10 Burst results for "Francis Morla"

"francis morla" Discussed on Switch4Good

Switch4Good

07:20 min | Last month

"francis morla" Discussed on Switch4Good

"Why we don't as a vegan for over thirty david was constantly confounded by the idea that good hind people continue to eat animals so he wrote a book about it. Dave is also former animal law attorney and previous executive director of vegan action the nonprofit that his certified over ten thousand products worldwide with the trademark. That was david's idea. David also makes his own tahini. Tofu which is just a fun. Fact that i had to share. Welcome to the podcast david. Thanks thanks for having me. Yeah so you vegan way before. Alexandra did way back in. One thousand nine hundred eighty eight. I know from researching about you that you did it for ethical reasons but wondering what prompted you initially to think about making the switch and what was so was so compelling that made you completely rejects seidel especially back then and journey down our lifestyle. Okay it actually started when i was twelve unfortunately after a tragedy. My father died in some accident. And what happened. After that. I all of a sudden became very to suffering and it wasn't just myself ring my family's but i looked at the animals all around living woods Suburb of new york. And i saw suffering everywhere. And i realized these animals. They wanna live just like i. Do they suffer. Just like i do so. I kinda sat with that it. It really do anything. But this was the nineteen late nineteen seventy s and you probably don't remember But the anti for movement was big at the time. And i remember in really feeling strong kinship with the anti firms may because of this sudden awareness. But i wasn't vegetarian at the time. So then i went to college and when i was eighteen i was having a conversation. Someone offhandedly remarked. You know there's really no difference between for and eating me. They're both unnecessary. One is for cased one is for vanity. But you need to do either one and that really struck a chord with me. And i had a pretty big decision to make none one hand house big meter as as big as anyone also had a sense that i was causing suffered analysts are hurting animals. And i didn't want to keep doing that. So i thought about it. Do it late at the tar as as you may have experienced i think most people find the initial decisions very hard but i finally made that decision. I win vegetarian. Unfortunately at times just after publication of the book diet for small planets by francis morla. Okay so there was some awareness about vegetarianism. It wasn't until eleven years later. I was in law school and went to exhibit. I up and i became aware of the treatment of foreign animals and i had no idea and at that point i decided to go vegan fact i had never even heard working before i went viga. It was a data exhibit also. Read the book animal factories and saw pictures. Which is very important. And also. I came to conclusions just as much harm in eating dairy and eggs as there. Is it me so. I became vegan and that was nineteen eighty eight. So so we have to have francis more pay On the show because several people have mentioned book and david. That's the reason. I became vegetarian when i was fourteen. Is i read her book. And it was for environmental reasons so you you became vegetarian in college. Yes unfortunately my college they did happen vegetarian option to think it was very rare at the time inside. Have to starve. You were a public defender for four years. Is that correct yes. Yeah so. I'm i'm imagining that. You had a an argumentative way about you or you could argue very effectively. And you've you've said that in the beginning when people ask you why you're veg turned vegan That you responded in a fairly confrontational and argumentative way. But what helped you to kind of move from vacs way of communicating with people to kind of a more philosophical way. And we're gonna talk about that in a bit and and definitely more of an engaging way to actually get to hear you. Well a few things happen. And i actually talk about half in the book. It's kind of a slow process but as you say. I was raised very argumentative. My best friends in high school. We would disagree about anything. If he was a yankee fan at the medicine. If he liked one politician he's opponent. It was just was in grain that way we go to family dinners. He will be arguing back and forth five conversations. Everyone shouting that was standard. So i went to law school. I became the sender. And when you're core it's the same thing arguing all the time. I'm you're arguing against the district attorney. Sometimes you arguing against the judge so what happened. I was doing it for years. And i ended up in this courtroom. I was put there for three months. I still remember. The judge is kind of this big rough guy every day. This judge had to yell at someone and normally would be. Some attorney wasn't defender district attorney. Just start yelling at them for not one day in court. This is not free months in. Nothing was going on. But he needed to yell. He started yelling at the back wall. I mean screaming at just yelling. At afterwards he stops and says i feel better. That kind of woke me up. I went back to my office. And maybe there's something not quite right here. And i actually quick defenders job Just a few weeks after that and became a high school teacher which my parents did. So that point on i just started becoming aware of the confrontation aspects and trying to lessen it. I also read the book Carnegie's had to make friends and influence people title. How to win friends There you go and just degree book i just. I just learned a lot. You know people. You don't win arguments. He never been arguments. You convince people by persuading them and also by being a role model so it's more effective. And i think for once personal health and way of life it's much more wholesome catholic had a big influence on me to at david. Math reading list Sorry go ahead. I was gonna dive into that book. Because i'd love to know a few tips from it like on how to really influence people that you pulled that you're You pulled from that you still probably today use in influencing people to consider changing.

david francis morla seidel Alexandra vegan Dave David new york francis Carnegie
"francis morla" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

04:09 min | 5 months ago

"francis morla" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Can change what you're having for lunch today So that's the beauty of it. It's extremely empowering to be able to make those choices absolutely so as people here we kind of wrap things up here as people really weigh What it is that. They're eating here and you sit down and you look at your plate. Matter of fact you know what. Let me ask it this way You had the specific you grew up very much in in a beef loving a part of of the nation here and you obviously grew up eating red meat yourself. At what point did you look down at your plate and realize. Hey what i'm eating here not just impacts my my own health but the health of the environment. Do you remember the first time that everything kind of clicked for you and what those thoughts were. What emotions were feeling. Well you know. I have to say i want to give credit. Where credit's due francis. Morla pay wrote a book. Decades ago called diet for a small planet and it was something that people read. They talked about. But i think they might have forgotten but her argument was really very simple. It was just. We can raise a lot of grains feed them to animals and get a little bit of meat out that we can. We can eat but if we eat grains directly and the vegetables and fruits and ended the bounty of botanical foods. Not only will we have plenty for ourselves but plenty to feed a hungry world. And so i remember hearing about that and thinking that it's obviously logical and obviously true The problem i think i might have had in my own life. Is that my own extended families business all my uncles and cousins and not to mention my vamp and my dad and everybody is far back. Second trace was was actually in the animal. A cultural doesn't but we grow we change and we discovered that the benefits are huge. Oh you black vegan sheep you. Dr neal barnard i appreciate that very much. This has been really enlightening and we will go ahead and drop to the study that i was referencing there. That twenty sixteen study will drop that in the episode notes as well so you can check that out for yourself. Dr barr thank you so very much.

neal barnard barr today Decades ago Morla pay first time twenty sixteen study francis Second
"francis morla" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

04:09 min | 5 months ago

"francis morla" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"Can change what you're having for lunch today So that's the beauty of it. It's extremely empowering to be able to make those choices absolutely so as people here we kind of wrap things up here as people really weigh What it is that. They're eating here and you sit down and you look at your plate. Matter of fact you know what. Let me ask it this way You had the specific you grew up very much in in a beef loving a part of of the nation here and you obviously grew up eating red meat yourself. At what point did you look down at your plate and realize. Hey what i'm eating here not just impacts my my own health but the health of the environment. Do you remember the first time that everything kind of clicked for you and what those thoughts were. What emotions were feeling. Well you know. I have to say i want to give credit. Where credit's due francis. Morla pay wrote a book. Decades ago called diet for a small planet and it was something that people read. They talked about. But i think they might have forgotten By her argument was really very simple. It was just. We can raise a lot of grains feed them to animals and get a little bit of meat out that we can that we can eat but if we eat grains directly and the vegetables and fruits and ended the bounty of botanical foods. Not only will we have plenty for ourselves but plenty to feed a hungry world. And so i remember hearing about that and thinking that it's obviously logical and obviously true The problem i think i might have had in my own life. Is that my own extended families business all my uncles and cousins and not to mention my vamp on my dad and everybody is far back. Second trace was was actually in the animal. A cultural doesn't but we grow we change and we discovered that the benefits are huge. Oh you black vegan sheep you. Dr neal barnard i appreciate that very much. This has been really enlightening and we will go ahead and drop to the study that i was referencing there. That twenty sixteen study will drop that in the episode notes as well so you can check that out for yourself. Dr barr thank you so very much.

barr neal barnard today Decades ago Morla pay first time twenty sixteen study francis Second
"francis morla" Discussed on Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

13:44 min | 1 year ago

"francis morla" Discussed on Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

"Standing by from US standing here it is I I. I was waiting for the CY like we do. But it didn't happen. I didn't know what to do anyway. Hello everyone molly would hear. Hello I'm Kai Ryssdal. Make me smart as you know. Because as you're hearing you're downloading issue and listen every week as as we hope you do It's about all the things that interest us in tech in culture in the economy. A little podcast. We do call make me smart. None of us as we all know is a smart as Olis' that is right. All of us today includes a brilliant woman who actually has possibly had a bigger impact on how we eat eight or at least how we think about what we then. You're anybody else we can think of. Her name is Francis More low-pay the things she is most known for is starting the conversation around the plant based Diet now obviously. That's a huge conversation. Right now. Francis dropped a little book on it called Diet for a small planet in nineteen seventy one one and at that time the ideas amounted to a little bit of a revolution. Yeah just a little bit so here we are Let's see forty nine years later We are still eating. Hundreds hundreds of pounds of meat A year in this country but vegetarianism and veganism as well Are you know plant-based through and through That is growing as a way that people choose to live right. The VEGAN economy is big it is international and it is growing enormously so I think get safe to say that a plant based Diet now is going mainstream absolutely and one of the reasons of course is climate change. And they're you know that's just one of many conversations around it. There's was health ethics of animal treatment Desertification of soil And then of course the impact on climate of the way that we conduct agriculture and then of course animal use and so there are very smart people doing things in sustainable food production. You've heard on this very show. We talked about meat replacement but right. Now we're going to talk about sort of how to eat writ large Francis Morla pay. Here's the official introduction. She's a researcher author on food and Democracy Policy She writes a lot And she is now here with is taking a break from writing Francis. Thanks so much for coming on. Thank you my great pleasure. So it's been as I said forty nine years years since your breakthrough book Did you think it would take this long for for a plant based Diet that become mainstream thing. Well I was surprised from from the beginning at the response I got and I came to feel that people really really wanted to connect their daily choices to a bigger meaning. You know we're having an impact every day with what we what we choose to put into our mouths and I think that's the need it met and so in that sense. I'm not surprised because I think the sense of of you've meaning and power in connection to others that's really really powerful. It was interesting because your first book was about the global scarcity scare right in the late sixties this idea that hunger and food shortages where in the headlines and you argued that there was more than enough food for everybody on the planet and I wonder how you're thinking has evolved from This idea of scarcity scared to climate. Well I'm still shocked at the prevalence of the scarcity scares still the idea that there's not enough even though there's twenty nine hundred calories produced for every person on earth and still we have over eight hundred million people who are callard deficient in that number is growing so we still have the same problem that shocked me out of my chair in the UC Berkeley Library so It's it's it's really this. Both and world people are waking up but not going deep enough and I think the more that we can see our food choices as a way to ask the next question question the next question. How our diet choices are linked to a food system that is destroying the capacity of the earth? Defeat us at the same time. It's helping the heat the planet and so this is the time for big wake-up so let's talk about some of the things that you have you have written about and you've been an advocate for regenerative. They've agriculture first of all. was that well. I love that term. We used to call it sustainable. But now we're really talking about because our soil is so degraded in so many ways and massive overuse of chemicals that we're talking about regeneration of that that living earth that we have to understand understand the difference between dirt and soil. That soil is alive with microorganisms. They say that they're in a teaspoon. They're more than all of humanity in number number and these are the microbes that enable plants to grow and and transform nutrients into what plants it's can use. That's a healthy soil. And that's what we're destroying so regenerative. Agriculture is the real serious focus on the quality of our soil and therefore the planting keeping it covered and keeping plant life going. And what's so great in. What really inspires me is that we're learning that it can happen faster than we thought as we stop the over intensive turning of the soil and using of chemicals and really allow Plants to grow agroforestry for example is a terrific instance of this regenerative approach because you're mixing shrubs and trees with food crops and it increases the output and restores of soil In an interview with the farmer wants and and we were standing on his driveway. And I said let's go stand on that dirt over there and he said it's not dirt soil. That's great great so no I. Actually I was thinking of that documentary that has been making the rounds biggest little farm that sort of introduces uses these concepts but doesn't really call them that The reason I bring it up is because that's a a small farm like where do these ideas regenerative agriculture. And then. We're GONNA ask you to explain this to agroforestry. Where do they collide with? You know commercial agriculture this ridiculously large scale. That we've been practicing doing it right. Here's the problem that we are locked into a belief system and I believe so strongly in the power of ideas that says says oh the market will decide and actually what has happened then is This notion of a free market which there is no such thing every market it has rules but ours is what ours is whatever brings highest return to existing wealth. So what we see is it's incredible concentration of power in the food industry industry. That is very happy to keep that degradation going. The prophets are still good and just soaking everything up so what we have to do. It was really questioned that and understand that we have to be working for true democracy and be listening to our preamble to our Constitution toossion that said our purposes a nation is to promote the general welfare and to do that we have to have democratic polity that can create farm policy. Let's see that really encourages farmers to nurture that soil and to experiment with for example Agroforestry That is proven as I say to be so so effective and other forms of what are called agroecology regenerative agriculture. So really. We have to go that deep. We have to go that deep to what. What are the rules that you know really when you think about it? No one would say yes. I want to destroy the soil. I WANNA produce foods that make us ill. Well actually you know. Our Diet is leading cause of major disease in this country. No none of us would choose that and so we have to ask okay. What is leading us in that direction and I really think we have to go that deep to this false belief in somehow we can just turn over our fates to some magical market which actually is driven to create monopoly? So that then as I say takes us to democracy and what is it okay so sure. So there's a lot of no big deal I'm going to take the end of it. I E and look I hear you about the democracy part and certainly as we see if we read the news today. Democracy in this country has challenged on a on a on a very systemic basis every single day. But let's back up for a minute to the market forces that Act Don Agriculture in this economy we've been working on on agricultural economy for four hundred years here and the challenge. Now if you know if you I I wouldn't talk to farmers or you go to the Yakima Valley Washington talk to apple farmers. They WanNa do creative inventive things. They WANNA farm cleanly and they WANNA film feet as many people as they possibly can catch of course is that the business incentives in the agricultural economy today are skewed toward corn. That can be used as ethanol right. It's skewed toward maximum production with least possible investment to get the most return and the challenge of course is overturning turning that system. And how do you do that. When democracy to circle back to the point is is challenged as it is well We you have to do it. Do both a friend of mine once said you know you can love to children at once that we can be focused on our passion in this case food and growing food in a healthy way for healthy earth and on democracy reforms at the same time and I was just with farmers of this last weekend in Iowa and many of them are very excited about the green new deal for farming and ranchers and farmers coalition that they say represents ten thousand farmers farmers and are very interested in changing the incentive so that they would be rewarded for actually caring for our earth. Away that really almost all of us would cheer for and that means that we have to take democracy reform seriously to get the role of big private money out of our system and also protect the right to vote so that we can really resist the effort to suppress vote. Quite frankly so I think it's all tied We can't separate out these two elements well and I guess we could say. Hey that markets the idea of what the market is is not necessarily fixed right. We are seeing a movement even if it might not be as big as we think mainstream as we think we are seeing movement toward plant based eating toward a different style of interacting with food and different choices right like does that drive through market in a way that could have an impact on the capitalist forces and even the democratic decisions. Yeah I I mean I think that every choice we make our dollar spent every choice we make that aligns with the world that we want is important. Because it motivates us more and other people also see somebody's always watching right and in those choices are sending signals out to the wider market. So I think those individual choices are absolutely critical and and I think that we've got to Embrace our democratic citizenship selves to and recognize that is not just a dull duty but an enlivening action. And that's why I'm so excited. There there is a democracy movement growing of people in the Environmental Movement Food Movement Labor movement coming together and saying together we can institute democracy reforms so that we have a government accountable to the citizens and one particular organization is called Democracy Initiative which now is representing well over forty million people through dozens of organizations and that both ends you know we can focus on particular concerns and this deeper question of our democracy and I want to return again to that. The preamble to our constitution which said our purposes one of them is to promote the general welfare and that is has to include the capacity of all all of us T- well and now they're just enormous Food Insecurity in our own population so all of that is our is our responsibility ability. How much of this and you know acknowledging that you've been working on this For fifty years or more frankly How much of this is a generational issue You know I am and the root of the question is look. It's going to be really tricky to convince Americans of a certain age to give up their hot dogs and hamburgers and non plant based foods but I I know a number of younger people in this economy. Teenagers and young adults who are are Vegan. Vegetarian in part because of climate change range that we just have to wait until they're old enough to have some you know mass market effect. Young we can certainly lower the voting age to. That's all podcast. But yes the beauty. The beauty of what we're saying is that everybody eats right. And this is truly an intergenerational movement and I've noticed just right near my office five you know five years ago. I didn't see any of this and now I'm seeing four places right there in Harvard Square where you can get really wonderful plant based food and all..

Environmental Movement Food Mo US Kai Ryssdal Democracy Initiative Olis Francis Morla Francis More Francis Don Agriculture researcher UC Berkeley Library official
"francis morla" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense. At least on the surface, I said, would you mind if I give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on it, and without and see what they choose hidden brain a spicy podcast about science psychology. And why people do what they do. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today ideas about how we can stop the worst effects of global warming and save our planet. And what the way we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis Marlow, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through animals. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co founder of a nonprofit called the good food institute the most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a chicken to get one calorie backout in the form of chicken meat, and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops. And then you have to ship all of those crops to feed you to operate the feed mill you have to ship the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse, you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I'm gonna get one thing out of the way. I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. Hasn't worked for fifty years environmentalists, global health experts and animal activists have.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla NPR world Resources Institute Roz Francis Marlow United Nations good food institute nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie mill
"francis morla" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

07:55 min | 2 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz, and I'm the show today. Ideas about how we can stop the worst effects of global warming and save our planet. And one of the ways we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis Marlow, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through in a most. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co of a nonprofit called the good food institute. The most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a chicken to get one calorie back out in the form of chicken meat, and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops. And then you have to ship, all of those crops to a feed mill yet to operate the feed mill you have to ship the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I get one thing out of the way I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. It hasn't worked for fifty years environmentalists, global health experts and animal activists.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla Roz world Resources Institute NPR Francis Marlow good food institute United Nations mill nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie
"francis morla" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"Human behaviour doesn't always make a ton of sense. At least on the surface, I said, would you mind the fide give the dogs a little piece of cracker with some hot sauce on it, and without and see what they choose hidden brain a spicy podcast about science psychology? And why people do what they do. It's the Ted radio hour from NPR. I'm guy Roz and on the show today. Ideas about how we can stop the worst affects of global warming and save our planet. And one of the way as we might be able to do that is, by changing our diets and eating a lot less meat. I read a book called diet for a small planet by Francis morla pay and Francis morla, pay basically, makes the argument that in order to eat meat we have to grow massive amounts of crops that we then funnel through animals. This is Bruce Friedrich. He's co founder of a nonprofit called the good food institute the most recent statistics from the world Resources Institute indicate that it takes about nine calories fed to a check in to get one calorie back out in the form of chicken meat and chickens are the most efficient animal. So you're talking about nine times as much land nine times as much water nine times as many pesticides, herbicides on the crops, and then you have to ship, all of those crops to feed millions to operate the feed mill you have to ship, the feed to the factory farm, you have to operate the factory farm, you have to ship the animals to the slaughterhouse you have to operate the slaughterhouse. Once you crunch all of those numbers. And all of that inefficiency what we find is that meat production. According to the United Nations causes about fourteen point five percent of all human caused climate change globally. That's more than transportation. So the animal agriculture industry causes more climate change than all of the cars and the trains, and the planes than all forms of transportation combined. Here's more from Bruce Friedrich on the Ted stage. I'm gonna get one thing out of the way. I am not here to tell anybody what to eat besides convincing the world to eat less meat. Hasn't worked for fifty years, environmentalists global health experts in animal activists have been begging the public to eat less meat and yet per capita consumption is highest it's been in recorded history. The average North American last year eight more than two hundred pounds of meat and I didn't eat any. Which means somebody out there. Eight four hundred pounds of me. On our current trajectory. We're going to need to be producing seventy two.

Bruce Friedrich Francis morla Roz NPR world Resources Institute United Nations good food institute Eight four hundred pounds two hundred pounds nine calories five percent fifty years one calorie mill
"francis morla" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on Here & Now

"Molly Siegel. And it's almost thanksgiving time to drag out the serving platters the table leave and the tofurkey Joe. Folks, we're a sustainable free range to. Gracie's to humanely from birth and try to fill all their days of joy care and love tofurkey is of course, the plant based alternative to Turkey created by Seth timid in Oregon in one thousand nine hundred five and you can laugh, but this thanksgiving the company says it will sell its five million holiday tofurkey nothing compared to the forty six million Turkey sold a year. But he for companies that make meat alternatives and Seth Tibbett founder and chair of tofurkey joins us now from Portland, Oregon. Seth are you feeling a little vindicated? Oh, yeah. It's been a great ride over the last twenty years or so since nineteen ninety-five when we sold the first five hundred tofurkey at thanksgiving and now five million it's hard to even get your head around. But the last year has been particularly great. We are about twenty four percent up over the years past and the whole category is just blooming right now. So. Great time to be selling plan pays foods. Those who research says things say fourteen percent of Americans are using plant based proteins as a substitute for me on a regular basis. That's big. Why do you think it is what? And why do you think it's increased? So in the last year. Well, there are so many reasons that people go to a plant based diet, but I think just the flavor and texture of these products has gotten so good. You know, when nineteen eighty there was actually zero plant based meat alternatives in the grocery stores, when I first started the company, and now, you know, it's a six hundred seventy million dollar industry and growing at this alarming rate that's really hard to keep up with and I really think flavors the main thing. Well, when you say nine hundred eighty this is when you first started, you know, maybe becoming a vegan you read Francis morla pays.

Seth Tibbett Oregon Molly Siegel Francis morla Turkey Joe Gracie Portland founder six hundred seventy million do twenty four percent fourteen percent twenty years
"francis morla" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

04:07 min | 3 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"It's water use its soil desertification it's chopping down the rainforests every single issue. The meat industry is one of the top two or three global causes of that issue, including climate change per calorie basis, somebody sits down and they eat chicken, which is the least climate change inducing meat. That's four thousand percent of the climate change as if you were eating like owns like soy or Ps forty times as much on a per capita basis for that meal. L total insanity at it's total insanity. It is what does it look like with beef. Well, it's even worse. It's about twenty five calories in to get one calorie backout. So it's two thousand four hundred percents throwing away twenty four calories for every calorie that you consume three hundred and thirty times on a per calorie basis. I pulled that out of the resistance, and my brain, it's a Lancet article from I think twenty fifteen three hundred and thirty times. Much climate change per calorie protein for beef as opposed to four Lega. Gms soy, not soya end piece. So the UN report that was two thousand eight and it was yeah. Ten percent one in two thousand eight they said eighteen percent. And then I think in two thousand thirteen twenty fourteen they said thirteen point five, right? And then there was this Chatham house report is well, right? Couple years later while there's a world watch report that was put together Chatham house. Chatham house had a really interesting report Chatham house, the Royal Institute of international affairs, which is the foremost think tank and Europe, and they really report this at less animal product consumption goes down every country. No country is going to be able to keep climate change under two degrees celsius by twenty fifty which is the Paris climate agreement that is the primary no country can do it unless they're meat consumption goes down, and they recommended that we educate populations about this issue. And then WorldWatch did a report from a World Bank. Agricultural economy and International Finance Corporation agricultural economist in which they basically disputed the UN numbers, and they said actually climate change more than fifty percent of it is a tributary animal agriculture in. That's pretty easy to find just Google Worldwatch Institute climate change World Bank. It'll be like the first thing to pop we tend to focus on the thirteen point behind because it's still more than transportation it still awful. And and certainly should be should be motivating to people. Yeah. It's it's shocking. It's shocking that we're not talking about this more like what are the barriers to really being able to penetrate mainstream awareness to elevate this discussion to the highest level. And really, I know you're doing everything you can achieve if I, but what do you see as as the biggest impediments or the challenges that you face in trying to get people to really understand this and make change well, rich, we're not actually trying to get. To understand this and make change GSI theory of changes that we have beat are heading into the wall of education for decades, we have attempted to convince people to change their diets with educated people about climate. We've educated them about the inefficiency. I mean Francis morla pay wrote the book that turned me vegan more than thirty years ago. She wrote it almost fifty years ago now, and it makes the arguments that we're making now about the environmental impact and the inefficiency pitas been around since nineteen eighty telling people about the harm to animals environmental groups have been talking about the inefficiency cows spiracy what the health phenomenal films and yet in two thousand seventeen per capita meat consumption in the US was the highest it's ever been and US history. Eighteen is going to be even higher. So I mean global it's both it's both it's skyrocketing globally. But it's up in the US highest it's ever been. I mean, people are generally pretty shocked by that. Sometimes people even say, well is that because the populations bigger, and I have two per per capita. Seventeen. Hi, it's it's interesting that that is in tandem with with the growing. Market of plant based foods and plant base meets it is. Yeah, no. It's super interesting. And I think I think we will see this turn as we give people what they want but produced in a different way..

Chatham house US UN World Bank Chatham Google Worldwatch Institute WorldWatch Lancet Lega Royal Institute of internation International Finance Corporat Europe Francis morla Paris four thousand percent twenty five calories twenty four calories two degrees celsius
"francis morla" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"francis morla" Discussed on Good Life Project

"To show each other that were you don't enjoying life outside of this place is so important because when we come back in revitalize with energy with new creativity because we've been part of the world and with the worst thing to me that we can do as entrepreneurs is isolate ourselves it's the first thing we wanna do but it's the last thing that we should do you know when we connect with people a blur friends in our family they will love us way beyond where the company is and they are the people that uplift us when things get when we're down in they are the people that just remind us who we are and there's people that you know in my case if something's going terribly wrong there the canaries in the coal mine and so i think those connections with those people those relationships are essential in those relationships also to an entrepreneurial tribe the tribe that always wants tell each other how good everything is we have to find those entrepreneurs that were willing to say this is hard and again i'll say i can say a million things but oh same one more thing about the journey is a lotta people i use the words bold humility and i heard those words from found francis morla pay who is a you know brilliant writer about the food food movement and what struck me about those words and i've carried them with me now is.

writer francis morla