9 Burst results for "Francis Soiree"

"francis soiree" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

03:22 min | 2 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"Place. You'd like paris london. Tokyo newyork seven cisco many former residents. Like chicago's black. Middle class have left to make their future elsewhere. Many who still work in those cities or forced into intolerably long commutes as the middle class dwindles. It leaves behind a marginal airlines population. Who depend on the city for a livelihood but often can barely get by but likely no longer and of course wherever this high skilled newly mobile capital cu labor re congregates. All other forms of work will be viable as well. This need not be understood at surface level as an elitist prediction but rather as baby steps toward feasible localism. At long last physical capital still matters clearly so does cultural capital. These are so obvious as to be weird to need to point out but those in a position to extract protection rinse physical capital likely with the lure of cultural capital will need to adjust to this new reality. Sticks are out. carrots are in. What are you gonna do about it. Build a wall. Good luck with that. A tweet from swan bitcoin. Miami mayor francis soiree says quote. We're looking at creating a regulatory framework that makes us the easiest place in the us to do business in cryptocurrencies. We are looking at being able to make payments in crypto in bitcoin in particular being able to pay your taxes re tweet from preston pysche the race amongst jurisdictions to attract bitcoin into their local domains is upon us. Most elected officials haven't realized they are in a race of epic proportions. But for those who have big benefits in the remarkable essay economic consequences of organized. Violence historian frederic lane emphasizes the importance of sovereign competition in using and controlling violence in an era of more mobile capital than we are used to today quote if all the tribute was used for conspicuous consumption. The term which seems particularly appropriate for the court of prince of the ancient regime growth was slowed by lack of investment merchants. Who gained protection rents from trade and colonization. Although not entirely inconspicuous consumption probably had a lower propensity to consume. If so lower profits for governments and higher profits for trading enterprises meant more capital accumulation and more growth mcneil similarly observes that in the wake of the eleventh century upsurge of venetian and genoese private commercial activity in the mediterranean quote rulers of old fashioned command societies were simply unable to dominate behavior. As thoroughly as in earlier times peddlers and merchants made themselves useful to rulers and subjects alike and could now safeguard themselves against taxation and robbery by finding refuge in one or another port of call along the caravan route and seaways where local rulers had to not to overtax the trade upon which their income and power had.

preston pysche eleventh century today francis soiree paris london Miami genoese Tokyo newyork venetian mayor mediterranean frederic chicago bitcoin cisco seven
"francis soiree" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:45 min | 8 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sunny, breezy smoke and haze hot, very hot again today, Eyes in the eighties up to possibly 112, far inland. Also very hot, excessive heat warning, in effect until 10 p.m. for the Sacramento Valley, Sonny and hazy today, Sacramento's predicted high 110 degrees. I'm tan Xena Vega and you're listening to the takeaway. It's great to have you with us on this Labor day. What the unions are the second largest group to be affected by police brutality. After black Americans, they're disproportionately affected by co 19 many of the essential workers that have kept our society running over the past six months have been immigrants from Latin America who have also been caught in the cross hairs of the Trump administration's anti immigrant policies. At the same time, Latino civil rights organizations have struggled to organize large swaths of the community, which in itself is widely diverse and language, immigration status, race, national origin and political affiliation. We're going to take a look at what it would take to galvanize the Latinos in the United States and addressed the issues most affecting them come November for that, and lots more. I called up Julian Castro back in July. He's been US Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. And also a former presidential candidate. Good to be with you, Secretary. I want to start by saying that I understand that Koven 19 affected your family recently. And I'm very sorry to hear about your stepmother. Thank you very much for your condolences. Here. We lost our stepmother, Alice. Alice and my father were married for 31 years. On DH. She was a wonderful woman. Fantastic. Wife and mother and step Mom. Toe my brother walking and me. And it's difficult these days because family's heir unable to grief in the usual way that you do because of when somebody dies with covered 19. It's something that has really changed. The way we live in so many ways, and I think one of the reasons we wanted to have this conversation with you. Mom specifically was because Latinos are now at the center of so many of the issues that are Happening in this country and covert 19 is among them. It has been devastating Latinos across the country. We spoke to the mayor Kate Diego of Phoenix. Yesterday on our show, and we've spoken to Mayor Francis soirees in Miami on the show about these populations and how they're faring and the numbers are rising at an alarming rate of Latinos, who not only have Corona virus but are dying from Corona virus. What do things look like where you are in Texas? Right now, Secretary Here in Texas. It's a lot of the same story the Latino community burying a disproportionate share of that, for many of the reasons that people have cited, um, really vulnerabilities that existed well before this pandemic. People that have to go out to work because they can't do their job from home. Folks that are not getting adequate health care to begin with, especially in a state like Texas that hasn't expanded Medicaid folks who have underlying conditions. You know, I have a mom who has diabetes. My grandmother passed away years ago from complications related to diabetes and With covert 19 Underlying condition, like diabetes definitely makes you more susceptible. To a harder time with it. So for so many reasons, the Latino communities is especially struggling right now. Do you have a message for our country's leaders about covert 19 and how it relates to communities of color specifically because not only are Latinos being affected, but black Americans and indigenous populations are also Bearing the brunt. Of this virus right now. My message would be pay attention to what's going on. And If you really care. Take the time to understand why And understand that there are things that we can do. To make sure that we rewrite that story in the future. In other words, getting health care to every single person in this country, making sure that every single person has a safe, decent, affordable place to live in this country. Ensuring that people Have the dignity of work but also are paid what they should be with the kind of benefits that they should be. Because what we're seeing today is just the culmination just a demonstration of the shortcomings. Of making a commitment to people in this country that has fallen disproportionately on people of color. So I'd say to policy makers like pay attention and learn the why and the how we how we can make it better in the future. In addition to the Corona virus pandemic We're also experiencing what a colleague of mine in journalism Aaron Haynes often calls a pandemic within a pandemic, which is the uprising for racial justice that we've seen across the country. What's underpinning that uprising secretaries? You know they are the police killings of black Americans. But we also know that Latinos are the second largest group to have been killed by police and experience police brutality, thinking of the killings of Carlos Ingram Lopez in Tucson. Andres Guardado in Los Angeles. It was found recently that undress was shot five times in the back after an independent autopsy. Where do you see the role of Latino activists in the larger uprising for racial justice in this country right now given where Latinos and how Latinos have also been experiencing police brutality? You know, When you looked at those pictures of people in the streets protesting or, you know, I went to participated. I bet a lot of listeners participated in one of the protest's. It was wonderful to see people of all different backgrounds. Marching for equality and marking against police brutality, including Latinos. And the role I think of the Latino community is to tow our stories. Also to stand in solidarity with the black community and all folks who are affected by this And to make sure that We work in every single way Protest ng on the streets..

diabetes Secretary of Housing and Urban Secretary Texas Alice Sacramento Valley Sacramento Julian Castro Sonny Latin America United States Corona Trump administration Miami Andres Guardado Phoenix Kate Diego Carlos Ingram Lopez Aaron Haynes
"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:45 min | 8 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm tan Xena Vega and you're listening to the takeaway. It's great to have you with us on this Labor day. That the unions are the second largest group to be affected by police brutality. After black Americans, they're disproportionately affected by covert 19. Many of the essential workers that have kept our society running over the past six months have been immigrants from Latin America who have also been caught in the cross hairs of the Trump administration's anti immigrant policies. At the same time, Latino civil rights organizations have struggled to organize large swaths of the community, which in itself is widely diverse in language, immigration status, race, national origin and political affiliation. We're going to take a look at what it would take to galvanize the Latinos in the United States and addressed the issues most affecting them come November for that, and lots more. I called up Julian Castro back in July. He's been US Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. And also a former presidential candidate. Good to be with you, Secretary. I want to start by saying that I understand that Cove in 19 affected your family recently and I'm very sorry to hear about your stepmother. Thank you very much for the condolences. Here. We lost our stepmother, Alice. Uh, Alice and my father were married for 31 years. On DH. She was a wonderful woman. Fantastic. Wife and mother and step Mom tow my brother walking in me. And it's difficult these days because family's heir unable to grief in the usual way that you do because of when somebody dies with covert 19. It's something that has really changed. The way we live in so many ways, and I think one of the reasons we wanted to have this conversation with you specifically was because Latinos are now at the center of so many of the issues that are Happening in this country and covert 19 is among them. It has been devastating Latinos across the country. We spoke to the mayor Kate Diego of Phoenix. Yesterday on our show, and we've spoken to Mayor Francis Soirees in Miami on the show about These populations and how they're faring and the numbers are rising at an alarming rate of Latinos, who not only have Corona virus but are dying from Corona virus. What do things look like where you are in Texas? Right now, Secretary Here in Texas. It's a lot of the same story the Latino community bearing a disproportionate share of that, for many of the reasons that people have cited, um, really vulnerabilities that existed well before this pandemic. People that have to go out to work because they can't do their job from home. Folks that are not getting adequate healthcare to begin with, especially in a state like Texas that hasn't expanded Medicaid folks who have Underlying conditions. You know, I have a mom who has diabetes. My grandmother passed away years ago from complications related to diabetes and With covert 19 on underlying condition, like diabetes definitely makes you more susceptible. To a harder time with it. So for so many reasons, the Latino communities is especially struggling right now. Do you have a message for our country's leaders about covert 19 and how it relates to communities of color specifically because not only are Latinos being affected, but black Americans and indigenous populations are also Bearing the brunt. Of this virus right now. My message would be pay attention to what's going on. And If you really care. Take the time to understand why And understand that there are things that we can do. To make sure that we rewrite that story in the future. In other words, getting health care to every single person in this country, making sure that every single person has a safe, decent, affordable place to live in this country. Ensuring that people Have the dignity of work but also are paid what they should be with the kind of benefits that they should be. Because what we're seeing today is just the culmination just a demonstration of the shortcomings. Of making a commitment to people in this country that has fallen disproportionately on people of color. So I'd say to policy makers like pay attention and learn the why and the how we how we could make it better in the future. In addition to the Corona virus pandemic We are also experiencing what a colleague of mine in journalism Aaron Haynes often calls a pandemic within a pandemic, which is the uprising for racial justice that we've seen across the country. What's underpinning that uprising secretaries? You know they are the police killings of black Americans. But we also know that Latinos are the second largest group to have been killed by police and experience police brutality, thinking of the killings of Carlos Ingram, Lopez and Tucson. Andres Guardado in Los Angeles. It was found recently that undress was shot five times in the back, Um after an independent autopsy. Where do you see the role of Latino activists in the larger uprising for racial justice in this country right now given where Latinos and how Latinos have also been experiencing police brutality? You know, When you looked at those pictures of people in the streets protesting or in, I went participated. I bet a lot of listeners participated in one of the protest's. It was wonderful to see people of all different backgrounds. Marching for equality and marching against police brutality. Including Latinos. And the role I think of the Latino community is to tow our stories. Also to stand in solidarity with the black community and all folks who are affected by this Um, and to make sure that We work in every single way Protest ng on the streets. The policy makers that you now have their Latino in city halls across the United States and state legislatures and the halls of Congress. To activate themselves. On on these policies and make the changes that should be made. In every single way. People can play a role in changing that. With the Latino community. You know, police violence and, um, excessive force. Has long been used against Latinos. You know, that's nothing new. I don't think it's gotten the same attention. Over the years. Why? Why do you think that that I mean, I know here on the takeaway. We've tried to focus on some of the cases that had been emerging in the past couple of months, particularly that of Andres Guardado and others. But why do you think it hasn't gotten The same attention. Is it the media that isn't doing the job? I mean, I think that Often times In the narrative of America. Latinos. Are sort of pushed to the side. Even though the Latino community has become the largest Ah Minority group in the country and I you and I think that They're different reasons.

Texas Andres Guardado diabetes United States Secretary Secretary of Housing and Urban Alice Julian Castro Latin America Corona Trump administration Um Miami Phoenix Kate Diego Aaron Haynes America Los Angeles Tucson
"francis soiree" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:51 min | 10 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Hardball politics. I'm talking about what is and what it is. Is. A group of suburban voters who were offended and put off when a president makes a vert appeals to racism, and he goes down in the polls. This president though even though he's surrounded by people who understand, this is a losing proposition, the man just can't help himself. He thinks it's nineteen seventy-three. Absolutely and to show that he just is out of it. In. Many ways is the politics. There is the evidence as you cited from the mid elections and. The politics of it doesn't even work. I can't tell you joe, the amount of people white who have stopped me that say I live in? The coast, we call the Gold Coast of New Jersey the nicer home sections, and I may have a different politics than you reva now. But I can't fathom how you justify a man's knee on a man's neck for eight minutes and forty six seconds. I think it is an insult to the intelligence of the people. He thinks he's appealing to that they would be on the other side of the questions that are being raised. Now, the questions being raised now a criminal justice and police reform and things of that nature in that criminal justice space, he's appealing to them talking about. Something that is not what these demonstrations about knotweed mobilizing about. We're talking about voting rights as well as the criminal justice reform acts in Washington, and he's still acting like aunt Bee's worried about somebody moving into the neighborhood on not on television anymore Mr President. and. We got to stop pretending like this man his even in tune with what's going on in two thousand, twenty 'cause. He's not. He's still watching F troop that night and waiting on odd redefine finished with the apple path. It's so incredibly backwards and politically self destructive. You just have to ask the question. What is this really for? Still Ahead on Morning Joe, a big city mayor and a top doctor team up for an OP ED entitled Mask Mandates won't work unless they are enforced. We'll talk to Miami Mayor, Francis. Soirees. and Dr, Van Gupta about the top of enforcement. They would like to see you're watching morning, Joe, we'll be right back. With more power cargo capacity and range than a traditional bicycle? Electric Bikes are changing the way people travel and.

Joe president Van Gupta New Jersey aunt Bee apple Miami Mr President. Francis Washington
"francis soiree" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:57 min | 10 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And morning low cloud intrusions as the marine layer stays in place. Sunny afternoons, mostly inland, and some smoke and haze from the mineral and coyote fires will impact portions of the Bay Area into today. Cantina Vega and you're listening to the takeaway. It's great to have you with us. Latinos in the United States are at the center of many of the biggest issues of our time. We're the second largest group to be affected by police brutality after black Americans, they're disproportionately affected by covert 19. Many of the essential workers that have kept our society running over the past four months have been immigrants from Latin America who may also have been caught in the cross hairs of the Trump administration's anti immigrant policies. At the same time, Latino civil rights organizations have struggled to organize large swath of the community, which in itself is widely diverse in its language, immigration status, race, national origin and political affiliation. Today in the takeaway. We're examining what it would take to galvanize Latinos in the United States and addressed the issues most affecting them come November for that, and lots more. We called up Julian Castro. He's been the US secretary of Housing and Urban Development and also a 2020 presidential candidate. Hello. And welcome to the takeaway. Good to be with you. Secretary. I want to start by saying that I understand that Cove in 19 affected your family recently and I'm very sorry to hear about your stepmother. Thank you very much for condolences. Here. We lost our stepmother, Alice. Alice and my father were married for 31 years on She was a wonderful woman. Fantastic. Wife and mother and step Mom tow my brother walking in me. And it's difficult these days because family's heir unable to grief in the usual way that you do because of when somebody dies with covered, 19 It's something that has really changed. The way we live in so many ways, and I think one of the reasons we wanted to have this conversation with you specifically was because Latinos are now at the center of so many of the issues that are Happening in this country and covert 19 is among them. It has been devastating Latinos across the country. We spoke to the mayor Kate Diego of Phoenix. Yesterday on our show, and we've spoken to Mayor Francis Soirees in Miami on the show about These populations and how they're faring and the numbers are rising at an alarming rate of Latinos, who not only have Corona virus but are dying from Corona virus. What do things look like where you are in Texas? Right now, Secretary Here in Texas. It's a lot of the same story overall in the state, we see a rise in the number of cases, hospitalizations and now the number of deaths. Related to Cove in 19 and also the Latino community, burying a disproportionate share of that, for many of the reasons that people have sighted Really vulnerabilities that existed well before this pandemic, people that have to go out to work because they can't do their job from home. Folks that are not getting adequate healthcare to begin with, especially in a state like Texas that hasn't expanded Medicaid folks who have underlying conditions. You know, I have a mom who has diabetes. My grandmother passed away years ago from complications related to diabetes and With covert 19 on underlying condition, like diabetes definitely makes you more susceptible. To a harder time with it. So for so many reasons, a Latino communities is especially struggling right now. Do you have a message for our country's leaders about covert 19 and how it relates to communities of color specifically because not only are Latinos being affected, but black Americans and indigenous populations are also Bearing the brunt. My message would be pay attention to what's going on. If you really care. Take the time to understand why And understand that there are things that we can do. To make sure that we rewrite that story in the future. In other words, getting health care to every single person in this country, making sure that every single person has a safe, decent, affordable place to live in this country. Ensuring that people have the dignity of work, but also are paid what they should be with the kind of benefits that they should be. Because what we're seeing today is just the culmination just a demonstration of the shortcomings. Of making a commitment to people in this country that has fallen disproportionately of people of color. So I'd say to policy makers like pay attention and learn the why and the how we how we could make it better in the future. In addition to the Corona virus pandemic We are also experiencing what a colleague of mine in journalism Aaron Haynes often calls a pandemic within a pandemic, which is the uprising for racial justice that we've seen across the country. What's underpinning that uprising secretaries? You know they are the police killings of black Americans. But we also know that Latinos are the second largest group to have been killed by police and experience police brutality, thinking of the killings of Carlos Ingram, Lopez and Tucson. Andres Guardado in Los Angeles. It was found recently. That address was shot five times in the back after an independent autopsy. Where do you see the role of Latino activists inthe e, larger uprising for racial justice in this country right now given where Latinos and how Latinos have also been experiencing police brutality. You know, When you looked at those pictures of people in the streets protesting or, you know, I went to participated. I bet a lot of listeners participated in one of the protest's. It was wonderful to see people of all different backgrounds. Marching for equality and marching against police brutality, including Latinos. And the role I think of the Latino community is to tow our stories also to stand in solidarity with the black community and all folks who are affected by this And to make sure that we work in every single way. Protest ng on the streets. The policy makers that you now have their Latino in city halls across the United States and state legislatures and the halls of Congress. To activate themselves. On these policies and make the changes that should be made in every single way. People can play a role in changing that. With the Latino community. You know, police violence and excessive force. Has long been used against Latinos. You know, that's nothing new. I don't think it's gotten the same attention. Over the years. Why? Why do you think that that I mean, I know here on the takeaway. We've tried to focus on some of the cases that had been emerging in the past couple of months, particularly that of Andres Guardado and others. But why do you think it hasn't gotten The same attention isn't the media that isn't doing the job. I mean, I think that Often times In the narrative of America. Latinos are sort of pushed inside. Even though the Latino community has become the largest Minority group in the country. And I, you and I think that They're different reasons for that. But I saw that I really did see that running for president the different ways in which that happens. And I think it's true that In our country, You know, people of color Generally, you know, your story is not told in his taught in history class is, um, in so many different ways. You know the media don't focus on the perspective of people of color generally in the way that stories were put together the newsroom's themselves or not diverse, So I think this applies toe you know whether it's the black community or Latino community, others but I think that For the growth that we've seen in the country of the Latino community and the fact that the.

United States Texas secretary Andres Guardado diabetes Bay Area Alice Cantina Vega Julian Castro Latin America Corona Trump administration Housing and Urban Development Miami Cove Phoenix Kate Diego America Aaron Haynes
"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:25 min | 10 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm tan Xena Vega and you're listening to the takeaway. It's great to have you with us. Latinos in the United States are at the center of many of the biggest issues of our time there, the second largest group to be affected by police brutality after Black Americans, they're disproportionately affected by covert 19 Many of the essential workers that have kept our society running over the past four months have been immigrants from Latin America who may also have been caught in the cross hairs of the Trump administration's anti immigrant policies. At the same time, Latino civil rights organizations have struggled to organize large swath of the community, which in itself is widely diverse in its language, immigration status, race, national origin and political affiliation. Today in the takeaway. We're examining what it would take to galvanize Latinos in the United States and addressed the issues most affecting them come November for that, and lots more. We called up Julian Castro. He's been the US secretary of Housing and Urban Development and also a 2020 presidential candidate. Leon. Welcome to the takeaway. Good to be with you. Secretary. I want to start by saying that I understand that Cove in 19 affected your family recently and I'm very sorry to hear about your stepmother. Thank you very much for the condolences here we lost. Ah. Our stepmother, Alice. Ah, Alice and my father were married for 31 years. On DH. She was a wonderful woman. Fantastic. Wife and mother and step Mom tow my brother walking in me. And it's difficult these days because family's heir unable to grief in the usual way that you do because of when somebody dies with covert 19 It's something that has really changed. The way we live in so many ways, and I think one of the reasons we wanted to have this conversation with you. Um, specifically was because Latinos are now at the center of so many of the issues that are Happening in this country and covert 19 is among them. It has been devastating Latinos across the country. We spoke to the mayor Kate Diego of Phoenix. Yesterday on our show, and we've spoken to Mayor Francis Soirees in Miami on the show about These populations and how they're faring and the numbers are rising at an alarming rate of Latinos, who not only have Corona virus but are dying from Corona virus. What do things look like where you are in Texas? Right now, Secretary Here in Texas. It's a lot of the same story. Overall in the state. We see a rise in the number of cases, hospitalizations and now the number of deaths related to Cove in 19 And also the Latino community bearing a disproportionate share of that, for many of the reasons that people have cited, um, really vulnerabilities that existed well before this pandemic. People that have to go out to work because they can't do their job from home. Folks that are not getting adequate healthcare to begin with, especially in a state like Texas that hasn't expanded Medicaid folks who have underlying conditions. You know, I have a mom who has diabetes. My grandmother passed away years ago from complications related to diabetes and With covert 19 on underlying condition, like diabetes definitely makes you more susceptible. To a harder time with it. So for so many reasons, the Latino communities is especially struggling right now. Do you have a message for our country's leaders about covert 19 and how it relates to communities of color specifically because not only are Latinos being affected, but black Americans and indigenous populations are also Bearing the brunt. My message would be pay attention to what's going on. If you really care. Take the time to understand why And understand that there are things that we can do. To make sure that we rewrite that story in the future. In other words, getting health care to every single person in this country, making sure that every single person has a safe, decent, affordable place to live in this country. Ensuring that people have the dignity of work, but also are paid what they should be with the kind of benefits that they should be. Because what we're seeing today is just the culmination just a demonstration of the shortcomings. Of making a commitment to people in this country that has fallen disproportionately on people of color. So I'd say to policy makers like pay attention and learn the why and the how of how we could make it better in the future. In addition to the Corona virus pandemic We are also experiencing what a colleague of mine in journalism Aaron Haynes often calls a pandemic within a pandemic, which is the uprising for racial justice that we've seen across the country. What's underpinning that uprising secretaries? You know they are the police killings of black Americans. But we also know that Latinos are the second largest group to have been killed by police and experience police brutality, thinking of the killings of Carlos Ingram, Lopez and Tucson. Andres Guardado in Los Angeles. It was found recently that undress was shot five times in the back, Um after an independent autopsy. Where do you see the role of Latino activists in the larger uprising for racial justice in this country right now given where Latinos and how Latinos have also been experiencing police brutality? You know, When you looked at those pictures of people in the streets protesting or, you know, I went to participated. I bet a lot of listeners participated in one of the protest's. It was wonderful to see people of all different backgrounds. Marching for equality and marching against police brutality, including Latinos. And the role I think of the Latino community is to tow our stories also to stand in solidarity with the black community and all folks who are affected by this And to make sure that we work in every single way. Protest ng on the streets. The policy makers that you now have their Latino in city halls across the United States and state legislatures and the halls of Congress. To activate themselves. On these policies and make the changes that should be made in every single way. People can play a role in changing that. With the Latino community. You know, police violence and, um, excessive force. Has long been used against Latinos. You know, that's nothing new. I don't think it's gotten the same attention. Over the years. Why? Why do you think that that I mean, I know here on the takeaway. We've tried to focus on some of the cases that had been emerging in the past couple of months, particularly that of Andres Guardado and others. But why do you think it hasn't gotten The same attention. Is it the media that isn't doing the job? I mean, I think that, um Often times In the narrative of America. Latinos. Are sort of pushed in the side. Even though the Latino community has become the largest Ah Minority group in the country and I you and I think that They're different reasons for that. But I saw that I really did see that running for president the different ways in which that happens. And I think it's true that In our country, You know, people of color Generally, you know, your story is not told in history taught in history class is, um, in so many different ways. You know the media don't focus on the perspective of people of color and generally in the way that stories were put together, the newsroom's themselves or not diverse, So I think this applies, Teo..

United States secretary Texas Andres Guardado diabetes Alice Julian Castro Housing and Urban Development Corona Trump administration Latin America Miami Cove Phoenix Kate Diego Aaron Haynes America president Los Angeles
"francis soiree" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:41 min | 10 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Storm Fay formed yesterday afternoon off North Carolina Coast meteorologist Melissa Griffin says it will be off the Jersey shore later this afternoon. That's where the heaviest rain will fall from Philadelphia Jersey Shore up the New York City throughout the day on Friday, Friday afternoon into the evening and into the overnight hours, the heaviest rain moves from New York City up there Hartford and eventually up into New England so we could see the heaviest rain moving into parts of Upstate New York, always back through Maine. Now, Griffin says that the storm is not expected to gain hurricane strength as it moves over land Corona virus cases They're surging in Arizona, Texas and Florida. They are part of a group of Sunbelt states that re opened earlier than other states. Dr. Anthony Fauci has an opinion about that. ABC Matt Gutman reports. Dr Anthony Fauci, warning states with severe outbreaks should seriously look at shutting down, killing 5 30 Eights podcast 19. Some open too fast despite the guidelines, and the recommendation is to open up carefully and prudently. Some states skipped over those and just opened up too quickly. Certainly Florida I know You know, I think jumped over a couple of checkpoints. More than 1/4 of everyone tested in Miami Dade testing positive issue beds are scarce, and patients are dying alone. That's a bee sees Matt Gutman. Extra steps are being taken in Miami Dade to get a handle on the virus. Mayor Human is announcing he will hire 250 contact tracers, and he says an APP will soon be available that will identify local virus hot zones, hiring the tracers to cost $14 million that money coming from the federal cares Act. Local mayors, though, have been critical, including Mayor Francis Soirees of the city of Miami, criticizing Jimenez for not keeping them in the loop on some of his recent actions. Fantasy Fest 2020 Is being canceled. The iconic key West Party will not happen because of the pandemic. The event organizers, though, did Post up save the date message on Facebook for October 22nd through October 31st 2021. Former vice President Joe Biden, laying out more of his plans for the economy. Focusing on a program to buy American foxes. Jessica Rosenthal has that story. The presumptive Democratic nominee spoke to people at the Metal Works factory in Dunmore, Pennsylvania. Joe Biden mocked President Trump's promised to bring back manufacturing, saying he will actually do it. Promising to invest billions in technology are Andy Modernized infrastructure, replenish stockpiles and enhanced national security made her He said President Trump's been too divisive and has failed during the pandemic, carrying on ly about things like the stock market, ending Obamacare or.

President Trump Matt Gutman Dr. Anthony Fauci Melissa Griffin Miami New York City Joe Biden Florida Mayor Human Philadelphia Jersey Shore Storm Fay Miami Dade New York North Carolina New England vice President Jessica Rosenthal Maine ABC Sunbelt
"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is NPR news. And this is morning edition on W N. Y C coming up in a little bit. One suburban Cincinnati community plans to stage what they're calling a reverse parade this July 4th. So what it is is the units are stationary and motorists drive through the parade. Celebrating Independence Day while maintaining social distance that's coming up in about 15 minutes. Stay with us. W. N. Y. C is supported by Lulu presenting the original drama Siri's The Handmaid's Tale starring Elizabeth Moss and out, Joseph finds Yvonne's Tarkovsky and Bradley Whitford. The third season of the Handmaid's tale is awards eligible and now streaming on Hu Lu w N. Y. C and it's local and national news coverage are supported by the Jerome L. Green Foundation, helping to make the arts affordable and accessible to all New Yorkers. For more than 40 years. 19 cases in Florida explode. Miami Mayor Francis Suarez is looking for the way forward. The virus doesn't care. What it destroys Who kills and our economy doesn't understand, relate to the fact that there's a virus out there. And so we have to make sure that we protect people. Mayor Francis Soirees on the Corona virus in South Florida. I'm tan Xena Vega, and that's next time on the take away. Weekday afternoons at three on 93.9. FM. Nothing like a little Springsteen in the morning. It's 71 degrees. Sunny skies in New York City. We'll see mostly sunny skies all day today with highs around 90. It'll be partly cloudy tonight with lows.

Hu Lu w N. Y. C Francis Suarez NPR Cincinnati Jerome L. Green Foundation Bradley Whitford Florida New York City Elizabeth Moss South Florida Siri Miami Springsteen Tarkovsky Yvonne W. N. Y. C Joseph
"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 11 months ago

"francis soiree" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Other protesters plan to stay on to call for further criminal justice reform and economic relief for low income communities. A three storey Brooklyn building that housed a health club shattered by the Corona virus pandemic collapsed today, three weeks after building inspectors issued a stop work order. One person was treated for minor injuries after the collapse around 4 30 in the corner of court and union streets. In Carroll Gardens. Indoor dining at New York City restaurants will be delayed out of fear it could cause a spike in Corona virus infections, Mayor de Blasio said today he's concerned that if the city welcomed diners back into restaurants, enclosed spaces It could be a surgeon covert cases that's now being seen in other states. Outdoor dining will still be permitted. New York Assembly when David Gant, who served the Rochester area for decades, has died. He was 78. The announcement by his office elicited accolades from elected officials who prays Gan for his dedication and concern for those he represented. Gant was the only African American to be elected to stay government. From Monroe County, where Rochester is located. This's W N Y. C. Support for NPR comes from the Vital Projects fund supporting the Museum of Modern Art. Virtual Views continue on MoMA dot or GE with exhibition explorations, including Donald Judd sculptures and Dorothy Lang's photographs. As covert 19 cases in Florida explode. Miami Mayor Francis Suarez is looking for the way forward. The virus doesn't care. What it destroys Who kills and our economy doesn't understand, relate to the fact that there's a virus out there. And so we have to make sure that we protect people. Mayor Francis Soirees on the Corona virus in South Florida. I'm tan Xena Vega, and that's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on 93.9. FM. You're listening to queue on CBC Radio one in Canada and across North America on serious Exam 1 69 and P R X. My name is Tom Power. That is meal, young and crazy Horse with cinnamon.

David Gant New York City Mayor de Blasio Rochester Brooklyn Gan Carroll Gardens CBC Radio Francis Suarez Donald Judd Museum of Modern Art South Florida North America Miami Tom Power Monroe County NPR Florida Canada Vital Projects fund