name of the piano. Clementi helped make the piano popular and he taught a lot of people including carl czerny. Czerny is most famous for writing a set of piano exercises. You'll probably run into if you take lessons. Jeremy's most famous teacher was beethoven and he wound up being the soloist for the premiere. The first performance of beethoven's fifth piano concerto. Because beethoven was deaf to hear the orchestra by then another famous pianist. Composer was clara as a teenager. Clara veep was known all over europe. As queen of the piano she married. Robert schumann who also started out as a pianist after he hurt his hand and couldn't play anymore. Clara played the premiere of all his piano pieces in nineteenth century america. Amy beach became famous as a pianist and composer at a time. When most americans still traveled to europe to study music. Amy beach studied in boston. Her family moved there from new hampshire where she was born one spanish pianist composer who performed in america never made it home when an week.'. Granados came to new york for the premiere of his opera. He was also invited to give a piano recital at the white house. This was in nineteen sixteen during world. War one a ship that granados took to get home was hit by torpedo from german submarine and he didn't survive frenchman. Eric not made his living as a pianist for most of his career. So did american. Composers scott joplin Greek used to spend the spring and summer at home in norway composing but he spent the fall and winter on tour as a pianist. Some people we know today as pianists are also composers. Marc andre hamlin. Who's from canada and gabriela monteiro. Who was born in venezuela. She performed at president obama's first inauguration. Montano is very good at improvising. That is taking a melody and making up music from it on the spot. It's interesting to think which people we know as pianists might be better remembered one day as composers..

Scarlatti naomi lewin Beethoven chopin Amy beach Luzio clementi carl czerny Czerny beethoven italy Clara veep domenico franz Clementi westminster abbey Granados portugal Robert schumann spain europe granados
"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"I welcome to classics for kids. When franz liszt was twenty he went to a concert by violinist niccolo. Paganini the first superstar classical musician panini was as big as any rockstar today and he put on a great show. He was pale and thin. The dressed in black. He also memorized all his music which most performers didn't do them and he came up with new very difficult effects on his instrument. Missed left pag concert thinking. That's what i want to do. So he invented the solo piano recital with the piano facing sideways on the stage so that the audience could watch his hands and face half a century after list was born. A polish pianist became a superstar. That's nick nazi yon paderewski performing his own music. Paderewski eventually became a politician and even spent time as prime minister of poland. Them clyburn got caught up in politics in a different way. Van clyburn was from texas and in nineteen fifty eight at the height of the cold war between the united states and russia he went to moscow and won the very first trajkovski competition which made him an instant superstar. When band clyburn got back to the state he became the only musician ever to get a ticker tape parade in new york. P. t. barnum of the barnum and bailey. Circus brought jenny lynn to america. She was known as the swedish nightingale. That's soprano joan sutherland. With a song. That jenny lynn sang all over the united states. Schools and bridges got named for her. And you could buy jenny. Lynn shirts ties coats hats pies cigars even jenny. Lynn sausages jenny lind lived before there were sound recordings but not enrico caruso. Thanks to recordings italian. Tenor enrico caruso became the most famous singer in the world. He made two movies but they were silent. Because caruso died before films became talkies nor singers. American tenor mario lonzo was born. The year caruso died. He became famous through the movies and wound up starring in one. Call the great caruso. Another tenor became world-famous. Thanks to television and concerts in stadiums. Opera fans and soccer fans fell in love with new chano poverty. There were also conductor superstars likely opposed to kofsky in the nineteen forty movie fantasia. He conducted his own arrangement of music by baa and he got to shake hands with mickey mouse husky. Lister stokowski my congratulations sir. The first american born conductor to become an international superstar was leonard bernstein. He was also a pianist and he composed for the concert hall and for broadway. Why classical music superstars today. Include trumpeter wynton marsalis who also plays jazz. And composes cellist. Yo-yo ma and pianist long long who loves to play list. That's the hungarian rhapsody number two by franz liszt list left hungary when he was ten and hardly spoke the language but he considered himself hungarian and always remembered the music. He heard as a kid more about that next week. I'm naomi lewin. I write classics for kids. And i produced this show.

jenny lynn clyburn nick nazi yon paderewski Paderewski Van clyburn franz liszt trajkovski barnum enrico caruso caruso niccolo Paganini russia panini united states jenny Lynn mario lonzo joan sutherland
How Paganini Inspired Franz Liszt

Classics for Kids

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

How Paganini Inspired Franz Liszt

"When franz liszt was twenty he went to a concert by violinist niccolo. Paganini the first superstar classical musician panini was as big as any rockstar today and he put on a great show. He was pale and thin. The dressed in black. He also memorized all his music which most performers didn't do them and he came up with new very difficult effects on his instrument. Missed left pag concert thinking. That's what i want to do. So he invented the solo piano recital with the piano facing sideways on the stage so that the audience could watch his hands and face

Franz Liszt Niccolo Paganini Panini
"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

Classics for Kids

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Classics for Kids

"Welcome to classics for kids. I'm naomi lewin. Eighteen eleven was called the year of the great comet because a comet lit up the sky for over nine months and eighteen eleven was when franz liszt was born this came from writing which is in austria now but back then it was part of the austro-hungarian empire lists father worked for the same hungarian prince haydn had worked for years earlier. He wasn't a professional musician but he played several instruments including the piano list was six. His father started giving him lessons and list played his first concert in public when he was nine. Local members of the nobility were so impressed that they paid for him to go steady in vienna. Which was the center of music there. He took lessons from carl czerny. Who had studied piano with beethoven when czerny saw how talented list was he started. Teaching him for free list also started studying composition and he had his first piece published when he was eleven after a while czerny told list he had nothing more to teach him so list and his family moved to paris when he tried to get into the paris conservatory. They wouldn't take him not because he wasn't good but because he wasn't french list continued to study privately and to give concerts around europe since he was also very religious. He thought about becoming a priest instead of a musician but his father said you belong to art. Not the church. In paris list met three musicians who changed his life pianist. Frederic chopin was just a year older than list. Who thought chopin was great. Composer actor barely owes wrote program music. Which tells a story without using words that fascinated list and then there was niccolo. Paganini a violinist. Who was the first musical superstar when list saw how audiences reacted to pack amini. He decided he would be the pack anini of the piano. People went crazy for list. Not only did he play well. He also looked interesting tall and elegant with long hair way before there was bieber fever. The german poet heinrich china coined the term list oh mania. His fans wore jewelry with his portrait and may jewelry out of his broken piano strings and one woman even picked up a cigar but he threw away set in diamonds and wore. That list spent eight years giving concerts all over europe. He made a lot of money and gave a lot away to charity then when he was thirty. Five a polish princess convinced him to stop touring as a pianist and spent time composing so he settled down in weimar germany to conduct a court orchestra. Not only did he. Invent new ways of conducting. He also came up with a new musical form. The symphonic poem another thing lists specialized in was taking other people's compositions like songs and operas and turning them into pieces for solo piano speaking of opera lists daughter cozy my wound up marrying opera composer. Richard wagner after lists other. Two children died. He moved to rome and finally studied to be a priest. He spent the last two decades of his life teaching masterclasses which he invented in a masterclass students. All sit together taking.

czerny naomi lewin prince haydn carl czerny paris conservatory franz liszt amini paris austria Frederic chopin heinrich china vienna niccolo Paganini chopin europe weimar germany Richard wagner rome
Who Was Franz Liszt?

Classics for Kids

01:53 min | 3 months ago

Who Was Franz Liszt?

"Eighteen eleven was called the year of the great comet because a comet lit up the sky for over nine months and eighteen eleven was when franz liszt was born this came from writing which is in austria now but back then it was part of the austro-hungarian empire lists father worked for the same hungarian prince haydn had worked for years earlier. He wasn't a professional musician but he played several instruments including the piano list was six. His father started giving him lessons and list played his first concert in public when he was nine. Local members of the nobility were so impressed that they paid for him to go steady in vienna. Which was the center of music there. He took lessons from carl czerny. Who had studied piano with beethoven when czerny saw how talented list was he started. Teaching him for free list also started studying composition and he had his first piece published when he was eleven after a while czerny told list he had nothing more to teach him so list and his family moved to paris when he tried to get into the paris conservatory. They wouldn't take him not because he wasn't good but because he wasn't french list continued to study privately and to give concerts around europe since he was also very religious. He thought about becoming a priest instead of a musician but his father said you belong to art. Not the church.

Prince Haydn Czerny Franz Liszt Carl Czerny Austria Vienna Paris Conservatory Paris Europe
"franz liszt" Discussed on Mt. Rushmore Podcast

Mt. Rushmore Podcast

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Mt. Rushmore Podcast

"Just made that noise if i just make can make the boop right they wanna that. I didn't really scan you. Put the thing down. That doesn't way and it's on on on the scale. How you how does it know how much this exactly ways. It doesn't doesn't. It's it's eleven eggs. How does it know so when you brought that up do you. Have you stole anything michael nothing of like any. I don't remember anything of any particular value. Probably took a candy bar or something from like a whatever just to try it. yeah whatever. I have a vague memory of going to a friend's house and like stealing one of his toys. Really i really wanted that. He man character named squeeze who is guy with these big long snake arms. And i just took it because i i could the ten. And maybe when you're playing friend's house and things get lost all the time in my head in my this all right manfredi what your third my third one and i referred this a little bit with my beatles choice Was the idea that this was. The beatle mania was kind of the be model for some modern version of the big chemical mania or like the biggest version of that But it may not have been the I historical version of this I am talking about listening listening mania. Yeah which is not just a pretty decent Russell was pretty decent phoenix song or a pretty bad shit insane. Ken russell movie which i do. Remember watching the movie list of mania. Because i had watched the. Who's tommy. i thought. Well that's this movie's crazy. But it's kinda crazy like in a fun way and then you watch list of amiens like what happened here if you've never seen it guys. It's just like pates hedera. But i'm talking about the actual list of menia franz liszt the piano player and composer Basically was the first rock star of music before there is such a thing as rock and roll. I he was the first guy to get up on a piano recital and actually start the recital from walking in off the wings before everyone just the audience came in and the pianist was already there and then he started and that was kinda he actually walked in from the wings to rebuild a little bit more excitement He was the first person to work from memory and not from cheap music. Oh there's actually considered to be Arrogant to work without sheet music at the time but he thought it was something to create more of an atmosphere but more of a performance and he would do things like he would turn the piano so that he was the audience could see him and he used this really good looking guy had this long flowing hair and so that they could see him sweating and the hair flowing and his beads of sweat coming off him and so he was. He was well aware of his potential for doing something that was could incite an audience. And he did he would you know. They're the term list of media was something came up in the press because he did this tour of europe and people especially women in their twenties to forties. We're just going nuts. No storming the stage After his performance if there is a broken piano scrape string. They'd fight each other for it. If he had a cigar that he'd smoked a suzy. Put it out some woman we come up threw it up and keep it as a souvenir and and to me..

europe Ken russell eleven eggs michael third one first guy Russell first person third pates hedera first rock twenties phoenix forties liszt one of his toys menia manfredi tommy ten
"franz liszt" Discussed on Podium Time

Podium Time

08:25 min | 1 year ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Podium Time

"In Cleveland the clear articulation short notes, and of course, the precision and Utah intonation, he was just an equality of some of the individual players, as well really spoke to him so that when I remember I remember a few others of he he, he was not so interested in not specifically I. Remember taking some Benny Goodman. He loved Benny Goodman. And a few things he hadn't heard he was delighted by those. But. It was interesting to the thinks he would pick out because he was a record skied to. He had grown up in Minneapolis attending rehearsals of metropolis someone he revered. Of and the always encouraged me to seize of this particular metropolis recording remember the politics infancy one. He singled out as being a unique interpretation of the piece which it is. And how much she enjoyed that! complaining to certain, Minneapolis recordings to try to find because they were back then they were hard to find a. they're probably all online. So are do you listen with you? Listen to like historic records with a record player, or are you listening to the digital urgent well? It that that's a good question. I still I still have some vinyl, but when I moved from New, York City here I finally parted ways with a lot of my collection of I've been collecting records probably since about nineteen seventy eight and I had probably about three thousand vinyl LP's at least at number of CDs, and so that the thought of hangs, move them across. The country was. A little painful, so they stayed behind, and my tenant tolerated having. Stuck in boxes. And then when I sold the place last year. I decided I would go back and pick out the ones I absolutely could not replace the ones that I hadn't managed to download from some other source or weren't available for streaming site I. Did that and I gave the rest of? Incredible quantity away, so my listening a lot of it. In the meantime I had been part of some recording newsgroups where people exchange things. They taped off the radio so now I have a rifle of live performances. Of various things that I've chosen to collect not not all which I have time to listen to download them so when I'm like Oh. What Recordings Brahms? syfy number four, which is something I'm preparing right now. Who? Do I have in thirteen of them. They, all sound interesting. There's no I can hear them all. But as many of them are things, I I did not have previously either because they're alive or things I didn't bother to collect, and they're all fascinating so i. do have some vinyl. And I've actually bought a few new vinyl I bought the Beatles. I bought the new Sergeant Pepper online on. It's fantastic and. When I have time I do that, but a lot of hard drive stuff on headphones the also. I right before I moved to Colorado I was getting into like going to the store and looking all the finals and trying to find. Something old I think the coolest thing I found was a was a Schurenberg conducting bureau lunar, which I still haven't gotten a chance to sit down and listen to, but just like I just wanted to own bat. Yeah I had that record back in the day after. A veiled for streaming as well. I'm told Schurenberg was not a terribly effective conductor recently. Would have known that. That was a piece that I. I played it a few years ago here but that was one where I was called a lot as a last minute substitute for rehearsals and concerts that was very good sight reader, and that was one thing I got called to. Can you fill in? Somebody's it as a whole. I actually like I. I I think. They faxed me the music. That's how long ago. And practice that a loss because you cannot sight read that. It's very as I. I got through the dress rehearsal without destroying it. A very difficult piece to play, Wow! I'm wondering if we can actually Kinda, pick a piece, and then if you would walk us through a couple of different recordings, you have maybe talk about some specifics went sure what differs them just again. Really dig into the weeds. And then I want to make listening lists for myself to go off. And find them in here. All the shirt and we can continue to exchange ideas over email about recording to. Which is I? Mean I think you. You probably know your record collection more. Which piece would you? Would you be able to compare a couple all a really any standard work? Either Symphonic Concerto Could I mean I can always say pass if I don't know but. I know pretty well. I mean Beethoven five is the first one just. There is so many recordings of it, but you know maybe maybe maybe the since you're working on the Brahms, maybe. Maybe fourth well I would start with two. Max fiedler, who conducted of in front of Brahms has as recording Lebron's four and I think. Everybody should hear it because nobody makes music this way anymore. It's just. A type of a musical flow that it really doesn't exist where. The tempo is always flowing in one direction or another nowadays when people talk about robotics, we talk about where we're slowing down, hesitating pausing but Max fiedler and the conductors of his generation. It also meant flowing forward at faster, sometimes to quite remarkable degree, and I'm not talking about the code of the first words, almost traditional speed up a little bit but where it starts quite slowly at the beginning like Oh, my goodness! We're going to be here a while, and then it just gets really gets going. Then it pulls way back and each team just seems to find tempo in which rest and once you're not being jarred by it. It's quite. It's quite remarkably convincing to me. But if you've never heard the style of music making. It, it's easy to like okay. That's crazy like nobody would ever do that, but it's this is someone who again worked at Brahms's presence in had his approval, and he also recorded the Second Symphony, and at least one of the piano concertos and a few things. So that and also Felix Weingartner who also was old enough to have been around Brahms in who worked in Vienna, so they almost certainly must have crossed paths at some point in and vine, gardener, whose name probably familiar to hopefully because he wrote the book about Beethoven Cetera was a student of Franz Liszt as a pianist, so he was, he was Very distinguished musician and his bronze fourth is on Youtube among other places. Of is very different from Max feeders. It's much more contemporary sounding. It's very swift. A! Brahms recording temples are quite fast. And But it's it's also just it's wonderfully contemporary sound and compared to Max there and yet here conductors of fairly similar generation, so those I just think are really important recordings by people who lived in the nineteenth century, and lived long enough to to make records so That's those were those are unmissable Brahms fourths. Ob. Is it contemporary in that? It's in that the bottle in the tempo is something that we would expect more now. Vine Gartner It. Yes to that extent. What's different about it is that it's generally swifter than what it what we would expect for most people now. It's a it's a much more. He's what I would call more organic interpreter of these in other. Let's the natural flow of the pulse. Ganic style music making me think of Toscanini. George Sell. These kind of conductors were as villars what I. Call Interventionist. Interventionist style conductors. Stokowski for.

Brahms Max fiedler Benny Goodman Minneapolis Cleveland Colorado Utah Sergeant Pepper Schurenberg York City Toscanini Beethoven Felix Weingartner Max George Sell Franz Liszt Youtube Beethoven Cetera
"franz liszt" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

10:29 min | 1 year ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Have a quick word from one of our fabulous sponsors. What Need Vincent Van Gogh one of the greatest painters and most tortured souls of all time? There's something truly magical about the fact that he pulled out of this life of misery these joyful images of flowers and rolling hills and Reich colors what Albert Einstein be diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. Today he was a very good student in math and sciences and he was mediocre to decent student in other areas. Some of that is lack of interest. Some of that is also lack of talent. Was Harry. Houdini predestined to become the escape artists. Based on his family's great escape all of these things can function as sort of a metaphor for his own genesis and origin story. Which seems to be again. You know a series of escapes. I'm Dr Gail Saltz. And on my new podcast personality. I'll be joined by amazing experts to delve into the minds of famous historical figures. If you want to know what really made exceptional people tick then take a listen to personality listened to personality every Monday. On the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts so to get to the end of the mania and the end of life in eighteen forty seven list met princess. Caroline's you son Wittgenstein and he met her in Kiev and they started a relationship and she like his previous long term love affair with Mary. The princess wanted him to stop touring and settled down and focus on teaching and composing instead so while he and the previous his previous love interests come tests had needed to escape. Paris and scandal instead list was installed in the princesses estates as last paying concert was in September of that year and he was thirty five at the age of thirty seven. He accepted the permanent post of capita MEISTER. Basically the person in charge of music for the Grand Duke of Weimar. This position came with a royal benefactor. Carl Alexander to be his patron so he had the financial and social backing to just continue his own work. Liz Move to Mar. And the princess later joined him there. In addition to his ongoing teaching and composition list started trying to create new musical forms. The most famous of these was the symphonic poem which is a musical piece. That's meant to evoke or illustrate a story. Or if you SA- Visual Art. These compositions were really groundbreaking. And they attracted more music students. He wanted to learn from him. He dedicated most of his music around this time to the Princess Caroline and while in Weimar List wrote what's considered to be his most accomplished symphonic work in Faust symphony or Faust Symphony. This is essentially a series of interconnected symphonic poems based on Johann Wolfgang Von Jeff. This tragic play faust guarantee and. Schiller had both lived in. Weimar and Liz drew musical inspiration from their literary work. His post capital Meister also meant that was responsible for conducting the orchestra and in doing so. He really revolutionized what it meant to conduct up until that point. The conductor was basically a human metronome. He made sure that all of the orchestra played in time with one. Another and the nobody missed their cues. But at least added gestures and expressions and an emotive physical presence to guide with. The Orchestra's should sound like in the shape of the playing itself. And this is pretty much taken for granted in the field of conducting an orchestra today. That's how it works. At the end of the eighteen fifties life became more difficult for list. He resigned his post in Weimar in eighteen. Fifty nine and at that point. Two of his children also died one in that same year that he resigned and then another a few years later in eighteen sixty two he also got caught up in a musical feud known as the war of the Romantics and this pitted the more romantically inclined musicians list. Richard Wagner against the more conservative classically inclined traditionalist faction of Robert Schumann Felix Mendelssohn. Yohannes Brahms was basically a dispute between the more avant garde musical scene and the composers who drew their influence from past masters like Bach Mozart and Beethoven this association with Wagner also meant that lives developed a reputation for having antisemitic views but there's significant dispute about whether quotations that were attributed to him in this Area of thought were accurate or they were not at this point. Wagner is kind of notoriously antisemitic in his views. I had a hard time confirming exactly what views were so as whole musical schism was going on list moved to Rome where the Princess Caroline had gone to try to get her previous marriage annulled by the pope. She enlists hopes to get married but her annulment did not go through so they did not and at this point lists turned away from a lot of the world in eighteen sixty three moved to an apartment at a monastery outside of Rome in two years later in eighteen sixty five. He cut his hair in a tonsure. So that's the shaving of the middle part of the scalp that leaves a ring of hair around it. At this point he took holy orders that same year and he pursued an extensive study of theology with the hope of joining the clergy and although he was never ordained he did become an Abbott and he produced a number of religiously themed musical works in Eighteen seventy lists returns to Hungary to visit and while he was away from Rome. Victor-emmanuel a second attempted to unify all the Italian states and essentially laid siege to round since he couldn't return list remained in Hungary and accepted a post at the Royal National Hungarian Academy of Music in Budapest and today this is the Franz Liszt Academy of Music for the last fifteen years of his life list divided his time. Among Budapest Weimar Rome he continued to teach extensively and cultivated the idea of a master class. And that's an idea that's continued to be part of musical and other artistic education today. He taught these demonstration based classes. He being the master of course for free. He's struggled with depression and failing health for the end of his life and he died in Germany on July thirty first eighteen eighty six by then he had composed about fourteen hundred works although he's pretty universally recognized as virtuoso piano player as well as contributions to the art of conducting in the idea of symphonic poems there are still people that argue that his skill as a composer was all hype. I found several articles that were like five list. Was He really any good? I don't think that's always the case with avant-garde folks though right like even also the case with excessively pretty soulful looking people who acquire an overly excited base of fans that liked to scream a lot. Right I mean you could say that. Any person in the arts or anything really wear like if they have really rabid fans. There's always gonNA to be a kickback of like no. They're not worth all of that. Even though they are super talented and amazing right people say that about the Beatles. Plenty of arguments. You can make about the Beatles. And what their influences are whether there's influence should've gotten more attention and whether all of their work is really great but really seriously you can't just dismiss the entirety of the Beatles because ladies were screaming about them. Yeah so they're also this whole phenomenon. Spawned a weird rock opera about front of list in the Nineteen Seventies. That was called Mr Mania. There's also a song and album by the band. Phoenix that became very popular more much more recently. If you want to read all kinds of primary sources about prompt Franz Liszt the library of Congress has a whole bunch of a bunch of them are on the web pretty cool. Thank you so much for joining us today. For this classic if you have heard any kind of email address or maybe a facebook url during the course of the episode that might be obsolete it might be doubly obsolete because we have changed our email address. Again you can now reach us at history podcasts. At iheartradio DOT com. And we're all over social media at missed in history and you can subscribe to our show on Apple podcast. Google podcast the iheartradio APP. And wherever else you listen to podcasts stuff. You missed in history. Classes a production of iheartradio for more podcasts. From IHEART radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hey I'm Joe Levy in on the latest episode of inside the studio. I sat down with one of the all-time Great Singer. Songwriters James Taylor. We talked about his new album. Where is music comes from? And how telling his life story through his songs has helped music saved my life but I was lucky also to survive. I did some very stupid. Some some years at were were just really high risk unnecessarily so and a lot of people around us died Ca. So join me. Joe Lebie editor at large at billboard for this and other in-depth conversations with the biggest artists in music. Listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get gas you know. The thing about food is that it's never just about the food sources. The origins and the roots of different food ways are all intrinsically tied to our humanity from iheartradio. Whetstone magazine comes point of origin. Podcast dedicated to exploring that connection. We traveled the globe to connect with those immersed in different food ways from Korea to Norway from Nigeria to the Appalachian Mountains and beyond fine point of origin. Season to the iheartradio APP. Or wherever? You listen to podcasts..

Apple iheartradio Weimar Princess Caroline Rome Liz Move Richard Wagner Dr Gail Saltz Vincent Van Gogh Albert Einstein Budapest Weimar Rome Beatles Grand Duke of Weimar Hungary Houdini Weimar List Harry Carl Alexander Faust Symphony
"franz liszt" Discussed on Duo Queue

Duo Queue

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Duo Queue

"Which is which is a lot for me so we're GONNA cover a little bit of what's What's been happening in the world of Blizzard? Recently going to cover some things happen with Rockstar Games Bethesda. Ea and then we're going to roll into Logan's terrifying story. Oh Yes oh yeah. I almost forgot to mention. We got a guest host on the show today. You just call me friend Karen. I'm Erin Join US today. Got Our buddy Aaron with us. Aaron how you doing today good My name is Beta. Tester I Beta tested rage to in told it software that it fucking sucked right to their face and they haven't invited me back since so that's my qualifications that bring me onto this podcast today. Solid solid qualifications. I love and we did a double check this before. We invited him on. Yeah we have standards true. I contacted the company themselves and they said WHO's that and I hung up because you know they. They completely forgot about they were so angry about it. I called but once they said hello. I hung up very nervous very scares me. Human human interaction scares me this. Why do podcast so I do a podcast of my van? I can't I can't be under a roof with anyone else while talking so with blizzard. I don't know I'm sure since you know the hundreds of thousands of people who listen to podcast all of your gamers. All of you had to have heard of warcraft. Three forged the absolute travesty. That happened with that. I call it a travesty Yeah it was a travesty sucks. What happened those unfamiliar warcraft? Three reforge is essentially like a it's like an HD remake of warcraft three there. There's a lot happening with it right now as we speak. It's cut a metacritic score of zero point five stars which is the lowest you can go get go any lower than that at almost thirty thousand ratings right now. It's it's probably sitting at Twenty eight or twenty nine thousand. It's insane what what is going on with this game. You go through you go through the comments you or not comments you go through the reviews and you see people talking about the just the outrageous amount of bugs. You Look Online. You see the cut the cut scenes. Ui improvements that were promised or not delivered the removal of like fan favourite features. Aaron were you able to find anything specific anyone talking about that yet so on the metacritic user by the name of Stab in the soul left zero rating with the following review in his review. Actually really detailed some really good stuff. He broke down a what they took out in what they no longer have. They said they no has no clans. No profiles can no longer have more than one account no more custom campaign functionality no more built in tournament functionality no more land functionality no more off game versus the AI. No more cross chat with D. Two players which is the ability to players know more slash commands remove the Franz Liszt removed custom game filter. No women are system. No custom key. Bonds cut all promised new cut scenes. Cut Off Dude. It's a long lake on. Hold on hold on hold on so would you say they cut out cross chat with d? Two is it specifically only with D. Two or all other games. I think it was just why the film I remember. I remember being able to be in D. Two Games. Go into like a specific channel. And you'd see like the little starcraft people down at the bottom and you can talk with them. While they were in in warcraft. Yep so they were just like the community is a little too toxic for what we're trying to do this game. I don't want to he overwatch. Three keep.

Aaron Blizzard Beta Logan Ea Franz Liszt d AI Karen
"franz liszt" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Facts sponsored by cat's pride and if I could think of one thing that sums up nineteen forty six it would be this spring is in the mountains nineteen forty six so it's a wonderful life nineteen forty six Christmas film produced and directed by Frank Capra and the film stars James Stewart as George Bailey what a wonderful film and of course the into what a wonderful life what a wonderful film in life so despite performing poorly yeah at the box office had some stiff competition at the time yeah that it was released but of course the film became a classic and the change in reception was helped in part due to there was a clerical error and the film somehow was put into public domain prior to right when it was supposed to be and so of course with that it was allowed to be shown freely without you know licensing or royalty fees that kind of thing so it got reversed though it's no longer in the public domain is that right yeah if there was some kind of clerical error rate but it is no longer in the public domain film all right we'll be careful that's why you don't see it as much as you used to I have it on DVD so since in nineteen forty six seven eleven changed its name from totem did you know that now so it was it was started out as T. O. T. E. and then like apostrophe M. so the company's first outlets were named totem stores because customers toted away their purchases some stories even featured some real Alaskan totem poles in front of the store so in nineteen forty six their names were changed to reflect the new hours became seven eleven became seven eleven started they opened at seven A. M. and close at eleven PM see I never knew that yeah well now you know why it's called that although I don't believe that that's necessarily the hours that they hold the problem is I have so much old time radio facts in my head then everything else I'll leave here out I don't remember I don't remember what you just said about that yeah seven eleven what what what's your name did you say something are you I can hear you and that Tom and Jerry's episode where Tom performed Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsody number two Franz Liszt yes the won the Oscar for best animated short film this was in nineteen forty six.

Frank Capra James Stewart George Bailey T. O. T. E. A. M. Tom Jerry Franz Liszt Oscar
"franz liszt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Meta for them disappointed as for five lines the commander showed us the frontline many have diets to defend. these men are fighting for the U. N. recognized government which has the support of Turkey and Qatar they're holding all forces led by a rebel general anti theft charge who has the backing of Egypt the UAE from Russia. while the battle for Tripoli is raging there's a moment of opportunity for groups including the Islamic state according to Livy is interior minister fatty but Shaka this is very good the Charles for applied for book ahead for dies for organized crime now in Libya it is very good on vitamins a new issue is this house they can grow now and it is it under come move he told us his government will keep trying to capture all yes militants and will continue security cooperation with Britain and the US but it must focus on defending Tripoli that was all together and now he's one of classical music's most famous can poses and now no Castro work by the Hungarian pianist Franz Liszt has been discovered after lying largely forgotten in a German archive more than a hundred and sixty years the piece called a hundred years ago was performed only once in his lifetime in eighteen fifty nine and never published it will be given its UK premiere next month as all's correspondent Rebecca Jones has been finding out. having lane silent for decades. it's finally brought back to life. one hundred years ago was a musical.

Charles UK Castro theft Rebecca Jones Franz Liszt US Britain Libya commander Shaka Livy Tripoli Russia. UAE Egypt Qatar Turkey one hundred years
"franz liszt" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Man strangles eight Canada goose which is of course obviously better than choking the chicken thank you Jesus highly one room shack one time I made I contact Franz Liszt here comes I set it up you knock it down man strangled a Canada goose he claims attacked him at a gas station this is a perfect example of those false flags yeah if you build it happens all the time he strangled the goose because he says he was in fear of his life where else have we heard that before Daniel Hodgins sixty six choke the water fowl that's what is says chose what now at quick fill gas station somewhere outside of Syracuse hi gins allegedly use crackers to more way to lower several geese to the station he's reminding their own damn business he's had I probably had just come back from the convenience store right next to the gas station you want to bet what they had with them I know they have want to bet what they had written France okay I screamed no no it's always skills in ice tea always skills and I see always hi jims allegedly use crackers to lure several geese to the station with the killing took place two employees of the gas station called police and said they witnessed Hodgins strangle the animal and then throw it in the back of his truck and drive away wait well who who it was dinners what yeah look the owners are put into my truck is because no I'm sorry there's no ground and pound here is ridiculous he strangled the goose after it allegedly attacked him and so he throws it in the back of his truck and tries to drive home cops looked at the surveillance footage which had the whole killing on it and we're able to read his vehicle registration and then went from there he was charged with taking a waterfall out of season and illegally taking protective wildlife if guilty he could face up to thirty days in jail for murder murder thirty that make that sounds about right she yeah that's the cost of life these days that's a formal formal what would it be story in here you know I don't like bees it's hard for me to do these stories it's very interesting there's a Louisiana Lafayette Louisiana couple who had a tree fall on their home during hurricane very recently and then after the tree fell on the home and trapped the woman who lived in the house they were attacked by bees it's not funny for us the father mother had been hospitalized since last week this is Kim to Robertson she says I want to say it was like a thousand pounds on my chest talking about the tree I just talked to guidance it please save me so I can be with my husband to raise my three kids that was for prayer as she was pinned under the tree I messed up the tree falls on your house lands on you in the bees were probably in the tree and then they attacked her because she's just sitting right there they just assumed it was her fault after they they're there they'll never side with be look they are they never side with them did attack her on just he had nothing to do with with the three and there'd hive being almost destroyed the that's why I know that's why give no slack to the bees Killam all kill the ball I know you can't but you can kill a lot of this is this is just a good so darn mistaken identity the identified her as the cause and this is look this no harm no foul no no harm no D. Shi me yeah yes our water from the web and we're back to square one KFI am six forty more stimulating talk now Michael's.

Jesus Canada thousand pounds thirty days
"franz liszt" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:51 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Okay, Chuck, so there's another big push in good Samaritan laws in the United States. It's interesting how they're kind of like refined as, as things go on. But there's this thread the sentiment that runs through them. That's like, okay, we need to make sure that people are don't hesitate in helping their fellow their fellow human in need. Yeah. A lot of these I mean this label this special interest, good Samaritan laws, but these, these are great like it makes a lot of sense, especially while they all do, but this one about the food donation in the mid nineteen nineties, there was a realization that a lot of food was going to waste fourteen billion pounds specifically food go into landfills when people in America needed that food. And, you know, you've heard stories about grocery stores, can't be held liable. So they just have to throw that stuff away. Right. So they passed the Bill. Emerson good Samaritan food donation act, which is to provide some protections. In case you donate food, and someone gets sick from eating that food, right? Exactly. So I remember back when when grocery stores did have to throw that away before that law is just so wasteful, and so just morally wrong. So they passed that one ninety six Goodyear for passing laws. I guess. And then there's even newer kind of push of good Samaritan laws that are protecting college kids, who drinks, you even though they're underage. They might be worried on me and I'm going to get expelled or kicked out of college. Yeah. If I call for help, and so apparently that some of them weren't calling for help, and some universities, I think it's up to thirty two hundred and forty universities in thirty five states now have something called nine one one lifeline or nine one one, good Samaritan law where if you call for help for yourself or for somebody else who's head too much to drink, and it's like a medical emergency. You won't get in trouble for having been drinking under age. But it's laid the groundwork for a like a larger law about opioid abuse that we really kind of need that the good Samaritan law for that, that protects people who are calling for somebody who's overdosing on heroin where under normal circumstances. They might. Hesitate because they're on heroine themselves. And they don't wanna get busted for it. Yeah. What's it's called now? Zone. And this is basically it comes looking epi pen now and it's something that cops have their emergency kits and just like an epi pen, something that civilian can use. You don't have to medical training. If someone is overdosing on an an on heroin, or some other kind of opioid you just inject this thing. And that Kim, say their life and so do junkies. Don't wanna call the ambulance or the cops or whatever just the same as an underage college kid doesn't want to call the cops, so they're often described as medical amnesty laws and his great. You know exactly. And it's making a difference. There was one study in two thousand two at Cornell about the alcohol one and they said there was a rise from twenty two percent to fifty two percent of counseling sessions attended by students in two thousand four because students weren't afraid, you know, I'm nineteen years old or whatever. I need help. So they, you know, it's shown that it's working, and I think this is going on with this now drug right? Yeah. So like the naloxone kind of has its own protection where whether you're somebody who's on heroin or not, if you minister that you could be a medical professional. It's like such a new thing that, that they've they've realized they need a specific. Good Samaritan law for that, to cover anybody who's administering Nalic zone, like if they do some damage or whatever they were still trying to help. But then also, if you're like on heroin yourself just calling nine one one, you can have immunity in some states from getting busted for heroin for being on it yourself. Right. So, like, hey, we're gonna save you and you're under arrest. Right. Which I guess, is is still in some states. It's still a possibility don't like you don't want people worrying about whether they're going to get pop themselves. And then saying, well, I can't. Call for you know, shortage over here. Which is I guess a heroin users name. You know, so the, the, the heroin user, who's overdosing, who would otherwise live dies because they're the person, they shot up with, like, is too worried about getting busted themselves because the last thing, a heroin editor drug addict might do in the throes of that drug is thank let me call a cop, or right? A police officer. They might help. Right. They say, like as far as vice goes for good Samaritans. This article councils people that think sensibly most states do have laws to protect people that if you're doing something reasonable to try and help which all goes back to split second is kind of tough. But that goes back to what you're saying, like reasonable maneuvers to help somebody. Yeah. I mean it's not necessarily like like don't try the tracheotomy right right, right? So. Yeah. So that kinda ties into saying, don't try things. You're not trained to do and just kinda ties into reasonable like is, is trying to administer CPR reasonable thing if you come upon somebody's not breathing. Yes, totally reasonable. Is it is it, you know, unreasonable to try to get their heart going by by pumping their arms up and down in dislocating, the shoulder, probably not going to be protected by a good Samaritan law. Yeah, but how much can you get sued for for a broken collarbone, probably a lot, especially if the person's like ping pong player or professional illustrator? Yeah. Right. Exactly. You love it. We need to do an episode on pingpong. I love ping pong, too. I'm surprised we never squared squared off. I, I am as well, Chuck. Well, we've never been in the same room as a ping pong table today. I was thinking I was going to make a camp joke, but. Debate me to the truth. You got anything else? Oh, yes, I do. There's one thing that came up if you don't mind talking about it. The Seinfeld thing. Do you remember how that the final episode? Right, right. Yeah. Which is like the least funny episode of Seinfeld ever. But it had like a weird message when, when the gang gets gets put in jail for watching a guy, I think it was Jonathan Pinette get carjacked by somebody with a gun and just sitting there making fun of them while they're videotaping it, right? Yeah. And that kind of raise the this it kind of ties into good Samaritan laws. A lot of people are, like can you actually is there any place in the country where you can get get in trouble for that kind of thing? And it turns out no kind of falls into that duty to act law, where you are in some places like for Mont, or I think in, in California under some circumstances. You are required to report a crime, but you're not required to actually intervene. Like, kinda that big point I made earlier at the beginning of episodes. That's a big distinction, right? Yeah. And not only are you. You know, not required interview you're not even required to report the crime during the commission of their, the crime for most duty to act laws. You just can't walk away and pretend you never saw anything that's the that's where you will get prosecuted. So the Seinfeld gang probably would not have gone to jail, and this article that I read. Quotes, a guy who's an attorney in San Diego named somebody lists. Oh man. I wish I could remember the guy's name FRANZ Liszt. No not FRANZ Liszt, who's a great great composer. But a. L. I. S S lists. Yeah. Peter lists criminal lawyer from San Diego, ended up in this article he basically says, not only should they not have gone to jail. They provided very valuable evidence by recording the entire crime. So let them off the hook has there ever been a tougher show to end than Seinfeld. Probably not. But they really chose Severi specific unsatisfying way to do it. What about sopranos everybody hated how that? And it yeah. I didn't love the sopranos, but then moved to LA during its run and didn't have TV. So I quit watching it, but I do remember all the hoopla, but seinfeld's just one of those, I mean that the stunk but it's just a hard show to end because you can't it was the most sentimental show, probably in TV history. And most shows have finale that is highly sentimental. Right. And you just you couldn't do that on Seinfeld that would not have been true to the show. So I don't know what I would have done. It is tough one. Maybe it was the perfect ending wasn't a. You could make that case for sure. You know, I'd like to hear maybe if someone had a better idea. Okay. Right. Rewrite the Seinfeld finale. In one hundred sixty characters or less to us or to forty now. What is that? So weird. Anyway, I think that's the end of this episode. We kind of let this Peter out to. Yep. Okay. If you wanna learn more about good Samaritan laws actually a tip go. Learn your state and or countries good Samaritan laws. So you know what to do in your ever faced with an emergency situation. And since I said that it's time for listener mail. This one's great who's going to call it great Email guys in the spirit of thanksgiving in this glass of wine. I'm drinking. I wanted to reach out and tell you think lamb for you been listening to the show for a few years and your comforting voices light dad humor. An interesting topics have become increasingly important to me, my brother passed away, almost two years ago, the age of twenty four using credible. Soul in would've loved your show trouble falling asleep for a while and began playing your podcast. When my mind was racing in Anita distraction. Fell asleep. Too many interesting topics for months greatly appreciate your help through the sad times last year. I sailed from Seattle. The San Diego with my uncle and father. This was the scariest and most exhilarating trip I've ever taken ever. We kept a watch system, two hours on four hours off during my first to our night alone. I was scared poop less with no land in sight in my life secured to the boat plugged in my headphones. And listen to the stuff, you should know selects fecal transplants episode midway through my watch porpoises started following in playing with the boat can only phosphorus but I was so darn happy sitting there in the cold and dark listening to you. Both talk about poop by watching porpoises create tubes of glitter in the Pacific. Well, can you imagine that, dude? Yeah, that's amazing voices didn't ruin it. This brought me so much comfort in a time of such great discomfort now. You've heard it before in the risk of sounding sappy your podcast brings comfort enjoyed your.

heroin Seinfeld San Diego Chuck United States FRANZ Liszt Peter America Goodyear Emerson opioid abuse Pacific California Seattle Cornell Kim naloxone LA officer Jonathan Pinette
"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:46 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can you describe for our listeners what we're listening to FRANZ Liszt ram? And it's one of the most it's the chocolate box piece of classical music is that at least. Things about appreciable friends list is area that are monster. Not villain comes from. Hungary. In some strange village. Hundreds of great place. It's got a huge music tradition. But there was one thing that I just wanted to do with this character. I wanted to have a piece of music at the start that was absolutely beautiful and melting sometime around the middle. I wanted to become nauseous and terrifying by the end just wanted to even hearing it again to make you feel sick. You know that kind of thing. I don't know why wants to do that just did you know, I used to put police before when I was a kid. Fit the character. So. Then it was so melodic and almost the song puts you into a trance and a little bit of a way. And I remember the first time we shot that scene where you push in on both of us. And we're kinda I'm looking at her and she's just playing the song. And the song is, you know, hearkens back to the relationship with my mother because it's in a movie that we love together leaves from means a dream of love exactly is there's so many layers to it. We're just fell. Also, it was it was it was kind of a featured very heavily and all About Eve, remember. Yeah. The film that my mother, and I love have this thing this shop this scene. It's not in the movie anywhere in the movie. Of course, not no your list, you're looking watching all About Eve leaders from play it again. Are you playing with twenty five times? Well, again, the twenty six. I was under the ninth something like that. Yeah. Play it again. Anyway, it's in each party and all About Eve, they were sick of that too. It's a nauseating tune. When played too many times. Really? Anything heard that many times downing if you push it becomes kind of what happens in between the times, we hear it. Also doesn't hurt? Feel about. Is how we feel better. My guests are khloe grace merits and Neil, Jordan. We're talking about the film. Greg something I found really interesting in the film and another producer here. We both picked up on. It was that Greta the main character is really adept at technology. Yeah. That was interesting. Why did you make that choice was just to make sure the plot went four? She says, oh, I don't know how to use the phone just show me how to make a photograph taken photographs alleged. Okay. You know, come on. She's breadcrumbs before she. Yeah. Donald tries to get away from her. She you she kind of trolls through the internet, and the internet is terrifying. It's amazing. What you can find out us. But somebody within two seconds. You know, it's her accomplice in many ways hundred percents has got new girlfriend. I said he just give me your name. Okay. I just went on the nets within fifty minutes. I found out who. Worked where the mother came from. It was just it's terrifying. I think well, even with anybody the bone of obsessionally, given like an inkling to be obsessive the internet allows you just you just jump in having I'm not obsessive. But like if you want to dive deep on anyone can. We all have at some point. And so it's just I mean, it's someone that might have a, you know, chemical imbalance or something of the sides. You really puts you in a really weird place. It was interesting to watch, you know, in the house. She also hurt her how she could lie. She's so facile in her. I mean, just practically speaking I needed a device to enable us to believe she did what she did. I mean. So when she shares that those photographs for the father, the friend, which is, you know, and it's like, I could imagine somebody managing to swing something as creepiest on overtime. You definitely could. I think but enough photos and stuff. Yeah. Neil. You mentioned earlier how this part of Greta changed when he was cast Clem interested for you. What was it like to work with her? She's fuel legend hundred percent. I mean, she's she's an icon in French cinema. She truly is a massive pillar within it. For me. It was it was really enlightening. You know, she was I met her. I was terrified. I hope. She was you know, she's going to be nice to me a bit. She was more than the nice to me, we really became quite close during filming and we hung out off sad. And we would sometimes go and get a drink together after work and just hang out. And and she was she ended up being a confidante in a friend. And and I think what I really gleaned from my relationship with her. Gained know her over this time is that she is it constant student. You know, she always asked me questions, and she asked questions of people around her and she cared about my opinion on things, and my brothers opinion on things and she wanted to dive deep into those opinions be, you know, politics music, you know, my world her world, and I found that very interesting. You know, she didn't preach to me about what it's like to be in the industry for so long or anything like that. But she just treated me linear to herself. And I think that was that was really wonderful an incredibly welcoming. And it made me feel like I had a seat at the table, which wasn't really I think a gift treat. Did you take anything away from from this experience, and from her that you think you know, what this is going to be useful to me as an actress man, I think from every single experience, you know, be it a, you know, an interview to a a meeting to making a movie, I try to you know? Learn something from everything but with this one. I think what I really would say that. I probably learned the most is. How I mean, I've always learned this on each project. But it's really how important the personal relationship is in the safety. It is to be able to go to these places with someone comfortably, and it's you know, continued on every single project via the comedy, or or you have to have an actual personal relationship with those that you were working with and be able to have that come rotary there. So you feel like, you know, with your director with your actor, everyone that if you're going into these spaces that you can talk freely in that you feel supported by each other. And I definitely felt that on this project. You know, we had scenes where I'm very claustrophobic, and I had put in this very confining space center tied up in some scenes. Yeah. You went through a lot for selling from Neil to Isabelle's every single person was so wonderful, though. And gave me my time and gave me my space. And if I needed a break to walk off set it was there, and it just, you know, I'm continued to be amazed with people that that do take time with the Vadnais. Don't just treat. You like a I think actors have to to be good they have possessed, you know, right on I suppose to allow yourself to be possessed. You have to be in a safe environment. Don't you really? Right. It was interesting to see how Isabel became possessed. You know, it was very subtle. You know, those first few scenes that we were very realistic and sweet. Taking photographs of the dog and all that sort of stuff. I'm looking at among the okay? And I'm wondering should there be a dimension of threat there or not? But now, it's just simple and sweet and as the performances development as we got deeper into. Stories you realize, okay. So she has made the kind of quotidian elements of this. Character is important as the monstrous ones, you know, she's made it rather everyday appearance of this woman as important as the all the secrets that she's hiding, you know, it's the same with Chloe. I mean, I really think that your German is amazing. Oh, thank you sophistication. Thank you. Have you seen? Oh, yeah. It's it's interesting German. I don't I had to pretend. Thank you. I did I I had to learn fifteen pages of dialogue and German. And then learn it in English, and then I had to be able to jump in and out of German to English and make it seem real. The most extraordinary things real people ordinary people can't do they aren't extraordinary deal as a director. What did you? What did you think you needed to do? So that this film would be successful be successful. Yes. As drought. I've no idea. It's not financially. No, I don't. That'd be a good movie. I just felt a hat. I mean, I felt I had to push. It's very simple premise, you know, it's kind of a promise a friendship that goes horribly wrong. You know? I just felt I had to push the the implications of that premise far as they could possibly go on me. And it ends up in bondage in captivity. And I don't mean in a. In a real kind of emotional sense. Yeah. She's held captive by somebody else's desire on. I just felt I had to push that as far as we go. If it went into areas that were Rotestein fine. Let's go there went into areas that were bloody of monstrous, let's go there. It went into that were comic. Let's go there. And it went into all those areas, really. And that's what I just felt we had to do with this. And. I mean, when you start out making a film, you know, you have you have all these colors in your mind is like having a weird dream or something. You. No, you don't really know whether you achieve them all, but you have to you have to kind of peel the onion and get to. Rotten. The name of the film is Greta it opens in theaters today March first khloe, grace merits and you'll Jordan thank you so much for being with us. Thank you. You're listening to all of it on WNYC. It's that time of the week when WNYC's culture editor Charlie Herman comes and pays a visit. And he lets us know about something that is opening up. We should check out. And maybe something that's about to go away that you should catch before we miss it. Hi, charlie. Hey, alison. So the first thing I want to point out is the Ford Foundation. The actual building on forty third street between second avenue and tutors this week. They actually reopened to the general public the recently restored gardens in the atriums..

Neil Greta WNYC khloe director Jordan Hungary FRANZ Liszt ram Ford Foundation Vadnais Donald Greg alison producer Isabel Charlie Herman Clem editor Isabelle
"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A Russian French astronomer named Benjamin Jakubowski discovered a minor planet, which was a dark asteroid from the middle of the asteroid belt, and he named it eleven Eighty-one Lilith in her honor. So as memorials go not the worst lovely on February twelfth, I love this because your book is full of very beautiful explanations. About a page long on February twelfth there is one sentence. Do you want to read it? It it is mid February be consoled by this just this constellation by FRANZ Liszt. Clearly, I was just Dino. Had enough with the writing deadlines today. I'm just going to throw in one line, mid February before Valentine's Day and. Perfect. Perfect mid February. We all need all the Sonics solace. We combat people. And I love the fact that this is called a consolation. It's number three by fans list in d flat. Major and I at least find it intensely consoling. It's funny. I didn't know whether to come back in 'cause I kept.

Benjamin Jakubowski FRANZ Liszt Sonics
"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"franz liszt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Based on what that sounds like. You really peaceful, by the way, when you're listening to that you really went into very intense reverie. It was quite a thing. I thought you were going to. There's something deep going on that was very moved by that. Yeah. And how do you memorialize a woman like that? I should point out that it was on this day. The eleventh February one thousand nine hundred thousand nine that a Russian French astronomer named Benjamin Jakubowski discovered a minor planet, which was a dark asteroid from the middle of the asteroid belt, and he named it eleven Eighty-one Lilith in her honor. So as memorials go not the worst lovely on February twelfth, I love this because your book is full of very beautiful explanations. About a page long on February twelfth there is one sentence read it it is mid February be consoled by this just this. It's constellation by FRANZ Liszt. I know clearly, I was just you know. Had enough of the writing deadlines today. I'm just going to throw in one line, mid February before Valentine's Day and. Perfect. Perfect mid February. We all need all the Sonics solace. We combat people. And I so of love the fact that this is called a consolation it's number three by FRANZ Liszt in deflect major, and I at least find it intensely consoling. It's funny. I didn't know whether to come back in 'cause I kept waiting the piece.

FRANZ Liszt Benjamin Jakubowski Sonics
Legendary Chocolatiers Leave War-Torn Syria For Hungary

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:51 min | 3 years ago

Legendary Chocolatiers Leave War-Torn Syria For Hungary

"Serious war has devastated. So many lives not brooded so many families and businesses for that matter, including one of Syria's oldest chocolate makers, it's a company called grow. We a brand synonymous in the Arab world with something special a gift of handmade chocolate or fragrant candied fruit. Now, this company is reopened in a country. That hasn't been so welcoming to immigrants Joanna kakissis has the story from Budapest. On Benxi avenue in Budapest is lined with luxury boutiques representing the finest names in Europe, the name rally stands out, this boutiques from Syria inside their sculpted, walls and ceiling murals, designed by the same man who crafted Cartier jewellery shops. But the jewels inside the glass cases here or handmade hand painted chocolates. No, EMMY, Tsing clusky. Where's plastic gloves to select them for curious Hungarians? Yeah. And they s like what makes this gieco special? And so we thought them how much effort goes into each piece of chocolate who does not have to brief tourists from the Middle East people recognize the name like they're just coming. Oh, my God is is with the growing. Like, we said, yes. The grocery that's one that you know from before Basan Mugabe who ran the company came from one of Syria's oldest merchant families. He wore tailored, suits and loved classical music. He named one chocolate after an opera by composer, FRANZ Liszt. And he supplied chocolate to the Queen of England his wife that I'm yes as he believed in his chocolate that was amazing me that every time he wanted to taste his own chocolate. He has. Sparked in his eyes, and he looked at it as if he's seeing it the first time, and then he's so happy, but war forced the family out of Syria. You know, you don't really leave your country. You take it with you. This man of the memory everything roses from Damascus pistachios from Aleppo apricots from Huta. Here's Basan talking with a Chinese news network need good machines. But you need the people who is in love with talked of making chocolate. He flew many of his staff from Syria with him to Budapest. They reopened their factory in Hungary where they could afford real estate and labor costs in Europe. Hungary was not kind to Syrian refugees walking through Europe in twenty fifteen Hungary in police attacked them with batons water cannons at the border. To tech Jimmy Hudson. Nebulous Prime Minister Viktor Orban's has repeatedly declared that Hungary is not a nation for immigrants, but his administration. Welcome. Does it always they had money Bassano? Could I we invested in Hungary and made this promotional video celebrating his company's relaunch there were looking to build a beautiful presence in Ongeri and to Hungary on the chocolate map of exporting high quality chocolate. Then just as the company was taking off again. He was diagnosed with an aggressive form of cancer. He died in may his wife. Rania now finds solace in the Budapest teak. They built together. It's making me feel that I'm was have. And it makes me closer to him. What's closer to him? And this is the only way for her eyes fill with tears, but you watch them away. There's a work to do the shop is full. In serious legendary chocolate here is expanding to Paris for NPR news. I'm Joanna kakissis in Budapest.

Syria Hungary Budapest Basan Mugabe Joanna Kakissis Europe Franz Liszt Rania Emmy Middle East Prime Minister Viktor Orban Damascus Tsing Clusky NPR Jimmy Hudson Queen Of England Paris Ongeri
Clara Schumann; Queen of the Piano

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 3 years ago

Clara Schumann; Queen of the Piano

"Another famous pianist composer was Clara v. As a teenager, Clara beak was known all over Europe as Queen of the piano. She married Robert Schumann who also started out as a pianist after he hurt his hand and couldn't play anymore. Clara played the premiere of all his piano pieces

Gabriela Montero

Classics for Kids

05:59 min | 3 years ago

Gabriela Montero

"And Gabrielle Monteiro who was born in Venezuela, she performed at President Obama's first inauguration. Montano is very good at improvising that is taking a melody and making up music from it on the spot. It's interesting to think which people we know as pianists might be better remembered one day as composers.

The First Superstar Classical Musician.

Classics for Kids

05:57 min | 3 years ago

The First Superstar Classical Musician.

"When FRANZ Liszt was twenty. He went to a concert by violinist Niccolo Pattani. The first superstar classical musician. Pannonia was as big as any rockstar today, and he put on a great show. He was pale and then dressed in black. He also memorized all his music which most performers didn't do then. And he came up with new very difficult effects on his instrument. List left pregnancies concert thinking. That's what I want to do. So he invented the solo piano recital with the piano facing sideways on the stage so that the audience could watch his hands and face.

Jenny Lynn Rico Caruso Franz Liszt Van Clyburn Jenny Lind Dan Clyburn Rico Russo Hungrian Leonard Bernstein Pannonia United States Poland Naomi Lewin Niccolo Pattani Yon Podrasky Lohan Leopold Stokowski Wynton Marsalis Mario Lanza Barnum
Who is Van Clyburn?

Classics for Kids

05:57 min | 3 years ago

Who is Van Clyburn?

"Van Clyburn was from Texas and in nineteen fifty eight at the height of the Cold War between the United States and Russia. He went to Moscow and won the very first Tchaikovsky competition which made him an instant superstar. When Dan Clyburn got back to the state, he became the only musician ever to get tickertape parade in New York.

Jenny Lynn Rico Caruso Franz Liszt Van Clyburn Jenny Lind Dan Clyburn Rico Russo Hungrian Leonard Bernstein Pannonia United States Poland Naomi Lewin Niccolo Pattani Yon Podrasky Lohan Leopold Stokowski Wynton Marsalis Mario Lanza Barnum
Where Does Bohemian Music Come From?

Classics for Kids

05:43 min | 3 years ago

Where Does Bohemian Music Come From?

"In French. The word bohemian is also used to refer to the gypsy or Roma people. That's because when the Roma gypsies migrated to France, it was from the general direction of Bohemia. So the French started calling them Boheme bohemians the Roma gypsies are famous all over Europe and beyond for their music, Spanish, composer public at Asante, borrowed some of their melodies. Early. And so did Hungarian composer FRANZ Liszt.

Bohemia France Giacomo Puccini Naomi Lewin Europe La Boheme Judah Messana Tim Linter Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Bohai Mia Paris Franz Liszt Czech Republic Lada Edrich Cheaney Yohannes Brahms Smetana Cincinnati Carmen
Classics for Kids Puccini's La Boheme

Classics for Kids

05:43 min | 3 years ago

Classics for Kids Puccini's La Boheme

"I may OMI Lewin welcome to classics for kids. Giacomo Puccini's opera Laba. Whim is about struggling artists in Paris, France. Laba win means the bohemian lifestyle. But Bohai Mia isn't in France. It's in eastern Europe. In the Czech Republic unto Nin version was born in Bohemia and wrote music about the legends connected with bohemian forests. Edrich smitten was also from Bohemia and he included a piece about bohemian forests and meadows in the set of tone poems. He called mave last my fatherland. Smetana's first opera the Brandenburgers in Bohemia also celebrated his native region. People from other countries wrote bohemian music to one of the regional dances that Russian composer Nikolai rimsky-korsakov put into his opera ballet. Lada was bohemians. And when Frenchman Judah Messana wrote an orchestral suite called picturesque scenes. He included a bohemian festival. In French. The word bohemian is also used to refer to the gypsy or Roma people. That's because when the Roma gypsies migrated to France, it was from the general direction of Bohemia. So the French started calling them Boheme bohemians the Roma gypsies are famous all over Europe and beyond for their music, Spanish, composer public at Asante, borrowed some of their melodies. Early. And so did Hungarian composer FRANZ Liszt. And German composer Yohannes Brahms. Put a gypsy style finale onto the end of his first piano quartet. Of course, the most famous gypsy bohemian in music is the title character of George visas opera Carmen. Since room gypsy unions were often poor, highly independent unusual lives. French playwrights, and authors started using the word bohemian to describe poor artists who also led highly independent unusual lives Puccini based his opera level him on a French play called Cendana, beatable, whim, or scenes bohemian life by v meal. She the main characters in level Wim live hand-to-mouth. They never know where their next meal is coming from, but they don't worry too much about it. Cheaney's opera about happy, but poor artists seems familiar to you from the musical rent. It's no coincidence that's because the plot of rent was lifted from LA Boheme next week on classics for kids musical theater that's taken directly from classical music. I'm Naomi Lewin. I write classics for kids and produce it with Tim Linter at WG UC Cincinnati. Please join me next time for more classics for kids.

Bohemia France Giacomo Puccini Naomi Lewin Europe La Boheme Judah Messana Tim Linter Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Bohai Mia Paris Franz Liszt Czech Republic Lada Edrich Cheaney Yohannes Brahms Smetana Cincinnati Carmen