17 Burst results for "Francois Truffaut"

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Five years later Hollywood was watching and suddenly it sounds having a huge effect on the way Hollywood movie Samaj which also loosen up the Jason out on location which also stop being so Stevia Bounden overlooked so it really had a profound effect on world cinema eventually and was defined group or was it just a kind of general feeling came out. There was a cold group agenda. Gutter Francois Truffaut closed. Chevro- Jack Revette all of whom knew each other as critics on Kyrie cinema and then there is a broader bunch of people who picked up on the language some older because he's a young youthful movement and some of the old filmmakers remained. Kleeman George Phones. You and people like that. We'll watching what was going on. And it affected the way they made films of but the core of it was these youngsters who cut their teeth by writing about Hollywood but unlike most film critics they said we want to make films rather than just write about them all the time and show what we believe in and they invented this thing called the auteur theory. Which is the author and the important thing about a movie is not the STAR. Which was the thing in? Hollywood not the producer. It's the director and on the analogy of literature. You have an author for a film. It's the product of a single intelligence said the director and they wanted to be that Directa so they make movies. Where if you look at the posters which are the subject of this book the Director's name is in huge letters. When it's featured at all and the star is how dimensioned the star of these films is the director and he molds the performances to his or her image though wanted to hers Agnes. Bado who died recently was one of them so this is offered cinema whereas they thought not of Hollywood Cinema was assembly line cinema made by an industry in factories where actually the star system dominated so that was part of it as well. We want to offers. You say they were writers so it was a theoretical movement to what is it practical. What what. How much will people out that doing? It started off as theoretical but they wrote as one of the practitioner us. They didn't write as professional movie. Critics the everything they wrote saying. I could do better. Just give me a chance. And what's interesting is that you know having researched this that the government in France under the Great Culture Minister Andre Malraux. Didn't give them any money to assume they'll grants to do this. Which would be the cases of Arts Council in England instead? These were maverick producers thaw. These youngsters might have something. That's worth investing in a bunch of maverick producers who put money into jumbo garage films. Truffaut's films which did very well actually the book selfish maneuver turned out so yeah they were practitioners in waiting rather than professional movie critics and they write some. Caja Semis full of heroes. So they have a sort of Pantheon. Filmmakers Hitchcock couldn't do any wrong Nicholas Rey couldn't do any wrong but Betty Sam Fulla not the mainstream people who made epic big budget films but the slightly maverick Ulsan wells people on the edges. The move is might be better in the smaller. The budget the more that necessity is the mother of invention on your level to get much more exciting films in low budget land so they had these heroes and you find complete madness like a Hollywood director is compared with Beethoven or compared with star Charles Dickens. I mean they were really overdoing it saying. These are my here but give me a chance and I'll make a movie as well. So you've got this kind of creative energy. I suppose and is translating onto the screen and it's translating into their writing but I suppose what this book is looking is the way that French new way was revolution design so the way that it changed the world of movie posters on. I just let speech Tony About. How the energy transferred in the ways in which it manifested itself in these posts by the mid fifties late fifty S. A lot of the Hollywood movie posters had become very traditional in the way that for example. So bested posted for man with the golden arm which was just the arm with these blue blocks of color on it. Used for the premiere of the film.

Hollywood director Hollywood Cinema Francois Truffaut Jack Revette Charles Dickens George Phones Caja Semis Jason Andre Malraux Directa Tony About Nicholas Rey Bado Betty Sam Fulla Arts Council producer Agnes France Hitchcock
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

Very Bad Wizards

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Very Bad Wizards

"It's it's laying bare the damage that this can do to another human being and to me Judy is actually at least for the. Second part of the film the protagonist. Yeah. Absolutely. And that's and that's because of the choice that Hitchcock and MRs Hitchcock, make right? I yeah. I mean the way that it would I I could see it as a feminist statement is an exactly what you said the way it exposes the harm and the the wrongness of this kind of controlling male figure, and I don't think that's something. That's unintentional. You you have an echo of it. When they're describing the story of Carlotta Valdes guy in Berkeley. And he says something along the lines as he says, she's just discarded men could do that that back, then, you know. And yeah. And what are you saying that I wasn't sure whether he was saying it wistfully come across condemning Lee. But yeah, you you never know with Hitchcock in the interview that hits did with Truffaut. The French filmmaker Francois Truffaut. Became a book. Write it came Draymond again. I have the book I own the book, here's a psychological theme. He him dressing are up to look like Madeline who he believes is dead his intention was to shoot it as if he's undressing her because his goal is to is necrophilia to have the deg dead woman. And he says right at the very end where she has the the the the the dress and the shoes, and but that she's let her hair down because and she says it goes better with her with her face or something like that. And and he says, no you have to put your hair up Hitchcock said that was like she's naked except she still has her knickers on. And then she she puts her hair up. Now, the knickers are off and now he can love her and accept and embrace her. And and so that's the moment where there have he's he's finally having sex with his finally engaging. In that active necrophilia that he's been trying to engage right? I mean. Hopefully hitchcock. It didn't mean, you know. Actual sex with a dead body. But in some symbolic way, this is having sex with somebody who just does not exist. Right. He's creating somebody. And so their existence is purely your creation, which Lee which this leads me to. Kind of interpretation of this film that that like I don't know if it's a stretch for me. But. Because I think I'm just a fan of meta nece in general everything that I like either is meta in some way or or interpreted in that way. But my favorite works of art are ones that seem to be critiqued like seemed to be commenting about themselves about something. Yeah themselves, and and here's what I'm what I was thinking as I saw the movie, and I was reading about it could be taken as a statement of what? What movies cinema Hollywood does? To the audience. It creates this fake person that we then become obsessed with and if that's the case if that's the statement that's being made to me the standing for Hitchcock in this movie is Gavin Elster Gavin Elster creates this person X knee Hilo sort of you know, and and Jimmy Stewart from the moment, he sees her in that restaurant. It is like the classic movies of love at first sight moment. He is obsessed with her in the way that that people become obsessed with with actors, and he has created this person. This person is not true is not a real person. And Jimmy Stewart has to deal with the pain of of that nothing real person in tries really really hard to make that into a real person and the whole time this there are other real people in his life. Right. Right. Yeah. And and I couldn't. But read that this is, you know, and we haven't even talked about his actual vertigo. But but the role of this this movie director in in giving us emotions is like what governor has done Jimmy Stewart. He's taking advantage of his naturals vertigo exploiting. It..

MRs Hitchcock Jimmy Stewart Francois Truffaut Madeline Lee Carlotta Valdes Judy vertigo Gavin Elster Draymond director Hollywood Berkeley
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Let's talk a little bit about visual storytelling because I wonder if this is as we mentioned this is the infancy of cinema. We are still very much in the early stages if not or the mid stages of silent. Cinema and the different very different type of storytelling that takes place because of that, you know, that that's obviously changes drastically. When dialogue gets put into the mix. I wonder since you still teach this film regularly that. Charlie Chaplin has to use certain devices in order to have us understand exactly what he means purely on a visual level, and that's in part because he has to be very direct because film audiences at that time are still getting used to how to receive a film, and I wonder almost if students today are in the same position. Because watching a silent movie is not akin and the slightest to watching a contemporary Hollywood blockbuster, or even even you know, your kademi award nominated movies of the day. And I wonder if it almost resonates on the same level because we're almost as. New to this type of storytelling as audiences were at the time. I that's a that's a great point. All I know is this it works with kids today. And I and and to me the distinctive elements of chaplain, storytelling visually are these and one he himself made such a point of. And that was I don't want to re frame. I don't want to move the camera more than seems necessary. And I want to keep a certain objective distance from the characters in question. He he's he's he's really big on that. And and to get a little nerdy here. One of his one of the people that he actually influenced without knowing it was Francois Truffaut. One of the great leaders of the French new wave and Truffaut often sites that he wants his camera to be as calm. I think was the word. He used. As chaplains but something else about chaplains visual style. And this is you can see it. It's the early language of film trying to find a way to talk and trying to find a way to express itself. It's the use of the iris in the film. The iris is used a great deal and it in many silent films often is used at exactly the same speed. It opens and closes at the same speed not in chaplain chaplain times the speed to the moment in question. If it's a comic beat that iris moves quickly. If it's a serious sadder beat the iris who slowly there's a lovely exchange of irises, if you will early on in the movie of the the bad guys who didn't realize it was a baby in the backseat of gotten rid of the baby and they drive off quickly in the stolen car and the iris goes. Very quickly down right after that. We're back to the mom and she walks off slowly into the distance and the iris goes ever ever ever. So slowly on her. That's all we need rhythmically to let us know. What happens? I take that back. It's not all we need. We need something else which chaplain also provides and that's the music that he wrote which is so rich and so beautiful, but we'll leave that for a second. There's another great iris moment in the film where you can really see an early effort at deep. Focus and deep focus is something's not going to come in to film for twenty more years in nineteen forty one with Gregg Toland and citizen Kane, and the little foxes, and it's the moment where the mom has brought some gifts to the poor children..

Charlie Chaplin Francois Truffaut Gregg Toland Hollywood citizen Kane
"francois truffaut" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

The No Film School Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on The No Film School Podcast

"Sell good number eight is the four hundred blows by Francois Truffaut. High also had the poster in my college dorm room. Do you get extra points for that? Because I gotta go back through the lake. Number seven is eight and a half by Rodrico Fellini. I number six is persona by Ingmar. Bergman. I five is the rules of the game by John Renoir. Number four is Russia Mon by Akira Kurosawa? Number three is Tokyo story by ozo-. I haven't watched it. How we've talked about those cool things they do at New York Film festival where like a modern day luminary filmmaker comes and talks about films that influence them. Jim Jarmusch at the one. I went to listed this film as one of his still on my list. But now, we're like shamed. We all have to watch Tokyo story by like next week. I'm generally shaving by this entire brasses. Number two is bicycle thieves. Number one is seven samurai. I. I don't think I've seen it. Now that's a four hour in a lot of. But there's so much samurai action. Yeah. It's so good. I know seen the magnificent seven the remake not there. Yeah. Denzel Washington won in the one from the sixties which any sleep. So what are you guys favorite just around this out? What are you guys favorite for films? Actually breathless is not my favorite good Dr weekend, two or three things I know about her in praise of love breathless is the canonical title. So I could see why it would be there. But I wouldn't have selected that from him. For instance. I think pure food my favorite. Yeah. That's good as well. From that time period, there were sixty seven filmmakers on the list. So there must be multiple titles from almost half of them. So I bet there's more than there. You know? Like, if we went further up on the list, you get to like, your mother Toro, and like pants labyrinth is on there. So like a lot of them are more contemporary. It's just like the classics are, of course in the top twenty. So. Yeah. We have more Bergman on Bergman, persona persona. Not seven seal. I'm surprised. Okay. Okay. Yeah. Love these films are really classic to Johnny. We're seeing those more contemporary ones higher up on the list. I I would say generally that like the cinema scene from Israel in the last twenty years has totally lead only say blown up. It's a bad bed words for Israel. But it has been burgeoning a lot of the shows we like here in the US come from Israeli show is so I would definitely recommend people. Check out some Isreaeli cinema. Any anyone film in particular or nothing coming directly to mind, but I would say generally, I haven't seen like a bad movie out of Israel in the last decade, and there's been a lot. But I think super Indy wise to mama tambien is probably my favorite. I was gonna say I'm shocked by the lack of like Mexican and Latin American presence in the surprising. But yeah, it's done said, I guess like higher like in higher numbers there are, but that's spent one of the top languages. Yeah. This is a massive undertaking. You know, like sorting out the one hundred greatest films of like. Regardless of the fact that their foreign or not it's just like this is the entire world. We're talking about it's not just America. It's and every decade like they didn't even narrow it down. Surprising. How much of the like dominant mid-century thing is still part of the top of illest. That's all it's just interesting that like a whole lot of the ones that were used to seeing there are still up there. Well, I guess that's what makes them classics. Yeah. And then I'm also conduct not see the conformist. Although I wonder what Berta Lucci made it. I'm sure there's a Berta Lucci somewhere in there. But it was kind of surprised not to see that one. I think probably right up the whole list. And while we might not have it by the time this podcast is released. It'll probably go out on Friday. So stay tuned in to that cool and speaking of voting for things you all know by now that we had election day in America this week. There were lots of races all over the country, and there's one I can pretty much guarantee. You heard nothing about, but it's actually relevant. Indie filmmakers, I'm talking about the fight over the congressional seat in west Virginia's third district a rural..

Bergman Israel Berta Lucci Jim Jarmusch Denzel Washington America Francois Truffaut Tokyo Akira Kurosawa Rodrico Fellini Ingmar John Renoir New York Film Russia west Virginia US Isreaeli twenty years
"francois truffaut" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"So that was after you were how long after he became the assistant that happened? Well, I then was head of marketing for new world. Pictures just kind of moved around has in wherever there was a need. You went regardless of how skilled in and in that position. And and then I went from that to being a PA. So I went from head of a department to be production assistant. So you're, you started this, then your head of marketing. So what were you taking in at that time that you know in intellectually or for your own business model? Did you when did it start to his way of doing business start to impact the way you saw out to do what you do? Well, I think that if you look at what Roger was doing back then, in addition to the exploitation films that he was making, he was distributing Truffaut films. And yeah. Yeah, films and Ingmar Bergman films. So it was very much like if you wanna look at my career, I've make incredibly commercial things and then I make documentaries. So that was a great example for me and we. So as head of marketing you, you know, you'd marketed everything from rock and roll high school, which is right. Francois Truffaut does the green room right? Calm. The distribute the the first distributor, right in America, Janice films, I think predated him, but it was really Janice and new world at the time. So his whole because I talked to him why I, it's, it's interesting that he continued to make the type of movies that he makes. But he always had such amazing respect for these movies at were the much loftier and much more artistically provocative is you think that he, he didn't see himself as being able to produce those kind of movies or you don't? I. That I think the concern really was if you didn't get it a hundred percent, right? It was going to be a failure because that audience is much pickier right. Right. Audience will at least show up for the first weekend, and if you make the movie for little enough money. Right. And in addition to that, you know, he didn't give anyone final cut. You're not going to say to an Ingmar Bergman or Truffaut, you know, right. Roger was never wanted to be Harvey Weinstein. Right. Well, that's good. Yeah. In every possible way. Right? Like he, he also like even though the directors, it started with him, went on to do incredible sort of autour type of movies when they were with him. They made Roger Corman movies and but Raja was very upfront about that. Yeah. In fact, when Jim and I wanted to make the Terminator he said, it's the budget's going to be too large. You've learned everything you can possibly learn for me. It's time for you guys to go out on your own. I mean, how many people would would you know would would say, well, you know, most people would say, I'll executive produce. I really won't contribute anything, but I'll, you know. Take my cut. Instead, he said, you've learned all that. You can learn here. Go go out and fly on your own wings. Yeah, and he did that a lot with everybody. Yeah, he gave them the the nuts and bolts education of production or directing, or whatever the hell they needed to do. And he said, go, go get a new crew people to make this stuff. Exactly. And he was okay with it and you know what? We're still in touch when I say him and Julie. Yeah, once or twice a year. And you know, and and I think that I think he his name really should be a household name along with everyone else because I can't imagine the American film industry without the people whose careers he started. No doubt, I and I think he is a household name to to people who know film. Yes, right? Yes. So you when you go to to be a PA, is that where he started to really understand the set and how that all worked?.

Roger Corman head of marketing Jim Ingmar Bergman Harvey Weinstein Francois Truffaut production assistant Janice America executive Julie Raja hundred percent
"francois truffaut" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"Interpreter of francois truffaut had to speak french my dish in that day and to release big fragile sherry of really really good and i'm not really good but i have a good accent so i come in at his julia phillips and stephen i don't think drivers was there and marian darty because my first three or four movies there were always marine darty in the same office it was very comforting funny sort of way and they won't talk to us in french a little bit and i say idia coodinated we fall sinisi in his subaru salah cleaned if you see it's been many years since i've spoken french if you give me this job it will be very difficult i'm not lying i don't wanna be lying 'cause they'll soon so i said this all real you sound like you're speaking french and we talked about some other things and then then they say well just regale us for a while in french and i said oh golly oh show to taste with about day vehicle these went on and it's the ant and the grasshopper by rochefoucauld or somebody and i had memorized the entire poem in seventh grade and fortunately held onto it 'cause i i sleep by when it rhymed because you obviously i wouldn't be talking conversationally rhyme and that was like well you really are wonderful and then i went out and they said you got the job and immediately went to bullets and took an intense ten day course and how to speak french headaches migraines yeah unita shield as you news inflation in your eyes in your sinus yeah demos only healty if hives you have allergies dibley go burning on your face on your body yes who are you people know counties yeah i got one just like in my living room who are you people the ps when mo question now famous i'm going to have you recently had a close encounter uncle w twin close encounter with something very unusual who are you people so i remember that the other thing i remembered was the whole thing was fabulous experience being with francois truffaut for eight months standing next to him nobody else spoke french except his translator who is a really nice person it wasn't fun for him to be with his professional translator so we hung out all the time i got to translate for him he gave me a script to read that i had to translate for him until him what it was about its and the first time i met him was in gillette wyoming where we shot the real exteriors their release the devils tower and we were there for a week or two weeks everything like that would normally take three days would take three months because special effects it was a long time and we'd go to a little restaurant in gillette wyoming and francois in his french and my holding french and his even worse english than my french was even better than his english he wanted me to explain to him what chicken fried steak with and it's like that was the beginning and i i loved him anyway but i'm media loved him because the irony of me playing his interpreter and not being able to speak a word of french vassily of he steve founded so droll and it was so much like antoine ellwood get into situation like that the had it just you know i fell in love with him and it was like standing around for eight months telling fun stories and there's a i wrote a book about a call the close encounters diary them really was my experiences there and steven wrote the production for which was really nice of him to do and i hadn't realized it but there was one scene where we're an indian were getting out we're about to see the men in the yellow ropes point at this guy and it always starts with us we drive up in a car and get out and stephen ronin is introduction because i had never known this stevenson i'm kinda like france was babysitting whatever it was i kind of kept him amused whenever he said but he always wondered when we got out of the car every time and we'd then we'd run up with armed fingers pointing he said press kwa seemed mysteriously amused all the time what was i doing to elicit that response in him it was like we were telling each other jokes because we wanted to see if i could make jokes into french that would be funny and.

francois truffaut eight months three months three days two weeks ten day
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Kickass News

"Seinfeld in fact this oscar and emmy nominated actor director writer and producer has been one of the most delightful parts of many of the best movies and television shows of the past fifty years and perhaps more than any alist movie star bob's very presence in a film is a sure bet that it's gonna be terrific just like his latest project a miniseries based on the classic political thriller three days of the condor condor airs wednesdays at ten pm eastern in pacific on at and t audience network and today bob balabagn joins me on the podcast to discuss reuniting with his old friend william hurt in condor getting to play his first role as a bad guy in ages in how his character rationalize is diabolical behavior and what this update of the classic film says about america's growing paranoia over conspiracy theories and the socalled deep state he recalls his family's early roots in the golden age of hollywood his first break playing line yes in the original production of your good man charlie brown and how he ended up playing francois truffaut 's translator both on and off screen in one of his first films close encounters he shares why sometimes enjoys auditioning for a part more than actually getting it and how he likes to study the famous directors he works with from steven spielberg and robert altman to wes anderson and christopher guest plus bob's career as six degrees of warren littlefield why strangers still come up to him pitching him television ideas and how to shoot a film about the richest woman in the world on a shoestring budget coming up with the delightful and talented bob balabagn in just a moment.

Seinfeld oscar bob balabagn william america hollywood steven spielberg robert altman director writer producer charlie brown francois truffaut wes anderson warren littlefield fifty years six degrees three days
"francois truffaut" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Fahrenheit four fifty one mike jordan and michael shannon among others i remake of a movie from the sixties yes from nineteen sixty six with oskar werner ed julie christie francois truffaut directed i love the book i remember reading the book in high school if thinking this sort of like reading nineteen eighty four i was like this is very important and then i remember seeing the nineteen sixty six film and thinking it's hard to translate this right and it was interesting to see how this one fared on the big screen the little screen so to speak and it just never really made that jump for me because i remember the original one being kind of cold yeah cold just sort of it just it's hard for me when you're talking about burning books in our day and time now when books really don't exist anymore because everything's online so it was just kind of weird and it's it's hard they do have this thing throughout it all like a bald eagle that's like looking out at you and says see something say something and but that's more of like you're in forming on all these people are you know or guinness avert our society and i know we live in weird times but it's hard even from the weirdness of what we're living through to make that jump to a totalitarian state like that that needed fine yeah it just it didn't i know i wanted i'm going to go back and watch it again but it just i remember i left at saint miss the morning yes to what about you guys what do you watching well i am waiting with baited breath.

mike jordan michael shannon julie christie francois truffa
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"Ten ten fam come massive may nineteen sixty eight fronts is in the grip of mass protests that some fia might lead to another revolution meanwhile in the city of ken on the french riviera it's business as usual full the famous film festival or at least it was until two of the country's most influential film directors decided to speak up francois truffaut and jeanluc goto knicks i'll come rate students showed us the way getting beaten up a week ago we have to demonstrate a week and a half late the solidarity of the cinema is students than workers in france the fury exhibited by gone and truffaut mirrored that which will staring across franz and rippling further across the globe the moment was perhaps best captured when goede screamed at those around him who were arguing full the festival to carry on as usual i'm talking to solo dougherty he says and you talk tracking 's and close ups your idiots the cannes film festival was eventually cancelled in nineteen sixty eight in its place the french directors guild held their own competition the directors fortnight now in its fiftieth year the section runs parallel to the main competition at cannes wad wayne job has been overseeing the full nine for the last seven years this year will be his last they've been many questions asked of candace year of the role of streaming and emerging technologies in cinema but white trump isn't worried for him cinema is all about making sure people have the chance to watch movies and he's not talking about franchise films existed in beginning because it was you know supported by your world movements on cinema at that time the cinema was the most important thing avoid the outs like said not chow ski ba.

france franz goede dougherty ken francois truffaut cannes french directors guild candace seven years
"francois truffaut" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"One what what's like have has you have your ambitions as a director obviously they've changed since you were such a young kid making your own films but how how how did they change as it relates to things like this and the difference that you can make in the world and when when did that when did that aspect of filmmaking show up and and what are your aspirations now as a filmmaker where you know i i think the whole the whole for me changeover to uh you know drama from from from you know a kind of conceptual no conceptual stories laissez conceptual i meanth close encounters is a concept draws a concept union john sumter concept you tease a concept for the first time i saw the power in just drama without concept was when i made et and even an and and when he tees not even the room i really realize oh my god these kids are give me such amazing interplay and reality authenticity and drama and i s i was and i remember when francois truffaut was working with me on close encounters uh and i was he was watching me direct issel three year old boy carry goughie and he came over to me i just made a film called i guess is called in i guess the english titles small change and he said you really should do a foam just with kids part of the reason i made e t the way maeda was because what truffaut said to me and he said you really should just to a movie with kids and after that i got more interested in doing films more about characters then concept the concept was always there rick so i guess the first real adult movie i think he's he's my first adult movie but i there's art people were are will argue against that but i think color purple is probably the first one for me that was the first one with no special effects at all and and and then.

director maeda francois truffaut rick three year
"francois truffaut" Discussed on We Paid To See This

We Paid To See This

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on We Paid To See This

"Eddie who so really's just two stories his family he gets cold out because the powergrid goes out because of these closing canas and he is he hasn't experience with a ufo that that changes his life and he is obsessed with finding it more and the same thing happens with melinda her son barry these names are so hilarious has some gorgeous keaton cinema at that time was named barry and they have a citing as well and her son gets abducted and so that's where this story sort of join up and it's this race against the government because in their minds the us fires have given them this vision of what ends up being devils mountain but they can't get it out of their minds and so hundreds of people across the nation have been cold to this vision to assemble to central at the foam is but it is one of the most beautiful looking spielberg films it it's so valentic it's a groin me a tears something that i mean i used to love it i haven't seen it in years but there's so many scenes in it that hurdles like board into my mind it seems like in a good way like the the spaceshiplike obviously the music at the end is great you know that in that scene ship okay let yet lance hendrickson here for a million but i think he's in that scene i forget he's might be in a couple scenes acclaimed french newwave director francois truffaut he's actually one of the main characters in aiding the investigation gad because they've been ufo sightings all over the world one amazing thing that they do in the film is that they fake a natural disaster and it makes you so paranoid not that it happened but for example just say they was a ufo raid in the burbank mountains yes how would they keep people away well a huge wildfire.

Eddie barry us director burbank spielberg lance hendrickson francois truffaut
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"The culture quite rightly quite fatty abroad their embassies do a lot of work tipper for our coach germany evolve exposure the frenchlanguage and when the best initiative that they did new york it's cold films on the green and basically what they do is get together a coterie of cultural heavyweights to cure rate a francophone film season and each film is shown in a different new york public park tuskers them froehlich who so we've already heads gianluca odds contempt jim jarmusch let's but food his selection was a sexual orientation his kind the famous new york sonic hottest copan lifter yeah really cool people yet and the fine the screening of the season is going to be on of loans of columbia university on the sense of september it's going to be francois truffaut's the wild child are never say i have you nancy in and i understand now nerve it a you are a francophone cinema file tom utter you we and a you're not we neither nor now i i love the french cinema whenever the patients can i touch trail to a few an upcoming monitor both of least isabelle hooper appearing on the begins oil and yes as well hand luggage in dublin last week to infringe simanta interview on of the titans of french cinema isabelle pair the fantastic actress she's made over 100 film she what with who fo with dodge luminous screening prison is amazing amazing as little bit nervous as we finicky atmosphere around that cnn on a complete tension big interview stellar names who israel gotta well people will have heard must monitor already legendary pulse of the world's greatest shares warmoth ira cyclists oh chefs yet even alive and that was just that was very much just the apparel thief we've got you can drop the french thing now or africa k and finally continue to laura already a lights of farc.

new york columbia university francois truffaut nancy isabelle hooper dublin cnn germany york public park jim jarmusch israel ira africa laura
"francois truffaut" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let's this horror for the 1962 film jewels and jim directed by francois truffaut the score was composed by george delarue jewels and jim starred narrow as well he mian woman adored by two men in a tragic love triangle it was one of the most influential films of the french new way we've which brought international fame to moreau who was adored as a firm for towel of the french cinema merle was known for breaking the rules onscreen and off as a young woman she kept her acting a secret from her father who disapproved when he found out he hitter and kicked her out of the house she never returned murrow made over a hundred ten films who started and louis miles early films elevator to the gallows and the lovers in truffaut's the bride wore a black louis boone wells diary of a chambermaid and orson welles the trial at the age of seventy three moreau became the first woman to be inducted into france's academy of fine arts terry spoke with john munro in 1993 eastern in the early films have louis malle lying the hairs found yes verse on yeah like elevator the gallows and then he's from lovers illegal eastern enter foes early from jails in jammu than the bride where black you had been in at least one film before that when several times before that was different to work with with the new wave directors then was to work in your earlier films aidrie's tell take different in fact i i stack it filming at the same time is asked target acting onstage unball and i'm from the stage my only ambition waste could be onstage i've never seen a film was forbidden was considered gas scandalous i was not allowed to score to see films and i was not allowed to read the newspapers that the ramp was porter as you can see to that they lay restricted ad discipline cell i started filming all and i must say linnea wave borja about killed who different approach at dealt of freedom at the old farms i had made i never met the director was contacted by the producer i would made the costume design law the karma land and then maybe two or three days before added that first day of shoot i would add that meeting with the director the direct tells on the sat.

aidrie terry louis boone wells george delarue francois truffaut jim producer director borja the house jammu louis malle john munro france moreau orson welles murrow three days
"francois truffaut" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The estate of miles scatter men whose bequest is a tribute to npr's ongoing dedication to music and the arts and the listeners of kqed partly sunny partly cloudy today around the bay and temperatures from the low 70s at the ocean to midnineties inland and tonight overnight lows will be in the fifties with mostly cloudy skies partly sunny tomorrow a little bit cooler tomorrow than it was today and then monday i should say sunday will be a little bit cooler as well oh oh this was fresh air i'm dave davies filling in for terry gross today we remember actress jeanne moreau who died monday at her home in paris she was eighty nine ooh let's this horror for the 1962 film jewels and jim directed by francois truffaut the score was composed by george dollar ruehe jewels and jim starred murrow as of all he mian woman adored by two men in a tragic lovetriangle it was one of the most influential films of the french new way they've which brought international fame to the robe who was adored as a film for tell of the french cinema merle was known for breaking the rules onscreen and off as a young woman she kept her acting a secret from her father who disapproved when he found out he hitter and kicked her out of the house she never returned murrow made over a one hundred ten films who started louis miles early films elevator to the gallows in the lovers in truffaut's the bride wore a black louis boone wells diary of a chambermaid and orson welles the trial at the age of seventy three moreau became the first woman to be inducted into france's academy of fine arts terry spoke with john munro in 1993 eastern in the early films have louis malle i the has found yes felt verse on yeah like elevator to the gallows and then his from lovers over eastern truffaut's early film jails in jammu than the bride where black you had been in at least one film before that were in several phones before that was different to work with the new wave directors then was to work in your earlier films aid reads 'to take different in fact i i started shelling at the.

france louis boone wells george dollar francois truffaut jim kqed jammu louis malle john munro npr orson welles the house murrow paris jeanne moreau terry gross dave davies
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That's the score for the 1962 film jewels and jim directed by francois truffaut the score was composed by george delarue jewels and jim starred miro as bohemian woman adored by two men in a tragic love triangle it was one of the most influential films of the french new wave which brought international fame to robe who was adored as a finn for towel of the french cinema merle was known for breaking the rules onscreen and off as a young woman she kept her acting a secret from her father who disapproved when he found out he hitter and kicked or out of the house she never returned moreau made over a hundred ten films she started louis miles early films elevator to the gallows in the lovers in truth foes the bride wore a black louis boone wells diary of a chambermaid and orson welles the trial at the age of seventy three murrow became the first woman to be inducted into france's academy of fine arts terry spoke with john burrow in 1993 eastern the early films have million mile and the whole sam's gus on yeah like elevator the gallows and then is from lovers easter intra foes early from jails in jammu than the bride where black you had been in at least one film before that when several times before that was different to work with the new wave directors then was to work in your earlier films aid was totally different in fact i i started filming at the same time as i started acting onstage i'm bowling i'm from the stage my only ambition was to be onstage i had never seen a film was forbidden was considered dr scandalous i was not allowed to go to see films and i was not allowed to read the newspapers that's the way i was porter as you can see to that very very restricted discipline.

the house orson welles murrow france john burrow gus jammu jim francois truffaut george delarue moreau louis boone wells terry
"francois truffaut" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"The words of the irish war pilot francis ledwidge read by his great nephew frank led which and france's cedric died in the battle of passion now which began one hundred years ago the french film star joao moreo has died at the age of eighty nine she went award for several acting roles and also worked as a director and a singer as hair in the acclaimed film jewell asia him new nagging magpie in who are aimed not an unnamed italy when any sean nominee in one the duma animal oscars one of vincent dow told me more about the life and career of an actress revered in france and across the world john moreau was an icon for wants that terrible word is justified all the new wagner french new wave starter immolate 1950s and was hugely influential filmmaking around the world hollywood was influenced and films like body and clyde and whatever and that movie jules jim there it by francois truffaut was an absolute masterpiece is one of my favorite thumbs i have to say and joao moreau was the female star it made her famous obviously in france and europe but all round the world in fact it to be louis malle another dara to put your on the road to stardom a couple of years earlier with elevator to the gallows interestingly he'd seen her onstage playing malkey the female leading cattle halt in ruth and he'd seen something a sexuality i suspect which he really liked.

europe joao moreau jules jim clyde sean italy ruth dara louis malle francis ledwidge francois truffaut hollywood john moreau vincent dow director joao moreo france frank one hundred years
"francois truffaut" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"francois truffaut" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Time for foreign actress she appeared in more than one hundred thirty films and worked with a string of famous directives such as francois truffaut louis mile and john lewis got ussouth molly guinness looks back now at her life as you know ma the new meaning given a man is when generous things about the whirlwind of life in the 1962 films you lazy him she looks as if she's doing nothing more than having an amusing chat named auxiliary shall be bounding jagger moves wyler my knee no no real with this film morrow became an international star but actually told the bbc it had taken the director francois truffaut some time to walk up to asking had to be and his movie regularly we met for lunch once a week and debt fuss when he was spoke always was wong spoke in some towns i didn't know what to say so which singing songs ally and things like that while we're having lunch always at the same place and he was always having the same dish at that time it was eating snails and when i would go home and then that would be a one of those very far fast to male and that i would have a letter with all the things he wanted to tell me any didn't elliot backed went on for quite a long time in the early sixties murrow was a new kind of actress who suited the mood at the time in the new wave films women dressed casually they would joyfully adultress and men with our friends as well is that office professor of film she net vessel under explains her appeal she was she can she was sexy and she was intellectual and at the time when hollywood actress is would either be bookish and succeed but they can be both john mojo uh initiated this this kind of femininity where you could be sixty an exciting in the royalty because you were intellectual the daughter of an english dancer and a peruvian restauranter murray began her career the theater when she was a teenager she loved it and she went on to appear in hundreds of productions on stage and screen something that you give flesh flesh too forces huge goal in alias you'll never thought about if.

john lewis molly guinness morrow bbc director murrow professor john mojo francois truffaut wong elliot hollywood