17 Burst results for "Frank Bennett"

"frank bennett" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

08:12 min | 3 d ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Now here's what's going on. We use them as our experts explain what that means Mark. Explain what that means. How do we use the referral list? Not only does it provide great people to go to if you need help, But how do we use them? As our experts? Man? We send them out to look at problems. Exactly. Ted's a perfect example. Ted with Kane H. Ted give an example. Being on the referral list. You're also in the magazine by the way, Okay. How did you? How were you used in the past? That's an expert. Well, first of all, Good morning. Good morning. Well, you had you've requested that we go out. Take a look at jobs at a problem Jobs jobs that we haven't, um, doesn't work? No, no, but I wanted an independent on you wanted somebody who will take a look at it, and we normally don't tell you who's involved in it at all We press have you look at the job? We just give you an evaluation on it. Uh, you know, we've done this in the past. We've had people that ask us to fix it. Ask us if they can buy stuff from us. We back away from that, right? Right. Exactly. So you go out as an independent expert to look at stuff and by the way, Ted Is Ted our first guest? No. Is he our first guest in the second? Whose baby yesterday? Oh, yes. Jamie Baumgarten from real CBD that works dot com. Ted is our second guest in the studio since the pandemic, Speaking of the pandemic, and by the way, people are numbers 33713 talks 7138255. Of course, we want your calls on any problems, questions or complaints. That's what we do here. Okay? If you're just tuning in, we solve problems. That's what we do. We really do. We'll give you some examples. But Ted, the pandemic the jobs. Here's what I don't understand. Okay, Here's what I don't understand. There are millions and millions and millions of people on unemployment. And before we went on the air, you say it's hard to find people to work now. I don't understand. I have had every company tell me they can't find people to work right with great wages and benefits. They can't find people to work. Yet there is an unprecedented number of people on unemployment. That doesn't make sense to me. Maybe during the pandemic? I don't know. So why is it so difficult to find people? Boy? If I had the answer to that question, why I'd be finding people. I I don't understand. Unemployment is usually given to people when we are in a recession or have a problem and we can't find work. I'll venture to say that right now, there are people listen to me who own companies and every single one of them needs employees, right. You know, in our industry, the industry I'm in. There aren't a lot of young people coming up, so by and large the the average age Is going up. So that's one reason maybe some people are retiring. Natural attrition, right When you say young people coming up for what position installers? Yeah, it's dollars. Uh, you know for we do exterior modeling, So it's uh, it's dollars for that type of thing, and it's not really taught in the schools. I'm going to say something that's going to shock people. Not everyone on should go to college. Absolutely. I agree with you. Not everyone know that's not No, no Mark. They don't and not everyone benefits from a college education and there are trades where you can have great success. Now I'm all for education in and of itself, but The fact is, we are not all going to be professional, Tom did they waive the requirement that you have to prove you went for a job interview to get unemployment because that's a big problem. You know, during the pandemic, people were not required to prove they went looking for a job and that's still going on. I don't know. Then that may contribute to why people are still out of work. I don't know what the requirement. Let's figure that out. But here's what I'm asking if you can't find people to work. You need installers Sales people. What else do you need? Just office health, Administrative people, customer service type representatives. Okay, So, um, Here's the thing If you can't find people and I talked to fix it, 24 7, I've talked to plumb line. I've talked Mark. Who do you talk to? People all the time that need help. Everybody on our referral list could hire people right now, everybody So I don't understand, and that yet there's an unprecedented number of people, you know, unemployed, So I'm going to ask a question and I'm serious. When I asked this question, did we As a government, I say we whether you're personally responsible or not, we as a people did we create A society, not a society. It's not yet converted completely to this, as have we created people who just rather sit home and collect money and do nothing. Yes. Do you think so? Yeah. There are people. You know we didn't. But my company didn't personally experienced this in a big way. But, yes, there were people that felt that at one point, I guaranteed my employees a certain amount of their composition. And they said I could make more money sitting home with the extra federal. Okay, I declared a problem. And of course I'm not the only one. Everybody's been talking about it. Mike. Um, let's talk to you and deputy smarty pants. Uh, You have an update now? You originally called Mike. And can you explain what your original problem with sir? Um, me? Yes, sir. What was your original problem? When you called us Original problem was that I was getting kicked out of my house that I've been renting for 7.5 years, you know, And here's the thing. I felt kind of bad for you. I really did. I mean, you you were there for a long time. And you said, Hey, now they're selling the house. No, I think what they're doing with no, I think he said he thought the mayor was going to move in. Well, whatever they were getting rid of him. He's been there for so long. He runs his business out of there. He says he doesn't know what he's gonna do. And and I, you know, As I said, Mike, there's nothing we can do about it. If you're You know if your rental came to an end, if you're least came to an end, there's not much you can do. But I put I don't I guess why did I put you on a deputy smarty pants? What was the directive? Really? We We weren't sure what we could do about it. What we wanted to know from the landlord, I think is his motivation. What was the landlord's motivation? And maybe Mike could work out a deal to stay there. So what did you do, Marty? Well, I never got a hold of the landlord. He's very difficult to reach but interviewing Mike He doesn't want to stay there, either. He just wants more time. Cause he wants. His goal is to purchase a house. So what I talked to Mike about is if I can negotiate you staying there a little bit longer. Just until you can buy a house. Would that be okay with you? And he said that would be great. So that was my goal is one to introduce him to, um Frank Duran, who he has spoken with right to locate a new home. But the hard part is to extend that, uh, the lease or to allow him to stay. So I asked Mike, I said, What if I could talk to the landlord to get you to stay to the end of two lie? Would that be okay? Because I felt asking for longer would not work. And by the way, um, by the way, I'm happy you're thinking about buying. You never mentioned that in the first call Mike. Yeah, let's had a lot going on. So you okay? So you are looking to buy that's great. Yes, Yes. So they're part of the equation is taken care of. Frank's been a content. Right? Mike? You and Frank Bennett. Yeah, each other, Okay and up. Frank has asked you to do certain things and you're the process of getting that together, right? Correct And what?.

Frank Bennett Jamie Baumgarten Mike Frank Duran Marty Tom 33713 Kane H. 7.5 years Ted Frank Mark 7138255 yesterday millions second second guest first guest 24 7 first call
"frank bennett" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

07:19 min | Last week

"frank bennett" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Your daughter to marry Atlanta, Georgia has Ah, high end peace in the middle of it. Also all cities to where all the rich folks live a lot of us to rich folks, but it's one of the bar. Uh, let's say well to do areas it's called Buckhead bucket and what they're thinking about doing. I just saw this. It's in The Washington Post. This is astounding. They're going to form their own city, breaking away from Atlanta. They're getting away from that psychotic broad. Who's Who's the mayor? That racist mayor? Whatever any of his bottoms, but anyway Uh, they're starting around city. And the reason is is because the crime is just off the hook. There. They want to be able to form a city with the mayor and their own police force and then run the police force the way they want to know they've raised over 600 grand to do this so far. Of residents gathered to form bucket exploratory committee to petition Georgia to allow residents to vote on whether district will stay part of Atlanta thinks you're going to see more of this happening, You see, it's the fragmentation of America, and it's all because of the Democrats psychotic. Socialist that that's exactly what it is that they Frank Bennett our society. Well, what else? What else would you call it? They destroy everything. They put their hands on everything. They put their Communist hands on, they destroy it. There. Just look at the education system. Did you really think the education system is an education system? If you do, you're stupider than they think you are. Is that harsh, tough deal with it because it's a fact straight up back. So anyway, bucket now. The mayor is actually said that and I can't believe that. What's her name? Keisha. I gotta kiss your bottom ski show Lance Bottoms. Okay, You got three names so she could be a soul circular burn middle names that Wayne so anyway. Uh, she acknowledged the city was experiencing ready for this unusual dearth of police in the streets in June last year, and she said police morale is down. 10 fold That's putting it lightly down temple Now this is serious business poison growth when you can't count on the police. Do with the police do and what the police do as much as it's getting further and further away from it. Here's what the police do If the police show up domestic abuse, armed robbery, whatever. Uh, somebody CRA feeding on wall and whatever it is, If it leads to that, they're gonna play somebody under arrest. Or they tell them to stand on the back of the car with your hands on the hood while they are on the back. Trunk deck. Watch while they search my frisk him, And if that person gives him any grief, it all They respond with overwhelming force. Absolutely. They don't think about it. They they don't think about it. They just do it overwhelming force. And if something happens to hurt that person tough because that person should have never done anything stupid. In the first place in terms of resisting arrest, you don't turn around with a smart ass. Comment. You don't give the cops the bad evil eye. No, you say Yes, sir. No, sir. Yes, ma'am. No, ma'am, You shut the F up and let the police do what they do and tell people start saying that we're going nowhere again. It's the overwhelming of the system. They crushed the system. Could be worse. It's bad now. It's real bad by American standards. I don't know how it gets much worse, but here's, uh, a group of people want to form their own city. They got what they call that secession. Yeah, I got some pals and I'm tenant agree with him more and more every day. That succession may be the only answer. There's there's no way Anytime in the foreseeable future, they're going to turn this country around, Bring it back to a constitutionally limited republic. So if we get pieces of swaths of real estate where, let's say, for example, just for the second example, let's say you took over Chelsea, Michigan by takeover. I mean, people voted to go 100%. The right conservative and they're not gonna have one shred of Democrats, Socialism, associating with a given area, and then everybody says Hey, I'm gonna move there. Well, the next thing you know, you've got basically seceded from the, uh, the it's pure Michigan crowd. Now, Here's what happens. If this keeps going the way it is now and this. I'm fascinated by this because I just watched Much, Uh, Where is it here? Oh, I just watched the syriza on. Uh, Amazon episode Prime and it was about the cartels and how the Zetas came to pretty much be in. Uh ah thing Now, it didn't name them as the state has been showed. How Special operators within the police department. Mexico broke off and started their own rogue gang because they said, Hey, you know, we could be the baddest cats on the street. The crime that we're fighting. What? Why don't we be the best crime? They did, and they used all the training and the money and the guns in the weaponry that were given to them by the United States government because we trained that we trained the Mexican military and the war on drugs, which is a joke. It's a pillow fight on drugs. And we trade these guys, so they one thing led to another. They became brutal. And here's what what's happened because of it. Local police officers and Mexican border state. Are actively working with ruthless cartel to fight off rival attempt to take control of a drug distribution of now this gets really good. So bear with us on and Just, uh, CliffsNotes version. The police are working with one of the factions in the drug cartel being on their side right now today to say we could beat these other guys, Then we'll get a bunch of money from you guys, and we'll be part of it. That's worth lot orders that in Mexico, Okay, I posted this on Facebook, but I think my comment was Hey, let's go on vacation in Mexico. Don't worry Water resort. It's supposed to be safe there that they toasted say. Cooperation between the municipal cops of Garcia, the Waverly home. The cartel don't know. Race to faction of low Zetas that there you go, has already led to more than 30 burgers this year. They don't just murder people. They're your things, like, Put your face on a stick in your front yard, Not your head. Your face on a stick for real. Take all the skin off your stop. We're going to stick in your front yard Sends a hell of a powerful message also hang you over the edge of a freeway overpass. Other people could see when they're driving by. Maybe you're beheaded. Hanging upside down naked. Yeah, that kind of thing They do They love doing that. So So anyway, Reppert, Texas obtained exclusive access to intelligence. And police documents revealing how active and former members of Garcia National Police Department are leaking information. Uh, protecting hit man s. Oh, they're they're covering for him, and I want to get into this because there's a couple of things here that just amazing on just a stall me that this is the case, and all of these people keep in mind are living on thin ice and borrowed time. Because at some point somebody's gonna take them out. Now the ruthless criminal organization is fighting against a gang of independent drug dispute distributors known as Are You sitting down and do where we go? Lohse, Billy's Billy's I like that. So the billies who get their product from the cartel and let's go to the waiver generates y'all that how'd I do album? All right. The information points to rogue operations and raids by Garcia cops to try to locate independent drug pushers and their stays, stash houses. We're gonna find a sadistic little.

100% Frank Bennett Garcia National Police Departm Keisha Atlanta June last year Wayne today Amazon over 600 grand 10 fold Democrats this year Chelsea, three names Facebook more than 30 burgers The Washington Post one second example
"frank bennett" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:35 min | 9 months ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"A sports of brandy at 7 45. If you can get your Here's a clear sky and look north, you might get a glimpse of the northern lights. It is fascinating and beautiful phenomenon is known as the Aurora Bori, Alice, and it's a good time of year. See them. Director of UW Madison Space Place. Jim Lattice explains what we're actually seeing these essentially beams of reasons if you will of electrons that are sweeping across Our atmosphere from outer space, and they can move very, very fast. Melissa Barclay W. T. M J knew suggest getting out of the city to find a clear sky and look to the North, a museum dedicated to quilting enthusiasts reaching out amid the Kobe 19 pandemic. It's an opportunity for more home handiwork and creativity. The National Quilt Museum of the Ohio River City of Paducah, Kentucky, has started offering online subscriptions. Director Frank Bennett says the museum is on ly getting about 40% of its normal visitors because of Corona virus at the digital approach is a way to reach those who love quilting and fiber art worldwide. Jim Krystle, a CBS News Can't seem to be burning up the Internet looking at quilts today that doesn't doesn't call to ST not let like the political buttons, no or the or the swearing parents that I would look tell me about the swearing parents there when there were appearance on display in a zoo in England, and they had to take them away because they curse. Then they swore to each other. It's a lyricist 7 39 Wisconsin's Morning news sponsored by first Midwest Bank. You have plans first Midwest Bank has ideas Member F D I C. What do you get.

National Quilt Museum Midwest Bank Director Jim Krystle Jim Lattice Melissa Barclay W. T. M J Alice UW Ohio River Paducah Frank Bennett Kentucky CBS England
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

09:42 min | 10 months ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"E. l. quip the good habits company. And we're back that sounded like, Kay. What's that movie there back we're back a dinosaur's to Oh. That's poltergeist were here. No. So young so we just don't know. for Yeah I. Think it's poltergeist sounds right but she says something like there he is. I think a good place to start talking about this movie is the way it was adapted because I liked that leads into a lot of the discussion that kind of needs to be had about this movie. So there's there's so much context for this movie and a lot of it is very interesting and some of it is kind of frustrating. We have the very rare example here of the author of original work co authoring a screenplay. That is amazing. Fanny flag who I wasn't familiar with her. But now that I learned more about her, she's awesome she is she is a queer writer and comedian who got started in the sixties went on to become a really popular gameshow personality on match game. If you grew up watching game show network or their grandparents that was real. And later in her career was over. an outlet spion who had I mean? Just a murderer's row of girlfriends. She dated Rita Mae Brown another really famous queer writer and a really famous soap operas star named Susan Flannery. If you WANNA look up the relationship between the three of them very interesting not necessarily. Not Relevant to the PODCAST, but I was hooked. In any case, she wrote this novel in Nineteen, eighty seven and then was approached by the director of this movie at John Abbott to write the movie herself she had never written for the screen This is very rare for any marginalized writer to get an opportunity to go from zero to writing their own screenplay of their own work So that's incredible. She enlists her friend Carol Sobieski who also wrote the script for any they work on it. Together Carol unfortunately passes away before the movie comes out but they are both honored with an Academy Award nomination. So it's it's a beautiful story. In that way. What do think is interesting is Again, we haven't read the book. So if you have read the book and you have a more detailed nuance take I'm just going off of the academic pieces I was able to find about the adaptation of this in although fanny flag is an openly queer writer. There seems to be a lot of debate on I mean for sure in the movie, it is coding coding coding till the end of time holding in the book there does seem to be a little bit of debate it is definitely less coded, but it isn't also never explicitly stated there's some fans of this book who say it is not coated it is very clear but the wording that fanny flag uses is a little obscure. So there are some people that are that it's still coated. I don't know I. Haven't read. The book is my understanding that the word lesbian never appears in the book but other pretty specific indicators that. explicitly. Say that they are a couple who are in love and romantically involved are very present in the book. So there is a again the debate gets kind of really nuance because people who are fans of this book are like go super heart and I was like, Oh, now in some forums and yes. So from just what I read, it seems to me like it is not quoted in the book, but they also like people were like well, they never like kiss there's not a lot of physical interaction or affection shown in the book and some people are like it's not it's not explicit enough because they are not like. You know they're a married couple that aren't kissing. Hello you know. So there there's all that but there are these very like to me like very romantic passages that has co should read this book. There here's a quote from the book and also the word like wife girlfriend partner that never comes up They are pretty exclusively called friends and business partners in the book so. You know if you're a fan of the book. Let us know. So. Okay. When iggy this is from the scene Edgy is upset that ruth is leaving to go Mary Frank Bennett towards the beginning of the book and she says Oh no, you don't love him. You love me you know you do so it is. It is way more explicit of like don't marry him stay here it'd be my girlfriend but so yeah, wow, that's very different than the movie Yes. Yes. So I think it's really interesting an interesting case study that fanny flag wrote both that passage and this movie where the relationship is presented very differently nineteen ninety-one, very nineteen ninety-one. That said this movie did win a glad award for portraying a lesbian relationship. So I. I think clear to queer audiences what this movie was, but it isn't explicitly stated even less. So in in the movie then in the Book But It also it's. kind of it's it was an interesting watch because like watching it you're just like Oh. Yeah they're obviously in love and they're like You know this is like this long standing you know marriage they have a child together like gets the raise a child together they run a business together very the yeah. But but I mean it's coded I couldn't remember back and when I re watched it, I couldn't remember whether they ever kissed. And the time when they would've kissed I think is when they were like drunk lying by the riverbank and talking about how she's GonNa probably have to get married soon and they inner she. Yeah. I mean I mean she kisses her on the cheek and then Ruth and then jumps into the water and it's all very my God. It's it's lovely but. The. Relationship is so deep even though there is I, mean physical their like they have a food fight and not food fight was the director makes director John Adna saying I think on the DVD commentary that he was he intended for that food fight to be seen as symbolic of lovemaking. Yeah which which I do think is. Like sir, how're we supposed to know that it is? A, really sweet scene and I love Mary Stuart, masterson Marie Louise, Parker plays so well off of each other. I like fully by that. They are in love and they're like, it's so sweet. But. It's like I. If you're a viewer in one, thousand, ninety, one year, they were in a food fight. Yeah. Yeah. That was not it wasn't they weren't weren't like. You know like it wasn't that was. And being like that sex you're like, sir, have you heard of sex before in any case if you view if you know that that is how he was thinking of that scene, it is kind of interesting to watch because right after are like caught, having a food fight the COP friend comes over at the WHO is pursuing edgy and says like this isn't right. Women shouldn't be doing stuff like this and. If. You're reading the seen as a food fight. It's a very strange comment to make but. If you're reading it as they have a relationship with each other i. do believe that that's how he viewed that scene I just think that it's weird that he thinks that that re- that is extremely clear read for of your because I don't think it was but I love that scene. It's very sweet I love I love them. Yeah. I just think all the all the language in the film that refers to Iggy is both it's like nine, hundred, ninety one and then very Jim Crow South like forties fifties language around like she's different she's a little weird. She's not lack other girls. You know she wears pants there's a lot of like hilariously. Skirting around the fact that she's gay and much everyone knows it. It is funny. There is a lot of elements of IGE's character that reminded me of Catherine Hepburn. Characters where like so many Katherine Hepburn characters were just thoroughly thoroughly thoroughly queer coated and it was through like the tomboy aesthetic. It was through all these coded phrases that yet that are just frequently used to just avoid letting a queer character be a queer character. I also found an interesting Mary Stuart masterson. Apparently is the realist one of all time because he's able to find an interview that she did in twenty seventeen with queer writer Kate Arthur who also run a really great piece about this movie and just breaking down what it meant for its time. But she does a great interview with Mary Stuart Masterson and it straight up asks like you know she says.

writer Mary Stuart masterson director iggy ruth Carol Sobieski Catherine Hepburn Fanny Kay Rita Mae Brown E. l. Academy Award IGE Susan Flannery WHO partner Mary Frank Bennett Mary Stuart John Abbott Kate Arthur
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

03:52 min | 10 months ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"Nam Nam Nam And then iggy tells ruth like you don't have to worry about frank coming around anymore and like did you kill him and she's like no idea thin now but I know for sure dead and yeah. But I definitely know US dead anyway I felt for Ruth in that moment because she's just like okay I don't think you're a murderer but you're sounding. Like a murderer and Mary Stuart Masterson it's like just be cool. Please stop asking you. Then, several years pass and one day francs pickup truck is found in river. So iggy and big George arrested for his murder and she is tried but the judge throws out the case because he's like well, you know frank just probably got drunk and drove into the river accident and got eaten by river creatures which it seems like. IGGY is such a beloved person in this community that the judge of didn't want anything bad to happen. Like that was my read. It was the role of the priest remember. Yeah. Right. Because the priests kind of lie and then the judge kind of did a bad job but it worked out the way it should have ray works out well yet we're the characters who we are rooting for but I'm also just like is this how the justice system worked in nineteen thirty-three not at all definitely if there was a black man accused of killing a white man. He probably wouldn't have gotten off, and especially if there was a white woman who everyone knew was gay, that's not what would have happened but look, this is Hollywood this is fantasy. Yes, is amazing. That's why this movie rules things turn out the way they should accept thighs. Yeah and like human flesh breaks down into a great sauce somehow that no one can take. So we don't. We you know we don't. We have we ever tried ask the train. But yes, justice was served to the characters who we like meanwhile back in the present Evelyn a has begun this journey of kind of self liberation. She's knocking down walls in her house. She's crashing her car into other people's cars. She goes back to see any who continues the story about it in Ruth. Ruth has gotten sick and dies of cancer, which is so sad. So sad heartbreak ads I was balling it was who yeah. Rough story of the ducks. Yeah. The ducks are in like district so boring and I don't get it but I'm crying. And back in the present Evelyn thinks that any has died but it turns out that it was just news roommate at the nursing home who died. So Evelyn goes to find any who tells Evelyn the final bit of the story, which is that it turns out it was sip see who killed Frank Bennett and Iggy and big George Bar do they barbecue body or do they turn his body into the sauce I was not super clear about that. There is a long night of like Robert durst style dismemberment that takes place that we don't see a but they go full during that night and we just don't have to watch it and I'm fine with that. Sure totally. In any case they feed his remains to the cop who had been investigating his disappearance. So that's like the big reveal at the end of the movie hence the cannibalism that Jack Jamie and I remembered yeah that's the story Let's take a.

Evelyn ruth iggy Frank Bennett Nam Nam Nam IGGY Mary Stuart Masterson US Robert durst George Bar Jack Jamie Hollywood ray murder cancer
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

The Bechdel Cast

06:19 min | 10 months ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Bechdel Cast

"This is most things named buddy I feel like our dogs let's just be. Yeah, Airbud. Yeah exactly. Airbud, because we just roasted the editing on this movie I just did a very the quickest Google of my life Brag and so there is a female editor on this movie Deborah Neil. Fisher her resume is so extensive. She edited sonic the Hedgehog this year she. She edited two thirds of the fifty shades of grey franchise. She edited every hangover movie she edited Baby Mama she added. all of the Austin powers she. She's just she's edited you me and debris. She's edited all sorts of movies. So, just if you were worried that she lost work, she showed buddy getting out of his boot and confusing us. She did not. She's fine in every single. One of those films someone is hit by a train I. think if the common thread that's her signature thing even if it has nothing to do with the movie, she edits it into the movie she right? Yeah. We'll editors are often you know the real authors. It's weird I don't remember sonic the Hedgehog ever getting hit by a train. But in this movie does I think of all the movies that's the one I would definitely assume it happens. Do Pre for sure gets hit by a train. Oh Yeah. You mean and what name a fifty shades movie were to go to Johnson doesn't get hit by a train. It's her trademark. So okay. So back to the movie he is he's killed by the train and IGGY is heartbroken over this It's also around this point in the story where we formally meet Big George F as well as less formerly meet his mother sips he Tyson Yep they are two black people who work for the thread good family 'cause they're like a rich wealthy white family who has help. And big. George does a lot to look after a g specifically Okay. So the story is unfolding, but just then Kathy Bates is has been comes in and interrupts. Typical man. And we see them go back home a little bit Evelyn couch has been going to these marriage counseling classes I. think she's kind of trying to connect with Ed better, but he's not into it. He does not appreciate her this whole plot point we'll come back to it. and. Only counseling women altogether not couples yes. The husbands are not present. No no ED is asked nothing which I appreciate that commentary but they I feel like the movie kind of goes out of its way to make women trying to get in touch with their sexuality better to see him ridiculous and perhaps hysterical I didn't like how those were framed. Sure anyways. We'll talk about it. Yeah So then sometime later Evelyn goes back to the nursing home and here's more of the story from mini. So we flash back to IGGY. Who is all grown up now and she is Mary Stuart Masterson and she has not really recovered from the loss of her brother Buddy And Ruth who again was buddies young love comes around and befriends her. We see them getting into all kinds of hijinks. They're giving out food to poor people. There's a scene with honey bees they play poker they get drunk together things like that I love to be seen and so much. It truly. Was Brimming with anxiety. and. Though the movie never makes this explicit, it's pretty clear that edgy is lesbian who is falling in love with Ruth and Ruth also loves her. Yes. We'll and we'll talk about all of this later. But Ruth gets married to a man named Frank Bennett and we already know from the beginning of the story based on what he said this is a murder mystery about edgy being accused of murdering Frank Bennett. But we don't yet know how or why or when or anything like that, and then we meet Frank Bennett and we're like, thank God he got murdered. He's A truly truly a piece of shit. Yes. So she goes off newly married, they moved to Georgia and after a few years, edgy drives to Georgia to pay Ruth visit and discovers that ruth's husband is physically abusive. So edgy gets ruth out of there with the help of Big George and says to frank if you ever touch her again, I'll kill you. Ruth who was pregnant when she left her husband sorry. How's the baby? Oh. I'm sorry ruth who was Greg Nint-. That's right. Sorry. I don't mean I don't mean to like tone police, but you did say that word. I said the word incorrectly she was pregnant with a a greg named. Buddy. That's his nickname though his name is. And then, G. and Reuss Open restaurant the Whistle Stop Cafe where they serve Fried Green Tomatoes, I love the name of the movie. and. Barbecue. That big George makes this becomes important. Frank shows up a couple of times trying to get his baby. His baby. And you see him. One night we see him being knocked out by a shovel. I think which he then presumably dies from because he yeah, he's trying to kidnap a baby. Yeah. He's got baby basket in the hand. He's yes he's about to make away with the baby He's also a member of the KKK we find out. So we are not sad that he dies Oh yeah. Later, some police from Georgia show up to the cafe to see if Iggy Ruth know anything about Frank's disappearance and they're like no, and he's like I don't trust you but I do love your Barbecue Nam Nam..

Iggy Ruth Frank Bennett Deborah Neil Big George Mary Stuart Masterson Johnson Evelyn couch Georgia Whistle Stop Cafe Airbud Austin Greg Nint Kathy Bates Google editor Ed anxiety. George F Reuss Open Tyson
"frank bennett" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Take it. You Lost David. I gotTA congratulate you and thank you for at least doing your part in bucking up people's spirits letting people know that there are options. I Beg your pardon get Davidson. Thanks Phil Li doesn't sound like he was all that intent on telling how to open up the economy. Now what what was that about really. That was just having a party with a bunch of friends. I don't even know if there is a place called Mulligan downs. I don't even know if he changed it to the name. Steve Downes and I don't even know if there was actually people there. It might have been a sound effects tape. Tell US Much Steve Downes because we heard that This it's a guy worked with. I don't know I mentioned him. Wants to David and David. There's a good name for a racetrack or something. Why because his last name downs? Yeah Yeah but Steve. Downes was our program. Richard K West years and years ago came in from Pittsburgh. I'll never yet this GIG. Where's everybody going to grab some coffee? I'm saying something here. Okay okay never mind go ahead and tell US story I was. I was working at in Miami. Steve Downes was at a God. Damn it he was in Pittsburgh W he was in a Pittsburgh. A rock station and Frank Bennett was at KABC in Long Beach and we went over. And we had dinner at Tommy's house in Venice beach. We all came into town. And we were the three new jocks. I guess that were being hired from out of town that was technically from out of town and we had dinner and we talked about the new radio station and st was program director. And that's an off. We went into the wild blue wild blue yonder. She said why blue no I didn't into the wild blue yonder now whereas K. West. Now now it's power one. Oh six so there. You go all right folks. We'll be right back in the world. Famous Fillon re-showing Jay Santos of the citizens auxiliary police who has set up a flare drop. And is this for nasal swabs or something. Yeah Jay Santos who? This is very questionable. Fill he thinks that he's going to stop. People flare drop them and stick up q tip of their nose. Yeah that's A. That's one for the book I can't. I almost wish I was in Lang to be tested. Just to you see. I wouldn't be tested to emotionally as well as physically all right. We'll talk to Jay Santos who has been very quiet. Frankly in the midst of this pandemic very quiet I usually. Jay is very very vocal and outspoken. When it comes to something having to do with the public safety but he's been rather quiet so we'll talk to Jason's we come back here on the world famous Phil Hendrie show..

Steve Downes Jay Santos US Phil Li Pittsburgh David Mulligan downs Phil Hendrie K. West Davidson Richard K West Long Beach Venice beach program director Lang Frank Bennett Miami Tommy Jason
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"At much later in life. You know. It's really never too late to become a writer if you can if you can dictate even even if you can't type dictate it's not is it or you can still right so yeah that's great. So what is next for sir? East W. have the right of. What have you got on your desk for the next twelve months? Say Well when you call me. I was finishing up my word. Count for the Frank Bennett. Book that I'm writing right now which is called Ice Jig. It takes place all the Frank Bennett books. Have a vaguely. Fishing related tackles. I got into this fishing Seem but there's really not that much fishing takes place but there's actually a lot of interesting of fishing equipment that had sound sinister so so I'm writing ice jig right now and that will be out of finishing it up that will be out. March twenty third and then I'll move onto writing the next Life in Palmerston story which is called life up ended. And I'm hoping that that will be done by the end of the summer and then we'll move into the next Estate Sale mystery which I discussed the cover for yesterday and that will be called. Rock bottom treasurer. It's about a woman who is a rock journalist in aging rock journalist and obvious helping her sell her rock and roll memorabilia. That sounds great. It sounds a Weenie but Very popular one last year. The daisy daisy giants. Yeah we've got Stevie Nicks now have been in the states out. Yes that sounds wonderful. You sound as if you've got a wonderfully under control. It said some very impressive a wider. No but that my husband's always saying why don't you make an outline? But I'm a dancer. I don't outline so so I we've already established that you enjoy interacting with your Rita's and that you're willing to listen to their suggestions. How do you like to interact way? Can they find you? I have a facebook page. That's very Very active S W Hubbard author. And if you look from there on facebook you'll get to see pictures of my dog. Libi who my husband has taken out for a walk right now. So that you you're barking in the background And I'm on. I'm on twitter among good reads so absolutely pleased. The and my website. S W Hubbard Dot net so definitely looked me up online and Shoot me a message. I'll definitely answer you the other thing that I would really like to mention this that you also very happy to talk to book club sanctuary. I am I love book clubs. I love my own book club. In fact I joined my book club when I came to talk to them about. What am I books? They were reading one of my books. They invited me to come and talk to them and then I liked them so much that I became a member. I can only happened once so I'm in that group But I I do love to. I'll come to anyone any any book group in New Jersey in person but I also do it online by skype or facetime and it's a lot of fun. Oh that's wonderful where all the links to your books and your websites and the social media will have all of those in the show notes. Are they easy for people to find so just remember? It's it's w Hubbard so have it. Thanks so much for your time today. So it's been really great. Thank you so much thrilled to be here. Thanks for listening to the joys of venture reading podcast you can find all the details and links for this episode at Dub Dub Dub dot the joys of binge reading Dot Com. We'd love to your comments and suggestions for who you'd like us to interview next and if you enjoyed the show take a moment to subscribe on Itunes or a similar provider. So you won't miss out on future guests. Thanks for joining us and heavy reading the Jewish bench reading podcast put together with fantastic technical help from Dan. Cotton and Abe Raffles. Dan is an experience sound and video engineer. Whose radiant available to help you with your next project seeking out at D C audio services at G. Mail DOT COM that Steve. Daniel CPA Charlie audio services ex. Gm DOT COM or check casher nights. He's fast. He takes pride in getting it right and he's great.

Frank Bennett facebook Dan Steve Stevie Nicks writer w Hubbard Palmerston treasurer New Jersey Gm Daniel Abe Raffles engineer skype Cotton
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

09:32 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"Loved it. I really really loved my students and I miss them but it was kind of time. My husband recently retired and it was just time for me to devote myself to my writing and to be able to have the freedom to travel you know so Doing volunteer tutoring and I hope to do some lecturing on South Publishing Because they do. I do like to teach but I don't want that. I don't want to be locked into the academic year schedule x say that was where I was going with it because with your experience. Terrific experience. it would be a lot of people who would benefit from moving about but the pitfalls and the benefits of independence shame. Yeah Yeah I you know I hope to do a few talks to different like Mr Groups. And so on I don't really want to do other people's marketing. I you know there is an opportunity for that to set yourself up as the marketer for other people but I I I have a passion for marketing. My own books I. It's a lot of work and I don't necessarily want to take on other I A- problems what do you think is the most obvious thing. That new writers under estimate in terms of the challenges. The one thing that more than any other. You'd kind of warn them about well. I would say that you really need to know who your readers are. I think a lot of times people. You'll ask someone. Will you know who who would enjoy your l? Everyone will enjoy it well. That's you know not true. First of all it doesn't make it. You know it. You'll have a really hard time marketing. Your book if you don't have an understanding of who your prime Key readers are so you need to know who your readers are and then where do they hang out and then what would make them you know. What can you do? That would make your book most attractive to them and I would say the most important thing is to is to come up with the right cover I didn't really know much about cover design when I when I started out and I I don't know another man's treasure does not have the perfect genres specific cover but it has sold and sold and sold and sold so. I'm not going change it at what. America's exists but I did with I ended up recovering Frank Bennett folks to try to make them Exactly right for the sort of Sub Genre of mystery that they are in which is sort of a I call it a location specific mystery. I. I have a lot of readers who all for the Frank Bennett books. There's a lot of readers who seemed to enjoy other like outdoor focused authors like C. J. Box than Craig Johnson who writes the longmire series so I kind of tried to make my covers more in tune with what they were doing. Interesting that that that indicate set the trade publisher may be necessarily get the covers right either not well the very first The take debate cover was really good. I really liked it but the other two I never particularly cared for and then when I got the rights back to the other two you don't get the rights back to your words you don't get the rights back to your cover. I had to recover them once when I got the rights back but then I didn't do good job so then I recovered them again When I had my wits about me came up with a you don't the ideal covers of for those in the inner now. I think I came up with a pretty spot on cover for the for the women's fiction books so yeah it's you really have to study your competition and come up with a with a cover. A lot of people feel like they cover to be really different. But you really don't want your car to be released from cover to fit into your genre so that readers who were browsing or like This this is what I usually like to read. Yes yes the looking back over. Your experience now is stay one than that. You've done more than any other that you would create it as the secret of your success. I would say just creating really believable characters I am I am not a fast writer. I was you know. When I was traditionally published. I was writing one book a year. Then then I started writing books a year when I was you know self published a now that I'm retired. I'm trying to write three books a year but I don't see myself ever getting any faster than that. I'm just not a fast writer. I spend a lot of time thinking too much. Time thinking So I I can't write to trends A lot of people can write to transcend. There's nothing wrong with that but I'm just not fast enough. You know by the time I would get the book down in the trenches would be over so I really But what on the positive side you know Another man's treasure was released way back at the end of twenty twelve in. It's still selling still my best seller so It's not trendy. It's just a book. That's based on really believable characters and That's what has worked for me is just creating these characters that people love. That's wonderful look turning to suicide rate. Of course this is the joys offending way trying to Katia for giving people suggestions At the books to read as well bringeth radio self and who do you like to bench read. Well that's a good question because I am very very grateful that there are binge readers in this world who start at the beginning and read every single book in a row honestly. I don't read that way. I'm not a compulsive person at all so it does not bother me to start in the middle of a series and just been dip out. You know I usually like to mix it up. You know So there are certainly authors that I have read all their work but I didn't necessarily be them one after another after another without taking a break so I'm a big lover of all things British so I definitely grid all the Work of Colin Dexter Ruth Rendell PD James. So those are some sort of classic Ritz that that I definitely read everything. A nowadays I like I had to make notes for myself. So that I wouldn't forget who I wanted to a an cleaves amongst the Brits Michael Rowbotham who I think is Australian. Yeah yeah I I like him. And then Among Americans I like I really like Laura Lippman. A lot and I liked Jillian. Flynn so there's I'm always willing to try something new But those are ones that I will go back to you now time again. Yes Michael I. I'm hoping he's got to come on the PODCAST. Later in the year I had approached him and he said when he's ready to nor to sneak spoke he'll give it serious thought so. I'm really excited about that. He's by love good. Combat girl that was excellent fits right is with static. Come to the end of our Time Today. The circling around looking back over. Your Life. I noticed that the beginning you mentioned about babies and books who managed now to head birth babies and books. I enjoy successful. Happy Guy Having children. That's wonderful look at the stage in your life. If you doing your career pot all over again is the anything that you would change about how you've approached edge. Well you know I it a little random in my career path that my kids are in their early twenties now so they are setting off in their careers at. I'm always kind of play. Doh. Don't do what I did I. I was a little random I. I don't think that I knew exactly what You know they're always saying follow your passion. I did not have a passion when I was when I was twenty. Two or twenty three. And it's only now a much later in my life that I feel that writing is my passion and that teaching is a passion So I I don't think I would have been a very been teacher in my twenties. I did know enough about life and I certainly would not have been a great writer in my twenties as I definitely did. Not You know I had tried to write some fiction twenties but I just didn't have anything to say really so I would say that right writing is one of the you know unlike music or ballet Or or ice skating or something that you have to be good at when you're very very young Writing is something you can get good.

writer Frank Bennett Mr Groups Michael Rowbotham Laura Lippman Colin Dexter Ruth Rendell C. J. Box America publisher Craig Johnson Jillian Flynn Michael I.
"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

09:57 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The Joys Of Binge Reading: The Best in Mystery, Romance and Historicals

"That's where you'll find details also about how to subscribe to the podcast Future besides but enough for me now he is is w heaviest sue and welcome to the show. It's great to have you with us. Thank you for having me. I'm delighted to be here. Looks to Your Baby. Author of two different mystery series. Which you describe as twisty and just a little bit edgy. But before we get into talking about the books could you tell us a little bit about how you got started in writing fiction? Was there some sort of a piffle when you thought really got to do this or is it something? You've always had the desire to say. Well I was always a bookworm. I Al Lisa was reader from a very young age and I always loved mysteries. I started with the boxy. Twins in quickly moved up to egg Christie I was in English major in College. I always worked as a writer Marketing writer newsletter. That sort of thing but when I after I got married my husband and I were struggling to have a baby and I thought well if I can't make a baby maybe I'll just make a book the some therapy for me to write of mystery. So that's when I began writing my first mystery. Take the bait. And that project sort of taught me to write Took me ten years to write it because I had a lot of digital a belong to a lot of different writing critique groups to sort of teach myself along the way but eventually that book Did get new. Literary Agent in did get me started on my writing career. It's fabulous press. We'd like to just established right at the beginning that you right under the name of its w habits so when I call you so I want how we listened to fully understand that when they look for your books you are is w I think that's because there's another super-busy Stuck doesn't it'll like what you write has. Isn't that right right? Yeah that's good. So it's W. will so either one's going to do you watch the kinds of mistakes that you love to read which twisting believable full of complex characters and highlighted with slide. You Map that you've mentioned you've been a lifelong mystery fan. What do you think attracts you to mystery books? It is John Laura. Well mysteries Help us to sort of explore the dark side of ourselves and help us to deal with our fierce I think and then In the end usually justice is served in so the world comes around and is restored to Rightness again so that's that's what appeals to me and I always try I always tried to take the crime in my books very seriously. I don't think there's anything Funny about murder but I do think that every one of us is capable possibly of committing a violent act if something that we or care about is written. So that's what I try to explore in my books. What would drive average people to commit a crime I never write about serial killers or people who are you know. Assassins or hit manner professional criminals in any way I always write about Just average people who are driven to do something extraordinary in the course of their of their lives show so you now hit two different series that drew established police detective. Frank Bennett and the AD FDR under next series and ordinary nealon NBA estate. Sound mistry series Take the bait. Was there also pat of one of those series? Yes that was. Actually the first book in the Frank Bennett series but Well it's a long complicated story about my public. It will be the first. Three books were published by Simon and Schuster and then Back contract was not renewed in them. I started writing more books in that series that are independently published and I was never able to get the rights back to take the bait. The other two are the rights back to but So really the series now begins with the lower but Yeah that the very first book was still a Frank Bennett book. So that the Frank Bennett series he operates out of this town called trump round in the upper state. New Yorker Snippets Lovely Pretty Mountain village. Right I get that. It might be similar to search to places that you've lived yourself. Is it Ryan? Well my husband and I had We loved the ADIRONDACKS. We live in New Jersey so The area where Frank Bennett is located at trout. Run as a fictional town. But it's located in the high peaks area of the adirondacks. And if you're familiar with the The Olympics the Nineteen. I think eighty two Olympics took place in lake placid and so near It's near there. we My husband and I built a small vacation home there years ago before our kids were born and we just loved the area so we We go back there all the time and I decided to to Write that first series About a small town police chief inserted base it on real towns That exists up there. It's sort of a combination of several different towns That that actually exists. And I I like to mix in real places with my fictional town so there there's people get a kick out of that hearing the you know the real places mixed in with the fiction. Yeah Yeah and then Ordre so winded. Audrey come along. She's a sale expert so she moves in wind. Somebody's recently died. Helps the family to get rid of all the belongings if they need help with that kind of thing a great sesia because she can move into all different sorts of analysis mate all different sorts of people. But we did you decide. You wanted to seek and series. Well I'll win the Frank Bennett series. I had written three books and then my contract with Simon and Schuster was not renewed and so I decided to My agent literary agent at the time told me that I should just write something new something completely different and What I decided what inspired me was my own mom passed away and she lived in. Pittsburgh which is about six or seven hours away from where I live in New Jersey so It was really a big challenge. How I was going to. I'm an only child so it was a big challenge in house going to clear out her house and put it on the on the market after she passed way so My real estate agent who is helping me sell the house said will you should just hire an estate sale agent. They'll come in here and they'll do everything for you you know. They'll sell off everything in the house and just leave it. Clean an empty and ready to be sold so I never really dealt with anything like that before and so I did hire states organizer to do my mom's house and I just thought. Wow what a great. What a great job you know a because I was acutely aware of how I took. I only wanted if you mementos to keep you know from my mom's life but I was just acutely aware that this woman was going to be going through my mom's possessions in insertive seeing her whole life Through her possessions. So I just thought that was a pretty cool setup for for mystery a amateur sleuth mystery some yes and six in that series called treasure built on Sanders just recently published. Actually we're going to be having a giveaway associated with the CPA side. People who are interested might like to enter the draw to see if they can win a copy of that. I get the feeling that I mean. I'm probably a person who likes to dig around and say contained shocks and things. I think a lot of our story but I get the feeling that you really enjoy that aspect of the little item set our founding the back corners of people's houses. Do you like to bag on how the TRICIA yoursel. Well I do like to go to estate sales I'm not a hoarder by any and my husband is even more not order so he keeps short lesion terms of acquiring. Alon stuff but I do like to go to state sales. There's usually quite a few around where I live CH- and I do like to go to them to get some inspiration. I did By a very pretty little limos dish recently that I that I bought at an estate sale. But Yeah I mean when you go. It's it's really fascinating to see what people have. And there's usually beautiful things right next to awful things and it's quite a range of people's you know possessions and usually the estate so organizer. Their their philosophy is put. Put a price tag on everything you know. They'll sell you know they'll sell half a box of tea bags you know. I mean it's.

Frank Bennett New Jersey Simon Schuster writer Al Lisa murder lake placid NBA John Laura Alon Olympics CPA Ordre Ryan The Olympics Audrey
"frank bennett" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The dollar the yen is it one oh eight point five zero Tom and Paul I think so much care and my delay there's a looking at Deutsche Bank headlines that right now job cuts of at least ten percent reach unit Deutsche Bank wealth management hire someone new to come in in final stages Paul of reviewing their rates business they do this will rebound and start they do they review their equity business fixed income business another rates business no place no part of that bank is in a safe the force of it remakes this is joy this is without question the quietest guy in New York it is a name you don't know you know her first of course and all that Frank panic is done for them in the years his leadership at New York Presbyterian and Lincoln center particularly has been absolutely profound and he's put out a book that's based on culture which is something to talk about right now but I go because I'm in the room with Paul Sweeny whose expert and media I got to go to your your harsh negotiating tactics here LBJ's a Lincoln bombing down the road with one hand negotiating a link it out of the LBJ ranch Dick what do you think our TV station in Austin is worse excuse me Linden I want to take a picture of that bowl over there later LBJ not even want to be denied follow Dick do you think in Austin station will be worth as much as this and I'm Tony a station that recently sold is that how business is done in the media business well business is done in so many ways that certainly unique however and is my view that that President Johnson was not really trying to get in there to buy the station but he was so opposed to at taking risk that that would entail that he had this little minox camera that he would stop every time is that Johnson would try to nail them and take a picture Paul this goes back in this is the bass family and there's also put me details an attorney tech it's all different sectionals all transactional back in the day was a big media tycoon's big media personalities and of course Frank executive vice chairman former CEO of hers and what I like about Frank in her company Thomas is the biggest media company that nobody's ever heard of and they've owned print they've on broadcasting the lan cable TV including this little cable network portion ownership ESPN Frank so give us a sense of you know kind of how Hearst has he involved and try to stay on the forefront of media trends weather was print to broadcast to cable how do you guys do it well that the generation management that I represent got handed the wonderful opportunity at the company almost Mr Hurst almost lost the company in the Great Depression everybody knows it was an afternoon newspaper company when I came to New York we had three television stations and when I got the opportunity to run the company beginning in nineteen seventy nine I knew that the pay of it had to be made and that electronic was the place to go conditionally and incidently and parenthetically my successor will be making yet another pair of it because of course the world is changing the two right now in the kids won't was run a lunch one well it again for Tyson in our case the payment is to business media databases that people use everyday for example we acquired the Fitch ratings agency which is one of the three largest ready for the world we have data bases for both the medical profession and for automobiles for example if you have a an auto wreck god for bid when you go into the shop the day that the fuse both parts cost and where to get it and the amount of labor all come out of a database that we offer what do you think of all the young Turks I mean you guys used to run things in price to cash flow in like actual accounting and you try to figure out down the income statement there would be this strange thing called profit what do you think of these guys with the revenue growth hopefully but no profits well some of them seems to seem to have brought along there their investment base their shareholders certainly in the case of Amazon you have to say what a phenomenal job he's done in his shareholder staying with him during that time were he wasn't returning a profit now of course he's returning a profit I think the system that we have with public companies were earnings per share rather than cash flow our motion look at I think they listen to that kind of of of an approach to business and I happen to think how much is going to fall out if you show it should turn it upside down a lot of our pockets is what business is about and so therefore there's no one that puts a heavier emphasis on cash than than we do so Frank in your career you've seen you know the media landscape transition from print to electronic as you mentioned radio TV broadcasting to cable television now we got this new thing called the internet and it seems to really be changing the way people consume media and therefore the way a big media companies need to distribute their media what do I need to own and we've seen your good friends of the Walt Disney company really changing pivot that company for example to appeal to the new consumer and health media is concerned what's the Hearst corporation thinking about streaming and and kind of embracing the internet well district distributing their a content happily we're a part of that as it relates to our ownership in the S. P. M. range is one of the places that Disney is making that payment but we're also independently and with other other parts of our business putting a significant emphasis on the web and on the internet and it's as certain that that we need to do that as it was when we need to do to go electronic I want to talk about the book the book is leave something on the table and is a wonderful history out of Texas of a frame Vanik I I want to talk about culture right now you lead with culture is everything how do you make a culture in a rush modern world well it's all about the respect that you have for the people who work with you that how can you do not have to work in ADR hours a week well we don't have the working AT bows and that that doesn't work for us we recognize that people are entitled to have lives of their own and if management wants respect it has to show respect for the employees so the first principle is the company's larger than the employee let's build a culture where everybody is inclined to be on the same page now there's no perfection but I would argue that our culture and is by far the biggest item of the success of the company to come in four hundred million to eleven billion dollars over on my watch and I I think that that really the relationship and culture is is at the heart of that I mean you get pretty good blurbs for your book at least something about only because of the spoiler bees coming back Frank Banik spent decades running a company at the center of American culture boy is that true leave something on the table offers valuable lessons in leadership by great CEO and even better storyteller that's true too Michael Bloomberg first Mr Bloomberg principal owner of of Bloomberg radio Bloomberg television where to come back as Frank Bennett can dive born in this idea of a culture out there and I do want to talk to him about his huge impact a New York philanthropy particularly on Lincoln center green on the screen of forty six the Vic's fourteen point three seven dollar flat and we're waiting and serious news out of the United Kingdom sterling you're having off a little bit and one over play that is we wait for it on the brexit debate stay with us this is Bloomberg national headlines right now with Michael bar Michael thank you very much Paul thank you Tom defense secretary mark asper says over the next few weeks US troops are being moved away from Syria and into temporary positions in Iraq however some will remain in Syria as the U. S. decides if nearby oil fields will be protected this withdrawal will take weeks not days Intel that time our forces will remain in the towns that are located near the oil fields the purpose of those forces a purpose of those forces working with the STF is to deny access to.

"frank bennett" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of Bedford park building for the future the white Sox talk podcast that goes straight we see sports Chicago caught up with Charlie hitting coach Frank Bennett keto who is now up here with the big league club for the remainder of this season check are fine ask the question very innocent question about what impressed him the most about Lois Roberts I'm gonna get redo this quote here. Medicaid answered very matter of factly says his miss hits what do you miss it's the ball it freaking goes I mean fold out in front of one hand Homer and I'm not talking about in Charlotte I'm talking about on the road full the slider down and away fooled beryl Homer holy cow that ball get out you know the ball jumps off his bat he's got leverage he's got bat speed he's just got to put it all together and he could be a monster. now this is a guy. as seven eighty because for some guys you may have heard of Christian Yelich among others so that's one of those things that you you have to kind of take with. more than a grain of salt maybe couple grains because this guy has seen a lot of hitters before and the way he talks about Louise Robert I would suggest that you go and check that the podcast out against white Sox talk podcast again through NBC sports Chicago and if I don't do it just as the way that he kind of brought these points across and just how much in amazement he sounded as to what this young man was able to accomplish interpolate is here and it's just amazing the obviously the numbers bore that out because you did hit over thirty home runs a soul over thirty bases and as we mention to you he was named Louise Robert the end of the pipeline hitter of the year and the white Sox have some some cachet on that list because last year of course so don't seize was named as the pitcher of the year by that publication and also a robber taking on the U. S. A. today player a minor league player of the year as well so you know a lot of good things on the horizon here for a guy like can you lose Robert obviously in the the the the fax was or is a she just didn't feel like he and the magical should spend a a fourth level especially here in Chicago to go home and rest and be ready to rock and roll for a spring training of twenty twenty we had a chance to catch up with the white Sox first round draft choice Andrew one today here the ball park as well did not seem very overwhelmed by what he experienced here in his first year of going through the motions here the minor leagues corseted that played a cal had a long season he did admit to a kind of wearing down a little bit toward the anti finished up his season in Winston Salem with a two fifty two batting average three homers in twenty one runs batted in that was in twenty nine games at that level overall he played fifty five games that was between the Arizona rookie league also Kannapolis and then of course in Winston Salem two seventy eight batter with six homers and thirty six runs batted in that total again in fifty five games we also had a chance to I chat with Chris gets the minor league player director and he was very very good the complimentary of Jonathan Stever with much of that name a few. times here he was the minor league pitcher of the month for the white Sox in the month of August and also in September and will the last month of the season he went to one one with its you already are a struck out twenty six for the dash and a one point eight sixteen consecutive scoreless innings pitched over three starts that lasted from all mid August to late August and add on nine strikeouts in five innings on August the fourth against Carolina's the kid that they really like a fifth round draft choice from last year out of Indiana and they it seems as though the the ceiling very high for this kit as well and it's too early of from what from what Chris gets was talking about today the kind of determined as to where any of these the prospects are gonna end up next year a lot of it depends on what happens in spring training and pens of who makes the big club depends on who's gonna go to triple a you know you could you could expect that guys like Steve were also Andrew one along with steel Walker may get promoted toward that for next year and did you know the the guys that were of being reminded actually always be reminded of the cohort of exit from the cubs just came up yesterday a traffic from this year is less than a year before he made it to the big leagues so it's not out of the realm let's put it that way and we did here and we did talk to a Rick Rick a retcon earlier this year your when they I mean the draft that he expected him to be kind of a fast risers or the system how fast again we don't know this year of good indication of at least what he can do again he did have a a long of the college season before the Miley said its season started as well so I was going to kind of catch up with him he ought to discontinuities now is get is physically never really a chance to walk around the city are you gonna be able to do that a little bit here today a little bit tonight of the four yards back home tomorrow the good to catch up with him and we'll be sharing some of that conversation with you over the next couple of days here as well I think it's just did and I was going on as far as the a minor leagues are concerned when we come back here to get the details on the pitching matchup for tonight's ballgame here the WGN white Sox radio network..

Sox Bedford park Lois Roberts Chicago Medicaid Charlie Frank Bennett four yards one hand
"frank bennett" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

12:35 min | 2 years ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"You have to master a number of different industries. So I was fortunate enough to both cover Wall Street than I was an editor on the front page desk, and then you had work on Cynthia. Sizing these big stories that could've come from the farm bureau's or the Washington bureau. So I think it was at still a very young age. Still in my twenties, a great learning experience. And then when I hit expressed to my bosses at the time a long-term desire to be on the business when a chance the Wall Street Journal, and her started talking about publishing the financial magazine. They said to me, my bosses at the journal so, well, this would be a good opportunity for you on Choubey our lead Representative on this project, and that led to the push into the business, interestingly enough that project, which was called thus mart money magazine, which we brought out in nineteen ninety one I think Hearst person that was put on that project. David carey. And he did a fabulous podcast with you, and David went on to run our magazine division in a fabulous way. And we've been good personal and business friends over since. Now, his graduated to becoming a student at Harvard. Now he is on the Harvard campus and advanced leadership program, and I have a son, who's on the Harvard campus as sophomore great from journalists to business person, and then obviously in chief executive senior executive Hertz corporation along the way. What could you point to for your ascendancy, that was an accolade, or sort of a bold Beth that you've made that got everyone's attention saying, well, this person really could lead this company. I don't know that it was anyone thing. And I think most of aside from the way you dress. The. Look, a lot of things in live his lock in being in the right place at the right time as long as you're working hard and trying hard and, you know, I think smart money, the fact that smart money ended up being a successful launch with myself, as the launch editor in David as the launch publisher. I think another thing that actually kinda helped me in an odd way, David decided after we were up and running a couple years to move on. And he joined nother fabulous media company at Conde nast when he moved on Frank Bennett, who has been my principal mentor in life. And I've been very fortunate in that Frank said to me, would you be interested in taking over David's business, I'd responsibilities, and I guess I was around thirty one at the time and I very much was so that was my first time with that. I was fully on the business, and it was really a lucky turn of events both the David decided to move on. And that Frank decided to give me a chance while it's worked very well. And now as the CEO, would you say that the most innovative moves that you've made or the boldest move may have been in the businesses area way from media? I think the biggest decision that Frank and myself and our board med was to push harder in to what we call business media, which is the Fitch and the medical and the transportation data off where businesses because I think it was relatively clear back, then this was early two thousand eleven that the entire consumer media sector some of which were still growing at a rapid rate. Certainly ESPN was knocking the cover off the ball and an e was blowing through their numbers every year PA positively. Yes. But I think it was clear what we were seeing happening with newspapers getting disrupted by technology and magazines getting disrupted by technology and yellow pages. Getting disrupt that the same thing was inevitably going to happen to the television business. Maybe not as dramatically because television, is it self digital business, but was going to happen. Something was going to happen to the model and we were getting at that time, roughly ninety percent of our profits from consumer media. So we decided in our board and our management team. It really is in many respects, like a partnership at Hearst of all of various division heads, and senior executives and our board, and certainly Frank. We decided that let's push more aggressively into an area that was already working for a so we had the credibility. We just weren't as big as we felt we needed to be. And now in two thousand nineteen we expect almost forty percent of our profits to come from these e to be businesses. Meanwhile, what we thought would happen has happened, not in a dramatic way. But clearly we're seeing some changes in the business model of. Television that has not in any way. Made it a bad business. It is still a very good business, but it's growth pattern has clearly been altered by the changing technology and media landscape. Could you give us a sense of speaking out, how big hurston, what the diversification, as well as a private company, we reserve, the right not to talk about our profits? We did about eleven and a half billion dollars of revenue and we run at a very respectable margin and about forty percent of that you'd think is you said as businesses in two thousand eighteen it was thirty three percent of our profits came from the business media. It's business media sits tend to have a higher margin. So they're not as big a percentage of our revenue. But of our profits thirty three and because our business media portfolio is growing at a double digit clip while the consumer media side. Is not growing anywhere near that fast. This year we think it'll be about forty percent of our profits. And obviously, if those patterns continue, and we're pragmatist so we don't know. But obviously, we will move and I think we would be in better shape, if we move more toward a fifty fifty balance or even just given the prevailing climate north of fifty fifty in favor of the BBC stuff. So this is what I'm really impressed with, because we all love the media business, and obviously, you have your tentacles, a lot of places in that business, and that's been a legacy part of the company, but to really plot out a diversified model that gives you hand growth and business diversification. The same time, I think if I could be bold is the beginning of your legacy the long way to go. We both fans of writer. David brooks. I've been studying his concept, even off the New York Times up ED's of what he calls his second mountain. We this is a personal development, but even from a business perspective. We all climb. Our first mountain, we've spoken about it a lot, which you reach your core competency, hopefully around our age groups and then you start to hit a valley of thought about what you really wanna be in the future versus where you came from. And that valley is a very self-aware process of what the business looks like and where you wanna go, and then you start climbing your second mountain, which is kind of a scary place to be because not where you came from. But it could be a very joyful productive exuberant experience because it's really taking on a new chapter. Once you have a purpose about that, then it can be transcended. That's how I think about you. But how you're working with hurston transforming the business in your direction? Well, first of all, David Brooks is fabulous and perhaps the best columnist writing today, and like you on excited to hear about his new book, and to read it at hers. I've already read it. Area. You're nothing if not flunked doesn't surprise me at all. I think that it hurts. At least it really is a partnership. I don't look at this as in any way my legacy, again, we're building on William Randolph Hearst, did. And Frank bin ich did, and he still with it. We still have this fabulous group of trustees who are both some retired members of senior management who are still very actively involved, some daily, we're just very blessed all of the divisions of hers, whether it would be Jordan were LeBron Hearst television are thirty three stations or David. And now Troy young running magazines Mark all them who's now our chief operating officer at the corporation, but he ran newspapers for many years. Now. Jeff Johnson neared Kim Lonnie who helps us oversee our entertained before we just have fabulous group of folks, Paul Taylor at Fitch or can great camper. We just have a fabulous group. Of really CEO's of their own business eve, Burton Burton, our chief, legal officer and matures CFL, I'm going to leave somebody out some purpose about this. But, you know, we just have a fabulous group of folks in its collective partnership again. We got a great board. Very supportive will Hearst in the hers family. So it's a collective and really what we've done is really a continuum that starts with the founder. So we're just building off of that to some respects in it. See David Brooks thing on YouTube, so I guess I'm a little familiar to some degree. I think what he could also be talking about, is what people do outside of work, and we all work most of the time. But obviously, there's also can be another leg that doesn't necessarily have to interfere with what you're doing businesswise. But, you know making more of giving back more of a philanthropic commitment, more of the civic commitment. And there again, you know, working at hers, that's just. Baked into the DNA. We are all expected. We've got David carry now up at Harvard in this advanced program, trying to learn more about the not for profit sector that will influence what he does either in his business life or in his private life going forward. Certainly, many of our trustees will is very Finland. Thraw bec- Frank Bennett spin on the New York Presbyterian hospital board for forty years and has served as its chairman served as chairman Lincoln center. So we learned that Franken regard because the chairman of the center, yet for Germany into the center, so trying to follow in his footsteps, there's well and, and, you know, work on things like Lincoln center. I'm also pleased to be on the board at New York Presbyterian, a very a privilege to be on that Boorda, chairman of the Associated Press. So some of that is what one does to make a contribution in areas that are not directly, but can be related to what you. Do in the workplace for sure. I want to talk about the area of partnerships because Hurst has been known over long time with one very notable example, which we're going to bring up of being just a phenomenal partner, contributing partner investor, but one that's very easy to work with, and obviously very productive to work alongside and these referred to ESPN. So Hearst for longtime at a twenty percent owners reviews peon in partnership with Disney, which has been the majority holder, take us through how that came to be, and why that parts of it works so beautifully relation with Disney overall. Well, yeah, I mean we're just so fortunate to be tied. Disney is innovating on so many levels when you're thinking about the great CEO's in general, or particularly great CEO's in the media business. You've gotta start with Bob Eiger. So the history of it is hurston ABC, when it was a stand alone company back in. The early eighties Leonard Goldensohn the phenomenal men who build ABC and Frank Bennett came together and decided to have television partnership, that would aim at this new thing called cable television and out of that partnership came the lifetime channels, and eventually the history channel Leonard also bought for ABC ESPN, then capital cities, the fabulous team of Murphy, and Burke with Warren Buffett as their biggest shareholder came in and quired ABC. So our partner became cap cities ABC during that time twenty percent of ESPN that was not owned by cap cities ABC came up.

David Frank David Brooks William Randolph Hearst hurston ABC CEO Harvard ESPN Frank Bennett ABC editor Fitch David carey Wall Street Journal Hearst Disney chairman Washington bureau
"frank bennett" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"Tree CO are able or cough to discuss his unique perspectives at the helm of the hundred thirty two year old family run media powerhouse conversation ranges from Hearst, prescient move into business media, and services to swertz, his well, regarded personal style, which she describes as IBM salesman. Circa, nineteen sixty tune into here how Steve and his colleagues are writing the next chapter of this multi generational juggernaut. It is my pleasure to be sitting here with the president and CEO of the Hearst corporation. Mr. Stephen source, thank you very much for being here. Thanks for having me. It is one hundred thirty year history hearse has grown to own conic print and digital brands like bizarre. L cosmopolitan, the San Francisco, Chronicle and more. They also have steaks and Amy ESPN and owned companies in the business information sector like Fitch Ratings was Steve at its two thousand thirteen and in senior positions for decades prior Hearst, which starred as a newspaper business now trousers, all areas of media, finance and business. Steve has one of the more unique executive this in the world as a leader of a very influential mass media company that controls acids of legacy and new media as well. Leading business information conglomerate and doing it as a private company. Steve, welcome. Thank you for being here with us on Kidger cast, thank you hearses one of those companies that I've talked internally about being. Model like it'd be so bold for how to really build a proper family. Run business. Let me just say that. I hope you and I can get together. When we celebrate the hundred and thirty second birthday of Lyon, tree. Thank you very much. If we get to the thirty second birthday lines of you happy to start. You know, we're only seven years in the making so far, but Hearst is a unique company. So tell me why, or how it is to work at a private family owned business. That's generational nature. I think every company is unique in their own way. I think some of the things that said as part I mean, we are a hundred and thirty two years old. We had a very dynamic founder William Randolph Hearst to was constantly challenging the business side to look for the next thing that made sense in the context of a media company, you know, here's someone who was born fabulously wealthy, because his father was one of the most successful miners in the great gold and silver, rush. Senator George Hearst. So he didn't really even have to work, but he went right into the newspaper business because he wanted to make a difference. He bought afternoon newspapers because he wanted to serve. The common man, and that the working man's paper was the afternoon paper, but he pushed us into magazines. He pushed us into radio before he died. He lived a very long life. He bought one of the first television stations and nineteen forty eight so he established our culture at our place of pushing beyond your comfort zone to look for new areas of growth and innovation. And then we had another icon, ick leader, my predecessor Frank Vanik ran the company for almost thirty years, and he pushed us much more into broadcast television and into cable television and got us going in what we call business media, which are companies like fetch. And so, yes, we're privately held we're actually owned by trust. The fact is, they're both management trustees and family trustees that trustees tend to be lifetime appointments. So we have people who keep a long relationship with the company it reinforces, the culture, reinforces the history, I think all of that. Makes it a relatively unique place to work, but there's something about the culture or maybe the charter, or even the trustees that encourage hurston the company and yourself as chief executive to put more money into the company for growth and innovation and not just to manage the assets of old. I really think it starts with the founder and I think that again, because we've had this trustee system, the keeps executives and family members with a long direct relationship with the company, I think that's how these things get passed on, and they don't get lost one of the shame of public companies, people reach a certain age. And then they're out there not only out as CEO or chairman, but they go off the board. One of the things that I think, helps us is that we just have this history that we're supposed to keep pushing we're not just building the company for today's colleagues and today's dividend recipients, but for future colleagues future dividend recipients, and that's just been passed on. I think it's in our DNA when I became CEO, I didn't have to change anything that was already in the culture, and of course, Frank still right down. The hall is our executive vice chairman make ensure that I don't screw things up hardly. But not. Only did you know the mandate when he became executive. But you also knew that the part of the role is to innovate is to change is to diversify the business again. A new business lines which you've done beautifully somewhat say her may not even be described as a media company. I mean, how would you describe? I will we like to think of ourselves as entertainment information and services company, but I would argue that a hundred and thirty two years ago, we were the same thing because when William Randolph Hurst, persuaded his father to let him take over a newspaper that his father, owned as part of a wide diverse holdings of Senator Hearst, the San Francisco Examiner in eighteen eighty seven I would argue at that time and still to some degree today that newspaper, particularly back then was a principal source of entertainment, a principal source of information and provided all kinds of services to the community hundred and thirty two years later. Would argue that we are obviously entertainment through. Yes. PIN through the history and lifetime channels principally in our local stations information. Yes, is still news, but has also morphed over time into financial credit information through Fitch aviation and information through a company called camp that we own fabulous company, and then the services have become more software services camp as an aviation data and software company, we have a couple of medical software company. So I would argue that while the actual execution elements have evolved. We've stayed in three broad areas of entertainment information, and services because one of the reasons why actually start doing this podcast is because of the storytelling opportunity around this industry, and really not only where we're going, but where we've come from, and that's why. By looking forward to this conversation with Steve because you have a sense of media, and information services is not being a static concept, but where we came from and where we're going very much still in growth mode, and innovation mode. And that is a hallmark for the industry. Most times these are public companies and very hard to transition into these new models, as a public company Bentley, when you have a traditional beat ABI business, which is media in most cases now to beat ac- to consumer business, also very difficult the skill set. So everyone says, I wish I was just a private company doing this, but you have the luxury of doing so there's a give you a different way of taking risk of being bold, as a private family, controlled business versus being public whichever wanna Republic ever is a long time. We have no current need or plans to be public one of the great things about our portfolio. Is it generates a very significant amount of free cash that allows us to keep invest? Sting in the kind of businesses that we want invest in without going to the public markets for equity capital and actually using very little debt as well. So, I think, though that it's not so much public versus private. It's a legacy and its credibility. So whether we were public or private, we would not have been able to pull off the expansion that we had over the last several years into more and more business data medical data or business or medical software. If we hadn't had a legacy of doing that which came out of trade publishing, so you go back forty or fifty years through various acquisitions. I don't think trade publishing was ever a top of mind strategy for the company, but through various acquisitions, we got some trade publications some of which we still publish we still publish Lor covering weekly. And if you wanna know what? That's about the name says it all, but it's still a profitable industry publication. So we continue to do that. But back forty fifty years ago, we were publishing magazines called American druggist. We republishing magazine called motor, which was for people who repair cars for living, fortunately, for us, the publishers of those to trade magazines, again, forty fifty years ago decided that as good or better business would be to be collecting data in their industry. And of course, at the time they had the publish this date in big books, because there was no internet, but American druggist spawned, a company called first databank, which we own one hundred percent of, and it is the largest source in this country of drug dosing information, drug interaction information that is relied on by hospitals and pharmacies across this country. And in some other countries that came out of American druggist motor more from a magazine about how to fix cars into a database as to how to fix cars and repair times and, and repair cost estimates. And is now a fabulous data business that is put together. I think it's in the realm of twenty seven or twenty eight straight years of revenue and profit growth, so we did more aggressively decide Frank Bennett, and I when I was fortunate enough to become his chief operating officer in two thousand eleven we jointly decided with the tremendous support of our board, and particularly our chairman will Hearst to push more aggressively into business data and business off wear, and since that decision we've made nine billion dollars of backwards issues in that area alone, including, including Fitch, we own a smaller piece of fish, we now one hundred percent. A fish and what is forever one's audience and sort of a rating agency component kids, one of the global ratings agencies clearly along with SNP and Moody's and Fitch itself has a long history. And I think Paul Taylor and his team are CEO there do a fabulous job, and it's global rating agency and then it has other non raidings financial information product. So it is a large global financial data provider. Now when you say ratings obviously, this is not media ratings. No, you're talking about bond rating. Right. But the debt markets and the financial markets, so you start off as a Wall Street Journal. Reporter, I believe way back when take us through how that skill set and being very well read gives you the qualifications to be overseeing this conglomerate and building this company. Most of us have had any success in life. And if it from just having head great mentors in from the time I joined the Wall Street Journal, I got to work with such giants in the businesses. Norm perlstein and James b Stewart who writes a famous column now for the New York Times. And I think that what you learn as a financial journalist, is how to analyze things you have to some things up quickly..

Senator George Hearst Steve Hearst CEO Fitch Ratings William Randolph Hearst president and CEO executive founder San Francisco Wall Street Journal chairman Mr. Stephen source IBM executive vice chairman Amy ESPN
"frank bennett" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"Any we've run out a frank sinatra songs probably over the better because i'm getting a migraine headache listening to him but here's one from tony bennett right you know k not a very good win either nonni bennett i realized is that that's a guy a term that people they use think in this pornography of is when dave they think stick of frank leaf sinatra fifty years although of frank tony sinatra had nowhere tony near bennett's as exciting they were set playing a by life the tony way is frank bennett doesn't sinatra now drive automobiles i am agean he never had learned i worked how to for drive tony a cone i'd probably have been the a very rain dissatisfied or something individual disturbing to about put it very this very and mildly yet when you listen to the greatness then of you tony say bennett you think i doubt it he's here a great is another singer from so tony maybe it's it's s all one right called that he yesterday doesn't drive i a heard non automobile the rain very very lovely when you song reflect on at further you realize it's a solo no it isn't all right it's still is something that's very abnormal mcleod tony's voice is an incredible voice now we'll say this about tony bennett inr regards to frank sinatra frank one said he's the greatest singer on earth tony bennett but that's all at frank had to do with tony out.

dave frank tony sinatra frank bennett mcleod tony frank frank sinatra tony fifty years
"frank bennett" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on WDRC

"Welcome back to the lars larson choice a great place that would be frank bennett earned like consider friend his brothers richard meditors you hear often on the show he frank though is a new york times best selling author of the most recently the author of the future of the gun you talk about being embedded with the gun law be the gun lobby goods beaten up a lot by the mainstream media tell tell me tell me what americans should know about the gun lobby in this country bulletproof thing to know that their it characterize it look through that reagan mollenkopf with enough under lobbyied i wanna get behind internet who the people really are an older people are clear how evil now wish degree in the in the year the politics and get an oath is weird vote that way in the areas it never really plane okay with on the way it it the american people inner eight gone wouldn't have any out our wasn't with a hundred million gun owners out there who booked their freedom or the fight lean up hitler members of the law of the gate it will be able to lobby at you come in from any organization at our our people net with one elliot the you know when you consider that were country of about three hundred million people of a third of the people own guns the public opinion polls say that well over half of americans support the right to keep and bear arms and it's a historic right it's embodied the constitution why would any politician think that they would be able to take that away or seriously infringe on it boy injured in a touch allotted you're live on the people who've come the for example even under any career on meets union groomed in one appealed your wallet awash imposed how do they think that nato america what it is what what's wrong why don't understand it at big of a continuing air voting their beat him on that issue anything we'll be up to each other air echo to the school nick in the hang out the same played together intellectually just talking to each other killing each other the smartest in the room they really not getting out there to understand america anthony the real question about that really work meet allow people have under the kudos regan a crime though down at at the.

frank bennett mainstream media elliot lars larson richard meditors york times reagan hitler nato america regan
"frank bennett" Discussed on Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

01:39 min | 5 years ago

"frank bennett" Discussed on Revolution Radio at Freedomslips.com

"Probably can't kill you better from there so player christer waterfront all right so yeah he started what the computer there's a huge quite contributed to search for in era you know brock soria british love it british bobby giving the game today but like durant stellar things what was i don't put we have that but it area canada in british columbia where they're using quite a few peters not only does is fred what she's in areas game he so completely insane when he talks ready he gets passages forever apparently where she's however on it with my wondering whether or not stirred is actually messing with the electorate data to the heads of the scientist there or something also even worse things going on there's a challenged with courtship computer what you give it were at the point it computed powered now where you simply can not driving of adams down a couple wire it's up to the smaller it's there's there's some raises some people saying hunter actually using up frank bennett branches of example stretches rat brains across a across it shipped to allow the the absolute you know literally the electorate stood to down it d be extent that quarter words of of brain tissue so and there is one other possibilities well they have order with a goal seve computers and it was all about six guys on the planet they can work.

bobby canada columbia peters scientist brain tissue brock soria durant fred hunter frank bennett