36 Burst results for "Franklin"

Fresh update on "franklin" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:34 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "franklin" discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"So can you walk me through what exactly I just watched there? You just watched total confusion and propaganda to a child to warp their minds. That's exactly what we just watched. I mean, but they're Charlie, here's the thing is they're open about it. They've already come out and said on their little private phone calls or private Skype calls conference calls that they have a not so secret gay agenda. So this is what they're going to continue to push on kids, where it goes against biology, science, and facts, and it's to warp the mind of a child even further. You can clearly see it. The individual that's like lecturing baymax is wearing a trans shirt. So it goes from that you must tolerate it, then accept it, then you must celebrate it, then you must participate in it. And then it goes towards your children, where you have these children that are being targeted with that content. So where was that? Is that a one off thing or is that in the show or what was that? I think that might be on Disney+, the baymax show. Okay, be wrong about that. Just as a just as an addition to that. I want to play a piece of tape here. I believe it's cut 94, which is the guy that came up to you and he said, quote, I love killing babies. Is that an exaggeration of what he said? That is 100% true in its context. That's what he said. Play cut 94. I guess the pandemic's over. What's wrong, sir? Do you like killing babies? You love killing babies? Love killing babies. You love telling babies, huh? You love that, don't you? You love that. Hernandez, Charlie, pulled out from Alex Jones. Because we were just out there. No, it's fine. Everyone was filming. Everyone was filming out there. I was helping Savannah film. Live TV interviews, everybody's out there, but the context of that was I was talking to somebody in front of the Supreme Court about how abortion is clearly murdering babies. This guy came out of nowhere. He came from all the way from the other side. It's like demonic Charlie out of these people just come out of nowhere. He came from all the way from the other side from behind me and then gets in my ear in my face and said, did you say that abortion is murdering babies like in a very like sinister calm tone? And then I'm like, yes sir, that's exactly. And then he just lost his mind. He just completely loved it. Almost assaulted you. Almost. I mean, it was right there. He did swipe at Savannah Hernandez. Yeah, almost got me too, but these people are dangerous. And by the way, I didn't mean that derogatory towards Alex Jones. I think he gets a bad rap, honestly. I really do. Me too. He's obviously a mixed bag. I had a lot of different things, but I think a lot of the censorship towards him has just been ridiculous and awful. And a lot of his predictions have come true. Drew, thank you for the great work that you have done and that you do. It's terrific. We deeply appreciate it. And you just have to keep on going to the front lines and covering things. And this is not for everybody. This is kind of like, do not try this at home. But I say this all the time. If you see a powerful person, take out your smartphone, ask them a question and record yourself asking that question. Absolutely. Anybody can do it. Absolutely. So if you see a powerful woman politician on the left, go up to her and say, what is a woman? And then you can email us the clip of their response freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com. You have the power to challenge tyranny and drew's an inspiration for that group. Thanks so much. Hey everybody, Charlie Kirk here. Right now, court packing is the real danger to our country. Make no mistake court packing is a coup. The radical left is working overtime on new plans to pack the Supreme Court. Look, if we do not stop them from installing four more justices so they can rig the system in their favor, it will be catastrophic for our court, our country, and the American way of life. We can not let this happen. I will not let it happen on our watch. That's why I need you to join us. We're gathering a coalition of 1 million patriots to say no to court packing. No to the left wing agenda and no to the Supreme Court coup. Franklin Graham, former U.S. attorney general Ed meese, doctor James Dobson, the family policy alliance, and more, and over 400,000 people like you are all on board. Please sign your name now. Go to supreme coup that's coup dot com to sign first liberties letter. First celebrity is a great organization run by a dear friend Kelly shackleford go to supreme coup dot com and God bless America. There are a few people that are in hero status and legend status in the conservative movement. And one of them is James O'Keefe. James O'Keefe I have known for nearly a decade. I have seen him get attacked by every major institutional imaginable, and yet he is stronger than ever. Project veritas is one of the most important charities in America. Project veritas is a 5 O one nonprofit just like turning point USA. I don't talk openly about favorably or positively about a lot of nonprofits. I think a lot of them are a waste of time, but project veritas is one of the good ones. And it's worthy of your support. James O'Keefe hits home run after home run, and he recently has an amazing one from his project veritas action as well, and yesterday I think was his birthday. James,.

Baymax Charlie Charlie Kirk Alex Jones Savannah Hernandez Supreme Court Skype Confusion Hernandez Disney Ed Meese Family Policy Alliance James O'keefe Drew Kelly Shackleford USA Franklin Graham James Dobson
Franklin D. Roosevelt Was an American Dictator

Mark Levin

01:08 min | 2 weeks ago

Franklin D. Roosevelt Was an American Dictator

"Now the great Milton Freeman explained many times over and deposited in my view That it was monetary policy that took us from a bad recession under Hoover and moved us from the depression that went on for ten years on needlessly But it was an opportunity for the American marxists to vastly expand the power of the central government and to do grave damage to our constitutional order His name is FDR FDR in many ways was an American dictator The way I use the IRS the way I use the FBI The way he centered information and on and on and on But they loved him because he was a radical lefty And we also had a war going on certainly starting in 1941 And so he got a pass on many things He's not rated Is one of our great presidents certainly not by me

Milton Freeman Hoover Depression IRS FBI
What Led Senator Mike Lee to Write About Court Packing

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

What Led Senator Mike Lee to Write About Court Packing

"Right now I get to talk to senator Mike Lee of Utah. He has a brand new book out really brand new. It's called saving 9. The fight against the left's audacious plan to pack the Supreme Court and destroy American liberty, not that there's anything wrong with that. Senator Mike Lee, welcome back to the program. Thank you very much, Eric. Good to be with you. Most of us have heard a lot of crazy things among them, the idea that the left wants to pack the Supreme Court and really destroy America. Let's cut to the chase. They want to destroy America by packing the Supreme Court. It's sometimes when we hear these things, they sound so crazy, at least I tend not to take them seriously because I can't bear to take them seriously, but I'm glad that someone like you has taken it seriously. But what led you a sitting United States senator to write a book addressing this threat? Yeah, so Eric, I started becoming concerned about this, beginning in the fall of 2020. When Joe Biden was debating Ben president Trump. And Joe Biden was asked about court packing. I hope I expected I assumed that the answer would be no, because Joe Biden, as a senator, it always said it's a terrible idea. Basically, every legal scholar, historian, everyone, over the last 80, 85 years, has said that court packing is a bad idea. Joe Biden didn't say no. Joe Biden hammed in hogs so much that I'd worried about it. A few months later, he appointed a commission to look at the idea of packing the Supreme Court. That's when I really started to panic. Because I realized we haven't talked about this in a long time as a society. And as far as I could tell, no one had written a book outlining exactly what happened the last time someone tried to pack the Supreme Court, which was Franklin D. Roosevelt, who is the idol of president Joe Biden back in 1937. I realized this story has never been told and it needs to be told because people need to realize what the dire consequences

Joe Biden Supreme Court Senator Mike Lee America Eric Ben President Trump Utah Franklin D. Roosevelt
Mike Lee: The Incredible Timing of Releasing Book 'Saving Nine'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Mike Lee: The Incredible Timing of Releasing Book 'Saving Nine'

"You So you have this new book out saving 9 now Interesting I mean the timing was fortuitous You had written this book about this ongoing onslaught against our court system You being a very skilled lawyer yourself And conveniently right around this time we see the Dobbs roe V wade decision is about to come out And we're seeing renewed attacks against the legitimacy against the Supreme Court We haven't even had confirmation of what the ruling is yet So unfortunate but fortuitous timing for the writing of this book Exactly Correct on both fronts when I started writing saving 9 over a year ago They didn't know this leak was going to happen Nor did I know exactly when a ruling in the DOM's case might occur but I had a feeling that Rome might be on the chopping block because roe is bad law But I started predicting based on a variety of tea leaves and based on what the Democrats were talking about starting early in this administration the President Biden might try to follow what his role model Franklin D. Roosevelt tried to do by packing the court I thought we can't afford that We are still paying the consequences suffering the dire consequences from what happened last time he tried to pack the court in 1937 I explained this in great detail in chapter four of saving 9 And I'm more concerned than ever now Dan especially in the link of these leaks from the Supreme Court That's exactly what they're going to try to do We know that because they're already doing it

Dobbs Roe Supreme Court ROE Rome Franklin D. Roosevelt Biden DAN
Tulsa gunman targeted surgeon he blamed for pain, police say

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Tulsa gunman targeted surgeon he blamed for pain, police say

"Police in Tulsa Oklahoma say a Doctor Who performs surgery on the gunman was among those killed in a shooting at a medical building Tulsa police chief Wendell Franklin says the gunman had back surgery late last month but was still complaining of pain Franklin says the gunman bought a semi-automatic handgun late last month and on the day of the shooting At 2 p.m. on June 1st mister Lewis purchased a semi-automatic rifle from a local gun store Franklin says a letter was found on the gunman Which made it clear that

Tulsa Wendell Franklin Oklahoma Mister Lewis Franklin
Extreme Athlete Tom Jones Is Running 76 Marathons for a Cause

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:51 min | Last month

Extreme Athlete Tom Jones Is Running 76 Marathons for a Cause

"I'm not making this up. He's my guest right now. Tom Jones, welcome to the Erik metaxas show. Hey Eric, thanks for having me on. Look, I want to ask you so many questions. First of all, the principal reason I'm having you on is because you are going to be doing something fairly shortly along the lines you just described. What is this thing that you're going to be doing soon? Actually, I'm almost right in the middle of it. I've run 30 back to back marathons as we speak in the middle of it now. Yes, yes, we left April 19th from montevallo, Alabama, and I've been running a marathon a day every day since then, including today. A marathon a day, okay, that's not something I've ever done, even for a single day. So what you're doing right now, it's affiliated with united we pledge. What is united we pledge? Because I know your goal is to draw awareness to the constitution to American freedom. What is united we pledge? The united we pledge is a nonprofit organization and what they're doing is they're building a very special and magical place called the American village. And the American village is a place that has recreations exact replica recreations of buildings that were instrumental in the constitution and the Revolutionary War. And they also have people that play the parts of people that were instrumental in that time, like George Washington, Ben Franklin, Paul Revere, Paul Revere's wife, men and women, they have colonial soldiers. And what they do is they bring in families and in particular kids, and they let them step onto the stage of American history and become part of the story. So it's a very, very impactful experience as far as history goes.

Erik Metaxas Tom Jones Montevallo Eric Alabama Paul Revere United Ben Franklin George Washington
How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | Last month

How Fox's Pete Hegseth Got Involved With 'Battle for the American Mind'

"Hey, welcome back folks. We're talking about American education, battle for the American mind, is the book uprooting a century of miseducation, David Goodwin has written it with Pete hegseth in that David. You're the head of the association of classical Christian schools. So you're like a brainy guy. Pete is just like a talking hit on Fox and Friends. We know he has nothing to say if it's not on a teleprompter. Pete, how did you get involved in this? I've always learned to join forces with people smarter than me. That's the key. Andy's humble, which makes me hate him even more. You went to Princeton, you went to the Harvard Kennedy school of government. What did you major in at Princeton? Politics. You did. I did. Political philosophy. As sort of a degree of that. But I'll tell you what I've learned in this project, how much I didn't learn. I didn't learn any of this stuff. My kids are in classical Christian schools and all I say every day is, why can't I go back to school and learn these things? Okay, you're singing my song. I have said this over and over in the last couple of decades. I learned something. I wrote a book called if you can keep it Franklin's famous line. And because of Oz Guinness, whose book I had read, I understood things, and all I could think of is how did I not get this? I didn't get any of this. So you obviously going through this elite schools, which like, Yale, they don't teach you this stuff. They teach you John Dewey on steroids, I guess. And they teach you now the latest manifestations of the Frankfurt school and critical theory, which is now we now see as critical race theory, and we talk about every day. But it was just the water in which we swam. I took social studies. We all took social studies who invented social studies. Yeah, why is it not history? Why is it social studies? We can't get into that. We can't get into that, don't talk about it. I didn't know where that all came from. David had done the research and then I was able to lay it upon the environment in which we live right now and realize we all got a progressive education. Yeah. Almost everyone watching guaranteed. Right. Got a progressive education that was started by atheist advanced by marxists who had their own agenda and it all happened subtly, and a lot of us think we aren't infected, but we are. And so you have to dig under the ruins of what used to exist. And that's what David did in this project. This is the way education our founders were educated, how free people and republics actually perpetuate themselves. Why don't we do

David Goodwin Pete Hegseth Association Of Classical Chris Harvard Kennedy School Of Gove Pete Princeton Oz Guinness David FOX Andy John Dewey Franklin Frankfurt
Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | Last month

Ensuring Good Education in a Post-CRT World

"Point chapter at your Belinda high school. Awesome. So last week on April 5th in a three two vote, my school board passed a resolution to ban critical race theory in my district. So my question is, what's the next steps to ensuring that we have a good education, even after that ban? That's great. So it's a two part dance. So that's great. Now you need to say, okay, let's get pro American curriculum in our schools. So what does that look like? Hillsdale college has done a lot of work in this. We're starting to do a lot at turning point USA. But we have to teach people, what is the American story? What is the problem? What is the proper way to view American history? What is America? Was it a mistake? Was it something that has kind of fell out of the sky? There's just a couple of things I'll share here that I think could really excite high school students that they're definitely not taught in school. America was summoned into existence at a time and a place that is very unusual. In fact, it's almost never happened before in human history. Most civilizations are countries stumble into existence. They're not summoned into existence. I want you to think about that. There was a decision to create America. China just kind of existed and it was kind of the Yangtze River valley civilization is kind of built into itself. In this river valley in India and so on and so forth. But America was a group of people that made a decision founding fathers. We have a set of principles. We don't like what's happening. We're going to declare independence of things that are always true. And I'm afraid that most young people are not just being taught that even we're serving taught the opposite. They're being taught to the founding fathers were racist bigoted slave owners. And they don't know their history. They don't know that the first antislavery convention in America was hosted in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin in 1775. They don't know that 9 out of 13 states before the constitution was ratified in 1787 had already independently abolished slavery. They didn't a lot of young people never top that Vermont was the first state to abolish slavery in 1777, inspired by the Declaration of Independence. So the next step is get your local school districts and not just teach this, but inspire young people to be excited about the country they live in. A lot of young people, I think, are

Belinda High School America Hillsdale College Yangtze River Valley River Valley China India Benjamin Franklin Philadelphia Vermont
Biden Wanted to Be the Next Franklin Roosevelt

Mark Levin

00:48 sec | Last month

Biden Wanted to Be the Next Franklin Roosevelt

"Because we now have a man in the Oval Office who lit a fuse To blow up our economic system Because he wanted to create a legacy for himself He wanted to be the next Franklin Roosevelt And so he was willing to destroy established traditions And processes and systems and lurch hard left He was desperate for this legacy A man in failing mental health who never had a high IQ or cognitive bone in his head to begin with

Oval Office Franklin Roosevelt
J.D. Vance Wins Ohio Republican Primary

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:22 min | 2 months ago

J.D. Vance Wins Ohio Republican Primary

"Jenny Vance will be the next senator from Ohio nominated last night by the Republican Party winning 32% of the vote, Josh mandel 24% Matt Dolan 23% proving a number of things. Former president Trump's endorsement matters a lot, Peter Thiel's backing matters a lot, and that there is a not Trump rump within the Republican Party that is probably as equal as to the always Trump rump. That helped JD over the top. He was behind until the former president endorsed him. He won handily. He is going to win handily. I note that Matt Dolan quickly came out and endorsed him on Twitter very closely act by the state senator and Matt Dolan delivered the two largest counties. He won Franklin Franklin counties where Columbus is in cuyahoga counties where Cleveland is, he won those counties handily, and his throwing in with JD brings the party together. I'm sure Josh will follow suit. And Jenny Vance should beat my friend, but he's a Democrat, Tim Ryan and Tim has committed to abortion all the time. Regime and said so yesterday on the eve of the primary and that's not going to fly in Ohio, which is a pro life state. Sign the heartbeat bill. It's a red state at the Trump state and Tim Ryan's great candidate, but he isn't going to make that up in 2022.

Matt Dolan Jenny Vance Josh Mandel Republican Party Peter Thiel Donald Trump Ohio Franklin Cuyahoga Tim Ryan Columbus Twitter Cleveland Josh TIM
Obama Speaks at Chicago Conference About Disinformation

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Obama Speaks at Chicago Conference About Disinformation

"Barack Obama is in the news again. He attended a somewhat ironically titled conference on disinformation. The God was sponsored by the Atlantic monthly, which by the way, has been one of the chief purveyors of disinformation. They've been part of the Russia collusion hoax. In fact, one of the Atlantic writers, Franklin four, was the source of putting out all the lies that were concocted by the Hillary Clinton campaign by this guy sussman by Christopher Steele. So the Atlantic were the not only the dupes, but I think the willing collaborators of these lies. And but this conference was in conjunction with the University of Chicago institute of politics and of course they trot out good old Barack Obama who can be always counted on. I mean, this is America's leading con man. I mean, there's competition, Stacey Abrams is in that competition, Hillary Clinton. There are others. But I think Obama owns the title. In part because he's able to kind of put that pompous expression and look to the left and he looks to the right. It's kind of his style. It was a little bit befuddling when it first came out in 2008, but of course by 2012 and later 2016, everyone had sort of seen through it. It's like the con man who was like fanning out the cards, take a look. Well, you know, we kind of know the routine by now. Well, let's look at Obama. And he's talking about disinformation and here he goes. It's something I grappled with. Imagine Obama grappling with disinformation. During my presidency, I saw it sort of unfold. And that's the degree to which information disinformation and misinformation was being weaponized.

Barack Obama Christopher Steele University Of Chicago Institut Hillary Clinton Stacey Abrams Sussman Franklin Russia Atlantic America
A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:37 min | 3 months ago

A Look Back at the Life of Dwight Eisenhower

"Of course, was the 34th president of the United States. He served from 53 to 61. Sort of the capstone of his career, you know, most do knowing his president, but most know him again as he is being the supreme ally commander in Europe at the end of World War II and leading the offensive of all of our allies against the axis forces and Hitler and Nazi Germany. These all playing together for this became his final speech and there's a lot written about Eisenhower and I would encourage you just to the wood of Washington. If you want to know more about the man themselves, you want to know about how they grow up how they came about, I would encourage you to read their several books out there to go read about them because they're fascinating in their where they came from and how they got there. In fact, it's a really interesting correlation between sort of three presidents in a row and this is an extra for you podcast listeners today. For listening, you know, if you look at the middle of the century in the United States during the came out of the FDR presidency coming out of the great depression moving into World War II, you had a person who was in essence grown for politics. He was groomed in many ways and his family from his cousin to everybody to be a politician to be a leader of governor or president. That's what FDR Franklin Roosevelt was sort of groomed to be. And then you have the one who became president one of the biographies of his accidental president. Harry Truman was one who was not groomed. He came from very humble backgrounds. He came from a very working class middle of the country background and Missouri to know to the presidency. And took those took that office very seriously because of where he came from and in the desire to serve the country. And then you transition to another midwesterner in Eisenhower. So in the middle of our time frame there in which we went through The Great Depression World War II into what began the use of the atomic bomb, the use of the beginning of the Cold War. And then the space race toward the end of Eisenhower's term that was beginning, again, this buildup of nuclear power, this buildup of military power through Eisenhower's administration and even the beginnings of what we say we see the battle of Korea. And then we see the start of what would be known is from our perspective later in Eisenhower's administration owning the candidates and then Johnson's is the Vietnam War.

Eisenhower Fdr Franklin Roosevelt United States Hitler FDR Germany Europe Washington Harry Truman Depression Missouri Eisenhower's Administration Korea Johnson Vietnam
The Top 3 Things That American Christians Should Do Right Now

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:12 min | 3 months ago

The Top 3 Things That American Christians Should Do Right Now

"Just real quick lightning round. You can just quit top three things, practical things we can do as Christians that are Americans right now. Boy, top three things. First thing is, I mean, take your faith very seriously. I encourage people to make that number one. So I tell people all the time, look, my life's work, what I do is focus on the second most important thing. So before I tell you what that is, let's make sure we all agree on what the most important thing is. The most important thing that we can do is to win souls for Jesus Christ. It's the most important thing that we can do. Now, so what's the second most important thing? To make sure you could do the first thing. Yeah, there you go. Come on. That's my day job. My job every day when I do three hours of radio two podcasts today, traveled 330 days last year, college campuses, churches, organizing people, 200 plus people on staff, is to make sure that number one can keep on happening. To make sure that the church will remain open, that they'll never lock us down again that they will never persecute our faith again. So I just want to make sure we all understand the priorities, right? Well, thank you. Which, and we should always be clear about that, right? That's number one. That's number one. That's number one. You can take off your coat right now. No, it's good. You can go right now. And number two, make sure you could do number one. So I just encourage all of you to read the word every single day. Get into a very serious prayer routine. And if you're struggling with your faith, ask for help. That is what the church is supposed to be. It's supposed to be the infrastructure for people that are struggling and struggling as normal because we are in a Supernatural and a spiritual struggle right now. And understand the equipment, the spiritual equipment that God gives us to be able to win the spiritual battle. I could go deeper into this. In fact, in the next service, we might want to do some of the spiritual warfare stuff, but if you are not experiencing spiritual warfare at all and it's kind of like a weird distant concept to you. I'm going to lovingly tell you, maybe you're not doing something important enough, so Satan doesn't take you seriously. There you go. Which is every person that I encounter that is fighting for the gospel in the kingdom is experiencing some form of spiritual warfare right now. And Satan Satan we know the character of Satan. He's a liar. He's a deceiver. First Peter, it says he prowls the world like a lion looking for those to devour. Okay, that's number one. We have to take our faith seriously. Number two, which is I want to challenge all of you to become really passionate learners and educators of this country. And so it's not just about doing, but it's also about pausing and learning. Learning is a substantial activity that improves your country. When you know more about your history, all of a sudden you will be convicted more to fight. When you are able to answer to a friend where they say, this country is so racist, be like, hey, let's talk about that. Where you shouldn't be caught be caught off guard about someone that says, you know, our country was founded on slavery. Like, really? 9 out of 13 of the colonies had already abolished slavery by the time of the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was held in 1775 chaired by Benjamin Franklin. The first state ever to abolish slavery was Vermont in 1776, inspired by the Declaration of Independence. Thomas Jefferson wrote in the original draft of the Declaration of Independence and monitoring king George for bringing the Senate slavery to the United States. Thomas Jefferson abolished the slave trade as one of his first acts of president in 1807 that this country said time and time again in the private journals and musings of every founding father, including the three architects of the U.S. Constitution, Hamilton, Madison and Jay that is not a matter of when it's how we will abolish slavery. We should all know that stuff, yeah? And so good. And so the third thing is this, which is you take your faith seriously, you're praying, you're fasting. Jesus said the hard things come to those that pray and fast. I'm a big believer in fasting. And so if that's a distant concept to you, I challenge you to look into it and to pray about it. I know that Greg leads you guys really amazingly on that. But I'm a big, big believer in fasting, then of course learning. The third thing is yes, it's going to take action. It is. And that means I know a lot of people here in this audience right now are saying Charles, you got to give me stuff to do. I've done everything that's been asked to me. I watched Tucker Carlson every night. I bought the pillow. I did everything I was supposed to do. Thank you. That's good. Promo code Kirk, by the way, at my pillow dot com. And the Giza dream sheets are spectacular. But all kidding aside, Greg, it's gonna take faith prayer and fasting is number one bucket. The second bucket is learning. We have a partnership with hillsdale college. It's Charlie for hillsdale dot com. Take some of the online courses. No what you have been given. If we have a national Alzheimer's moment, we don't know who we are, where we've come from a memory crisis. Then what are we actually doing here? You have to know what we're anchored to and the third thing, of course, is action. Running for office and supported a good ones that do. Homeschooling kids, shepherding those parents that might be overwhelmed that are homeschooling. Action action action and pushing yourself forward. Those are the three things that I would challenge this church to continue to do.

Satan Satan Satan Thomas Jefferson Benjamin Franklin King George United States Peter Vermont Greg Senate Madison Hamilton JAY Tucker Carlson Alzheimer's Jesus Hillsdale College Charles Hillsdale Charlie
Concerned Women for America's Penny Nance on the Lia Thomas Saga

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:17 min | 3 months ago

Concerned Women for America's Penny Nance on the Lia Thomas Saga

"Friend penny Nance, who's the president and CEO of concerned women for America. So penny, you've written this piece that's talking about the current madness of this gigantic man who calls himself a woman destroying women in swimming competition. Again, there's a part of me that can't help but find it funny. It's like, are we kidding? Like it's sort of seems so preposterous, but then I just wonder what happened to the actual men who are the fathers of these young women who are not standing up to the craziness and saying this is ridiculous. This has to stop. Well, a couple of things. And you're talking about a young man whose name is he's changed his name from will Thomas Delia Thomas. He was a collegiate swimmer for University of Pennsylvania as a man. The men's team. He was ranked at number 462. He now has taken hormones and has transitioned. He says that he's a woman, and he must compete on the women's team. And the coaches are like, great. We're going to win. And guess what? He's smoking all the women. He is finishing a full minute ahead of the other competitors. He goes from number 462 to first. And this week, Eric, he is competing in the NCAA championship at Virginia or excuse me. Georgia Tech and he's going to win and he's going to break he's broken the records of women. He's taken their trophies. He's going to be first. And women who are competing against him even women on his own team have been told, do not speak out. If you speak out, you will be punished. And so we have women who are coming forward to us, by the way, can someone for America, and breaking news here is getting ready to file a civil rights action against University of Pennsylvania. The Department of Education on the behalf of young women whose trophies are being taken. We've already done this with Franklin Pierce and university of Montana because this is a violation of these young women's civil rights, both in sports, but also he is changing in their locker room. I mean, all these

Penny Nance Thomas Delia Thomas University Of Pennsylvania America Swimming Georgia Tech Ncaa Eric Department Of Education On The Virginia Franklin Pierce University Of Montana
The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 3 months ago

The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

"Meaningful. The U.S. Senate has finally done something I approve. This shouldn't have taken so long, but it's finally done. The United States Senate has passed the sunshine protection act by unanimous consent to make daylight savings times permanent. I'm not a fan of daylight savings time. Falling back, springing forward should just remain the same time throughout the entire year. In fact, we should spring forward even more. So that the fall, it's the opposite. I never understood that in the most depressing time of weather, we also made it darker intentionally. Who thought of this thing? Makes zero sense. Now, I know you're gonna say it's Benjamin Franklin. And all this, no way, he was too smart for this. I think it's a Nicole Hannah Jones conspiracy against Benjamin Franklin. There's no way. A 2015 study published in sleep medicine, researchers compared the rate of strokes during the week after daylight saving to the week two weeks after the tweaks before. They found the rate of 8% higher the first two weeks after the shift, and people with cancer were 25% more likely to have a stroke later than the other times of the year. People over 65 were 20% more likely. A 2019 report found a higher risk of heart attack after both time changes, but particularly during daylight savings times. Interruptions to circadian rhythm can also impair focus and judgment. A 2020 study found fatal traffic accidents increased by 6% in the United States during daylight savings time. This shouldn't have been taken so long, but it did, and the U.S. Senate has finally done something useful.

U.S. Senate Benjamin Franklin Nicole Hannah Jones United States Heart Attack Cancer
Col. Allen West and Rick Green Tell Us About the Patriot Academy

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:38 min | 3 months ago

Col. Allen West and Rick Green Tell Us About the Patriot Academy

"It? When did the patriot academy start and how does it function? How can people get involved? Patriot academy dot com to learn more, but we started at 20 years ago in Texas at the Texas capitol, and then we started spreading across the country and hosting other capitals. And then when we created the constitution coach program, that's for anybody anywhere. You don't have to have any background in this. And Eric, these are the only constitution classes known to mankind where you will actually stay awake. And finish the class, all right? That you're setting a high bar. Yes, it is. You say awake. Come on. Throughout this entire class. Well, I'll tell you something. And I confess these things because I just think we should. But it wasn't until not even ten years ago. I wrote a book called, if you can keep it, which comes from the words of Benjamin Franklin, exiting the constitutional convention. And for the first time in my life, I was ashamed, and I am still ashamed that it took so long that I finally understood some things about how our glorious system of self government and liberty works. And the bigger takeaway for me was that if I had missed this generally speaking over the decades, it means that everyone my age and younger almost everyone has missed this. This used to be part and parcel of an American education. You could not get a high school diploma if you didn't get this stuff. This was the most basic thing, and that has, since the 60s effectively evaporated, which is why I wrote my book and I wrote it hopefully for young people, not just for all adults, but specifically for younger people, but they're all kinds of folks like you working along similar lines because it seems to me you understand what I finally understood that if you have a citizenry that doesn't get this, America is over. No, you're absolutely right. You're absolutely right, Eric, and I think that's the whole purpose here. You said American education. We don't have an American education. We have a cultural Marxist indoctrination that is happening in our school system. I mean, the left started out at college and university campuses. Now's in high school and now is down to middle school and they're trying to get it down into elementary school. And so what we have to do is start retaking that back in our homes in our communities and our churches even. And I think that's what the whole purpose is with the patriot academy is to specifically look at our young people 16 to 25, but then also we have this constitutional coach program where we have 12,000 of these constitutional coaches across the country because we have got to get people more engaged and more involved.

Patriot Academy Texas Eric Benjamin Franklin America
Pastor Phil Waldrep Recalls the Question 'What's Wrong With Obadiah?'

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

01:45 min | 4 months ago

Pastor Phil Waldrep Recalls the Question 'What's Wrong With Obadiah?'

"So I thought I will deflect her question by asking her a question. I said, well, big mother is he sick? She said no. I said, well, that's probably what's wrong with him. You don't think about it. She said to something he's been dead for years, I said, big mother, we need to start this conversation over. You call to ask me what's wrong with obadiah. Now you tell me he's been dead for years, and it was then my grandmother explained her question. You see, my grandmother had a Bible that she got during World War II when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president. I don't know what that had to do with it, but if you ever called attention to her Bible, my grandmother would say, I got this during World War II when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president. And my grandmother had developed a habit of whenever she heard somebody preach, she would write in the margin of her Bible, their name and the date that they preached. And she would draw a little line over to the text that they used. Now, that's what my grandmother had done. Well, that morning, in my grandmother, had got up and ran to her devotion and the suggested scripture was from the Old Testament book of obadiah. And when my grandmother finished reading it, she looked down at her Bible that she had had since World War II when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was president. And she realized there was no markings in the margin of her Bible, and it occurred to her that since World War II when Franklin del nor Roosevelt was president, she had not heard one Sherman from the book of obadiah. And she began to wonder why, so she thought I'll call my preacher grandson and ask him, son, what's wrong with Obama?

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Obadiah Franklin Del Roosevelt Sherman Barack Obama
James O'Keefe on Finding Moral Consensus in Journalism

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:06 min | 4 months ago

James O'Keefe on Finding Moral Consensus in Journalism

"But I'm sitting in the studio with James O'Keefe, founder of project veritas, who this minute in Thursday, on Thursday, is not here in New York with me, as you can see, but in Orlando at cpac. Kind of creepy, isn't it? But you and I, we were just talking about a lot of things, but you ended, I wanted to follow this line of thinking. You said people are looking for information. What do you mean exactly? I think you have a choice to make between coercion and informed consent. So I think our country, our country, was founded on this concept of informed consent. Newspapers are more important than government said Benjamin Franklin. Public opinion is everything said Abraham Lincoln. And I think right now we're so divided, which is I mean, what do we even agree on? What is the left even mean anymore? What is the right these ideas of division? So I'm trying to find moral consensus in journalism. I think journalism can provide a framework, real journalism. American muckraking because if you don't change hearts and minds and bring people together, you're going to have to use coercion

Project Veritas James O'keefe Orlando New York Benjamin Franklin Abraham Lincoln
DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:10 min | 4 months ago

DOJ Shuts Down China-Focused Anti-Espionage Program

"The Department of Justice Biden's Department of Justice is shutting down and anti espionage program aimed at China. Why? Wait till you hear this because they've become a little concerned about using racial profiling. They're worried that their stereotyping the Chinese. Now, this to me is pathological behavior. Over the last few years, the United States has been prosecuting various scientists who have been kind of in league with China, working for China, and at the same time not disclosing their ties to China. Now, it is possible for researchers to work on behalf of China, but there is a disclosure requirement. And so there have been a number of high profile prosecutions of academics and researchers who have made the grand applications, but not disclosed, not revealed that they are turning over their information to the Chinese. In fact, ultimately to the Chinese Communist Party. Last December jury found the former chair of Harvard's chemistry department, Charles lieber, guilty about lying to federal officials, filing false tax returns, this is exactly what this DoJ program was aimed at uncovering. Now it's true that they sometimes have had a case that has failed. They dropped all charges against an MIT mechanical engineering professor named gang Chen. Who was indicted for concealing his ties to Chinese programs. There's an ongoing case against a guy named Franklin Tao, a University of Kansas chemical engineering professor and he goes to trial soon. But right while this program was humming along and its aimed at dealing with the real problem and the problem is that China is aggressively engaged in academic and industrial espionage. So no one denies that simple fact. But the DoJ sort of almost without warning has shut down its program. It's law enforcement program for finding and discovering and prosecuting this Chinese this espionage on behalf of China.

China Department Of Justice Biden's Chinese Communist Party Harvard's Chemistry Department Charles Lieber Gang Chen Franklin Tao DOJ United States MIT University Of Kansas
"franklin" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

Checking In with Michelle Williams

04:55 min | 10 months ago

"franklin" Discussed on Checking In with Michelle Williams

"I know he's gonna make us laugh. And i'm really looking forward to everything that our guess kirk franklin has to say ladies and gentlemen. Thank you out the check again. Kirk franklin is up next. listen. I am so geeked. I'm honored i'm excited. I'm humbled i'm all those adjectives. This man needs no introduction. But because of who he is you have to give him a proper introduction a legend and icon. He's got to be in the hall of fame for everything. Give this man a bust in even hall of fame. Give this and every me sixteen grammy awards multiple stellar awards highly respected and sought after called upon in every john era of music except bluegrass. But i know that's common. I'm thrilled to introduce my next guest kirk. Franklin whether moma listened friend would have blue. Paper was gonna was. Are you today. i'm good girl. Good looking beautiful black queen. I just put on a little tinted. Moisturizer was the crown of the deliver broader. As you talk renew my lips. My god today. Oh lips listen see this. We don't get work done. I know we take it back to a couple years ago win. John gray got installed as pastor and we sat in that hotel lobby till like five in the morning so dope laughed and having good talk and laughter and they're just some people that i have loved and admired looked up to to the poor. I don't care where i am a my career. There are still certain people. That i'm just like man of i could just sit at a table with them and just talk and you are one of them. I mean and to know that you are such a dope artists but a great friend and a brother and it seems like when people call on you. Because i know you stay at the feet of god. You always have an answer. Even if it's just to encourage them you might not even have to go that deep theological but you always have an answer and you always give hope. I don't know who does any of you is where i don't or are you talking about me. Like definitely talking about you on the reflective me. I mean i try to be a good.

Kirk franklin grammy awards multiple stellar john era moma kirk John gray Franklin
"franklin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:02 min | 11 months ago

"franklin" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Aretha franklin was born in memphis tennessee on march twenty fifth nineteen forty two barbara seekers franklin and reverend clarence levin franklin by the time she was four a wreath as family had moved from memphis to buffalo new york before. Finally settling in detroit michigan growing up. Aretha was surrounded by music. Her mother was a gospel singer and played the piano and her father. A minister saying to at the age of six a wreath as parents separated and read the state with her father. Her mother passed away a few years. Later are rita's father's house was often home to visiting musicians. From dino washington to sam cooke to mahalia jackson aretha sisters erma and carolyn were also musically inclined and saying and wrote songs throughout their lives. Aretha had an amazing ear for music. Despite the fact that she never learned to read music her brother later said that by the time aretha was ten years old she could hear a song once and immediately be able to sing it and play it on the piano. Aretha made her performing debut as a member of the choir at new bethel. Church or her father preached. It didn't take long for her incredible talent to be recognized when she was twelve years old. She went on tour performing with other popular gospel artists. That same year aretha got pregnant and hundred first child at the age of twelve. A son named clarence two years later she had a second son. Edward throughout her life aretha would return to her roots singing gospel nusa when she was eighteen years old. She switched her primary focus to secular music. She moved to new york city parting from her son to state with her family in detroit that year in nineteen sixty aretha signed a contract with columbia records. Her early albums touched on all sorts of genres from jazz to blues. To broadway to aren

aretha Aretha jenny kaplan Franklin aretha franklin barbara seekers franklin reverend clarence levin frankl memphis dino washington jamie grammy awards jenny Jenny mahalia jackson detroit sam cooke erma rita tennessee buffalo
"franklin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on We The People

"They're appointed by the state legislatures but for terms long terms and he figured that would make them independent think nationally. They would live off in this rather than living in their states. And the adding god's go back to work political power with six years they would move to this new federal city that they were going to create member. The constitution also called for creating federal city and some new place and they would have these terms and suddenly they'd be more interested in the central government. They were the government so they threw a wrinkle into this connecticut compromise but franklin was central absolutely central to the entire process and he actually worked very closely with governor morris. He'd often gib- when he couldn't give a speech he'd pass it on. Either gouverneur morris or wilson to read for him at the convention. So this was this was You know this was in so many ways. I view this as more his compromise than the connecticut compromise bill. You quote the language that franklin offered to the convention that the legislature of the several states choose and send an equal number of delegates namely and then he fill in the blank became too of course who are to compose the second branch of the general legislature. And you say. Franklin's motion became the basis for the grand compromise that saved the convention and made the constitution possible. Just so i on our listeners. Understand who actually came up with the idea of franklin or or sherman or or someone else and exactly. What was franklin's role and tell us more about how that related to serve pragmatic compromising vision. We'll possibly. It has more insight on this than i do but i find it impossible to tell exactly where this originated. These were people who were gathering daily to discuss this stuff and they were gathered at that was in convention hall and then they were meeting outside and they were speaking to one another and the this idea of turned up to senators from each state was just in effect of variant of what worked at the didn't work in the confederation congress where each state got one vote so you could make it one you could make it to attend but the key is that you make it an equal number and so the idea was in the air. I can't say that. Franklin was i come up with sherman whoever it might have been but it was one. That was pretty obvious. Once it was articulated. And i'd like to add something here that i think contributes to franklin national view of all of this franklin of course was born in massachusetts but then he spent most of his young adult life in philadelphia but then he spent much of the latter part of his adult life overseas in britain for nearly twenty years and then in france for the better part of the american revolution. And it's i think an experience that lots of people have had that when you get out of the united states us tend to think sort of more as an american rather than a resident of texas or california wherever you might be and so franklin was only well. They've made extreme version of this is the astronauts who went to the moon and look back now. I'm an earthling now. I'm a part of the human race. Rather than just an american and so franklin have had been thinking of the united states this united states sort of looking from the national view and it came to him more naturally than it did to people like washington who never left the united states like virginia. I'm doug jefferson who was virginian through and through and they adams's were massachusetts men and so it was. It was easier for franken to see things in these national terms now. It sort of came naturally to him in and supporters at points out for the idea that representation should be by population rather than by state because he was from one of the biggest states and so it would benefit pennsylvania. but i think he wasn't thinking in pennsylvania terms he was he had the ability to think nationally and think sort of where all this would lead and he really was a of a belief that republican principles mean that people should be represented more or less equally and i won't say that he thought of the the divisions between the state's artificial divisions but he thought if it is indeed a national republic rather than simply a confederation because that's what they had and that simply confederation that hadn't worked so they need to do something else they may need to make this a national government so it came naturally to him but at the same time he understood that this simply isn't gonna fly although agreement was made at the beginning of the constitutional convention that we're not simply going to propose amendments to the existing articles confederation. We're gonna start over again. There's still an understanding that this thing is going to have to be ratified state by state. And if we leave all of their rhode island's in the delaware's you know out of this then we're not gonna get sufficient consensus to make this thing fly so we have to bring them on board. There was something else as well. And this is reflected in franklin's closing speech where he says this isn't a perfect constitution but it's the best we can do at the moment and franklin was enough of a pragmatist and enough of a a believer in human nature that you never get anything perfect you never get anything right for all time and franken look back on his own life and that of washington the next oldest in the convention and the younger man. No we've done a lot. We have won independence or the united states we got we won our war against britain and our setting up this government. And so okay. We didn't get it off done week. Leave something for the next generation. So we'll do what we can with this. And if their problems with this next generation or the generation after that you fix it it'll be your job to do in the future before we close by digging into the closing speech. Let's just review. Franklin's final contributions to the convention. You bill note that he advocated requiring not one but two witnesses to the same overt act of treason which would become crucial in the treason trial of aaron burr. He's second emotion calling for an executive council to assist the president and he acquiesced although it didn't take the lead in the infamous compromises over slavery. Ed what can you tell us about. Franklin's contributions to the debates over slavery and the other contributions think that we haven't discussed. I agree with bill On this is to emphasize In you're going into those slavery compromises And here we have to work with some of his letters and some of his comments and we have to sort of piece together what he was thinking..

franklin governor morris general legislature Franklin sherman united states doug jefferson massachusetts franken legislature connecticut wilson pennsylvania britain congress philadelphia washington france adams texas
"franklin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on We The People

"I'm jeffrey rosen. President and ceo of the national constitution center and welcomed the we the people a weekly show of constitutional debate. national constitution center is a nonpartisan. Nonprofit chartered by congress to increase awareness and understanding of the constitution among the american people. During the summer of seventeen eighty seven constitutional convention was well underway. And today we discuss benjamin franklin and the constitution franklin the first american in the words of our two great franklin historians today played a central role at the constitutional convention. A often underappreciated. And it's such an honor to discuss. Franklin's contribution to the constitution with two of america's greatest historians of franklin and two of the authors grace books written about franklin which. I'm so excited to share with we. The people listeners. Ed larson holds the high end hazel. Darling chair in law and his university professor of history at pepperdine university. He is the author of franklin washington. The founding partnership edit is wonderful to have you on the show thank you. Your center is a national treasure. Thank you so much for that. And h w brands is professor and jack s blanton senior chair in history at the university of texas austin. He is the author of the first american. The life and times of benjamin franklin which was a finalist for the poetry prize in history. It's such an honor to have you as well jeff. I'm delighted to be with you. And ed and i look forward to a good conversation. I've learned so much from both of your books. Franklin in washington and the first americans. I want the people listeners to learn from them as well. And i'll just begin by asking you to sum up franklin's contribution to the constitutional convention ed what would you say. Franklin's contributions work well. Franklin was the host. He was the governor or president was exact title of pennsylvania so he was the host of the event and a wonderful host often with meetings at his home inviting people over. He lived only a couple blocks away from where they met and he could meet with them under his mulberry tree or up in his new new he just added a wing to his house. That was lovely and so in that sense. He contributed in unsure. Bill has much more to say about that His book just captured that so beautifully i also would say though that he had a vision for a federal union and Certain powers that needed to be with the central government. I mean a federal union was something news or no and it goes all the way back to his albany plan so it goes back years fifteen years. And he's had this consistent view that central government needed certain powers which included control over interstate and international commerce so he could grow the economic pie. He had that vision because he had print shops. All over the colonies. Any knew they needed to break down these these barriers because each state was essentially a separate economic union. Also power to deal with native americans to deal with the open. The frontier over things about military power over international power so our ambassadors could have effective control and the to tax and spend for the general welfare and those are important powers and they didn't exist under the old articles of confederation and he knew those were needed so he brought that vision he brought the sense of compromises. And i'm sure we'll talk about how the leader in working the compromises and finally he was one of the to truly national figures with along with george washington and for my study of the ratification process. It would not have been ratified without his committed support and critically. He represented distinctly different ideology. George washington i would say would be some viewed as somewhat right of centre. Franklin is you'd have left of center and he was about the only trustworthy person who might have become an annual anti-federalist who didn't and his support of constitution as reflected in his closing speech which was published the only the only thing from the convention that was published at the time published nationwide. That was critical for ratification. Thank you so much for that. You've emphasized franklin's commitment to union to compromise the fact that he was a nationalist who has left of center. And your wonderful book you call him along with washington and enlightenment. Pragmatist who sense of compromise was crucial to the fact. That convention was passed. Bill as ed says your book so beautifully brings us to philadelphia gives us a sense of what the streets felton smelled like and how franken was walking near a tell tell us about the role. He played his host and also the crucial role of his temperament in making the constitution possible. Sure i'd be happy to. But i actually. I want to build on what ed said about. Franklin's vision i think. This is absolutely critical. Because franklin was he had been a reluctant revolutionary franklin had been a great fan of the british empire and he had hoped that the british empire could become enlightened enough that it would find room for a growing america and that america and britain could become the twin pillars of this atlantic spanning empire and he was grievously disappointed when british officials to his way of thinking. Were too short sighted to be able to embrace this. So franklin had seen the american colonies now the united states grow from very little in the early eighteenth century he was by far the oldest delhi to the the constitutional convention and so he had seen in his lifetime. The growth of this and he assumed that it would continue to grow and so he understood the need for and the potential in this federal union. That they were putting together that philadelphia because there had to be room for growth. There had to be room for new state to enter this thing so there had to be accommodation for what was going to happen. Not just next year next decade but the next century he had lived most of a century himself. The other thing he brought you refer to this. This franken brought a a certain temperament to the proceedings at philadelphia. The the driving spirits were ambitious. Young men like james madison and alexander. Hamilton they had much of their political futures ahead of them. Franklin's political career was behind him. He knew this his his life. Most of his life was behind. He knew this was sort of his swansong and so he wanted to remind the delegates at things. Don't turn out as you expect. So you have to make accommodations for that that in the real world as opposed to the world of your ambitions or.

franklin Franklin national constitution center jeffrey rosen benjamin franklin Ed larson franklin washington jack s blanton university of texas austin pepperdine university ed america george washington washington congress central government Bill jeff albany pennsylvania
"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"All over reese. The flaming alcohol scolded him with severe burns. Reese was badly hurt. Sadly he died two days later. Once authorities learned how reset died they charge the masonic pranksters with manslaughter. The philadelphia freemasons immediately distance themselves from the case claiming. They had nothing to do with the fake and inhumane rituals franklin even testified for the prosecution. He confessed that he'd laughed about the murderers joke but denied any other involvement in rhesus homicide. Ultimately only one of the men was penalized for the crime. His sentence to be branded on his hand it appeared. The courts weren't interested in bringing justice theresa's killers but the general public was a lot less forgiving soon after the trial rumors swirled suggesting that franklin had intentionally befriended res manipulated him in egged him onto his death. Franklin tried to defend himself in the gazette saying he detested abuse but that was a hard sell specially since he'd already admitted under oath that he thought the hazing was funny with few sympathetic years. Franklin leaned into his friendships with pennsylvania's wealthy and influential who apparently considered the scandal a minor affair seemingly not even murder could color their impression of the friendly successful businessman. Franklin continued to make friends win.

reese franklin Reese philadelphia theresa Franklin res pennsylvania
"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Franklin carved himself a reputation as a distinguished gentlemen now only needed was a wife to keep him honest and add to his wholesome image but franklin kept getting in his own way the more commercial success he saw the harder it was for him to follow his own plan for future conduct before long he backslid into old habits like sleeping with women from lower social classes who he considered unsuitable for marriage. Franklin's seemed well aware of his own hypocrisy even while he slept around. He wrote about his disdain for quote low women and quote he complained. They were expensive arm. Candy and they'd become inconvenient when they got pregnant in other words franklin wrote a lot about relationships but he wasn't all that invested in monogamy or marriage which makes it pretty astonishing that in seventeen thirty franklin somehow reconciled with his former fiancee deborah. It's not clear if they actually fell back in love or if they're a union was for some other reason. It may have been that. Franklin wanted a way to help shore up his reputation because he was about to become a father soon after he reunited with. Deborah franklin's illegitimate child. William was born. The mother's identity never became public knowledge. But she probably wasn't deborah. It's hard to say for sure because deborah and franklin had a complicated relationship. They lived as though they were married. Which wasn't exactly true after their first broken engagement. Deborah had wed another man who ran away to the west indies never filed for divorce since bigamy was illegal. The franklin's kept quiet about deborah's past nonetheless. Rumors began to fly about their marriage and their alleged son. It didn't take long for people to realize that william was too old to have been conceived before franklin endeavors alleged wedding and complicating matters. Even further franklin refused to say.

franklin Franklin deborah Deborah franklin William west indies william
"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Boston. In the middle of the night. In relocated to philadelphia soon afterward accepted a clerking position on market street and got his own place and once he was settled. Seventeen year old. Franklin let loose aside from having a good job franklin was smart charismatic and good looking women flocked to him he had multiple casual relationships was sex and impoverished women partners. He considered beneath him. One of franklin's first serious love affairs was with his landlord's daughter. A quiet young woman named deborah read. They later were engaged. But in seventeen twenty four franklin heard of a job lead in england so they decided to postpone the wedding until he returned but as soon as franklin arrived in london. He forgot all about his fiancee. He was traveling with a friend named james ralph and it didn't take long for the two men to befriend a woman lodging at the same houses. Them franklin's autobiography never mentioned the woman's name. We'll call her prudence. Prudence in ralph instantly fell for each other. Even though ralph was a married father has the affair. Grew more serious. Ralph told franklin. He planned to abandon his family and get a fresh start with. Prudence didn't only stand by his adulterous friend. He helped ralph. Cover up his infidelities. Ralph even assume the name mr franklin to make it harder for anyone to track him down. And when ralph didn't have enough money to support prudence. The real ben franklin chipped in this might sound like franklin was just being a good friend though to the detriment of ralph's first wife and child but it didn't take long for franklin.

franklin james ralph ralph philadelphia Franklin Boston deborah Ralph england mr franklin london Prudence ben franklin
"franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"The autobiography of benjamin franklin by benjamin franklin but this affair having turned my thoughts to marriage i looked round me and made overtures acquaintance and other places but soon found that the business of a printer being generally thought a poor one. I was not to expect money with a wife and less with such a one as i should not. Otherwise think agreeable. A friendly correspondence says neighbors and old acquaintances had continued between me. And mrs read's family who all had a regard for me from the time of my first lodging in their house. I was often invited there and consulted in their affairs wherein i sometimes was of surface..

benjamin franklin first
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

05:56 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"Everything's connected so if you're working in one realm of of healthcare that may be just your little area but it feeds into because we're looking at not poject looking at the a whole body. In what how they intersect. And so the collaborations comes back to this sort of being connected to everything and the you everything you do has an effect on someone else whether it's relationship whether it's health cat with That i think there is there. Is this constant feeding out. What do what resins story in so many ways as ripple effects it's not just a discoveries. Her own story inspires young women. Scientists it inspires young girls. It inspires to think how we do things differently this so many tentacles from one. Look good place that you could go. Which i think is is a beautiful park. I think the muslim faction university is magic. And i think why. The family feels connected supportive in so wasteful..

muslim one realm
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

05:15 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"Women take less risks. They nest wanting to go out to go for it themselves. And take leaps of faith will in wave and a man might think differently at the more prone to sang tried sales. Okay i'll get more investors. We know that women have more difficulty getting vest. As we know that the vc's not so favorable will try to change your things and they're saying women in science. So is that an unfair advantage that she had to be doggedly tenacious at the systems than a man might have some no choice that that is an advantage one could then flip it and say it forces you to do more diligent work that made these extraordinarily socials. Gave the fifty one the clarity it. Did she settle for anything less than defection point. Probably given the yes. She had an environment where she had access to education for example but in many of her colleagues and peers and things like that. I think it that much more amazing what she was able to do given that she was a woman and that she didn't have this extraordinary very unique access to something that other people didn't have at the time so i think that that again to your point makes her or that much more incredible to think about and talk about celebrate so dr patel just to kind of interject a little bit here you know. There's so.

fifty one dr patel
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"The coal. If you will that was used in these gas masks right and i this was the this was the work that she contributed for the war like she her. Her father had wanted her to help out with and she didn't want to help out directly but this is her bay of scientifically helping out the war. Exactly you know. After her work on dna when she left king's college then she really focused on viruses and understanding the structure of viruses. And she's most well known for the tobacco mosaic virus routine the but she also did work analyzing the structure other viruses including human viruses like the poliovirus and just as an example with tm v. Her work led to the understanding that it was. Structurally basically a hollow tube with a single strand of ornate inside the hollow tube. And obviously that kind of understanding then led to further understanding this can ripple effect of how other virus structures are are comprised. And things like that so it wasn't just a dna that she contributed in very short scientific career. She had a lot of other stuff. That has really led to a broader scientific understanding. That i think does go under appreciated. Go back to the values. We discussed earlier that she held. And you can't take away the gravity off the importance of fifty one and we want to know a bit about her earlier education opportunities that she had that kind of led her to be successful in taking that. Vote of fifty one. So i think that's that's a good question. Also i think we have self limiting beliefs of which we adhere to. She didn't have any. She didn't know that she couldn't do whatever she wanted to do. She was raised in environment very strong. Women very strong role models. They all rounder achieved variety things whether it was in a charitable situation. They lead the charities. If we're doing some things in government they really didn't so he would lead is on so many levels if they didn't have this prominent positions they was strong role models and i don't think she was raised thinking that she couldn't do whatever she wants to do. Which is also why when people would think. Why are they asking why questioning. Why did this. What if i should be doing something else. This is what i want to do when her father wants to be hot war effort this was the way she felt being off. The war effort was most beneficial. Not joining him in his efforts actually is independent. And you can go look and see some of these things that wilson had when she was very young the really softer well that that extreme attention to detail and the the studiousness and tenacity and that's another big piece of it because she was a human computer miscalculations. We didn't have could invest in those days right so the the fact that she could sit for hours.

fifty one wilson a single strand hours
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"What was known at the time about heredity. And how genes were passed on. Actually wasn't that. At the time that dna was the thing that made you you which i thought was fascinating. Can you maybe tell a little bit more to the audience about what we knew at the time. This is one thousand forty s and eighteen fifties. Absolutely the doctor. And you know if you to tell me what renew and nineteen forties and fifties about the the life The code of the life for resides. You and i teaching pharmacogenomics right now. It would be like you're kidding us right. But to the audience you know up. Until the nineteen forties and fifties scientists thought protein was the thing that held the code for life. The argument was that there's only four base pairs in dna. An how could only four base pairs hold a for life and so we believed back in those days. That proteins were the ones that held life code and not the dna. And i think so easy to take for granted. Now you know doctor telling you and i were educated. Really in the twenty first century right in terms of our understanding of genetic code in the genome. We just take it for granted that dina's what makes your genome your genome right. But at the that wasn't understood and that's one of the really pivotal mile markers in terms of our understanding of genomics is that it was dna not protein that made up us and photo. Fifty one. In dr franklin's work on dna was pivotal in our understanding of that. And i think that's fantastic and something that goes under appreciated by people like unfortunately you and i we just take it for granted because that's how we were brought up. We weren't brought up in an era of something different. That's absolutely right and you know it takes me back to what. What was that early. Two thousands when the code typing was completed like it was a big deal. And if you really think about it how d- rosalyn said you know..

twenty first century Two thousands four base pairs Fifty one nineteen nineteen forties d- one eighteen fifties one thousand forty s dr franklin forties and fifties rosalyn fifties
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"Which doesn't come through in the portrayals that we often need about that is where i mixed because my father has lots stories about in manson's on trips that in addition to fleeing complete non judgment i think he ran away in school arrived at a dole stepping cambridge. She said she just didn't ask any questions. Which you know today. I think inappropriately culture in america. I think that's unusual. Just not judgment match up with him the fact that she was accepting of everyone. I think that's such a great thing to think about. Kosovo often any celebrity. If you will. We just think about what they're known for right. Like rosalind franklin is known for her work with dna but she did so much more than that scientifically with gas masks with viral researching Understanding the structure of viruses let alone the fact that all of these people are people right their actual people who had lies have families and things like that so easy to forget that when you only hear the narrative about this one aspect of their scientific life that there's so much more than the person right absolutely Avenue back to saying it still feels other people's problems that they're experiencing.

america today Kosovo rosalind franklin one aspect
"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on HelixTalk - Rosalind Franklin University's College of Pharmacy Podcast

"I'm co host actor kane and i'm dr propel in the title of today's episode is dr rosalind franklin beyond photo fifty one today we are so excited to the interviewing dr. Rosalind franklin's niece to celebrate really distant tenuell event of duct. Rosalind franklin's life and we're gonna get into that episode which was recorded separately Now providing a little commentary as we provide that audio interview to the audience and really. This interview idea was to bring rosalind franklin. The needs of dr franklin to just discuss how a you know great her life and scientific achievement was and really beyond what reno in the literature and the science community. What she was truly like. And this is all about celebrating her centennial event. So we are. We were thrilled to have a conversation with roslin audiences benefit dr patel and i are going to interject a couple times during this interview so when.

rosalind franklin dr franklin today roslin dr. dr rosalind franklin Rosalind franklin dr patel fifty one kane dr propel times
"franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:08 min | 1 year ago

"franklin" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"But the why did not give them any satisfaction they contented themselves with admonishing me and dismiss me considering me perhaps as an apprentice who was bound to keep his masters secrets. During my brothers confinement, which I resented a good deal notwithstanding our private differences, I had the management of the paper and I made it to give our rulers. Some rubs in it which my brother took very kindly while others began to consider me in an unfavourable light as a young genius that had a turn for libelling and satire my brothers discharge was accompanied with an of the house a very odd one that James Franklin should no longer printed the paper called the new. England current. There was a consultation held in our printing house among his friends what he should do in this case. Some proposed to obey the order by changing the name of the paper. But my brothers seeing inconveniences in that it was finally concluded on as a better way to let it be printed for the future under the name of Benjamin Franklin and to avoid the center of the Assembly that might fall on him as still printing it by his apprentice. The contrivance was that my olden denture. Should be returned to me with a full discharge on the back of it to be shown on occasion but to secure to him the benefit of my service, I was to sign new in dentures for the remainder of the term which were to be kept private a very flimsy scheme. It was however, it was immediately executed and the paper went on accordingly under my name for several months. At length a fresh difference arising between my brother and me I took upon me to assert my freedom presuming that he would not venture to produce the new in dentures. It was not fair in me to take this advantage and this I therefore reckon one of the first era of my life. But the unfairness of it weighed little with me when under the impressions of resentment for the below his passion too often urged him to bestow upon me though he was not otherwise and ill-natured man. Perhaps. I was too saucy and provoking..

James Franklin Benjamin Franklin England
"franklin" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"franklin" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Franklin and and I really hope I wish everybody's the it is okay and the the footage that was posted by people you know who were there who were like you know in either like you know taking it from their house or whatever it was very scary stuff like it did it was very very scary stuff at lots a lightening incredible amounts of wind obviously it's a tornado and a ripping rain as well so we are keeping an eye on what's happening in in Nashville and hopefully we can get connected with some other people and talk a little bit more about and keep you updated but apparently there's been a substantial amount of damage and other trying to get through that but it's hard right now because there's more rain coming and it's gonna take it's gonna go from a tornado situation to a a flooding situation so all right we're gonna keep our eyes peeled on that here on a seven twenty WGN if anybody's listening V. you know the internet or anything like that we probably in that you're in and that's probably down but if you want to jump in it's three one two nine eight one seven two hundred and that we know we you know we live in the Midwest we know how bad tornadoes could be and so they have that you would need the merry maids who was meeting meteorologist that I talk to that I just talked to for my life from a national talk about the one that that went through in ninety eight and I remember I remember that I remember that tornado going through ninety eight and so did she said it was almost the same exact path that the the tornado from ninety eight went through so we're keeping our eyes open on this and now we will keep you updated if anything happens we find out more about the damage that that currently it has happened in not Nashville in the coming rain because it looks like it might turn into is probably gonna turn into a flooding situation we'll keep you posted so three one three one two nine eight one seven two hundred to Julia show continues here on seven twenty WGN.

Franklin Nashville WGN Midwest Julia
"franklin" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

Listen Money Matters

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"franklin" Discussed on Listen Money Matters

"And we're back. Let's talk about some more Benji Frank. This is probably my favorite Benjamin Franklin thing ever. Yeah. It is. It's been so valuable to me one. It has worked the when I lose it. I'm useless mess. Couldn't agree with you more about me. Yeah. Means being a great thing. And being a good thing. And and there is an and I think we'll we have to include a either a link to this or something in the show notes there. He he literally mapped out his day. And he has a solid routinely does every day. And I'm sure, you know, I know myself, I am a we're all creatures of habit. I literally know how your morning works because you've explained it to me multiple times. And I have a similar like robotic routine that I go through it wasn't like I crafted this wasn't like I was like, oh, I need to do these things in this order, you know, like the morning routine phenomenon that's out there on you read, any medium post, or whatever fuck all that ultimate x stuff. Like if you have to check a box when you brush your teeth. I think I've gone too far. You miss the signs. Yeah. You missed your turn off. Yeah. You must be exit. But but routine is there's bliss in routine, and I think routine is meditation. You know, there is so, you know, people talk about like hacking your mind, body, whatever I think the or the only true hack that I have found is routines. And like, I relate it to the fact that I could have a full conversation. Chew gum, do whatever. While I tie my shoes because I don't I literally do not use my brain to do this. And whenever you can put something in your life into autopilot like that like it's like a cheat code. Yeah. So there's this thing that he drew it starts from five AM and ends at four AM. So it's a whole full twenty four hours, and he has a broken down to these boxes and in the morning. He asked himself what good shall I do this day? Just such a, you know, sixty. And century thing to do or what is it seventeenth eighteenth century in the do in the evening? He asked what good have I done today? Which is great. So that's. Reflects. Yep. Great pre mortem postmortem love it. Okay. So the first thing he does at fuck and five AM right reading this. Right. Yeah. Okay. So I mean, hey. This time net flicks. So he went to bed early, of course. And I don't know what time he went. He went to sleep when the sun went down. Yeah. And what's interesting is he doesn't sleep that long. If you look at this. But anyway, he rises washes addresses and address power fhu powerful goodness in imprint arena. Italics contrived as business and take the resolution the resolution of the day. All right. Prosecute the present study and breakfast. It's basically that's hours in the morning five to seven. So he cleans himself eats thinks about what he's gonna do. Yeah. Does something like weird bent BJ? Bef shit. Shit. It'd be part of it. I don't know. Yeah. Then from then jamming he's been jamming. All right. And then from. It looks like about eight till eleven he works..

Benji Frank Benjamin Franklin twenty four hours