9 Burst results for "Frank Rosen"

"frank rosen" Discussed on RJ Bell's Dream Preview

RJ Bell's Dream Preview

06:42 min | 2 months ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on RJ Bell's Dream Preview

"Oh all right former stardust manager. Yeah mgm us bookmaking now. So the guy that was the fame. The guy was the guy that wrote we scottish shout and was his name or is his name. He's still alive. Sean was like the guy that was after. If i'm not mistaken franco rosenthal. He wrote the book. He writes an article for gaming. Today i think or at least he did recently and then He wrote a book which i loved that. What is shelton scott shetler. Oh shetler. I misspoke okay. But you know schadler. So i'm just getting the pedigree there. So it was the the the neo karen casino. Frank rosen all right and then shetler was next. I think he was. I think so. And then it was walker and then lubo and then loop over the last one before toward that s- coochie Okay you mean the guy was orleans. Okay yeah the boy guy bob. I don't hear about him at all any still. Avoid okay. Millennium good friends to i. I don't know sketchy. As well as i do like jay and robert and a bunch of the guys but everyone says bob's a great guy and the few instances i bet around him a great guy now i think about. He did that podcast on. Espn for a while at least a year. Not too and he. I remember he was a solve. The earth type. I've never met him but he was a poor shoot like almost close be a professional very good. Yeah it's funny man. We gotta maybe team up on this. And i'm gonna actually. I've actually had very i if i call it a preliminary but here's my theory. Almost everyone that really mattered in vegas gaming. Vegas sports banning. Let's say that. I kim gaming it's a scholarship on it but sports. Betting has no scholar meaning the history. There's no hall of fame which i know. that's something. oh they started one they did so They just had the first inductions this year and i was so happy to see vic salerno. Okay you one of the people in it and he roy's A lot of things for vick man. He was our true pioneer. I mean he built worries computer booking system. Yes that was him and well. There's a good story you can look that up on the internet. Yeah it's good stories on that one. Well that's not. The news is there was a lawsuit. Listen sarah slain and other one of my advisory board members used to run the sports betting task force for aga. She got inducted into the sports betting hall of fame. Oh okay so. This is different than because i want batters in there the biggest biggest betters. But that's if you think of industries the i can see the bookmakers getting their say but then you get to better. I like let's be. You could have a hall of fame without billy walters. I'm just saying it's a industry took. The poker hall of fame is all poker players. There's no like poker managers yet. Disgust betting hall of fame. See opposite you find perked up fast. I think both sides. I think by definition. They need each other right. Here is the list for this year's hall of fame classed. Raymond lesniak former new senator. New jersey help spearhead some of that. James spear and jay rude formerly of mgm. For a long time now the coo at bet dot works roxy roxborough. richard knows roxy This was is there anyone po. What is it posthumously. Or is only people alive. they're putting in. These are just the five. Because if you don't i mean if you don't have bob martin you can't put roxy and before martin if and but maybe they're saying if your dad your dad which wouldn't make any sense let me see. This doesn't seem like it's an inaugural class. So the monkey who is that judgment of the quality of the entrance the noxitril because in a way you ruin it by by putting lesniak to me you give special mansion. You give him something an honorary but he didn't spend it. What percentage of his life was about gambling all right. So so actually. It's five years old. So i just read you. The twenty twenty inductees right. The twenty nineteen inductees chris. Christie come on really art man. Terrorists stations casinos. I like that dan histories. Dennis driesen in who's an attorney and ceo. Dennis driesen attorney and see what ozzie worked at. Monmouth park he had some connections or monmouth horse racing and sports. I don't think it's supposed to be just reading you. The sports betting hall of fame list richard flint sky. Betting heard some of these john boyle founder and chairman of boyle sports. What is that Denise coates founder and ceo bet three six five oh the hell is rj bell. No no no no medicine. Listen all joking. Aside isn't bad. three six five offshore. Oh that was more in your though right. Yeah it's in the united states. Is this a worldwide sports. Sports us-based are hall of fame right. Because it's a whole different martin. Who knows what the five people that just went in role americans. That's what i'm saying so foul. Who was in the inaugural class. 'cause bob martin. I got nothing for ball martin. We get johnny anderson former. I'll get you some background music man. These are tough names if you haven't heard of them i probably haven't heard of them. Yeah i mean look. The couple win the chairman of intra lot. This is this is like a chamber of commerce type thing just reading you. The hall of fame. And is this something like you are chamber of commerce guy though glad-handing pinnacle perez smith from pinnacles. In it fred. Fred pinnacle pinnacles in. Henry's pinnacle or some other pinnacle. Yeah.

bob martin shelton scott shetler richard flint jay franco rosenthal Raymond lesniak Dennis driesen Sean Monmouth park roxy This boyle sports Frank rosen Espn vic salerno chairman john boyle mgm walker founder and chairman united states
"frank rosen" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

12:08 min | 8 months ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"To have access to the capital market so we don't issue public bonds or public equity meaning that there that's the way they get their financing in their operations is really through the banking system and answer non banks so we we had we have a facility that deals with companies that have access to the bond market and there's not Congress has done a lot for smaller companies that are under five hundred employees with the paid paycheck protection program so this is for the companies that are in the middle and it is very challenging because it's an extraordinarily diverse space the credit needs of of different kinds of companies in different industries are extraordinarily diverse and some of them borrow against assets some against cash flow some are much more volatile than others so it's quite it's it's quite diverse and trying to figure out the right credit products for that market is is challenging in addition the world of bank credit is a world in which every every credit agreement between a borrower and a and a bank is negotiated so and so each credit agreements a little bit different so that it doesn't have a degree of standardization for example that the bond market has where there are forms of indentures and forms of prospectuses and it's it's it's much more beat out it's much more routine than it is so it's challenging to get in there but nonetheless get in there we will and we've so we're we're days away from making our first loans in main street we have a we have three facilities that are part of it they're meant to reach out to different parts of that broad space meantime many of those companies are finding that they can borrow from banks others are are waiting for us to get our facility up and running out yet it is far and away the the biggest challenge of any of the eleven facilities that we set up are the three main street facilities but you know and I would the last thing I'll say is as we've shown we're very willing to learn from experience we've we put out a term sheet proposed term sheet we get we got a couple thousand letters from people on the first main street term sheet we turn that around we consulted actively with all different kinds of companies and experts and and we you know we've now released the documents and do expect to start making loans on main street in in a few days well congratulations you envisioning these loans to be Marian happen really I mean I mean that was me speaking you speak what size loans we talking about so that the current structure is that the smallest loans would be about a half a million and the largest ones could be you know over a hundred yeah and that's for the for the larger companies they're we're we're we're working with companies that have as many as fifteen thousand employees and five billion in revenue and there's no there's no limit on the on the bottom and so you know what would I can imagine is expanding on either ran to me that the whole nature of this exercise that the Congress has given us is go find companies that have employees really it's all about creating a context in which employees a climate in which employees will have the best chance to either keep their job or go back to their old job or ultimately find a new job that is the point of this exercise is is that it's all about those twenty five million people or so who've been laid off the ones who may not be laid off but maybe they will ultimately be laid off so that's what this is about and so we're looking for companies in any any any part of the economy that have employees that are not able to get credit that would have been able to get credit in two thousand nineteen so we're looking back at companies that were in good solid financial shape before the pandemic we're trying to find those companies and we're trying to create credit products that work for them that's the nature of the exercise thank you let me finish up with war and opening up to questions with one or maybe more nitty gritty monetary policy questions you've had all of these before quite a few European central bank and Japan post overnight interest rates into negative territory quite awhile ago in some cases years ago and kept them there yes even before you were chair has made it quite clear that it doesn't have any intention of doing that Alan blinder a Princeton University economics professor playing wise there's some aspect of American exceptionalism that's not so obvious just generally what did your drone maybe I'll give a little context so one the problem of we we set a policy rate which is the federal funds rate and we we lower it of course when the economy is weak we raise it when economy is stronger right inflation was more often a problem and we would often raise it it's it hasn't been a problem in a while but we'd raise it then to sort of it prevents the county from overheating not as a problem recently so in the late in the nineties limit in the late nineties I guess after just after you were at the Fallon Japan hit the effective lower bound hit zero and the question came to the fore what do you do now and so right since really then it's more than twenty years now central bankers and economists have been working on the problem of what can central banks do when they hit zero are they out of by the end of ammunition the answer is no so during the global financial crisis the fed got to zero and we did two things one we we effectively promised to hold our policy interest rate at zero for a long period of time that affects short medium and long term interest rates and that supports economic activity because borrowers borrow all all across the curve we also bought this was what became known as quantitative easing longer term treasury securities and other fully guaranteed securities guaranteed by the US government in order to lower long term yields those are the two principal tools that we use during the financial crisis we feel that we understand them we no longer think of them as non standard tools we think of them as in the toolbox because we are in an era of much lower interest rates we do expect part of the time to be at the effective lower bound of zero which we aren't that now it so some banks decided in addition to that to to use negative rates we don't think that that's an appropriate tool here in the United States well I think I would say the the evidence on whether it actually works is is mixed there are clearly some negative side effects is there sometimes are with these things and it's it's just not clear to my colleagues and to me on the federal open market committee that this is a tool that would be appropriate to deploy here in the United States we show that features like one because what's different in the United States compared to I don't know pick if the eurozone well a couple things one first I did it I don't see that I I see I don't see that the evidence this isn't really a difference is the difference in understanding and their their many central bankers around the world who who feel this way the evidence on whether it actually helps is is pretty ambiguous because one thing it does is it did it it interferes with the process of credit intermediation that banks undergo they take in deposits they landed out to the extent of the policy rate is negative you're you're so you're crushing down on bank margins and that makes them landless and there are other you know possible negative effects there I think I think the evidence is mixed it's not it's not clear either way we also have we have institutional arrangements here that would that would not work with negative rates I wouldn't say those are decisive things like the money market funds fund industry which a lot of companies of various kinds use to find themselves in which individuals look upon as as a place to put their money thank you very much let me turn to some questions a man from people listening to my squinting a little I'm reading this off my screen with my own even mentioning my age it's older than yours highs here's a question starts with from Frank Rosen's thank you for your extraordinary job and the question is how sensitive is the fed to the very difficult time that in particular the lower end of the economic spectrum is experiencing these days compared to the extraordinary strength in the equity markets that Wall Street has seen it does and does that affect policy at all or is it just unnecessary side effects that even if you aren't rooting for it just happens I'm a sailor Frank and say that we know that I guess everyone is is affected by the pandemic in a negative way to one degree or another but the burdens are falling very strongly on those who can least afford to bear them the unemployed come very largely so far come very largely from parts of the service economy which involve dealing with large groups of people in it that are that are tightly together so that's restaurants bars its travel it's hotels it's a lot of places and many of that many of the jobs that have been lost at least temporarily are relatively low paid service industry jobs so you can just see that that those are the people that are being laid off who have the least you know the least financial resources for example in our in our should survey a survey of household economic decision making which we released a week or so ago it looks like if you if you were someone who made forty thousand dollars or less annually the chances of your being laid off in the last month or so approach forty percent it's almost forty percent of those people have lost a job if you're making forty five that's that's so this is falling secondly falling on women to an extraordinary degree this is falling on women to some extent in those jobs and so this is this is there tremendous inequality in the way the pandemic is affecting our population now you ask does that does that affect our policy look it does affect our policy you know it although essentially part of our mandate is maximum of what its maximum point and stable prices are our monetary policy mandates so you know we're very focused on the full range of unemployment and doing whatever we can to related as I mentioned earlier to try to get those people back to work for in a new job it some of those jobs may be may take a while to come back it's important those people be protected from from this this event this is not something that was anybody's fault really this was a natural disaster so it's important that they receive support and they have received a very high degree of support so far thank you well this next question comes I think from the aliens from several people in a particular came first from Gilchrist for the question is what is another big waves of cold in nineteen in the late fall and the citizens to react again how big a balance sheet can you manage record gets to be a problem and one of the problems he ask him questions insulation or maybe you see other problems but just in general is there any limit how big you can make the balance so we'll meet let me start by saying that.

Congress
"frank rosen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

11:48 min | 8 months ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Bond market and there's not Congress has done a lot for smaller companies that are under five hundred employees with the tape paycheck protection program so this is for the companies that are in the middle and it is very challenging because it's an extraordinarily diverse space the credit needs of of different kinds of companies in different industries are extraordinarily diverse and some of them borrow against assets some against cash flow some are much more volatile than others so it's quite it's it's quite diverse and trying to figure out the right credit products for that market is is challenging in addition the world of bank credit is a world in which every every credit agreement between a borrower and it and a bank is negotiated so and so each credit agreements a little bit different so that it doesn't have the degree of standardization for example that the bond market has where there are forms of indentures and forms of prospectuses and it's it's it's much more beyond it's much more routine than it is so it's challenging to get in there but nonetheless get in there we will and we've so we're we're days away from making our first loans in main street we have a we have three facilities that are part of it they're meant to reach out to different parts of that broad space meantime many of those companies are finding that they can borrow from banks others are are waiting for us to get our facility up and running it is far and away the the biggest challenge of any of the eleven facilities that we set up for the three main street facilities but you know and I would tell us I'll say is as we've shown were very willing to learn from experience we we put out a term sheet proposed term sheet we get we had a couple thousand letters from people on the first main street term sheet we turn that around we consulted actively with all different kinds of companies and experts sand and we you know we've now released the documents and do expect to start making loans on main street in in a few days well congratulations you envisioning these loans to be a million have really I mean I mean that was me speaking you speak what size loans we talking about so that the current structure is that the smallest loans would be about a half a million and the largest ones could be you know over a hundred yeah and that's for the for the larger companies they're we're we're we're working with companies that have as many as fifteen thousand employees and five billion in revenue and there's no there's no limit on the on the bottom and so you know what we I can imagine this expanding on either end to me that the whole nature of this exercise that the Congress has given us is go find companies that have employees really it's all about creating a context in which employees a climate in which employees one of the best chance to either keep their job or go back to their old job or ultimately find a new job that is the point of this exercise is is to it's all about those twenty five million people or so who been laid off the ones who may not be laid off but made may alternately be laid off so that's what this is about and so we're looking for companies in any any any part of the economy that has employees that are not able to get credit that would have been able to get credit in two thousand nineteen so we're looking back at companies that were in good solid financial shape before the pandemic we're trying to find those companies and we're trying to create credit products that work for them that's the nature of the exercise thank you let me finish up before an opening up to questions with one or maybe one Israeli monetary policy questions you've had all of these before quite a few European central banks and Japan push their overnight interest rates into negative territory quite awhile ago in some cases years ago and it's kept in there yes even before you were chair has made it quite clear that it doesn't have any intention of doing that can you explain why is this some aspect of American exceptionalism that's not so obvious just generally what yeah maybe I'll give a little context so one the problem of we we set a policy rate which is the federal funds rate and we we lower it of course when the economy is weak we raise it when economy is stronger inflation was more often a problem and we would often raise it it's it hasn't been a problem in a while but we'd raise it then the sort of it prevent the company from over eating not as a problem recently so in the late in the nineties look me in the late nineties I guess after just after you were at the Fallon Japan hit the effective lower bound hit zero and the question came to the fore what do you do now and so right since really then it's more than twenty years now central bankers and economists have been working on the problem of what can central banks do when they hit zero are they out of by the end of ammunition the answer is no so during the global financial crisis the fed got to zero and we did two things one we we effectively promised to hold our policy interest rate at zero for a long period of time that affects short medium and long term interest rates and that supports economic activity because borrowers borrow all all across the curve we also bought this was what became known as quantitative easing longer term treasury securities and other fully guaranteed securities guaranteed by the US government in order to lower long term yields those are the two principal tools that we use during the financial crisis we feel that we understand them we no longer think of them as non standard tools we think of them as in the toolbox because we are in an era of much lower interest rates we do expect part of the time to be at the effective lower bound of zero which we are in fact now is so some banks decided in addition to that to to use negative rates we don't think that that's an appropriate tool here in the United States well I think I would say the the evidence on whether it actually works is is mixed there are clearly some negative side effects iser sometime Ms our with these things and it's it's just not clear to my colleagues and to me on the federal open market committee that this is a tool that would be appropriate to deploy here in the United States because your messages like one more because what's different in the United States compared to I don't know pick if the eurozone well a couple things one first I it I don't see that I I see I I don't see that the evidence this isn't really a difference is the difference in understanding and their their many central bankers around the world who who feel this way the evidence on whether it actually helps guide is is pretty ambiguous because one thing it does is it did it it interferes with the process of credit intermediation that banks undergo they take in deposits they landed out to the extent of the policy rate is negative you're you're so you're crushing down on bank margins and that makes them landless and there are other you know possible negative effects there I think I think the evidence is mixed it's not it's not clear the way we also have we have institutional arrangements here that would that would not work with negative rates I wouldn't say those are decisive things like the money market funds fund industry which a lot of companies of various kinds use to find themselves in which individuals look upon as as a place to put their money thank you very much let me turn to some questions a man from all people listening I'll have to squinting a little I'm reading this off my screen with mine I won't even mention all ages older than yours hi I'm here's a question starts with from Frank Rosen's thank you for your extraordinary job and the question is how sensitive is the sense of a very difficult time that in particular the lower end of the economic spectrum is experiencing these days compared to the extraordinary strength in the equity markets than Wall Street has seen does that and does that affect policy at all or is it just unnecessary side effects that even if you aren't rooting for it just happens I'm a sailor Frank and say that we know that I guess everyone is is affected by the pandemic in a negative way to one degree or another but the birds are falling very strongly on those who can least afford to bear them the unemployed come very largely so far come very largely from parts of the service economy which involve dealing with large groups of people in it that are that are tightly together so that's restaurants bars its travel it's hotels it's a lot of places and many of that many of the jobs that have been lost at least temporarily are relatively low paid service industry jobs so you can just see that that those are the people that are being laid off who have the least you know the least financial resources for example in our in our should survey a survey of household economic decision making which were released a week or so ago it's like if you if you were someone who made forty thousand dollars or less annually the chances of your being laid off in the last month or so approach forty percent so almost forty percent of those people have lost their job if you're making forty that that's that's the so this is falling secondly falling on women to an extraordinary degree this is falling on women to some extent in those jobs and so this is this is there tremendous inequality in the way the pandemic is affecting our population now you ask does that does affect our policy look it does affect our policy you know it although essentially part of our mandate is maximum appointed as Max employment and stable prices are our monetary policy mandates so you know we're very focused on the full range of of employment and doing whatever we can to related as I mentioned earlier to try to get those people back to work or in a new job some of those jobs may be may take a while to come back it's important those people be be protected from from this this event this is not something that was anybody's fault really this was a natural disaster so it's important that they receive support and they have received a very high degree of support so far thank you this next question comes I think from the aliens from several people but in particular came first from Gilchrist per arm and the question is what is another big waves of cold in nineteen in the late fall all and the food is asked to react again how big the balance sheet can you manage record gets to be a problem and one of the problems he and the question is insulation or maybe you see other problems up but just in general is there any limit to how big you can make the balance so we'll meet let me start by saying that.

Congress
"frank rosen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

13:29 min | 9 months ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Hi slowly on this rainy cold Friday morning believe it or not I was looking at the collapsing and me a chance to like it could be a wet flurry north of us somewhere Tammy come on man you're killing me you're killing me literally do it we've got enough of a corona virus we've got what the the killer Hornet wasps and now we got a chance of snow flurries so to and you had me believe me corona viruses been plenty so far for C. throw the the the the killer bees on the murder Hornets in Naryn now you get a got a superb just nastiness right now could be any worse these days with all along good news right the good news I guess yesterday is that the governor to Wyness said okay we're gonna start open things back up now how excited are you even a glimmer of hope that we're gonna start opening things normal do normal things again like you can get your hair cut possibly starting on the fifteenth and also outdoor restaurants and cafes if you have outdoor spaces at your restaurant you can start serving customers and presumably the next week on the twenty first and I was leaving late on this yesterday as fearing that it was gonna be end of the month but you know that the twenty first is where we're gonna start being able to figure out going back to restaurants like now for a lot of people obviously it may be a little too late and on number of restaurants have since closed but the problem of course is been the slow movement of the government to which Deborah Gillis in Warren County of a free Ohio now dot com and there's a group of like minded folks from almost every county in the state and again holding a rally tomorrow at different points right around one o'clock to to kind of call ten to the step good morning how are you I am absolutely fantastic how are you I'm hanging in there other than the fact we have these new new bees to be afraid of these murder Hornets and other prone a virus and all this rain and possibly snow flurry today other than that things were great hello tomorrow's weather for the protests are going to be absolutely fantastic that's good all right so I did the last check we you guys have a location in this is going to happen at one o'clock in before I get into the dots and bolts of it too did you get it did you get a new location yeah what happened I absolutely did get a new location I am so thrilled that we will be in downtown Lebanon I just got the approval from the city manager not five minutes ago so it was perfect timing so good okay good so styled Lebanon where again it is going to be at the intersection of main and Broadway where the golden lamb is and we basically will just be peacefully carrying our signs walking up and down the sidewalks and I'm gonna go check out the lady of the land a little later this morning but it's my understanding from the city manager that there's also a park nearby so depending on the number of people you know we may spill over into that part I'm sorry so when you get that out there the idea of the the protesters what exactly because we're starting to re open now what what are you what is it you're wanting that generally when you you know doing informational pain that's not gonna be anything crazy you know it's not gonna be like Portland presumably were little better behave here in Ohio and I know that you are specially so what what is it you're looking for what's the remedy well it's a very good question that you asked that and we discussed this kind of information on our conference call last night so the three things that we are actually trying to all right let me back up the first thing I guess we should understand is that there have been a lot of infringement of our rights throughout these last nine weeks when on March ninth governor DeWine slowly began to take those rights away when he declared a state of emergency we believe that this is only the beginning we being free Ohio now and all the people that agree with us and we are considering this as just one battle of the war so in this particular battle of the stay at home order and all of the crashing of our economy because of possible mis information and inconsistent data are the three things on Saturday we would like to try to get across is that we would like to free our rights from government encroachment we would like to free our economy so we can regain our dignity and earn a living and we would like to free the data so that we can actually see what the real data information as verses you know such as number of cases number of deaths right right okay so on those points I guess you said this is the it to begin you said well this is just the beginning of this is that we think this is a work we're going to March in rally for free Ohio now in Warren County other counties as well because the only the beginning of what well in the beginning of the day the way that our government is starting to take away our constitutional right and we feel that this corona virus situation is just one battle of many another one that I actually brought up last night on a conference call was be upcoming November election they're talking about how they don't think it's fair or they don't think it'll be safe to have him for voting they only want mail and and a lot of people feel that that is a huge disenfranchisement to our voters and it's a lot easier for voter fraud and another battle might be the school situation you know you're younger people are supposed to be the least susceptible and yet here they are already talking about next year's school that they might only go one or two days a week and that's going to be a huge issue for two working parents and I I agree with that I think that's a difficult difficult battle there but I guess back to the mailing thing you know so many few people participate anyway not that that's an excuse but the mail in it yeah I don't see why you make a point of disenfranchised in France and we're making it easier to vote well all I hear in franchising people by allowing me to take your for me to vote than it is to go and vote well my point is I have been working the polls here in Ohio since the two thousand eight Obama McCain election and I've worked every election in Warren County thanks for doing that it's good thank you and the way that this past election on March seventeenth it was handled was totally but the buckle I mean they waited until hours before the poll was still open they really didn't have any right to cancel the election that is done by normally the legislature and frankly rose who's the secretary of state is that decided to do that at the last minute and then they didn't even publicize it very well they originally thought that there was gonna be in person voting on June second then they didn't really tell anybody that it's extreme and I guess it's an extremely difficult time but but it's because of coronavirus say it sounds like maybe you think that they're using corona virus to infringe on rights when in fact this is well within the scope of things if you look at how this whole thing played out because it's a novel coronavirus dead because meaning novel we've never seen this before we saw what was happening in Italy and and what we thought China but there's bad data coming out of China we really didn't have that much of the we kinda knew it but we didn't know the pathology or any of that and so we aired and and some people I would agree that's well on the side of caution because we were expecting and bracing for the worst that that didn't occur in this incident occur I'm with you it's okay let's start opening up and let's do it in ways but I think we can make the way full quicker quite honestly rather than wait you know while months or weeks you know kind of a slower rollout here but this is an unprecedented crisis and I think within well within the rights of the governor and Frank Rosen others to do what they did is they saw fit at the time and I think it's just easier to go back and and second gas an armchair quarterback you know hindsight's twenty twenty you great no actually I don't I just think it should have been handled much differently and I believe that once they did give me once they did related posts pony in person voting and then changed it to mail in only on April twenty eighth one governor DeWine and Dr Amy Acton were every day from two to three thirty that should have been said something every single new station should have said something every single day thank the June second mail in voting now I'm not going to happen here's what you're going to have to do so when I said disenfranchised third difference transport you know what I'm saying a lot of people even up to the end of April or close to the end of April on the deadline people thought that they could still go on June second and do it I mean we we talked about it in it so I guess it's up to and because I I I think the problem is is that there's so much information either on people first and foremost worry about their health they're worried about their business their income their livelihood that voting kind of got kicked down the in and I guess that's up to the individual some people hold that right a lot more closely that like you do then maybe some other people do and we've seen you know in in the past let's face it an election cycles like this not very many people turn out I don't know if that's a sad indictment are to be expected I wanted while the voting thing else wanna talk about the part of this he said the constitutional violation S. yes and again when you are not allowed to go to church when you are not allowed to you know gather with your family and friends a lot of people are considering the stay at home order house arrest for healthy people I'm by myself knock on wood have been healthy I have been going at to every possible store that I can that's open without a map in without a beloved because that's the way to build your own immunity and now it's one which is which was a bad idea which was what was about a deal going out without gloves and mask on what not now not knowing what we know now because we've learned a lot and it's not as bad as we once thought but at the time if you go back a couple months yeah you're building herd immunity we need to do that but we were not prepared from a from a bad and a ventilator P. P. E. all the things that we need so if you did get seconded and think you what I'm I'm I'm healthy I don't think I get sick but a lot of people who who were close to death got away said Hey listen I I was dumb I made a mistake I didn't take it seriously I happen to be one of the chosen ones to succumb to the illness which I get the idea was that we delay this and flatten the curve to save life in the short term but you what what we're trying to do is try to catch up from may Abed and I see you in a ventilator and medical standpoint in order to handle an influx of people who would present with covert nineteen now that the current was was a lot flatter than we thought it would be that the experts that would be I would defer to them I'm not a doctor presuming you're not and I look and okay it's your call now that we know it's not as bad as we thought yeah I'm with you you know let's start opening things back up and maybe at a faster clip but if a second wave comes we're now per more prepared because companies like well Ford and others are making ventilators so we'd be prepared for what you're talking about in this bill I think it's just too early to build a herd immunity a lot of people would you know again if it went as we thought are they thought it a lot of people died that makes sense well it makes sense if you are listening to everything that everybody is saying and I don't always I agree with the the main topics a lot I don't know that's my personal it's your right to do that yeah but I'm I'm talking from a scientific standpoint we this there is no basis for there was no blue point for this and this this was the problem so you tend to err much more on the side of caution listen to the doctor and he acted into are worried about one thing out what about business and re opening that's not in our scope but but public health isn't so you defer to her and if you know if they're wrong we are on the side of caution I guess at least that's where I come from anyway I look at it I don't see a real constitutional violations here because if you look at the history the country there been times where where in in recent history the the federal government has cracked a much much harder on personal freedoms or talk about here okay what was there a question in there no just an observation I don't really ask questions I just kind of battled up okay that there's not an interview or just having a talk when we get back to the pre Ohio now yeah let's see what we're talking about what you know the reasons why we're having and I I should restate that it's the free free Ohio now rally and I wanna say there's about thirty maybe thirty counties that are doing this there are actually thirty two morning out of I believe eighty eight counties in Ohio a lot of people that there are actually other counties in addition to that that had expressed an interest but then they weren't able to find persons who helped organize it Hamilton being one of those however beside me doing Warren County we also have Butler county and Clermont county and if if if I would love to be able to give you the places that they're going to be yeah that's not happening stick to promote the event absolutely we got at the Butler County one is going to be at the.

Tammy murder Hornets Naryn
"frank rosen" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

10:28 min | 9 months ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on WTVN

"The Sunday six pack from the days of mansion remember on March seventeenth it was swell with Saint Patrick's day and we were supposed to have the Ohio primary and that didn't happen because of corona virus and I think it was that following Saturday afternoon I was on and I had Frankel rose on to kind of explain what was gonna happen at that point he had decided that June second would be the the day that the primary would be held that didn't sit well with folks and and it was on its way to the Ohio Supreme Court and we'll find out exactly what happened there first hole welcome back to the the six pack it's Frank Rosen and Frank Mr secretary like I said last time we were talking about the Ohio primary it it wasn't happening and you are making provisions and then all of a sudden some people through some red flags so at last we heard it was going to the Ohio state a Supreme Court can can you update us on what has happened since yeah sure in actually the Supreme Court case ended up being dropped after the legislature acted and we're thankful that the legislature is able to come into section and and and the and the they they passed a unanimous proposal that you know I did offered an alternative I I wanted to as you said to conclude this is a vote by mail election but leave our boards of elections time to prepare for that at the time it was going to take to print everything and and all that we were projecting that the soonest we could do that was June second probably could live with late band and my proposal was to send a nasty ballot request to every voter who had voted and include a postage paid envelope alternately the legislature chose a different course I've used this is making lemonade out of lemons and that's what we're trying to do it again listen this is a bipartisan thank you analysts vote of the legislature I respect the will of the of our state legislature so we're moving forward to conduct this vote by mail election and concluded by April twenty eighth the challenge is making sure that everybody can participate that wants to that was my concern along with that this is not a partisan thing anyway this to me about the the beating heart of our democracy is all about people having a voice in their government and that means that everybody that was participate the selection should be able to the challenges for people that don't have a printer or don't know what website to go to and that's why our call into shows like yours and and spread the word yeah well over a hundred fifty community groups and nonprofit groups that have got involved to help us with that newspapers around the state that are printing yes the ballot request form in the pages of their newspapers all you have to do is rip it out we got newspapers distributing our outlook at grocery stores distributing Ohio's food banks when they're giving out bags of groceries to people in need they're putting the form right there in the bag groceries so we're doing all we can and I look forward to hopefully telling folks how they can take advantage of this but the clock is ticking because we only have until April twenty eighth it's a stunning what you've been able to do in in such a short period of time and how I mean what's what's the secret sauce there how did you get grocery stores and newspapers I mean did everybody just did you put a simple request and everybody said sure we can help or or I mean it could have been that easy right now a lot of a lot of personal outrage I'm making phone calls our staff is making phone calls the people stepped up I mean this is something where there's been a really patriotic response great but I you know during the commercial break I was listening to some of these are small businesses that advertised on your station I was just thinking my gosh these are the entrepreneurs that run Ohio county these folks are struggling right now it's a difficult time for them but you know in the midst of all of this these businesses of stepped up and helped us these grocery stores and others have helped us get the word out I can't say how much I appreciate that so what will stress right off the bat and from going forward between now and election day there is no in person voting correct there is extremely limited in person voting and so let let me explain that just briefly that the the bill that was passed by the legislature created an opportunity for the it's it's worded such that it says that those who can't receive mail at home but effectively what it means you're almost in the disable so if your blind for example and can't take advantage of by mail or don't have the equipment to use our remote marking equipment this is specifically for the blind there and that you can take advantage of that but again that's going to be done under very carefully managed health scenario where only a certain number of people are gonna be able to come into the board of elections or to give it time the workers at all eighty eight boards of elections are going to have you know protective equipment available organized sanitize the machines between each person the use of and and that kind of thing and so really it's just for that small population are they can't take advantage of by mail for all the rest of us it's a vote by mail election and it concludes on April twenty eighth at night at seven thirty PM on a run the calculation and release notes unofficial results and effectively at that point include Ohio's primary that has gone on now for two office well in anybody that has taken advantage of early voting they don't need to revoke corrected their vote will be counted absolutely if you voted as part of Ohio's early voting period or vote by mail period way back in February or March your ballot is safely kept at your board of elections under double locking key meaning that there's a Republican kia democratic key it's like those old submarine movies from the launch the torpedoes well you got to have both keys before anybody can walk in that room where those ballots are stored so it's a one of those security procedures that we have your ballot is safe and sound at the board of elections will be counted on the evening of April twenty eight but for everybody else clock's ticking you're not speaking metaphorically there there really is a a key for each literally yeah it affected a lot of a lot of boards elections they color code and they have a red one and a blue once and so the the the you have to have the you know the Republican representative and the democratic representative and they're both there they put their locks and that's how you put a lock and that's how you open the door this is something a lot of people don't realize by the way about elections administration in general every aspect of it is on is overseen by Republicans and Democrats you go to any County Board of elections in Ohio's only needle and it's a really a bipartisan success story and it feels like in Washington Republicans and Democrats can't agree what they're the week it is but at your County Board of elections is really complex work is really logistically challenging high stakes job of running for election none of the thoroughly bipartisan enterprise right down to how the doors are unlocked and is allowed to go into the room where the ballots are short rushing to hear April twenty eighth it is the primary absentee ballots must be postmarked by the twenty seventh correct that's correct and so now is the time to request your absentee ballot that as the ballots will be mailed to you by your board of elections you've got to post market by the twenty seventh or if you want to return it in person the way to do that is using a secure Dropbox every board of elections has a secure Dropbox out front it kinda looks like a mailbox journal postal drive a box and it you know it has to be in there by seven thirty PM on the twenty eighth because that's when they make sure everything's cleaned out and they run the calculation so let's jump on to a different election the the upcoming presidential election and president trump doesn't appear to have faith in in voting might by mail now and one thing I want to clear up we we hear the term voting by mail does that mean does that automatically equate to absentee ballot or are they all is there talk of possibly doing a separate system so absentee voting invoke you know are synonymous okay good Kitty you know the average person we we tend to talk about his vote by mail because it's it's easier terminology that absentee voting okay but it works works virtually the it is the same thing out technically our early voting model highlights go to vote during that four weeks before the election that is also in person absentee voting so there's a little distinction there but it's basically the thing is our our presidential election this fall where to go to an absentee ballot voting system I know you have full faith in voting via absentee ballot in Ohio what about on a national level and on a level that that you can't control or would you somehow control like the Ohio votes or or would that be completely hands off for you so the elections are run at a state by state level and so my office by solemn obligation is Ohio secretary of state working with our bipartisan county boards of elections is to make sure that seven point eight million registered voters in Ohio have their votes counted accurately and honestly and efficiently and for federal offices down to your your local school board election that's that's our responsibility now well when you talk about a national proposal or something like that I worry that there are some folks that are trying to engage in what I call crisis opportunism that and try to get done maybe the partisan projects is that you know that that that that would be concerning about a federalizing of of election administration is a very bad idea but we both Republican and democratic elections officials agree on this the federal government is there to provide us the resources to support the funding that they've provided us the the work that the U. S. department of homeland security does is top notch we work with them nearly every day the federal elections assistance commission is great but when it comes to how we actually run elections that is a state for August and the federal government has no business telling states how to run their elections in Ohio we've got a very good system for vote by mail we've perfected that over close to twenty years by the way Highlander but boating by mail in what they call a no fault absentee ballot meaning you don't have to have an excuse any anybody that wants to or by mail but over those years we've put in place some really good safeguards we maintain the accuracy of our voter list we require identification and authentication of signatures have to be patched up but you know the things that we do we we provide ballot tracking just like when order package online you can track it to make sure that it's.

Saint Patrick Frankel Ohio
"frank rosen" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

13:48 min | 1 year ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Yes so you're right. I'm having a background in cognitive science and computational neuroscience and so I've been like focusing focusing on brain research for my pastor five years of education and now recently I've been doing more work on computational tation assistance biology and specifically on cancer and cancer trying to understand mechanisms of how cancer work and how we can find new treatments against cancer specifically quickly and in this work. I've been using mostly deep learning techniques and this will be part of like my presentation here at this conference. It's also and so yeah. So how do those things go together. So I think like many people think it's in a way weird if you come from brain scientists and then you go into machine running right and this is something I would say. It's like it's a very obvious thing to do in a way because if you look back into the history of machine she learning where it all came from like McCulloch and Pitts the first artificial neuron and then a few years later Frank Rosen ballot the perception. And so these were all computational neuroscientists and they were in the end really trying to understand how the brain works and they basically develop the The fundamental of the field of machine learning and so at some point this community and in a way it split up into groups and one group was more trying to and actually understanding the brain works and the other group was more interested in solving the problems. Right right and from this from this community. The machine learning learning community evolved into but whereas computation neuroscience right. Now it's it. It's still a field. It's still out there. It's has been separating more and more from the machine community what's there and originally it has been one like one big community. Yeah and so therefore I think it's quite natural to to have the process. Yeah Yeah you know I think Particularly here at Noor ups I have opportunity to speak with many folks that are kind of working on on that edge of cognitive sciences brain sciences and both using that to inform the way we think about machine learning using machine learning to validate you know some of the biological theories it was maybe more novel is coming from Cognitive Science and brain science and applying machine gene learning to developing cancer pharmaceuticals out in that. Come about yeah. How did that come about a good question? So like if you look at brain scientists this really this problem of seeing the brain which is arguably the most complex thing we have in the universe and and seeing like observing this brain and trying to understand his brain from at different scales at different spatial scales so to speak. So you can think about about the brain in the very abstract and cognitive ways thinking about cognitive phenomena like language and memory those things and you can think about it more from from neural perspective like how do act like what is the most fundamental unit of information processing. How do these units interact? How does information arise? And so like these two fundamentally different approaches and so I like in the first three years of my studies focused on cognitive science which has more top down approach unlike thinking from the big concepts and then down towards the implementation level whereas competition neuro science. They have more like the spot. Him Perspective They in the end and they're trying to solve the same problems but they start first with the basic building blocks like having a biologically plausible neural network model will that imitates basic behavior of neurons. And then they try to scale it up in order to understand more complex cognitive phenomenon and so like these field they really deep. They help each other and they need to work together in order to better understand how the brain works and so after after Android area defeating. Okay I need something a more solid and I really wanted to have this bottom up perspective from competition neuroscience which then I got my masters and so afterwards I I I mean I have to say that I was keen to explore and applications of machine learning because while studying the brain I got really interested more and more into the whole field of data signs and machine learning but and I wanted to apply those techniques but at the same time I wanted to I wanted to still somehow how work with the human body and with humans in general so this is how you how I came about him doing cancer Consume drunk modeling and so the poster is titled Pacman. Tell us about yeah Eh. So pacman is a frame. I mean it's an acronym so spelled with a double double and so it's an acronym. We came up during in my like about a year ago. During my master's thesis for prediction of anticancer compound sensitivity with multimodal attention based neural networks. And and so like when my supervisor came about with this acronym one of very long nights we spend in the lab. We like okay. There's no discussion. This is GonNa be the name for the project. Ah So quite funny how this came about so and we what we're doing in this work at that was the first step step off of the project and presenting at the conference. We were trying to basically forecast the effect the inhibitory effect of emol against a specific type of cancer and so we are treating this problem of predicting cancer drug sensitivity. Not really as the property of a pair and the pair is con- like composed of Itself the chemical the drug that you give to the patient and then the particular to more sell that you want to target because cancer is really like A. It's a family of diseases and the SORTA verse I. I mean there has probably never been two types of cancer that have been exactly alike because the Medicaid of mutations you have they vary like hillbilly inbetween of every individual patients. So it's really unfeasible to try to investigate whether molecule has some onto cancer effects in general. So you really need to treat this problem as the property of pair. So is this drug like hesitant. inhibitory effect against this specific type of cancer patient individually one of the questions. That comes up I is one of the techniques. You're applying here reinforcement learning. How does that play into Into achieving that goal so it comes about in the second step first that was really just trying to predict the sensitivity so the efficacy of Audrey and so what we what we did in consecutive step after we had built this model what we asked ourselves was like. Wow wouldn't it be amazing to have a model that can generate rate new drugs at can like come up and propose new anti-cancer candidate rex. Because in the old pharmaceutical industry there's a huge uh-huh productivity decline in the last few decades and the estimated costs that you have pulled new truck there Estimated to be two three billion Indian USD and most of these drugs that are like FDA approved and approved on the market. So they're really specific only for like very few types of diseases sort of even one disease only so the cost in our indeed that go are like spent in this business. It's just huge and and so we I mean we came up with this framework reinforcement. Learning is really core component. Where we're trying to design anti-cancer cancer drugs specifically for individual patients or groups of patients so we tried to envision the precision medicine perspective here where we're really We're not trying to generically. Come up with new cat. anti-cancer candidate drugs. But we try to like in the design process itself. Both we try to tailor the Monaco the drug specifically to the need of the patient himself or herself and so forth for this framework we use. We're using reinforcement Okay you also mentioned in the title of the poster transcript domain data. What is transcript Tomac data? You're right so you can think about transplant. Tomic data as basically The the expression of every single gene that you have in your body like you do you know about the human genome and so part of the human genome and code for specific proteins and these expression of these proteins. You can measure in the cell. That's different techniques techniques to do that so the most commonly used technique and the technique that was used to measure the data we work with is called are on a sequencing thing. Data we are you measure basically the M. A. Snippets in the cell. And so from this. You can infer basically which genes are expressed to what extent so so you end up if you if you do the sequencing step you end up with a vector of about twenty thousand genes and for each gene you would have an expression value view. This is usually just an integer. Like how many times did you find these Slip it in the sample. And then so this this vector Tori you can really think of it as like a fingerprint of the cell. So it's like it's a proper characterization of the cell there's different types of of comics data. So this is true. Tomic's data right. There's like also genomics data which directly directly measuring gene data and there's also also appropriate mix data actively measuring the the proteins proteins. So the starting from that first step. You're you're kind of starting with trying to predict the effect of drug on the cell. Is it It is a supervised learning in type of a problem that you is that the way. You've framed it. Yes yes this supervised learning so it's a regression problem in the end It's quite simple. And the fact that we're really trying to predict single property and this is the icy fifty value. So this is the micro molar concentration of a drug doc. You need in order to kill fifty percent of the cells. So and this is the thing you're trying to minimize so if you have a smaller concentration of the Druk truck then destruct as more effective right so you're training. Data comes from measurements that have been don on applying drop different types of drugs to different types of cells. Exactly so there's huge database for for these problem so two we're working with our GD and these astounding data based on the field and they usually don't work with patients directly because you can't try like several hundred drugs on right on the same patient right but they work with them so cancer line so these are abstractions. These are silence that have been growing in the lab Petra dishes for quite some time and you apply these struck. I mean to to these cell lines so these have been taken originally at at some point from humans but they have been growing in the lab for a long time and they have been mutations induced downstream so they are proxies off real cancer. But it's it's an active field of research to whether or not until what extent their problem proxies and so in the creation of this data set. Somebody carefully administered Small quantities of these drugs and noted the point at which half of the cells were just just over half of the cells of died off. And that's the proxy for the efficacy of the drug. Absolutely right okay and so you. You built a model to predict the performance of new new arbitrary drugs And how do you kind of feature is the the drugs folks right. So that's a good question because in the end of drug molecules so this is a graph and graphs are rather difficult represented present In a deep learning regime so what traditionally has been done by Chemo and Pharma Titians about a few decades ago they would Derive molecular fingerprint. So these are binary vectors and in these binary vectors every tem would basically specify the presence of certain feature and this was completely handcrafted. So one feature could be like Do I have X.. Aromatic rings in this molecule. Or not something this so so but this is a very arbitrary and handcrafted representation of molecule and the field of deep learning has been moving forward. So what I I mean. One great thing that you really brought to us like advance in natural language processing so and different representation of a molecule.

drugs cancer Cognitive Science Frank Rosen McCulloch supervisor FDA Pharma Titians Druk Audrey Chemo Pitts Tomic
Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

10:24 min | 1 year ago

Designing Anticancer Drugs with Reinforcement Learning

"Having a background in cognitive science and computational neuroscience and so I've been like focusing focusing on brain research for my pastor five years of education and now recently I've been doing more work on computational tation assistance biology and specifically on cancer and cancer trying to understand mechanisms of how cancer work and how we can find new treatments against cancer specifically quickly and in this work. I've been using mostly deep learning techniques and this will be part of like my presentation here at this conference. It's also and so yeah. So how do those things go together. So I think like many people think it's in a way weird if you come from brain scientists and then you go into machine running right and this is something I would say. It's like it's a very obvious thing to do in a way because if you look back into the history of machine she learning where it all came from like McCulloch and Pitts the first artificial neuron and then a few years later Frank Rosen ballot the perception. And so these were all computational neuroscientists and they were in the end really trying to understand how the brain works and they basically develop the The fundamental of the field of machine learning and so at some point this community and in a way it split up into groups and one group was more trying to and actually understanding the brain works and the other group was more interested in solving the problems. Right right and from this from this community. The machine learning learning community evolved into but whereas computation neuroscience right. Now it's it. It's still a field. It's still out there. It's has been separating more and more from the machine community what's there and originally it has been one like one big community. Yeah and so therefore I think it's quite natural to to have the process. Yeah Yeah you know I think Particularly here at Noor ups I have opportunity to speak with many folks that are kind of working on on that edge of cognitive sciences brain sciences and both using that to inform the way we think about machine learning using machine learning to validate you know some of the biological theories it was maybe more novel is coming from Cognitive Science and brain science and applying machine gene learning to developing cancer pharmaceuticals out in that. Come about yeah. How did that come about a good question? So like if you look at brain scientists this really this problem of seeing the brain which is arguably the most complex thing we have in the universe and and seeing like observing this brain and trying to understand his brain from at different scales at different spatial scales so to speak. So you can think about about the brain in the very abstract and cognitive ways thinking about cognitive phenomena like language and memory those things and you can think about it more from from neural perspective like how do act like what is the most fundamental unit of information processing. How do these units interact? How does information arise? And so like these two fundamentally different approaches and so I like in the first three years of my studies focused on cognitive science which has more top down approach unlike thinking from the big concepts and then down towards the implementation level whereas competition neuro science. They have more like the spot. Him Perspective They in the end and they're trying to solve the same problems but they start first with the basic building blocks like having a biologically plausible neural network model will that imitates basic behavior of neurons. And then they try to scale it up in order to understand more complex cognitive phenomenon and so like these field they really deep. They help each other and they need to work together in order to better understand how the brain works and so after after Android area defeating. Okay I need something a more solid and I really wanted to have this bottom up perspective from competition neuroscience which then I got my masters and so afterwards I I I mean I have to say that I was keen to explore and applications of machine learning because while studying the brain I got really interested more and more into the whole field of data signs and machine learning but and I wanted to apply those techniques but at the same time I wanted to I wanted to still somehow how work with the human body and with humans in general so this is how you how I came about him doing cancer Consume drunk modeling and so the poster is titled Pacman. Tell us about yeah Eh. So pacman is a frame. I mean it's an acronym so spelled with a double double and so it's an acronym. We came up during in my like about a year ago. During my master's thesis for prediction of anticancer compound sensitivity with multimodal attention based neural networks. And and so like when my supervisor came about with this acronym one of very long nights we spend in the lab. We like okay. There's no discussion. This is GonNa be the name for the project. Ah So quite funny how this came about so and we what we're doing in this work at that was the first step step off of the project and presenting at the conference. We were trying to basically forecast the effect the inhibitory effect of emol against a specific type of cancer and so we are treating this problem of predicting cancer drug sensitivity. Not really as the property of a pair and the pair is con- like composed of Itself the chemical the drug that you give to the patient and then the particular to more sell that you want to target because cancer is really like A. It's a family of diseases and the SORTA verse I. I mean there has probably never been two types of cancer that have been exactly alike because the Medicaid of mutations you have they vary like hillbilly inbetween of every individual patients. So it's really unfeasible to try to investigate whether molecule has some onto cancer effects in general. So you really need to treat this problem as the property of pair. So is this drug like hesitant. inhibitory effect against this specific type of cancer patient individually one of the questions. That comes up I is one of the techniques. You're applying here reinforcement learning. How does that play into Into achieving that goal so it comes about in the second step first that was really just trying to predict the sensitivity so the efficacy of Audrey and so what we what we did in consecutive step after we had built this model what we asked ourselves was like. Wow wouldn't it be amazing to have a model that can generate rate new drugs at can like come up and propose new anti-cancer candidate rex. Because in the old pharmaceutical industry there's a huge uh-huh productivity decline in the last few decades and the estimated costs that you have pulled new truck there Estimated to be two three billion Indian USD and most of these drugs that are like FDA approved and approved on the market. So they're really specific only for like very few types of diseases sort of even one disease only so the cost in our indeed that go are like spent in this business. It's just huge and and so we I mean we came up with this framework reinforcement. Learning is really core component. Where we're trying to design anti-cancer cancer drugs specifically for individual patients or groups of patients so we tried to envision the precision medicine perspective here where we're really We're not trying to generically. Come up with new cat. anti-cancer candidate drugs. But we try to like in the design process itself. Both we try to tailor the Monaco the drug specifically to the need of the patient himself or herself and so forth for this framework we use. We're using reinforcement Okay you also mentioned in the title of the poster transcript domain data. What is transcript Tomac data? You're right so you can think about transplant. Tomic data as basically The the expression of every single gene that you have in your body like you do you know about the human genome and so part of the human genome and code for specific proteins and these expression of these proteins. You can measure in the cell. That's different techniques techniques to do that so the most commonly used technique and the technique that was used to measure the data we work with is called are on a sequencing thing. Data we are you measure basically the M. A. Snippets in the cell. And so from this. You can infer basically which genes are expressed to what extent so so you end up if you if you do the sequencing step you end up with a vector of about twenty thousand genes and for each gene you would have an expression value view. This is usually just an integer. Like how many times did you find these Slip it in the sample. And then so this this vector Tori you can really think of it as like a fingerprint of the cell. So it's like it's a proper characterization of the cell there's different types of of comics data. So this is true. Tomic's data right. There's like also genomics data which directly directly measuring gene data and there's also also appropriate mix data actively measuring the the proteins

Cancer Cognitive Science Frank Rosen Mcculloch Supervisor Tomic FDA Pitts Audrey
"frank rosen" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"The most elite circles and finance he knows everybody and so to be invited to his meeting was a great compliment and a particularly to be invited to the speakers dinner after the meeting was a tremendous honor i got to talk with folks whose exports and finance are legendary and sort of my heroes phnom jim china's the most of successful and highly regarded short seller probably in history i spent some time talking with him there and i also had a great talk at the at the dinner afterwards with frank burrows anson frank rosen's has a long history and wall street he he played a role back in the michael milken scandal he actually had to testify against one was partners at goldman an end up in a terrible prosecution uh we'll get into that but uh he's just been around for a long time he now runs a ten billiondollar fund cult to conduct and he is a fantastic expert and bonds and i think as you know i'm i'ma i got a little crazy for bonds nobody understands why but banzer the cools financial instruments there are and frank knows more about them interestbearing by so we had a great talk about with i have talked with frank about understanding what the future is for a lot of these corporate sponsors don't make any sense case in point did you know book that after the deal for time warner is completed at t the wireless networking company will oh almost two hundred fifty billion dollars to in corporate bonds did not know that so think about this a private company has a larger amount of debt outstanding than the entire country of ireland.

frank rosen goldman the deal warner ireland phnom jim china frank burrows michael milken frank wireless networking two hundred fifty billion doll ten billiondollar
"frank rosen" Discussed on WVNZ Z104

WVNZ Z104

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"frank rosen" Discussed on WVNZ Z104

"That's the only thing it seems as though mantra said that sell we put matt to the test by calling him on wore the rose's we gave them the older pretend that would you like to give you throws this thing the sound stupid doesn't anyways we ramiel frank rosen stamina now a minor listen very carefully two who he answered and his reason because that was the whole crux of what everybody was arguing about yesterday if this guy telling the truth or thief flat out lie those guys yost they're a great sell and you would you like to ice end of it came of rose's two wedgies right yes it should be somebody the term at only and what messages you wanna put on the car that comes with him twitter i know it shocks right now but he didn't deserve you you deserve better give me a chance to show them you you know yeah i hate listened this isn't really a flour shot this is actually there's the morning's your radio show on d won all four and right now you're on war of the rose this and we actually have a manned on as well she's been listening this whole time.

mantra rose matt