35 Burst results for "Frank Langfitt"

China bans BBC World News from broadcasting

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

China bans BBC World News from broadcasting

"Television channel from London. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports that the move comes after a British regulator revoke the license of a Chinese state broadcaster. China's broadcast regulator accused the BBC of failing to report accurately and impartially while undermining China's national interests and ethnic solidarity. Most recently, the Chinese government criticized and denied BBC reports that women and internment camps for Wiegert and other Muslims in Xinjiang were subject to rape and torture. The BBC says it's disappointed with China's decision and insisted reports fairly impartially and without fear or favor. Chinese government already censored some BBC content on the broadcasters. TV audience in the country is tiny. The BBC has not been allowed to broadcast directly into Chinese homes. It's been available in international hotels and the homes of some foreigners and more globally minded Chinese Frank Langfitt. NPR

Frank Langfitt Chinese Government BBC China Television Channel Wiegert NPR London Xinjiang
UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

Marketplace

03:33 min | Last month

UK strips China's state media channel of broadcast license

"China has been recent years trying to improve its global image. That effort took a hit today in London, Britain's communications regulator announced it is stripping the state run China Global Television network of its broadcast license there, MPR's Frank Langfitt explains from London. The C GT N That's it's known, opened its European production center here to great fanfare about two years ago. Today off come, the British regulator announced it was pulling the network's license. Officials said. The reason was straightforward. The people in charge of CG Tien's editorial policy are ultimately beholden to China's Communist Party in British Broadcasting law forbids political bodies from controlling license holders. Thank goodness, Finally, this license has been taken away. Peter Humphrey, performer fraud investigator in Shanghai was glad to hear the news. He filed a complaint against CGT in last year. Not over Communist Party control of the network. But over Chinese state media is airing of what Humphrey says was a forced confession. It followed his arrest in 2000 and 13 on charges of illegally acquiring the personal data of Chinese nationals. Well, of course you go way up 10 personal information by illegal means. I regret what I did and apologize to the Chinese government. Humphrey insists he never actually confessed and that the interview was doctored. He also says his captors pressured him to make a statement by withholding medical treatment for his prostate cancer, considering the kind of brutal human rights violations that CD Tien has been involved with extracting and packaging forced confessions from prisoners held under torture in China, who've never been in front of a judge. I just think that we should have no organization like that on our soil in Humphries case, Afghan found CGT And had seriously breached fairness and privacy rules. It also found the network had failed to cover the Hong Kong democracy protests with quote due impartiality CG Tien was indignant with today's ruling. It blamed quote the manipulation of far right groups and had I China forces for the off calm decision, according to a statement on way ball, China's nearest equivalent Twitter. The loss of the license undermined two key Chinese government strategy. Steve saying is director of the so as China Institute at the School of Oriental and African Studies. University of London. She camping has been very clear he wants the Chinese story being told well. He wants his versions off everything being spread across the world in the most positive, light possible Sititi and is one of those instruments used for this purpose. It's hang expects the Chinese government to retaliate against BBC reporters in China. Even though the BBC is editorial independent of the British government. Peter Dahlin is the director of Safeguard Defenders Human Rights Organization, which spearheaded the campaign against C G. T n Here. The U. K stands out across Europe is having a quite well developed framework for help to regulate TV for how to control this information. The stripping of the license prohibits CG Tan from broadcasting here, but dollars, says that doesn't mean the network has to leave. Still, he does think today's move could have ripple effects are other countries going to start holding them accountable as well? I say this might be the beginning of a process that city and will find very unfavorable for their type of this information for their type of broadcasting. That would mean more challenges for a Chinese government that has invested a lot in trying to change the way it's perceived. Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS

Cg Tien China Chinese Government Frank Langfitt European Production Center Peter Humphrey Communist Party Humphrey London CGT China Institute Britain Tien Shanghai Humphries Prostate Cancer Peter Dahlin School Of Oriental And African Safeguard Defenders Human Righ BBC
Gibraltar Gets Its Own Brexit Deal With Spain

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Gibraltar Gets Its Own Brexit Deal With Spain

"Britain and Spain reached a last minute deal to keep the border open between Travolta and Spain. Now that Brexit is complete, and as of tonight, the UK is leaving the European Union for good. NPR's Frank Langfitt has more to make sure people can flow easily between the British overseas territory and neighboring Spain. Gibraltar will join Europe's border free Schengen zone and follow EU rules while still remaining part of the United Kingdom. Gibraltar, voted by an overwhelming margin to stay in the EU in 2016. About 15,000 Spanish workers across the border to the rock as it's known daily. The deal to keep people flowing easily between Spain and Gibraltar does nothing to address the difficulty issue of the territory sovereignty. Britain has ruled the territory on the southern tip of the Iberian peninsula for more than three centuries. But Spain which seated Gibraltar to the British in 17, 13 wants it back. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London

Spain Frank Langfitt Gibraltar EU Schengen Zone Travolta Britain United Kingdom NPR Europe Iberian Peninsula London
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:51 min | 2 months ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Months. That's NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Frank Thanks for ongoing reporting on this Hey, great to talk, Sasha. Mm hmm. It's chilly across the country today highs of just 58 in Miami and 16 in Minneapolis, which makes Minnesota colder than an Arctic as McMurdo station, But the cold weather doesn't last forever in the twin cities. And in Antarctica, it does ice There can last hundreds of thousands even millions of years and as NPR's Nell Greenfeld voice reports that makes Antarctica the perfect place to find some of the oldest ice in the world. Just how old is the oldest ice on earth? John Higgins says. Nobody really knows. You know what? I'd be surprised at this point. If we had five million year old ice. I mean, I'd be surprised, but not. It's not unfathomable. I think he and some colleagues recently collected ice samples in Antarctica that were later analyzed and shown to be as old as 2.6 million years. It's beautiful stuff. When you pull out the ice that essentially is crystal clear, except it's filled with, you know, tiny bubbles. The bubbles contained air from when the ice formed and this trapped air is what scientists are really after, Higgins says. If you want to understand how gasses like carbon dioxide have affected the climate throughout history, you know you can't really do better other than getting a time machine and going back in time and taking an air sample. Then using these ice cores, which you know, physically just trap samples of ancient air to release that ancient air. All you have to do is melt the ice. That's the sound of a research camp manager in Antarctica, making drinking water by melting scraps of 200,000 year old ice in a metal pot. Actually collect and analyze the release gasses, However, ancient ice has to melt in a lab. Sarah Shackleton studies old I said Princeton, where she gets to watch the trapped air bubble out, and that is something that I don't know if I'll ever get sick of watching. It's actually like Pretty mesmerizing and one thing that's really surprising. Every time to me is just how much gas is actually in the ice, she says. It's a lot and samples from time periods undergoing past climate changes could be used to help make predictions about the future, one of the biggest questions in terms of kind of the modern warming and anthropogenic climate changes. How much warming do should we expect with the United States? Oh, to that we have in the atmosphere now. Antarctica has been covered by an ice sheet for at least 30 million years. But it's actually pretty hard to find really old ice. John Gooch is a geologist at the University of Minnesota, he says, while snowfalls constantly add new layers of ice to the top of the ice sheet. The oldest layers at the bottom can disappear. That's because of geothermal heat coming up from the ground, so the rocks are giving off heat slowly over time, and so that has the potential to melt ice at the bottom. Still bits of super Old ice like that 2.6 million year old sample can sometimes be preserved at the ice sheets edges the older snippets of ice that we've been able to find come from places where the Ice has flowed up against a mountain range and been exposed to the surface. In those spots, though the ice convey all jumbled up and messy. It's not in nice layers that have been laid down sequentially over a long, continuous stretch of Earth's history to get a neatly layered I sample like that. Scientists need to drill straight down through the thick ice sheet. So far, the oldest ice collected that way goes back 800,000 years, Gooch says. The goal now is to drill down a couple of miles to reach ice. That's older, a million to two million years old. Whether or not we'll be able to find it. At the bottom of the ice sheet where we can recover a relatively simple continuous record is, I guess that's the $64,000 question. A team from China has drilling underway. A group from Europe will start in November. What everyone wants is ice samples that cover a key time period about a million years ago. When there was a dramatic shift in the planet's cycle of ice ages. Those had been coming every 40,000 years or so. But for some reason, that pattern ended and it changed to every 100,000 years instead onto us. Working on climate.

Antarctica John Higgins John Gooch NPR Frank Langfitt Minnesota Nell Greenfeld Sasha Europe Minneapolis Miami London Sarah Shackleton United States University of Minnesota Princeton geologist
U.K. and European Union reach Brexit trade deal

Morning Edition

04:01 min | 2 months ago

U.K. and European Union reach Brexit trade deal

"Has agreed to a post Brexit free trade deal with the European Union with just a week to go before New Year's Eve deadline. We're expecting very shortly to hear from British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who was a key campaigner for Brexit during the landmark referendum. 4.5 years ago. We want to turn to NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. He has covered the entire Brexit saga and joins us for this moment. Good morning, Frank. But Good morning, David. Well, it feels like we're there. It is. Actually we're just watching the press conference in Brussels. The You actually announcing this and we are waiting for Prime Mr Johnson. It's yet It's feel like it's been a long time coming. Yeah. How did negotiators finally finally get across the finish line here? Well, they had the actual were one of the big sticking points believed or not. David was a matter of fish and fishing grounds. I know that that might sound kind of odd to listeners in America well, because well, because Fisher is such a small part of, say, the European well, particularly the U. K economy, but this was also A matter of how much more fish the European fleets could continue to take from UK waters, and it actually had a big symbolic value for people here. If you remember back in 2016, the Brexit campaign slogan was all about taking back control. And basically the idea was that this nation state, the United Kingdom could be better off without European Union. Making its own rules and things like that. And so it was very hard for the UK toe. Be able to say yes, you can continue to take fish out of our waters, but in the end of the UK did agree to some things for the European Union, and that seems to have gotten over the line today. I mean, this was so much more than symbolism. This called such of a debate about what to do and what Brexit could mean for the United Kingdom. Do we know what the deal does mean? Going forward? You know, we do it. We're still waiting. It's apparently 2000 pages of material start when it actually does it only but it only covers so much of the economy What it will allow. We believe Is the UK to export to the U tariff and quota free. Well, that's really important to the foot for the honor Kingdom to be able to do that to do sort of as frictionless trade as possible. And then in the shorter run. Just just this week that you are talking about there was real concern that there was no deal Brexit. If this all fell apart, you see even more chaos at the borders in about seven days when the Brexit transition period ends well, We've already got a look at what that could look like this week, France closed down the port of Dover effectively and shut down the borders with the UK over the this Corona virus variant that we've been a coronavirus parent we've been reporting on We have thousands and thousands of trucks still stuck on this Chuck's side of the channel, so they're no deal. Braxton is a great concern that things would be even worse, and Brexit would cause more damage, Frankly. I just want to be really clear here, and I know you have 2000 pages to read, so it's gonna take a lot of things that there was in here, but But it is not clear that this will make the U. K a richer country. No, no, no, not at all. And I think David's really important for people to understand. That certainly Ah, lot of economic analysts and trade analysts would say that this deal averts. You know, a real basically could be a bit of a disaster at the end of the year. But it's not. It's what we would call a very thin deal. It doesn't deal with much with services. It's mostly with trading products, imports and exports. It's a hard Brexit. And economists say, even with his deal, per capita income in this country is still going to be reduced the growth by about 6.4% over the next 10 years, so many people would say. Certainly an economic analyst would say This was a choice between bad and worse. Okay. I'm sure I'll be hearing much more from you throughout the day. Frank just restating the news. The announcement is taking place as we speak. The UK government has reached a post Brexit deal with the European Union will be following this story. NPR's Frank Langfitt force in London, Frank Thank you so much. Great to talk, Dave.

UK European Union British Prime Minister Boris J Frank Langfitt Brexit Prime Mr Johnson David NPR U. Brussels Frank Fisher London America Dover Braxton Chuck France Dave
Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement

Morning Edition

03:45 min | 2 months ago

Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement

"European Union seem ready to sign a post Brexit free trade agreement before the end of the year. New Year's Eve is the deadline. Let's remember the U. K voted to leave the EU four years ago and it has been a saga since then. And let's turn to Who else MPR's London correspondent Frank Langfitt, who has covered All the big moments in the socket. Good morning, Frank. Good morning, David. Feel like I'm gonna believe this when I see it, but it sounds like we're getting close. What? What are the sticking points here? Well, interestingly enough, One of the main sticking points was actually fishing rights. I know that may seem, you know, given this is going on for so long. That may seem very odd toe listeners. Fishing is only less than 1% of the British economy. But what mattered, I think, particularly to British negotiators and Boris Johnson is back in 2016 when there was this vote. Bars Johnson and others. Their slogan was Take back control. Take back control of our waters. You know our our money our laws from Brussels from the EU, and so that's why symbolically, this has had an outsized role in the negotiations. Boris Johnson feels like he has to deliver and bring something back where people here feel like the United Kingdom really is leaving the EU and and moving on. And so own way to determine what kind of economic future is gonna have. Okay, so so fishing. I mean, a lot of symbolism there and and on many of these issues, but also so much at stake in this deal, as you've reminded us so many times there is I mean, this is the biggest trading partner for the United Kingdom there. They're leaving what they're hoping to get out of this deal and probably will will be terrifying, Quota free access to this enormous market. Of nearly 450 million consumers, and I think, particularly with his deadline coming up. David is to get some kind of deal so we don't see more chaos of the borders at the end of this year. When there's this Brexit transition period that ends and we've gotten a sense of how bad things could be just this weekend when France closed the borders because of the Corona virus variant we've been reporting about that appears to be Highly infectious and so France block things at the port of Dover. We now have, like 6000 trucks actually stranded around that part of the county, Kent in the southeast of England, waiting truck drivers waiting for negative covert 19 tests to be able to cross back and hopefully it's most of them. This will not work out for get home for Christmas. E into that could be a lot to sort of sacrificed. Here's as this process goes forward. I guess I just wonder, Frank A simple question. If this deal is confirmed, will it make the United Kingdom richer? No. In fact, it will do it. Sort of. Ah, choice. I think economists and trade experts will tell you, David choice between bad and worse. Getting a deal will help keep trade moving as frictionless as possible across the English Channel. But this is a feared thin deal. This is we've often talked about as hard Brexit. The U. K economy will not be is integrated with EU economy. For instance, financial services They're big business here in London. They're gonna have much less access to the European market than before. An economist that I've been talking to now for years, say that over the next decade, Even with this deal, per capita income here will be more than 6% less. Then, if the UK had actually stayed in the U E. We should say this whole saga cost two prime ministers their jobs. What is amazing political about Boris Johnson? I mean, calmer times for him, If if this goes through I think so. I mean, we're expecting to see him outside of number 10 Downing Street today, basically doing a victory lap and he will get credit for actually bringing this in. On the other hand, Brexit was always a gamble for this country, You know? Can they do it on their own outside of the EU and also Brexit has been so divisive that we've now seen up in Scotland is anger over that because the Scots voted against this There's now a bigger push for Scottish independence, and that could be the next big problem that Boris Johnson has to address next year.

EU Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt United Kingdom U. David Frank London Brussels France Johnson Dover UK Kent Brexit Scotland
"frank langfitt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:07 min | 2 months ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"NPR news. I'm Dale Willman. In a late night vote, Congress has passed a $900 billion pandemic relief package. The measure provides money for businesses and many citizens as well as money to help with the Corona virus Vaccine rollout. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland, says that while the measure represents some democratic values, people affected by the pandemic should not have been forced to wait so long for relief. These include a resumption of expanded unemployment benefits. Another round direct payments relief for renters assistance to make sure that Americans can put food on the table. In the richest country on the face of the Earth. We have people in food lines who can't feed themselves. That is not only wrong, it is immoral. Lawmakers also passed the $1.4 trillion bill that funds government for the next year. Both measures now go to President Trump for unexpected signature. More than 40 countries have now announced travel bans targeting the United Kingdom after an outbreak in England of a Corona virus variants scientists think is much more infectious. His MPR's frank Langfitt reports Prime Minister Boris Johnson went on national television. Try to calm fears at home and abroad with France banning trucks from crossing the English Channel of the board of Dover, Johnson told Britain's there was no risk of food shortages and that he'd spoken to French President Emmanuel Macron about opening up the border as soon as possible. Johnson also emphasized that the band targeted truck drivers hauling freight and not shipping containers. We believe the risks of transmission by a solitary driver sitting alone in the cab. Really very low. In announcing the risks of the variance Saturday and locked down in the southeast of England, Johnson seemed not to have anticipated how quickly and intensely other countries would react. Frank Langfitt. NPR NEWS London Attorney General William Barr has weighed in on the major hack of U. S government agencies at his last newscast. As attorney general Bar says Russia appears to be behind the breach. NPR's Ryan Lucas reports, the U. S government is still assessing the extent of the hack that first came to light just over a week ago. Experts say it is potentially unprecedented in scope. The Trump administration has not formally attributed the hack at this point, Although Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said over the weekend that it was pretty clearly the Russians Speaking at a news conference, bar says he agrees. It's certainly appears to be the Russians, but I'm not going to discuss it beyond that, while barring Pompeo have both pointed the finger at Moscow President Trump has refused to do so. Instead, Trump has sought to minimize the severity of the hack and has suggested China might have been behind it. Ryan Lucas, NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, the S and P 500 fell for the second straight day. On Monday, the index closed down 4/10 of a percent. His traders expressed concern over travel restrictions placed on Britain. After news of that potentially more infectious strain of coronavirus in that country. The majority of stocks on Wall Street fell You're listening to NPR news. If you find yourself outside tonight, don't forget to look up. With some luck. You may see Jupiter and Saturn appearing closer than they have in centuries. The last.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson NPR Ryan Lucas Frank Langfitt Mike Pompeo President Dale Willman Trump Majority Leader Steny Hoyer England Britain general Bar Attorney Russia Congress Maryland
2 guilty of manslaughter in deaths of 39 migrants in England

1A

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

2 guilty of manslaughter in deaths of 39 migrants in England

"Have been found guilty of manslaughter for the best last year. 39 Vietnamese migrants They all died in the sealed truck trailer. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports. Even Harrison is a truck driver from Northern Ireland. George Nikas Romanian who coordinated the operation. Police said. The smugglers packed double the so called normal number of people into a sealed refrigeration trailer in charge Passengers from 13,002 $17,000 each to be smuggled England by fairy, according to Britain's Guardian newspaper. The passengers began to run out of oxygen. Some recorded messages saying goodbye to loved ones. They died of us fix CIA or overheating Quote. You were treated worse than cattle, said Detective Chief Inspector Daniel Stop, who led the police investigation here. Human convicted of manslaughter, along with several others who pleaded guilty will be sentenced at a later date.

Frank Langfitt George Nikas NPR Northern Ireland Harrison Detective Chief Inspector Dani Britain England CIA
On Brexit and Coronavirus, Boris Johnson Leaves It Late

Morning Edition

03:50 min | 2 months ago

On Brexit and Coronavirus, Boris Johnson Leaves It Late

"Johnson, called an emergency meeting this morning. A variant of the corona virus is spreading in the UK and scientists say it could be much more infectious. In the original. Other European countries, including France, Ireland and Italy, have now banned travel to and from the UK and here's Matt Handcock, Britain's health secretary, Talking in the B B C yesterday. The new variant is out of control when we need to bring it under control, and this news about the new variant has been a Um, incredibly difficult. And, frankly, in awful year, NPR's Frank Langfitt is just outside of London. Hey, Frank. Hey. Good morning, Doyle. So you have a travel ban. You have a lockdown in some parts of the UK It is sounding a lot like March and April with respect to isolation. It does. It feels very much more isolated than it did even just a few days ago here on the island of Great Britain. Now France has gone further and say no trucks coming from Britain across the English Channel on fairies. The Euro tunnel, which runs under the channel is also closed. This seems to be a precautionary measure for about 48 hours. There's a lot of concern now around the Christmas season. We've already seen backups at the port of Dover, 20. Miles long. And what's been happening is people are trying to get freight across the channel before the deadline for the Brexit transition period, which is going to end on New Year's Eve. Right now we have truckers stranded on both sides of the water and the on Lee. Good news, I'd say is that shipping containers, which are the majority of trade, they're still moving, because, of course, they're not people driving the shipping containers. Okay, let's establish something that scientists say often, which is that to say often, which is that viruses do mutate. We expect them to why our government scientists in the U. K so concerned about this particular mutation. I think a couple of reasons. One is that it quickly became the dominant version in this part of England, where I am out in London and beyond. And that's not a big problem. We saw that with the Spanish virus, not over the summer when people tourist brought it back from Spain, the problem and and in London, for instance, right now, this new Varian about over 60% of the virus is found. In London. The problem is that this domination is coinciding with exponential growth of the virus in these areas. Scientists now believe it could be up to 70% more infectious than the various mutations that are floating around this country. And that's why I think you're seeing the dramatic response of these European neighbors. And, of course, the lockdown that we have here in London. One important good news so far is there's no sign that this mutation Has more severe symptoms or or is more deadly. Okay, That's some good news. What about scientists outside of Britain? Are they expressing concern about this? They are the ones that I've talked to particularly last 24 hours, vaccine expert and epidemiologist. They don't like the data they're seeing either. This is Emma Hot Cross. She's an epidemiologist who studies coronavirus mutations of the University of Baron in Switzerland. This is what she said this morning. I do think that it's concerning And I don't say that very lightly. Certainly, as evidence has gathered with this new variant, it does seem like there might be an increased transmissibility. And so I do think we need to start being quite cautious about what we're doing about it. And as you said earlier, Frank, the timing here is really messy because Britain still hasn't been able to strike a free trade deal with the European Union. Time runs out on New Year's Eve. This can't make anything easier, Can it No, It just makes things even worse, And I don't think people would have even imagined that this was likely to happen. There's the great risk. If there's no deal on free trade, there's no free trade deal. We see customs and tariffs going up in Dover. Right now. Trucks aren't even crossing the English Channel. So it could be even more disruptive than what we imagined would do a lot more economic damage on both sides of the channel. NPR's Frank Langfitt. Thanks, Frank, great to talk to him. The

Matt Handcock UK Frank Langfitt London Britain France NPR Doyle Frank Dover Johnson Great Britain Ireland Italy Emma Hot Cross University Of Baron U. LEE
Going 'the extra mile': UK, EU keep up Brexit trade talks

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

Going 'the extra mile': UK, EU keep up Brexit trade talks

"The UK and the EU agreed to continue post Brexit trade talks beyond today's self imposed deadline, but they have to get some agreement before the official deadline at the end of the month as NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London they're hoping to avoid major disruptions. Just Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission President Ursula von Dir Lan said he was quote responsible at this point to go the extra mile. Both sides are still far apart on issues such as European access to U K fishing grounds. And the U. K's drive for as much access to the use massive market of nearly 450 million consumers while retaining as much freedom to make its own rules and regulations. The Society of Motor Manufacturers and traders. The UK auto trade body welcomed the extension of talks, saying the UK leaving the you without a new free trade deal. Quote would be nothing less than catastrophic for the automotive sector, its workers and their families and represent a stunning failure

Frank Langfitt Prime Minister Boris Johnson Ursula Von Dir Lan UK NPR EU European Commission Society Of Motor Manufacturers London U.
Britain hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Britain hospitals prepare for coronavirus vaccine distribution

"Medical regulator says people with a significant history of allergies should not take the newly approved cove in 19 vaccine from Fizer, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from London to health care workers in the UK have allergic reactions. Regulatory agency said people have allergic reactions to medicines, Food or vaccines in general should steer clear of this one, which the UK began rolling out to thousands of people on Tuesday. Officials said the national health Service workers who carried adrenalin pens with them or both recovering well. Britain's regulator approved emergency use of the Fizer vaccine, which, like other covert vaccines, has been developed in record time because of the urgency of the pandemic. Given the speed vaccine, experts say the government must take even more care to monitor any bad reactions to the vaccine. You can launch the vaccine in 70 hospitals on Tuesday and plans to expand distribution to 200 family practices next week.

Frank Langfitt Allergic Reactions NPR UK National Health Service London Britain
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. The United Kingdom has given emergency approval to a covert 19 vaccine and plans to be in rolling it out next week. More from NPR's Frank Langfitt, London The government will begin distributing the vaccine to the most vulnerable, including nursing home residents in their caregivers, the vaccine makers say trial show it's 95% effective but it must be stored at minus 94 F. Richard Hatch, it Who runs the coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, which develops vaccines for infectious diseases, says developed countries like the U. K have the infrastructure to handle such ultra cold storage. The real challenge now is taking that vaccine scaling up its manufacturing. And delivering it to people. World what the news came. The store's pubs and restaurants reopened in parts of England after a month long lockdown. Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS London Governor Andrew Cuomo says the first delivery of Corona virus vaccine to New Yorkers will be enough for 170,000 doses. MPR's Sally her ship's reports, the first round will go to nursing home residents and workers. The fighter vaccine is set to arrive by December. 15th additional batches for Madonna are also expected this month. And next. On the list are the state's 600,000, other health care workers, those in emergency rooms, ICUs and others working with Covic patients. Meanwhile, Cuomo says, just to educate New Yorkers about the vaccine, safety and effectiveness could cost $1 billion, But with a budget deficit of 10 times that, he says the state is limited by the amount of federal funding it gets. Can I deploy the National Guard? Sure. Could I pay an incentive for people to come in and get a vaccine? Sure. It depends on the funding So far. He says that zero Sally, her ship's NPR news. The Corona virus pandemic has had virtually no effect on the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. That's according to United Nations. Scientists. NPR's Rebecca Herscher reports, the last decade has been the hottest on record. World Meteorological Association says no matter what happens in this final month of the year, it's clear that the Earth is hotter than ever before. More than 80% of the ocean experienced a Marine heatwave sometime this year. Overall global temperatures this year we're about 2 F hotter than the 20th century average. U N Secretary General Antonio Guterres is pleading with world leaders to stop burning fossil fuels Humanity is waging war on nature. Disease. Suicidal global greenhouse gas emissions are still rising. Rebecca Herscher NPR news officials with the founder reserve in their latest region by region. Snapshot of the economy, say a new wave of coronavirus began to take hold. For the 12 years with the Fed is central banks on little or no growth, and only modest growth was logged elsewhere on Wall Street. Today, the Dow was up 59 points. This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm terrorists Tyler Today In San Francisco, Health workers are wrapping up testing at four temporary pop up sites in neighborhoods hard hit by covert 19 cake. UT science reporter Lorik Livens visited a site in the mission. Olga Romero is managing a long line of people waiting for a test video already registered. Yes, every history The sights are part of a health initiative called Benito Sense Salute, which offers pop ups every few months. In addition to ongoing once a week, testing co founder and UCSF Dr Diane have, Lier says she was worried about high rates before Thanksgiving. Our positivity rate on this site was.

NPR Governor Andrew Cuomo Rebecca Herscher Frank Langfitt London coalition for Epidemic Prepare United Kingdom Jack Spear MPR England Lorik Livens United Nations F. Richard Hatch Olga Romero Tyler Today Madonna World Meteorological Associati
"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:07 min | 3 months ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Frank Langfitt NPR NEWS London The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a standard 14 day quarantine for people who might have been exposed to the Corona virus can potentially be sure into 10 or seven days. Under revised guidelines, the CDC says quarantine needs to last only 10 days. If a person has no symptoms and other option is a seven day quarantine for people who have no symptoms and then test negative. The Justice Department is investigating a possible bribery for pardon scheme as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports the alleged plan was to offer a large political contribution in exchange for a presidential pardon. Newly unsealed court papers reveal that in August, the Justice Department was investigating the possible bribery for pardon scheme. The documents are heavily redacted, so the names of the people under investigation are blacked out, as is the identity of the individual who would be pardoned under the plan. The current status of the investigation is unclear, but a Justice Department official says no government official was or is currently a subject or target of the investigation. Afterward of the pro broke president Trump tweeted. It was quote fake news. Trump has used his pardon power to reward political allies, including just last week when he pardoned his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Brian Lucas. NPR NEWS Washington The Taliban and the Afghan government say that begin negotiations aimed at ending decades of conflict in Afghanistan. MPR's DEA Hadeed reports from Islamabad, although peace talks ostensibly began in mid September that being bogged down in disputes over procedural matters, like what rules should govern disagreements between the negotiators. But in terse, new simultaneous agreements that used nearly exactly the same language. The two sides announced on Twitter that they'd agreed on those procedural matters. The U. S envoy's on my House Dad says. Now the two sides will negotiate a political road map and a comprehensive ceasefire. NPR's DEA indeed, reporting this is NPR news in Washington. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm David. First Police are investigating after an F D N Y truck crashed in the Bronx early this morning, injuring at least six people. The incident happened near East 160th Street and Tintin Avenue. The F D. N Y says the truck was responding to a fire to civilians and four firefighters sustained non life threatening injuries and were taken to the hospital. It's unclear what caused the accident. Mass drive. Thru coronavirus testing site has returned to Northern New Jersey for the first time since July. WN Y sees Cameron reports as cars lined up at Bergen Community College in Paramus, It felt like a flashback to the spring when traffic backed up for miles and people waited hours to get tested. Then they waited as long as a week to get the results. This time. The testing site is being run by the county, not by FEMA and results are supposed to come back in 24 hours. Bergen County executive Jim Tanesco says the tests are being processed on campus, which will help ensure rapid turnaround rates. You could stick a lot of people's.

Justice Department NPR president Trump bribery CDC Washington Ryan Lucas Bergen County DEA Hadeed Frank Langfitt Brian Lucas Twitter Islamabad official Bergen Community College London Afghanistan New Jersey FEMA
England to Shut Pubs, Restaurants and Most Shops as Virus Surges

The Saturday Show

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

England to Shut Pubs, Restaurants and Most Shops as Virus Surges

"A second lock down because of a resurgence of Corona virus cases. NPR's Frank Langfitt has more all pubs and restaurants will close along with non essential retail shops, but schools and universities will remain open. Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the country Saturday. The bars is spreading even faster than the reasonable worst case scenario of our scientific advisors. Who's models, as you've just seen now suggested. Unless we act we could see death in this country running at several 1000 today, The decision is yet another U turn for Johnson, who recently dismissed the second lock down thing would be a disaster for the country.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt NPR
England to Shut Pubs, Restaurants and Most Shops as Virus Surges

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

England to Shut Pubs, Restaurants and Most Shops as Virus Surges

"A resurgence of Corona virus cases will force England to enter a second lockdown starting on Thursday and it will last until early December NPR's Frank Langfitt has more from London. All pubs and restaurants will close along with non-essential retail shops but schools and universities will remain open. Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the country Saturday virus is spreading even faster than the reasonable worst case scenario of our scientific advises who's models Eve just seen nine suggests that unless we act, we could see death in this country running at several thousand today. The decision is yet another u-turn for Johnson who recently dismissed the second lockdown saying would be a disaster for the country. The move comes after a summer when life largely returned to normal here thousand Frank Langfitt NPR news London.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson London Frank Langfitt England
UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 5 months ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

Germany Boris Johnson Frank Langfitt German Government UK Berlin Rob Schmitz Rob Frank Prime Minister Covid Chancellor Angela Merkel NPR Europe London UK. Brexit Boyd Clemson Coronavirus
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 5 months ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

"That testing need to be fixed by the autumn, but the government didn't listen. They pretended that wasn't a problem. They didn't act quickly enough. Now the testing system isn't working just when we need it. And I gotta tell you, Steve, this is a critique you here across the country. Most people I know are stunned that after all these months, the government has not been able to build a testing system that will meet demand. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt. Thanks so much. You're very welcome, Steve. There are rumors that have gone viral on Twitter and Facebook that left wing activists started the fires the wildfires in Oregon. Those rumors are false. But so far these companies have failed to stop misinformation, some of the dangerous from spreading Facebook. I should note is a financial supporter of NPR. And here's our Shannon Bond. Cameron Hill and his family were fleeing fires in Clackamas County, south of Portland, and they'd heard some disturbing rumors. I heard that several activists in custody Down and Eugene starting actually seeing starting fires. That's Hill talking with Oregon Public Broadcasting's Monica Sama, Goa thes. Arson claims were not true, but they were lighting up social media. The rumor was the fires had been set by anti fascist activists known as antifa, or Black Lives matter. Protestors The rumors cause so much disruption, local police departments took to Facebook and Twitter to beg people to stop spreading them. They said there was no evidence that any political or activist groups were behind the fires. Tim Fox is a captain with the Oregon State Police. You know, all these rumors and things that are going around are tough because we have to find people to respond to him to investigate him to check him out. Part of the reason these claims spread so widely on Facebook is that the world's biggest social network rewards engagement post that get lots of shares comments and likes get shown. Two more people quickly amplifying their reach. As the fire rumors proliferated. Facebook did put warnings on some post its fact checkers found false and after the FBI put out a statement debunking the rumors, Facebook began removing post entirely. But by then the rumors have been circulating for several days. And what that did to us is That they're waiting too long. Karen Corn Blue and her research team at the German Marshall Fund found these rumors spreading in private Facebook groups, some with hundreds of thousands of members. And the claims were being amplified by social media accounts known to spread false information like followers of Q and on a baseless conspiracy theory. Facebook spokesman says the company acts aggressively to stop misinformation. But what happened in Oregon shows that once this kind of hoax start spreading, it's really hard to stamp out When you think of the psychology of misinformation, you know, you can think of something my molding play. Delores Albarracin is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. And when you have self clay, you can print anything you want onto it. Once it dries out. Now that's it. Your printer shape is set so well fact checks and removing posts can help the Realtor challenge is stopping harmful hoaxes from going viral in the first place. And some experts have a new idea about how to hit pause on social media is powerful amplification engine Aaron Simpson at the left leaning Center for American Progress, says Thie. Inspiration is the stock market. So if the SNP drops really suddenly we've had these specials in place for a lot of years now that the market will stop, and that will automatically trigger like review. Those automatic triggers are called circuit breakers, Simpson says. That's what social Media needs a circuit breaker to stop the viral spread that platforms are designed to encourage So when a controversial topic is gaining steam, Facebook or Twitter could limit its reach while reviewing disputed information. A system like this can maybe make it harder for stuff to go Viral instead of the status quo, which is a set of Facebook business products make it easier to go viral. The idea is even getting traction inside Facebook, it says. It's testing this kind.

Facebook Twitter Steve Oregon Cameron Hill Oregon State Police Tim Fox NPR NPR London Arson Shannon Bond Portland Clackamas County Oregon Public Broadcasting Frank Langfitt Aaron Simpson
UK leader: Britain at “perilous turning point,” scraps back-to-work drive, tightens restrictions amid virus resurgence

Morning Edition

03:48 min | 5 months ago

UK leader: Britain at “perilous turning point,” scraps back-to-work drive, tightens restrictions amid virus resurgence

"The prime minister of the UK announced new pandemic restrictions to help get the Corona virus under control. Mr Speaker. We will spare no effort in developing vaccines treatments. New forms of mass tested. But unless we palpably make progress, we should assume that the restrictions I've announced will remain in place. For perhaps six months. Great. Britain had been making the opposite of progress after a summer when life largely returned to normal Corona virus numbers in the UK Rose, NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt is living all of this. Hey there, Frank. Hey, Steve. What of the restrictions and how big a difference is it? Yeah, it's one of things is sort of a curfew for pubs, bars and restaurants are going to have to close at 10 P.m. Bar's Johnson also telling people to work from home if they can to avoid spreading the disease, which is a reversal of the government's position. This is coming after we're up to about 6000 Day in terms of cases, and this is what Johnson also had to say in the House of Commons today. This is the moment when we must act. If we can curb the number of daily infections on DH, reduce the reproduction rate toe one Then Then we we can can save save lives lives protected protected in in a a chest chest on on the the most most vulnerable vulnerable and and shelter shelter the the economy. economy. And And what what he's he's saying saying here. here. Steve Steve is is the the UK UK needs needs to to do do this this now now to avoid the kind of lock down that we saw back in March, which devastated a lot of businesses here, Okay, reducing the reproduction rate to one. That's a statistic he wants each new person on average tow infect less than one new person, although just saying the pub should close it. 10. Is that really a big enough change to make a difference? No, Steve. Most people don't seem to say that I see it that way. And I will include my daughter, Catherine in that she actually works our neighborhood pub and I talked about it this morning. And she says, you know, Late at night. People do get drunk, They become affectionate and there's a lot of ignoring of social distancing, so it will help to close down a little bit earlier, But last call there was at 11 o'clock anyway, so we'll be cutting time, much in that in that pub, and she doesn't think it's going to make that much of a difference, nor, frankly, I think to a lot of people here in England who have heard these measures today. I guess it does make some difference of people do work from home instead of going into the office, if somewhere and that will help. I mean, I think that I think that that will help some a lot of people that we're not going in right now, anyway, a lot of people out of convenience and otherwise they're staying out of London. What's the scientific community saying about these measures? I think something that it needs to go further than what the Gover what Boris Johnson is talking about. Other measures could include no mixing of households or a locked down for a couple of weeks that would try to put the brakes on the virus. It's clear that the government's deeply worried about the economy and doesn't want to go that far right now because the economy's been improving, actually Steve in the past couple of 23 months, and it doesn't want that stop. Now you go into hibernation, so to speak for another six months, according to Boris Johnson, is the country ready, though, if there is a big second wave It's better In some ways, you know, they figured out ways to use steroids to cut the fatality rate. And so that's been very positive. But on the testing front, we don't have the kind of testing system that we hope to many many months ago and cure Starmer. He's the leader of the opposition Labour Party, and today this is what he had to say to Johnson. We warned the promise two months ago that testing need to be fixed by the autumn, but the government didn't listen. They pretended it wasn't a problem. They didn't act quickly enough. Now the testing system isn't working just when we need it. And I got to tell you, Steve, this is a critique you here across the country. Most people I know are stunned that after all these months, the government has not been able to build a testing system that will meet demand.

Steve Steve Boris Johnson England Frank Langfitt London Prime Minister Mr Speaker Catherine UK NPR Labour Party House Of Commons Britain
Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

All Things Considered

02:35 min | 8 months ago

Pompeo Visits U.K. To Discuss Joint Efforts To Counter China

"London London Now Now that that is is where where Secretary Secretary of of State State Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo was was today, today, talking talking with with British British counterparts counterparts about about joint joint efforts efforts to to counter counter China. China. The The secretary secretary congratulated congratulated the United Kingdom for moving earlier this month to ban Huawei, the controversial Chinese telecom giant from the development of Britain's five G network, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports. Compound kicked off today's joint press conference by giving Britain a public pat on the back for supporting a harder line against Beijing. I want to take this opportunity Tio congratulate the British government for its principal responses to these challenges. You made a sovereign decision to ban WOL away from future five G networks. You generously opened your doors to Congress who speak nothing more playing just for some freedom. We support those sovereign choices we think well done. Pompon was referring to Britain's recent decision to offer a path to citizenship for up to nearly three million Hong Kongers after Beijing implemented a national security law, which is shrinking freedoms in the former British colony. The Chinese government has grown more assertive UK has repeatedly pushed back in recent months today. Pompeo also met with China Hawks in the British parliament and what was seen as an attempt to pressure Prime Minister Boris Johnson today can even harder line against China's ruling Communist Party. When a reporter asked British Foreign Secretary Dominic Rob, with pressure from the Trump administration has influenced the UK China policy robbed, denied any questions mean Mike and I always have constructive discussions and actually majority times on views overlap when we work together very well. Today's press conference was designed to affirm an Anglo American stance towards the world's second largest economy. Pompeii went much further, saying countries across the globe should join together to call out China for its moves in the South China Sea along the Sino Indian border. You can't go make claims for maritime reaches that you have no lawful claim to You can't threaten countries and bully them in the camellias. We want. We want to see every nation who understands freedom and democracy to understand this threat that the Chinese Communist Party is posing to them and to work both themselves and collectively. To restore what is rightfully ours. China's criticized the U. S and U K for engaging in what it calls a Cold War mentality. But this isn't just about geopolitics. With more than 140,000 Americans dead from covert 19 in the economy and recession. President Trump is trying to portray Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee, is soft on China and hopes his increasingly hard line will help him win a second term come November.

China Mike Mike Pompeo Pompeo Secretary Chinese Communist Party South China Sea Britain Beijing British Government United Kingdom British Parliament Huawei London London President Trump Chinese Government Joe Biden Frank Langfitt NPR Boris Johnson Trump Administration Pompon
U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

Morning Edition

03:16 min | 8 months ago

U.K. 'Actively Avoided' Investigating Russian Interference, Lawmakers Find

"Parliamentary report on Russian influence in the United Kingdom is out this morning. And it's bad, among other things that says the UK government actively avoided trying to figure out of Russia tried to influence the Brexit referendum for more. We've got NPR's London correspondent with US Frank Langfitt, who's looking at this high, Frank. Hey, Rachel. I mean, I said, it's bad. It's that that the British government would be intentionally trying to avoid figuring out the extent of Russian interference. I mean, what can you tell us? It's well, it's It's completely damning people here. Actually, we've been waiting for this report for months. And we thought we were going to find out if the Russians tried to influence the Brexit vote. The answer, in fact, was different and definitely it was more unsettling. Stuart Hosey is with the Scottish National Party is also in the parliament, and this is what he said today at a press conference. No one in government knew if Russia interfered in or sought to influence the referendum because they didn't know want to know the UK government of actively avoided looking for evidence that Russia interfered. Why, Frank? Why wouldn't anyone in the British government want to know this? That's actually really easy answer, and I think the answer is this. It would have undermined the Brexit referendum. Remember the biggest decision of the British people in decades? It's already changed the course of British history and the person who was front and center and that was a guy named Boris Johnson, who is now the prime minister. So if you say Russia interfered, then it could undermine this thing that has changed the course of British history. You can see why nobody certainly in the government wanted to mess with that. Ah Stewart, Hosey said No one would touch with a 10 foot pole and he went on and said this. This is in stark contrast. To the U. S response to reports of interference in the 2016 presidential elections, No matter how politically all quarter, potentially embarrassing there should have been an assessment of Russian interference in the referendum. They must now be one. Okay, So did this report find Russian influence anywhere in the British government? Yes, it absolutely did. One is the Scottish referendum. This was 2015 when Scotland was voting for independence. And the reason this is important is from the perspective of Russia. Vladimir Putin would want Scotland to leave the United Kingdom to weaken it. It's the same reason why we know that he wanted the Brexit vote to pass so that it would weaken the European Union. But another part and everybody kind of knows everybody knows this, Rachel, But another thing that that's mentioned here is that London is such a Place for money laundering, and this is a really good quote that I liked, frankly from the text. Russian influence in the UK is the new normal. Successive governments have welcomed the oligarchs and their money with open arms, providing them with the means of recycling illicit finance through the London laundromat. So how's the British government responding? Not much of anything, considering what this report says. You might expect something more robust. Dominic Robby's the Foreign secretary, he has has a boiler plate response so far, saying Russia must desist from these attacks. And that the UK has defend its country and democracy and values from such a hostile state. NPR's Frank Langfitt in London. Thanks, Frank. We appreciate it always breaks it

British Government Russia United Kingdom Frank Langfitt London Stuart Hosey NPR Rachel Vladimir Putin Boris Johnson Scottish National Party Dominic Robby Scotland Ah Stewart Prime Minister European Union Secretary Brexit
Paris protesters call for justice for Adama Traoré, a young black man who died in police custody in July 2016

Weekend Edition Sunday

01:47 min | 9 months ago

Paris protesters call for justice for Adama Traoré, a young black man who died in police custody in July 2016

"These protests which began in the United States have gone global now we're going to go to Europe where demonstrations have broken out not only over current issues of police brutality and racism but also Europe's colonial history of subjugating black and brown populations around the world joining us now to talk about these protests are NPR correspondent Frank Langfitt in London and Eleanor Beardsley in Paris good morning to you both good morning Lulu good morning will I'm gonna I'm gonna begin with you describe for us what happened in Paris yesterday well there was a very big demonstration in Paris the second very big one for of French black man who died in police custody in two thousand sixteen his name was Adam a trial right and none of the three arresting officers ever appear before justice and did those protests happen as a result of what's been going on here in the U. S. I mean because that that happen in twenty sixteen or are there local issues at play here well a little bit of both Lou you know after that over the last four years has been a core group wanting to reopen Travaris case led by sister but because of George Floyd's death this has just ignited and it's morphed into a nationwide because against police violence and racism in general listen to what I heard yesterday in Paris they're they're chanting justice for Adam and tens of thousands more came out in cities across France you know have a more white if not more many of these people didn't even know about Adama Traore a before George Floyd you've also seen at left wing people climbing onto this movement saying you know capitalism is a root cause of social inequality and racism you know I would say above other sort of an awakening in France at the so called color blind society where they don't even take racial statistic Lulu because everyone is considered equal well in fact everyone is not equal

United States Europe Frank Langfitt London Eleanor Beardsley Paris Adam LOU George Floyd France Adama Traore Lulu NPR Travaris
Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me!

00:54 sec | 9 months ago

Hundreds of protesters rally in London, Berlin over U.S. death

"President trump says the U. S. government will designate the anti fascist group antifa as a terrorist organization as NPR's Joel rose reports the trump administration is linking it to protests against police brutality that have turned violent in recent days president trump said on Twitter that the US will be designating antifa as a terrorist organization but didn't offer any details it's something he's called for before Attorney General William Barr blamed radical agitators for hijacking peaceful protests Barr said such violence is quoted domestic terrorism and will be treated accordingly it's not clear how many if any of the protesters involved in violent clashes around the country are associated with antifa as protests over the death of George Floyd have grown government officials have put the blame for violence and destruction on outsiders officials in Minnesota where Floyd was killed offer a very different assessment of who those outsiders our governor Tim Walz says far right white nationalists maybe sparking the violence Joel rose NPR news governor walls also said today protests were mostly peaceful in Minneapolis overnight after National Guard troops joined local and state police in a show of force to quell violence but governor wall says it will take far more fundamental changes to address the problem in his state we don't just right near the top on educational attainment we rank near the top on on personal incomes on homeownership on life expectancies things that make this and when they came out awhile back we are we rank second in a survey of the fifty states second in happiness behind a white but if you take a deeper look and peel it back which this week is peeled back all of those statistics are true if you're white if you're not we rank near the bottom wall cited unequal educational opportunities for children of color and lending practices that suppress black homeownership demonstrators turned out in Berlin Copenhagen in Toronto today saying they were rallying in solidarity with American protesters and NPR's Frank Langfitt reports hundreds of people marched on the U. S. embassy in London the protests began in London's Trafalgar Square where hundreds face Britain's National Gallery and took a knee the March continued across the river Thames to the U. S. embassy where protesters packed enough against a police cordon a black lives matters group in London organized the protest a Twitter account for black lives matter U. K. which said it is not affiliated with the London group questioned a mass gathering while Britain is still largely under lockdown adding quote we are currently discussing the implications of calling a mass March in the middle of a pandemic that is killing us the most government statistics show British blacks of African descent are nearly four times more likely to die from covert nineteen than white Britons Frank Langfitt NPR news this is NPR this is WNYC in New York I'm lance lucky governor Cuomo says new York's Attorney General will investigate the NYPD's actions during yesterday's protests the demonstrations turn violent at times with protesters hurling objects at police and police pepper spraying protesters video also show police SUVs driving into a crowd of protesters Cuomo says any allegations of police misconduct should be investigated by an external authority nuts local officials are they really in a position to be feet fair and objective they will say yes I say from a public confidence point of view have the investigation done by someone else Blasio has announced two of his some point appointees are conducting an investigation into the violent protests in the past few days in addition to the NYPD's internal probe the governor says the AG's review will be done by next month and in his press conference this morning mayor de Blasio largely praise the NYPD for its approach to policing this weekend's protests but he said his administration needs to do more to identify police officers in leadership or on the beat who he said are not cut out for the job that work needs to be amplified it speeded up intensified we need to make sure that anybody who should not be a police officer is not a police officer the NYPD says three hundred forty five people were arrested and thirty three officers were injured last night it is not clear how many civilians were

Donald Trump President Trump
Boris Johnson announces phased reopening plan for England; other UK leaders disagree

Morning Edition

02:32 min | 10 months ago

Boris Johnson announces phased reopening plan for England; other UK leaders disagree

"Else British prime minister Boris Johnson has changed course by outlining a roadmap for Britain to start opening back up but leaders in the rest of the United Kingdom say not so fast in Scotland Wales and Northern Ireland the word is still stay put at home Frank Langfitt reports from London you can lock down on March twenty third as part of the loosening Johnson said people in England will be allowed to exercise outdoors as much as they like those who can't work from home should now go to work as long as the social distance that includes factory and construction workers and the prime minister also said elementary schools and shops could begin to re open as early as June first Johnson signaled that the damage to the British economy which analysts say is heading into it historic recession figured in his thinking we must stay alert we must continue to control the virus and save lives and you must also recognize this campaign against the viruses come at colossal cost to our way of life we can see all around us in the shuttered shops and abandoned businesses and docking pubs and restaurants Johnson emphasized that the government will loosen step by step closely monitoring the virus to avoid a second spike all right if there are problems we will not hesitate to put on the brakes we've been through the initial peak but it's coming down the mountain that is often more dangerous in a striking split leaders in the rest of the country rejected Johnson's changing message and continue to urge people in their jurisdictions to stay home the UK government agreed not to advertise its new guidelines in Scotland where the virus transmission rate is higher Nicolas sturgeon Scotland's first minister said Johnson's new message stay alert control the virus save lives was vague and could put people at risk we mustn't squander progress by easing up too soon or by sending mixed messages that result in people thinking that's it Katie ease up no you let me be very blunt about the consequences if we we have to do that people will die unnecessarily you can government will publish a fifty page document today detailing the new guidelines Johnson has been pilloried for his administration's handling of the crisis many critics say the government moved too slowly to lock down fail to develop crucial testing capacity fumbled providing protective gear to health care workers and now has the highest number of deaths in Europe well over thirty

Boris Johnson Britain United Kingdom Wales Northern Ireland Frank Langfitt London England Prime Minister Scotland Europe Nicolas Sturgeon Scotland Katie
"frank langfitt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"To purchase vaccines and therapeutics when we get them and a provision that those which should be fairly priced and this is all supposed to move quickly right yes so another big pot of money in here nine hundred and fifty million will go to the state and local public health response three CDC and as you say half of that has to go or be allocated in thirty days that's really really fast and what the money will be used for at this point in the epidemic is things like health department staffing up to work twenty four seven laboratories buying equipment and paying staff overtime and investments in data to be able to properly do surveillance and to be clear is this all domestic spending or is there any money being offered to other countries that are dealing with an outbreak yes this is interesting the trump White House did not request any funding for an international response the head of the corona virus task force and health and Human Services secretary Alex is are actually told Congress they were focusing on the homeland on that but Congress in this law did include over a billion dollars for the international response and that could be used for instance to help low and middle income countries shore up their resources to be able to contain or mitigate outbreaks experts I talked to were really pleased and quite actually relieved to see if this funding and there any other notable areas that that are missing so one thing that we're starting to hear about are the people who don't have health insurance or under insured that's about seventy million Americans and nothing in this bill spells out whether any of this money will go to reimburse hospitals or patients for care so we've seen some announcements this week that tests will be covered by private insurers and Medicaid and Medicare but there are going to be lots of other expenses if you're compelled to stay isolated in a hospital for fourteen days for instance who's going to pay for that that is not clear and experts I talked to today said that the way in which this public health crisis collides with our fractured health insurance system is really the next frontier here that's NPR's Selena Simmons Duffin thank you for the update thank you first there was brexit than trump now another political earthquake in an English speaking democracy Ireland where shin Fane the former political wing of Irish Republican Army a terrorist group won a stunning upset victory last month and broke the nearly century long gripped by Ireland's two dominant parties NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from Dublin.

Ireland Medicare secretary Dublin Frank Langfitt Irish Republican Army shin Fane CDC trump Selena Simmons Duffin NPR Medicaid Congress Alex White House
"frank langfitt" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on Amanpour

"And there's more opportunities to maybe actually develop the economy, better make it more competitive. So it would be good for Chinese people, but not good for the party. So the party controls all these state or in enterprises. I mean it's not like remember that old expression. What's good for? General Motors is good for America. Well, in this case, economic reforms not good for the party insert ways the party wants to keep control of a lot of state on enterprises from which it has a lot of power. It doesn't want to privatize the whole system that would actually great create greater GDP greater job growth and things like that. But that's not in the party's interests. And there are some. People not a majority, all who see Trump, something reformer. They may not like President Trump in any other way. Others, though feel that he has President Trump is overstepped his bounds by going after awhile way. While way is terrific telecom company when I was that I re Nairobi bureau chief of NPR, there was not very good internet in Nairobi. And I used while way USB's to run my bureau for year. So I am a fan of walkway in that respect. And I think a lot of Chinese, particularly down Shenzhen, where while we another big telecom companies are big tech companies are located feels that feels that they're sort of unfair targeting of a company that's kind of a global leader from China. One of the characters was interesting was that they had come to the United States. Then come back to China and they're kind of struggling. Yeah. Sort of cultural question of where they are today versus where the grew up. This was a really interesting person that I got to know. Is an investment banker her parents are in the communist party there communist party officials the corruption the repression she decided she wanted to leave China and start a new and she got an MBA in the United States, and she'd be very, very good English got the United States and five five months later, President Trump won the election. And she had been a great believer in democracy. And this began, she didn't like President Trump, g didn't feel like a lot of voters had paid strict attention to what was going on. And she began to become much more disillusioned about whether American democracy, worked, and she started to see the communist party in a more positive light because you saw the efficiency the economic growth, the ability to change things quickly without the messy -ness of democracy. And when she was interesting because I know when she went to America, she didn't intend to return to China and in the end she moved back. Okay. So now here, she is back in China. Talk about a message democracy of protests. In Hong Kong happening every weekend over a specific issue. But they're gathering momentum at Ashiq. Think about that, right at her doorstep, so to speak. Well, she actually works home call. Yeah. And she lives in Inchon, Jen just across the border. She says, if she were a Hong Kong person, she would be out there every night, as well, because she, she thinks that from the perspective of a Hong Kong person, this is like a last stand against repression coming and the creeping of authoritarianism from the mainland. But I asked her about people in our offices. I was just talking to her this morning. And she said, a lot of mainlanders that she works with don't really have any sympathy for Hong Kong people. So it's really interesting here, you have these democracy, demonstrations in Hong Kong, and many mainlanders. Don't really, they don't care for Hong Kong people about this. There's a real division between them. This goes back historically mainlanders would go to Hong Kong in droves. Now, I applaud of lots of products and bring them back to mainland China because the prog. In Hong Kong were safe. There's a huge problem with food, safety and medical product safety in the mainland, and drove up housing prices. So there's a real kind of bitter division between mainlanders and people in Hong Kong. When you talk about a Terry authoritarian sort of increases that China has made one of the things that we at least see in the press is an increased surveillance state. Yes. They're a lot of people say that it's harder to get someone to talk now in China than it was five years ago. I think it is much more difficult for my colleagues now in my conversations with them doing what I was much easier to do for five years ago. Yes. I think it's become the the job as maybe more difficult now than since the tandem and crackdown. Why? I think the government realizes that it has a very sophisticated population that has a growing expectations. That's well traveled, and in it fears that if it allows people to be openly, critical and to talk more that they're basically, it's just going to erode their power, and I will say this, when I came back in two thousand fourteen I started looking at way ball, then this was the Chinese equivalent of Twitter. And I was shocked at how open it was on. I there was all kinds of criticism of the government and I sort of thought kinda Thornberry state is this because if this goes on a lot longer, it clearly was gonna road the power of the government. So I think what they've done, what she Jinping done is double down on repression, given that you have this cab out in public with these magnetic, and you're this white guy driving this can, and there's enough cameras around. There's enough Teresa around the authorities know what you're doing what they concerned in any way they definitely did because they. Read the solids must have passed a ton of cops Shanghai alone. I was never pulled over. And I thought I thought I might be, of course, I didn't short so that I could I could never be really. I wasn't breaking the law. Right. What I learned later, though, is that the Chinese ministry of state security, obviously monitors foreign reporters. They sometimes read our stories. They sometimes interview people that we've talked to I found out secondhand that one of my one of the spies, watching me had actually been listening to the stories, and he said, I would like these stories. These are really good. Is that I relate to some of these characters? I know some people just like this. So I don't know, for sure. But it may be one reason that they didn't bust me is because they thought the stories were pretty good Frank Langfitt. The book is called Shanghai free. Taxi. Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. All right. And unexpected vote of confidence glimpse inside China's secretive state. Join us tomorrow for my interview with Istanbul, new mayor, the opposition politician, whose remarkable victory against the Turkish president other ones party sent people celebrating into the streets, and revived hope for democracy. That is it for now. Remember, you can listen to a podcast and see.

Hong Kong President Trump China communist party government America United States General Motors Nairobi Inchon Istanbul Chinese ministry of state Twitter NPR president Shenzhen Frank Langfitt Ashiq bureau chief
"frank langfitt" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on Amanpour

"To bring our nation together because this is truly something that I think, gives us an opportunity to start working across the aisle. The American public is willing to and ready to drive down to these facilities, and take these children into their homes, if that's what needs to happen in order to make sure that these children are fed, and well-cared-for. But I don't think that needs to happen. All we need to do is for people to stop politicizing these children and to meet us at the border. You know, have us come to Washington DC, and we can get legislation out this week, if people would simply start politicising, stop politicizing these children and working cross the aisle and removing this debate from the immigration debate and making it, what it is, which is a child welfare issue. You know, I wanted to read you a couple of comments from some of our colleagues journalists who've been held in prisons around the world, some black humor here. David road of the New York Times has held by the Todd. Todd of on gave me toothpaste, and soap, Jason resign, who has held by the Iranian government said, I had a toothpaste, and toothbrush, not exactly. Akra facial, Tom's from the very first night, actually I almost nothing else in my cell while I was in solitary confinement. I was allowed to shower every couple of days. I mean, you know we can smile at that. But, but when I hear what you describing these children on concrete floors, maybe an aluminium thing sheet thrown over them for warm. But, but mostly, I want to know from you who were looking after these tiny little children. I mean, they're little infants there who is separated from their parents, and it wasn't the border gauze. No. Nanny patrol looking after them who was looking after the little children. So basically, most of the inference were there with their child mothers. And as we all know children who have babies need a high level of support from the adulterer with them in order to care for them. There was one infant child who developed influenza, and because there was no one caring for the for the children, who were quarantined the child mother had to go in there with her infant, the child mother, then develop the influenza and couldn't care for her infant. So they took the infant and gave it to another unrelated child and had that unrelated child caring for that infant toddlers, that we saw some of them were cared for by children who were as young as seven or eight years old, and we talked to the older girls in their cell, and what they said is that the, you know, very young children. Seven eight years, old simply don't know how to take a move, and so the yeah, but. Really, what we need is for these children be with their families, including the child mother, so that they get the support that they need and get them out of garment custody, their current one thousand children, who are in these facilities in the United States of America, and not only do we need national leadership on this. But frankly, we need the international community to start to put pressure on the US government to address this crisis immigration crisis. That is a remarkable goal. That is a remarkable coal Warren Binford. Thank you so much. I witness testimony on this Rulli horrendous issue. And we'll learn more from you as this continues. We wanna move now, though, from Boorda's and detention to a story about breaking down cultural barriers when Frank Langfitt, moved to China as an American journalist for National Public Radio. His job was to get people talking yet as a foreigner in a new country, locals were wary instead of giving up line fit try to different approach. He created a free taxi service, offering rides in exchange for conversations, his new book, the Shanghai free, taxi chronicles, his journeys, while providing unique inside into the many facets of contemporary Chinese culture, he sat down with a hurry, Srinivasa and discuss what he learned along the way now some photos in the interview have been omitted all blurred to protect the privacy of the people Frank met while working on his book in China. A free taxi. Explain this idea how you came up with it. Sure. So in two thousand eleven I had worked in China going back to about ninety seven and so I had a feel for the country, but I've been away for about ten years as a reporter and I returned in two thousand eleven and I could see that the country changed dramatically certainly economically. But you could also see that there were big problems with corruption, and the communist party was losing the hearts and minds of the people very rapidly. And I wanted to try to figure out where the country was going. But do it in a different sort of way. So of foreign reporter, particularly American reporter asking questions of ordinary Chinese is kind of a nonstarter. I've been taxi cab driver years and years ago, and I've found that was a great way to get to know Philadelphia, my hometown. So I decided, I would set up a free tax with no idea, whether anyone would actually get in it. Yeah. And I drove out and tried. And so what happened? So this is one of those cash cab, no cameras are not rolling. Ending that normal taxi. It's well what it is, is, I didn't know actually how to do this. I went to a taxi company and said, I'd like to be a taxi driver and they just laughed, and they said partners are not taxi drivers here. This isn't going to work. So my wife came up with the idea, Julie to get magnetic signs and put them on a rental car, and my news assistant, that I was working with Shanghai. He came up with a great slogan, which was gel, Sean hypo- Altron. Hi, Sean for in Chinese which means make Shanghai friends chat about Shanghai life. If I love. And it was called me and say, which loosely translated is free loving our tax free. I know it sounds.

Shanghai China reporter influenza Sean hypo- Altron Frank Langfitt United States Washington New York Times Todd National Public Radio Tom David road Jason resign Warren Binford Iranian government Srinivasa communist party Julie
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On for much longer. And peers Frank Langfitt in London. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Then you Van Gogh why nine a- the Kenyan author has died. Even if you don't know the name, you might be familiar with one of his most famous works of biting, satire called how to write about Africa one tip treat Africa as if it were one country. Another among your characters. You must always include the starving African who wanders the refugee camp, nearly naked and waits for the benevolence of the west. When I was a fierce champion of African literature. Also vocal advocate of LGBTQ writes, he came out publicly in two thousand fourteen James Maria is a Kenyan journalist, he joins us now from Nairobi. Welcome to the program. Thank you very much. You actually knew Mr. y nine right? Can you tell us about your relationship will I met him in two thousand three I was doing magazine project and he was doing his budget full? He's general the quantity project. He was alleged in life phonology. You actually walked into his life into his world. And it was one of those guys to use folk too and you, you left, they're thinking you could do anything. He came out publicly twenty four teen in an essay called I am a homosexual and he put out a series of YouTube videos to accompany at here's a little bit of one of those, I want these genetic of beyond billions of their kids, see Africans writing the own stories printed on stories that simple act. I think the most political that one can have how radical was the act of coming out in Kenya at that time, how important was this essay it changed everything. I mean the thing about the was it came from the background where it wasn't just Encana about across the continent. Wes, I'm really really horrible legislation was coming out, and I suggest criminalized being queer guns walking on their own legislation those a lot of discussions. So I mean at the time he came onto the most from Africa to come. Out as being gay so he really really validated. A lot of people who didn't have anyone look to say. Yeah. This is nothing natural for me to be this way. I want to come back to his essay how to write about Africa. He was asked about it in an interview with Al Jazeera about what he thought was wrong with the way, the west talked about the continental is probably the vast majority of coverage on Africa by the waste reinforces deplete listing idea. Existing narrative must be dependent and collapsed place. And then oh, maybe there's a good news story. If you're lucky, why did this make such an impact number one is because he was giving them a message of a lot of have known of a long time. People have often defense Africans know that daddy. So he was speaking to us, number one. Number two, he gentlemen and he's able to convey that he's able to tell you why. This is so. Beyond his work when I was a big boost of young writers on the continent. He founded a literary magazine and collective called quantity. What was his impact on the next generation? Well, many of us will knowledge literature those before being avenger. And then there's an anger, then literally community had been basically dead for about three decades he and his team came and the they give a new of life. It was the general which he did which now people could see the can print for the first time. And then the second part was his team denies something they call quantity open mic, which at the time was revolutionary. So when he showed up people said it writing Kenyan journalist James Maria, remembering the author Vigna vonda why nine when I died yesterday at age forty eight thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you very much. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. K Q, E traffic.

Africa Wes NPR James Maria Van Gogh Frank Langfitt Kenya YouTube Nairobi Encana Al Jazeera London Vigna vonda literary magazine three decades
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC, and I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. With this headline. Brexit is a total mess still politicians in the United Kingdom. Still can't agree on a way to leave the EU. Which is why Prime Minister Theresa may is heading to Brussels today to ask the EU for another extension before the clock runs out on Friday in recent days. She's been in Berlin and Paris seeking the support of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Emmanuel Macron now for more we turn to NPR's, Mr. Brexit, Frank Frank Langfitt in London. Hi there. Frank k David. Okay. So Friday's the big day that that Britain could crash out with no plan at all. So the prime minister, basically just saying she needs more time. She does need more time. She's going to ask she's asking for an extension to June thirtieth and what she needs is exactly what you're talking about. David time to find some consensus on leaving the EU. She's under a lot of pressure from Brexit. Here's here to get out as soon as possible she wants to do it before she would have to. Seat. You came members in the European parliament, the new parliament opens in early July. So she's looking for a short window to try to do something that the British parliament and the prime minister have failed to do now for like upwards of two years. Yeah. I mean, the and all those failures to to get any sort of agreement. I mean has to have e leaders feeling very impatient. What are they going to react? They're they're exasperated. But we do expect there'll be some kind of extension and the reason for that is just what you're out earlier, David. It's nobody's interest that the United Kingdom just walk away from the European Union without any way to sort out. How things would work at the ports and things like that. You'd have tariffs big lines of trucks things along those lines. One thing that you, of course, wants to hear his what's the plan? How are they going to break this deadlock in parliament Donald tusk as the president of the European Council? He's suggesting a long extension talking about up to year, and the reason for this is one is I think they're tired of the UK continuing to blow through deadlines and frankly dominating the. A you agenda and any expansion David is going to have to have conditions and one is going to be the UK not disrupting the EU if it remains inside for many, many months longer there is a concern in Brussels that when prime minister may leaves office whenever that is. There could be a Brexit here. Prime minister who comes in here, and the UK could actually become a Trojan horse inside the U N B disruptive. How are people in Britain feeling at.

prime minister Frank k David European Union Emmanuel Macron United Kingdom Mr. Brexit David Greene European parliament Brussels British parliament Britain Donald tusk Rachel Martin Frank Frank Langfitt Culver City Angela Merkel Theresa California Washington
"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm David Greene in Culver City, California. And I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington, Washington. DC British Prime Minister, Theresa may cannot say she was that surprised as widely expected the parliament. She leaves voted down another Brexit plant. And so now sixteen days from a deadline for Britain to leave the European Union. There is no plan NPR's. Frank Langfitt is in London and joins me. Hi, frank. Hi, david. All right. So more votes. Right. What what exactly happens in the coming hours and days? Well, what we're going to see today is they're going to vote on whether they should leave the European Union without a deal on March twenty ninth which is the deadline for Brexit. And it's not expected to pass because it could be seen as doing a lot of economic damage here. There's even a move to the UK saying it won't actually have any tariffs across the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland to prevent a hard board of their if that happens then most likely on Thursday. They'll be a vote on whether postpone this, of course, that'll be up to the US whether to accept it. And what's the likelihood that the EU is gonna show any more patients here? I think they will. They don't want to be seen as the bad guys in this as they are often portrayed by Brexit, tears. But there's also the problem of a European parliament elections coming up in may. So if we're going to be a delay would be a short one. And then the other question is Theresa May said last night is what are we gonna tell them? We're going to do with this extra time. They've been negotiating for over two years. They still haven't come to a resolution. So the us gonna wanna see a roadmap and a game plan. So the only thing we're sort of as you're going to be very busy in the coming thing. I think that we're going to be covering this for a lot longer day. All right NPR's, Frank Langfitt in London, Frank. Thanks happy to do it. Frank. Of course has been posting on Instagram. There's a picture put yesterday of sign in the house of Commons directions to the media center for what was called a meaningful vote. It said on the sign which indeed these votes have been as opposed to meaningless abouts. Let's bring in Sara Humboldt. She's sitting next to Frank there in London if I'm not mistaken, she's a political scientist at the London School of economics where she studies electoral behavior. Good morning. Good mine goodness studying electoral behavior, you must have had a lot of material to work with in Britain the last couple of years. Yeah. I mean, it's an exciting time. It's very surprising time what are people saying as they watch this apparent parliamentary train wreck. Well, I mean, the the nation right now, it's very divided. But there's one thing that British people agree on and that is that they are very unimpressed with the political class with what's going on in parliament. There's very little. Trust that parliament will be able to get a good deal. And that they will even be able to agree anything with that sad is this the apparent craziness of this week. Is there actually a logic to it? We're getting a vote and finding out there's no support for a deal. We're now going to get another vote in finding there's no support probably for leaving Europe without a deal and that in a way moves the process forward. Well, the the big problem is here that both into public but also in parliament parties and partisans have really split down the middle. And that's why it's so hot to agree on a compromise. It's so hot to sort of split the difference and Brexit because on the one hand, you have remain is who really want to stay find a way of staying in the European Union and overturning this decision and on the other hand, you have Brexit. Here's who really don't see a need for any kind of compromise and distinct it's better just to get out of there. But these these two camps we redefined in both parties, and especially within the conservative party. And that's why there's no prospect of finding a deal a compromise deal in parliament and people can agree on what they against, but not necessarily what therefore let me ask about each of those camps and your understanding of public support for those camps. You talked about Brexit. Here's whose attitude might now just be let's just go just just rip off the band aid. Whatever happens happens, just go. Is there any particular public enthusiasm for just going through with BreX? With no deal, and whatever disaster there might be. That's what it is. Yes, what we've seen since the referendum in two thousand two thousand and sixteen is that these two camps the levers of the Brexit here on the one hand, and the remain is on the other hand have really become more entrenched. It's almost become a sort of an identity that people at fault line that people are polarized along an undisputed or the the leave camp, they they really want to there's a big majority amongst those let's to sleep that's not talk to the EU anymore. That's not pay them anything. Let's get out of there soon as possible, of course on the other hand in remain camp. There's a lot of nervousness around that. And that means really in both camps. There's not a lot of support around a compromise deal for me because the remains want what they call the people's vote a second referendum Ephron referendum a second chance to overturn. This decision is the following a true statement, Sarah Hobart, we've gotten the impression from far that there is a very large part of the British parliament consisting of members who have. Committed to going through with Brexit. They know the people voted for it, but they actually privately or even not so privately think, it's a terrible idea. There is a tension between direct democracy that we saw in the referendum where we know the public was was sort of evenly split, but came out in favour of leave and a Representative democracy where there was a very clear majority in parliament full remain a leading up to the referendum, and that's clearly attention. However, parliament overwhelmingly voted for going ahead with this article fifty process that would lead to Britain leaving the EU. So they have accepted that the public will the problem is now there's a deadlock it's not necessarily what MP's wanted. I don't think that there was some secret plan not to go ahead with breaks at the problem is now that they can't agree on how to go ahead with Brexit. And that means that the option of maybe going back to the people is becoming more attractive, even though it's clearly not ideal. When the public is still so divided becoming more attractive? Meaning there is building support for a second referendum putting some slightly different question to the public. Exactly there is both in the public and also in parliament again. And I don't think that's a majority today in parliament for another vote. But it could as we approach the twenty ninth of March or the end of me a web in the Knicks Clifford will be it might be that the the option if there's no agreement in parliament. How are we going to get out of this deadlock on the one hand, we can leave without a few weeks as Frank said would have disastrous economic consequences is what most people believe and on the other hand, we could say, okay, let's just bring it back to the people and see what they think technically nothing has happened yet. But I'd like to know from your experience how this is affecting daily life. If it's getting to the point where people can't speak to each other. If they're on the opposite side of this question. Whether people aren't making plans for the future because they don't know what the future looks like even a month from now, this definitely a lot of uncertainty. But also there is this sort of polarization, wet spilled over into how people feel about it said that there are these camps where levers and remains field, very distrustful of each other. And I think that you know, the other side and not really have the the, you know, the nascent. Best interest at heart. And and that's a real problem with the kind of polarization also something that's known in the United States. Sure. Well, in the United States, in some cases, families are divided is that happening where you are. Yeah. That is very much happening. You know, people are divided at workplaces in families, and they really feel that you know, the other side they can't understand the other side, and they have problems finding some middle ground some compromise with Sarah. Thank you very.

parliament European Union Brexit Frank Langfitt European parliament London Britain David Greene Theresa May NPR United States Steve Inskeep Sarah Hobart DC Culver City California Washington Europe
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"U NPR's. Frank Langfitt reporting, William bar, President Trump's nominee for attorney general is facing intense questioning on Capitol Hill this hour NPR's malls parks reports the hearing has mostly focused on how far will treat special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation of pro that the president has characterized repeatedly as a witch hunt within the first hour to hearing William bar promise that he would provide Robert more adequate time and resources to complete investigation bar said he does believe Russia attempted to interfere in the two thousand sixteen election and the US has to quote, get to the bottom of it. A number of Democrats suggested President Trump may try to manipulate him. But bar was adamant that that won't happen. I am not going to do anything. I think is wrong, and I will not be bullied into doing. Anything was wrong by anybody whether it be editorial boards or. Congress or the president. How many do what I think is right? Partisan appear to need any democratic votes to be confirmed because Republicans hold the majority in the Senate, miles parks NPR news, Washington in New York. A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's plan to add a citizenship question to the upcoming twenty twenty cents as NPR's Hans long reports the ruling is likely to be peeled. This is the first district court ruling out of multiple lawsuits over the controversial citizenship question in his opinion, for the two cases in New York US district judge Jesse firm has ordered the administration to stop plans to include the question while leaving open the possibility that commerce secretary Wilbur Ross who oversees census could move forward with a question if you were to meet a series of specific requirements, including providing Rossi's, quote, real rationale as for the other citizenship question lawsuits, a trial in California started earlier this month and another set to begin in Maryland next week on Zee. Lewan NPR news, New York. The Dow is up one hundred forty five points. This is NPR. Dr from K.

NPR President Trump William bar president Trump administration Robert Mueller US New York Russia Frank Langfitt special counsel Congress Wilbur Ross Senate attorney Hans long
"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The big vote on Brexit is supposed to take place finally in parliament today. And it is not looking good at all. For prime minister. Theresa May the unpopular deal on the table is expected to fail in a parliament vote in a last push to sell her plan may warned of dire consequences if this doesn't pass fail and we face the risk of leaving without a deal all the bigger risk of not leaving at all NPR's. Frank Langfitt is covering this drama from London either Frank, Steve, okay? When last you discussed this vote with us some weeks ago, it was put off because losing would be such a total disaster for Theresa May. Did she make any progress in the last hours toward avoiding defeat this time? I don't think people think so, you know, parliament's had a long time to think this through and it looks like there's a lot of opposition. We just don't know exactly how much the votes going to be seven pm London time two pm Washington time. And the question really is. How much she does lose by? And then what the implications of that of it's twenty to thirty which is an MP estimated to me on Friday. Although that seems generous she could try to go back to you and get more concessions, but that doesn't seem very likely since Brussels been saying for weeks, no more negotiations. It's a larger number Brexit process. Gi going any number of directions, you you could try to delay it they could walk away from the EU which she was just talking about there and pay the economic price or the big thing would be do you take Brexit back to the people for a second referendum and just say oh gosh. Never mind. Let's not even never mind Steve. But more like, hey, you wanna think this went through again? Is that is that really possible it is possible. And if you ask me six weeks ago, I would have probably said, nah, he's not going to happen. But this has been such a mess. And I think also it's gone so badly in terms of the political process that that more and more members of parliament who remember we're always kind of for remaining in the EU to begin with are talking about this. But tonight, depending on what happens I mean, the country could head in any number of directions. Now that is an interesting point Frank Langfitt. We have a bunch of lawmakers who are going to vote down a Brexit deal. At least according to the prognosticators and a lot of them. You're pointing out if you ask them, privately, they don't favor Brexit at all. No, they didn't you had a split in the country in two thousand sixteen. It was fifty to forty eight in the populace the people who voted to leave. But it was very well known that members of parliament did not want to leave the European Union. And the reason for that is there have been a lot of economic benefits, of course. And also, it would take this island nation out of gigantic trading block, which is enormous economy that gives them a lot of leverage economically. In terms of cutting trade deals has the polling support for Brexit been sustained even amid all of this revelation of how. Difficult. It is is there still about half the country give or take fluids. Great question. Stephen. I think people would say there's been a split now that it's gone. Fifty two to remain forty eight to leave. But people are so concerned about another vote, and that it would be anti-democratic that even remainders might vote to leave because they would agree with the prime minister that it's just not fair, and you don't redo you don't get do overs in democracy. Frank. Thanks for the update. Really? Appreciate it. Have you to do it? That's NPR's. Frank langfitt..

Theresa May Brexit parliament Frank Langfitt prime minister European Union London Steve NPR MP Brussels Stephen Washington six weeks
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Dedicated servant of the house for bringing the Mason, restoring it to its place. I mean, it is just chaos though, she can't get her own government behind her. He's not going to get a better deal. It doesn't appear from the EU. She'll just. Forcement language is there any way Theresa May keeps her job. Well, I will say this Rachel she's last a lot longer than anybody thought. She would what we're waiting to see. And this has been a threat for months now is are there enough members of our own Tory party who will put in letters calling for vote of no confidence, it would take forty eight letters from all we understand. They're not at that point. Yet seems like they're going to at least give her another day in Europe. We'll have to see how that goes. The question is even if she comes back with good nicer language from the you will that actually be able to get it through the house of Commons. I don't think people necessarily see that NPR's Frank Langfitt with the latest on Brexit. Thanks, frank. I'm happy to do it. Rachel when President Trump meets Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer today to realities will be apparent one is that the president needs a deal with the top two Democrats in congress to avoid a government shutdown. The other is the Democrats in congress will be more powerful in the new year NPR White House. Correspondent tamra Keith has been asking if Democrats and the president can agree on much a little more than a year ago. President Trump had a couple of meetings with Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer and house minority leader Nancy Pelosi. He said he'd worked out a deal on immigration with Chuck and Nancy as he called them. But I think it could happen. We'll see what happens, but something will happen. It didn't.

Chuck Schumer President Trump Rachel Nancy Pelosi president NPR White House Frank Langfitt congress NPR EU tamra Keith Theresa Europe Brexit
"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on KCRW

"Our house because they don't burn, but the house just burns out from underneath it. So you end up with a metal roof on top of that just a pile of ash. I mean, there is nothing left. There is nothing left. More rain is in the forecast, which has set off fears of mudslides and. Flash flooding in a community already hollowed out by fire. Bobby Allen NPR news, Chico California. And the campfire is now ninety five percent contained in. It's burned more than one hundred fifty three thousand acres another deadly attack in Pakistan. A suicide bomber blew himself up at an open air food market and religious festival in the northern part of the country, killing at least thirty one people. No one has claimed responsibility. This happened hours after police foiled an attack by gunmen at the Chinese consulate in the southern port city of Karachi killing four three. Attackers were also killed India's. Foreign ministry is condemning the attack on the consulate saying there can be no justification for terror Baluch separatists, a militant group from Pakistan southwestern Baluchistan province claimed responsibility Pakistan has long accused India of supporting the separatists the United Arab Emirates says it is open to an amicable solution in the case of a British grad student sentenced to life imprisonment. For spying NPR's. Frank Langfitt reports from London on a case that has infuriated people in the United Kingdom, the UAE's ambassador to London Sulaiman Hamad. Al Masri said his government is studying requests for clemency made by the family the student. Matthew hedges the ambassador said, quote, we have an extremely close partnership with the UK because of the strength of that relationship. We're hopeful that an amicable solution can be reached authorities detained hedges a PHD student at England's Durham university in may at the airport and Dubai hedges. Who's an expert on the US's defense sectors denied spying, you a prosecutors say he confessed the sensing sparked a diplomatic crisis between the two countries hedges wife, Danielle jihad told the BBC her husband is absolutely terrified and suffering from panic attacks. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London row financial markets. Asian markets ended the day in mixed territory. The Nikkei the main market in Japan gained six tenths of a percent. The hang sang was down three tenths of a percent, US futures contracts trading higher. You're listening to NPR. News from Washington. It's black Friday. When retailers kick off the Christmas shopping centers with promises of great deals, but not all retailers are on board is impairs. Martin Kosti reports the outdoor gear store REI making a point of not being open for business. Alex Thompson with REI says for the fourth year running the chain will not be open. Even it's online retail operation will not process orders. We think it's the right thing to do to encourage people to be outside with family and friends rather than shopping for things because they're often some things.

Pakistan Frank Langfitt United Arab Emirates US London Matthew hedges England REI NPR India Chinese consulate Bobby Allen London Sulaiman Hamad Alex Thompson Al Masri Martin Kosti
"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Janine Herbst. The death toll in northern California's campfire is now up to eighty four authorities in view county say the remains of another person were discovered yesterday. And peers Bobby Allen says officially more than five hundred people are still listed as missing officials stress that though the number of the unaccounted for is in the hundreds many of them could be alive and just unaware. They're on a missing list as emergency crews continue to investigate the charred landscape. Some are still processing their own loss like Robert sharp. He's been working with the buke county search and rescue team and his own house in paradise was torched by the fire. We had a metal roof on our house because they don't burn, but the house just burns out from underneath it. So you end up with a metal roof on top of the just a pile of ash. I mean, there is nothing left. There is nothing left. More rain is in the forecast, which has set off fears of mudslides and flash flooding in a community already. Holly. No doubt by fire. Bobby Allen NPR news, Chico California. And the campfire is now ninety five percent contained in. It's burned more than one hundred fifty three thousand acres another deadly attack in Pakistan. A suicide bomber blew himself up at an open air food market and religious festival in the northern part of the country, killing at least thirty one people. No one has claimed responsibility. This happened hours after police foiled an attack by gunmen at the Chinese consulate in the southern port city of Karachi killing four three. Attackers were also killed India's. Foreign ministry is condemning the attack on the consulate saying there can be no justification for terror Baluch separatists, a militant group from Pakistan, southwestern Baluchistan province claimed responsibility Pakistan has long accused India of supporting the separatists the United Arab Emirates says it is open to an amicable solution in the case of a British grad student sentenced to life imprisonment for spying NPR's. Frank Langfitt reports from London. Even on a case that has infuriated people in the United Kingdom, the UN ambassador to London Sulaiman Hamad. Al Masri said his government is studying a request for clemency made by the family the student. Matthew hedges the embassador said, quote, we have an extremely close partnership with the UK because of the strength of that relationship. We're hopeful that an amicable solution can be reached authorities detained hedges a PHD student at England's Durham university in may at the airport in Dubai hedges. Who is an expert on the defense sector sectors denied spying? Prosecutors say he confessed sensing has sparked a diplomatic crisis between the two countries. Hedges wife. Danielle Tejada told the BBC her husband is absolutely terrified and suffering from panic attacks. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London world financial markets. Asian markets ended the day in mixed territory. The Nikkei the main market in Japan gained six tenths of a percent. The hang sang was down three tenths of a percent, US futures contracts trading higher. You're listening to NPR news from Washington. This is WNYC from New York. I'm Richard Hake. Good morning. It's eight oh, four sixteen degrees. Fair skies right now in New York City..

Bobby Allen NPR Pakistan Frank Langfitt London Washington Matthew hedges Hedges Dubai hedges California Janine Herbst India England Chinese consulate London Sulaiman Hamad New York City Robert sharp Al Masri Richard Hake
"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"frank langfitt" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming our way as rivers which job gathering water now from the ground and streams and tributaries in creeks, and they have not Christian. They have not even begun yet. But they will. Although most of the evacuee. Orders along the coast of South Carolina have been lifted orient Georgetown counties in the northeast are still under a mandatory evacuation. The top democrat on the Senate Judiciary committee Dianne Feinstein says the FBI should investigate supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh before a confirmation vote after a woman who accused him of sexual misconduct back when they were teenagers Christine Ford came forward today, telling the Washington Post it happened in the nineteen eighties at house party in Maryland cavenaugh, allegedly pinned her to the bed and tried to take off her clothes. He denies the claims. The Senate Judiciary committee is that to vote on Kavanagh's nomination on Thursday. Britain's divorce from the EU is somewhat more contentious today NPR's Frank Langfitt has more Colin who's a member of the rival labour party wrote in the Sunday Observer newspaper that quote, the government's abject failure. And the huge risk. We face of a bad deal or no deal. Brexit means that giving people a fresh say is now the right and only approach left for our country. Brussels's already rejected key parts of prime minister May's plan to leave the European Union. And businesses are preparing for the worse. The UK crashes out of the EU without a new deal. At the end of March, prime minister may is ruled out a second public vote on Brexit, but says parliament will be able to vote on a final deal with you. Frank Langfitt, NPR news, London. And you're listening to NPR news from Washington. And this is WNYC in New York. I'm Sean Carlson, a progressive New York. Congressional candidate says she's always ready to go toe to toe with opponents, but she would not be drawn into a fight with fellow democrat governor Andrew Cuomo on CNN state of the union Alexandria, Cossio Cortez was asked about Cuomo's comments that her primary win was a fluke and that the progressive wave in the state was quote, not even a ripple, but a Cossio Cortez said looking beyond the governor's race wins by progressive candidates in state Senate primaries reflect titled change within the Democratic Party. What I also look forward to moving forward is rallying behind all democratic nominees, including the governor to make sure that he wins in November Cossio Cortez says while the progressive movement lost big in the governor's race. A lot of down. Ballot candidates benefited from the candidacy of Cuomo's opponents, Cynthia Nixon. Subway signals delayed weekday morning two meters commuters every day last month except for one. That's according to the commuter advocacy group riders alliance, which analyzed delay alerts from the MTA the group's Danny perlstein says that one fateful morning in August with no signal delays. Still had delays on August. Twenty third even though the MTA data show that there were no signal or mechanical malfunction in six and ten AM in the morning being cute trains were still delay. While investigators thought to determine why a train's emergency brake been triggered a spokesperson for the DA says it's reduced delays in the last year, but will need a stable funding stream to modernize signals. Authorities say a man died in an apparent drowning while swimming in rough water off a beach at the jersey shore officers and seaside heights respondent shortly after seven o'clock last night to a report of a man struck by a wave and floating in the ocean. And Jade advance media reports that three officers entered the water and reported strong rip currents they were joined by water rescue units. And the man was brought to shore the forty four year old New Brunswick resident was pronounced dead at the seen. His name was not immediately released for the rest of tonight in our area. We'll see increasing clouds low of about sixty eight degrees tonight tomorrow Monday at twenty percent chance of rain if we do it'll be in the afternoon though, mostly cloudy skies with a high near eighty degrees. It's five oh, six support for NPR comes from the Epstein family foundation and supported a David Gilkey and Zaba Hewlett memorial fund established to support NPR's international journalists their coverage and their commitment to providing news of the world to audiences back home. This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Michelle Martin. We're going to start the program with news about the author of that letter alleging sexual assault by supreme court nominee Brett Cavanaugh back when he was in high school. The letter writers name is Christine Blasi Ford, and she has agreed to be identified today in an exclusive story in the Washington Post. Now, the allegations date back to when the two were in high school in Maryland cavenaugh has previously denied the allegations reporter, Emma Brown broke, the story for the Washington Post. And she is with us now around welcome. Thanks so much for talking with us. Thank you for having me. Could you start by telling us who Christine Blasi Ford is and walk us through. I what she says happened to her. And then later how this information became public. But I who is she and what does she say happened? So she is now a research psychologist and professor in California these events happened more than thirty years ago. So she says that she was at a house party. She doesn't know whose home it was she recalls. A handful of people in a family room drinking beer, she thought everybody had had one beer except she thought Brett cavenaugh and his friend. Mark judge were quite inebriated. She left the room to go use the bathroom and headed up a narrow stairwell. And she said she was pushed into a bedroom in the bedroom. She said Brad Kavanagh climbed on top of her on top of the bed. She was on her back. She said he was holding her down with the weight of his body groping her trying to pull her clothes off and the bathing suit that she wore underneath and grinding his body against hers. There was very loud music. But she thought if she called out somebody would hear her. So she she did that. And at that point. She says Brad Kavanagh put his hand over her mouth which terrified her. She thought she might suffocate. So at that point, the friend Mark judge jumped on top of them. She's not sure why. And then did it again, sometimes happen again, and they tumbled to the floor. And she was able to run out of the room and lock herself in a bathroom across the hall. I know that many people who've been following the story might remember that California Senator Dianne Feinstein has said she had information that she was sending to the FBI. But this is information she'd had for quite some time. So can you just tell us? How did this information come into the public domain Christine Blasi Ford? I contacted the post way back when Cavanaugh was on the shortlist before he was nominated to tell her story. So she has been thinking about this for a long time the end of July, she still hadn't decided she wanted to come forward publicly, but she wanted somebody in a position of power to know this story. So she wrote a letter to Senator Dianne Feinstein and in the letter, she she described this attack are alleged tack and she signed her name. She also said in that letter that she expected this to be kept confidential. Last week on Wednesday. The intercept wrote a story about how there was this secret document that Feinstein had and was refusing to share even with her democratic colleagues. And so it was that story in the intercept that kind of kicked loose the fact of this letter, and it was that series of events that then led Christine Blasi for to feel like her privacy was already being chipped away. At and she decided to come forward. Describe some of the corroborating information that you have been privy to Christine says she she didn't tell anybody this story in any detail until twenty twelve she was in couples therapy with her husband Russell Ford, and she told the story there so two things come from that I viewed Russell Ford and he said he recalled the syrupy sessions, clearly he recalled his wife recounting this episode and also recalled her using Kavanagh's name at the time. I was able to see a portion of the notes that her therapist wrote down during that therapist therapy session, and the notes say that she described an assault that it involved boys from an elitist boys school, and that the boys had gone on to become quote, highly respected and high high ranking members of society in Washington is it true that she's taken. Polygraph test and that she's passed it. Yes. On her lawyers advice. She took a polygraph exam. Her lawyer feared that should she decide to come forward. She would be attacked as a liar. She took it and she gave a statement about her allegation. And then was asked are you? Are you telling the truth? Have you said anything false? The conclusion of the polygraph report was that she is being truthful has responded since her name has become public. And also what about the the the the person described as the front Mark judge who is a conservative writer who I do have to note has also written a memoir about his struggles with alcoholism as a teenager where he's talked about the fact that he drank heavily as a teenager sometimes to the point of blacking out now, neither of them added. Anything today to their previous comments last week before her name became public. They both flatly denied that. This had occurred. Emma Brown is an investigative reporter for the Washington Post Emmett Brown. Thank you so much for talking with us. That'd be here. Joining us now with more on this story is NPR Legal Affairs correspondent Nina totenberg. She broke the story about. Sexual harassment allegations against now Justice Clarence Thomas, which were brought by need hill in nineteen Ninety-one Nina totenberg, thanks so much for joining us once again. My pleasure. So what was supposed to happen with judge Kavanagh's nomination this week? And it still may there's a vote scheduled then committee at one forty five eastern time on Thursday. And then the nomination is to go to the Senate floor the following week and presumably be voted on by the end of the week. We'll follow in. Today's report water Senator saying now about whether cameras committee vote should proceed. Well, by and large Democrats are asking that it be delayed. So that there can be a complete and thorough investigation of these allegations. And Republicans led by the chairman of the judiciary committee's Senator Chuck Grassley statement today giving a full throated defense cavenaugh note in all the various groups of win him over the strongly nomination. And not ever saying fat out. There will be no delay. And unfortunately, your line is deteriorating. Try to get this one. Last question you cover the last supreme court nominee who was accused of inappropriate sexual conduct. I have to ask how much is this process starting to resemble the confirmation process over the confirmation hearings involving Clarence Thomas. These are totally totally different times in that era. Senators didn't wanna know about it today. They're very skittish about this. Even though these allegations are more than thirty years ago in that era. There was a nominee an accuser who came forth to me and held a press conference the following day and testified and she worked for Clarence Thomas. Just a few years earlier. This is a an allegation that goes back more than three decades. So that makes a difference. But as I said, these are very different times and the atmosphere is very different. And I think senators are rightfully concerned that is NPR's Legal Affairs correspondent Nina totenberg, Nina. Thank you so much for talking to us. Thank you Florence's incessant. Rain bands are still dousing the Carolinas NPR's Rebecca hersher spent the morning and a Baptist church that has escaped flooding so far, but where people are still on edge pasture. Gregory bachelor has been anxious about rain for a whole week. The storm is moving so slowly, it's just been hard to know if the danger is past or if the worst is yet to come a one minute, we're thinking hot we're finally over it. And then thirty minutes later. Now, we're back. We're getting another rain band, but this morning. The rain had slackened pastor bachelor got up when the local curfew lifted looked out the window and said, okay, let's have services. It's been a long week people. Want to pray together at ten thirty worship got underway at Hoffmeyer road Baptist church in the aptly named Florence South Carolina..

judge Kavanagh Christine Blasi Ford NPR Senator Dianne Feinstein Washington Nina totenberg Washington Post European Union Justice Clarence Thomas Senate Judiciary committee South Carolina Senate FBI Brexit Maryland Cossio Cortez Frank Langfitt Brett Cavanaugh