17 Burst results for "Francis Lamb"

"francis lamb" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Francis Lamb, and this is the splendid table from a P m. The chauffeur, curious cooks and Peter's. We're taking your calls about all things cheese right now, and I have a special guest. Keenan, achieve specialist and author of Melt, Stretch and Sizzle is here in the studio with me. You ready for another one? I'm ready. I'm so excited to be here. All right. We have Amanda from Berks County, Pennsylvania. Hey, Amanda. Amanda. Hi. So I had a question. My husband and I host cheese. I never heard of parties which are dramatically and perfect, but always delicious. At these parties. We invite guests to bring a cheese that they've never heard of. And it's a really fun party. It really gets people talking and mixing the crowd and a great organic fashion. I was just wondering what cheeses would you bring to our party? Mm. Well, first of all, I love love love this idea, because the way the best way to learn about cheese is 21 eat a lot of cheese and to eat a lot of different kinds of cheese. And I love the joie de vive of this. Um, So you're asking me what she's as I would bring to that party, right? What would you recommend for guests THX out and bring that you suspected that they probably have never heard of Well, I think if you are lucky enough to live near a cheese shop, or ah, larger specialty food shop or even a supermarket that has ah cheese monger. Is to develop a relationship with that cheese monger on Go Ask them what they're eating. There's always achieves that the cheese monger is like has on their brains. That shit right now, if you Don't buy your cheese from a store that has a cheese monger. And I would think about going for maybe a category that maybe feels intimidating. That maybe isn't your favorite category of cheese And just taking that chance? Um This is all about Releasing yourself to the possibility of discovery. So why not let that guide the entire process? Um If you love brie to say Okay, I'm gonna I'm gonna get a French cheese, but I'm not going to get the French cheese that I always get. I'm gonna get a French cheese that's completely unknown to me. On go with that route. So take some of the knowledge that you have and then, like, swerve, make a right turn me ask you a question to you because one thing that is scary for people is What if I buy a tee lives hate and for a lot of people are like, what if I buy Jesus a super stinky? You know, if you have that in front of you, is there a way you can still learn to enjoy it. Or is it just like Is there something you can do it A mitigated cheese That's too stinky and still try to get it. Get something out of it. Or you just don't wanna buy this thing and find out like and have to, like, toss it. Yeah. I mean, I definitely I think the pain can be very real because trees Because cheese is for most of us, really, You know, it's it can be a luxury item. It's it's gonna Be half t spend on your own Your grocery bill. Um I think pairings are a great way to try to rein in a cheese. So like if you buy a cheese that you feel is too stinky that's usually going to be in the wash line category. Acidity can really rain that cheese in and change the whole experience for you. So, um You know, Munster would be one of the most famous wash Ryan. Stinky cheeses. There is a reason that when you go to the part of France, where monster comes from, it's served with the things that served with no. Typically it served with mustard. It's served with pickles. It's served with onions, these air all things that can take it. Take it down a notch and sort of create a more balanced bite s O thinking about pairings. Blue cheese. Typical condiments with blue cheese are often like sweeter condiments. Things like honey or dried fruits. Blue cheese can be aggressive. So we take something sweet to sort of Bring it in and make it more of Ah, complete, nuanced bite because I think hair or something. Yes, I think pairings are a good way, Tonto. Bring a cheese in. If you're feeling like it's escaping you That's a really great idea. And I that that is the party host. I always tried to provide different options for parents of the cheeses. But having the stronger pickles and onions is definitely something I'll implement in the future. Then you can do that not just with condiments but also with beverages. So, for instance, is stinky cheese or a blue cheese with with a sweet wine. Our report. You know the traditional pairings with Jesus like that are there for a reason. And it's really to answer some of the concerns that you talk about. Thanks for the call Amanda and Love your Man. I love it. It's like it's like It's like a G rated key party. Love it. Thank you so much. Thank you..

Amanda France Keenan Berks County, Pennsylvania Francis Lamb one Melt, Stretch and Sizzle 21 Jesus Peter French Munster one thing first Tonto
"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That will help thicken. So people use corn starch. And you see that in a lot of Asian soups. Um, yeah, I think those air there's a really good ways. I think some things you wanna puree and some things you don't So either pure rain or adding another ingredient like the rice or adding a thickening agent like corn starch. Jenn Lewis. His latest book is The Chicken Soup Manifesto was back with her in just a minute. And then you put Can chicken stock to a taste test with some extremely unsparing judges. I'm Francis Lamb, and this is the splendid table from a Pia. And why won't wait coming up tonight at nine o'clock? It's planet money. So what do you have Vaccine scientists, The Federal Reserve and mixed martial arts have in common. They're all part of a planet Money extravaganza called the rest of the story that starts at nine. And in about 9 30 on how I built. This show meets a self described anxious entrepreneur who says Being self aware has made her a better leader. Planet money and how I built this starting tonight at nine. Tonight's temperatures in the thirties and forties. Overnight in half Moon Bay, 43 36 in Livermore Napa. Expecting 37 overnight. SAN Francisco 43 Tomorrow's morning fog, otherwise partly sunny highs in the upper fifties to low sixties. The splendid table was supported by noon, providing an online evaluation and the tools that help people lead healthier lives through behavior. Change more information at noon and om com and by progressive insurance, comparing car insurance rates from multiple insurers, so shoppers can evaluate options in one place. Now. That's progressive comparisons available at progressive dot com or 1. 800 Progressive. I'm Francis Lamb. And this is the.

Francis Lamb Jenn Lewis Federal Reserve Vaccine Livermore Napa Moon Bay SAN Francisco
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the heir to a time capsule Special tonight From 7 to 9 on 93.9 FM and AM a 20 W N. Y C. This is w n y. C and w n y c dot org's a Mayan Levinson Look at your Sunday forecast for the overnight mostly clear skies with love around 27 Sunny today with behind your 39 tomorrow should be mostly cloudy and a high of 47. This'll is w N. Y C. FM HD and AM New York. It's the splendid table from a P M. American public media. I'm Francis Lamb Holiday Time is party time on this week. We've got the art of hosting a great party with the musician. Quest. Love who's got some advice. The seeds of everything that I do with food, and it's kind of my running mantra always say that music is the piece of That brings creatives together and food is the he sieve that brings everything together. We've also got talk on how to set a holiday table that works for eaters of all kinds. We spend time with Claudia Fleming, one of America's greatest pastry chefs. And we learned about some of the celebratory traditions of the African American Kitchen with Toni Tipton, Martin All that and more coming up on the splendid table. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Amy held President Trump is threatening to veto a covert relief and spending bill putting the US on track for a potential government shutdown set to go into effect just after midnight on Tuesday. Already the impasse means unemployment benefits for millions of Americans have lapsed. Danny Baker, a bartender in San Francisco is among those wondering how he will get by without the $300 weekly checks. Everything that I saved over you know my cushion, you know, per se. It's gone. Trump says he wants the payments to struggling Americans increased, but his own Treasury secretary has signed off on the bill now in limbo. Investigators are scouring hundreds of leads in the Christmas Day Nashville explosion that injured three people and damaged dozens of buildings, including area businesses. Georgia Public Broadcasting, Sarah Rose reports. Restaurant owner Carla Rosenthal is left picking up the pieces as the bomb exploded in front of the historic 200 year old brick building that house the birdies, EO Grill, debris and dust smashed through the front doors, blowing back chairs and tables, leaving the restaurant completely devastated. It could have been. Anybody could have been any one of our friends, you know, could have been any business. We just happen to be directly across the street from it and our businesses took the brunt. Rosenthal's other restaurant.

Trump Carla Rosenthal New York Georgia Public Broadcasting Danny Baker Francis Lamb NPR Claudia Fleming Toni Tipton San Francisco US Washington America Amy Sarah Rose President Nashville
"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Other is so telling, you know, when our celebrations revolve around food, how we serve each other and how we treat ourselves and our guests can say so much about what we find important. And I've been lucky in my life was spent lots of holidays with friends and their families like my wife's family, and I watched him put out a table of hundreds of shrimp stuffed pockets called free soy sh that my mother in law would mix and roll and fry and you know it's a time consuming treat. They would on Lee make it for special occasions, but they would serve them. So you could help yourself without any fanfare or pretense because they're warm, unpretentious people on Then there's the friends family who would always break out the cheese balls. You know, like the ones with that that weird purple swirl and they could be like coded and crush nuts and made it look like some kind of ice cream. But that only made it look more worrisome. You know that kind. Well, it was never clear to me who in the family like those things, But every year they ate them, and they laughed about how ridiculous it was. They were eating them. But they showed up year after year and they laughed about it. Year after year, Man I've seen families whose special occasions would be spent like on edge Because people knew that the pressure to get it all just right would make someone crack at any moment and there be screaming and tears and apologies and regrets. And, you know, I've been guilty of those myself when I put my ego and what I was cooking ahead of the people that I was actually just trying to feed. I've tried to learn from those moments and You remember that celebrations are special, but they can also be like putting a magnifying glass on real life, like sometimes, like glass can make who you are bigger and clearer. And sometimes it can distort you and make you all weird and so If you're celebrating this season, if you don't mind me, saying Just remember to relax. Life is hard enough without making all this stuff that's supposed to be fun hard, too. Coming up America's test it in with a gift guy for the cooks in your life and our contributor, Melissa Clark talks to a cultural historian about a classic French dish that helped revolutionize entertaining. I'm Francis Lamb. And this is the splendid table from a P M. American public media. Support for KQED comes from Eric and Wendy Schmidt, whose philanthropy includes Schmidt futures focused on finding exceptional people and helping them to more.

Lee Francis Lamb KQED Wendy Schmidt Melissa Clark America Eric
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Francis Lamb, and this is the chauffeur, curious cooks and eaters. Spending this episode with the food science writer Harold McGee, whose newest book is Nose Dive, the 10 Year Project on the Science of sent. We've talked about his own beginnings, how he's seen the cooking world change and we share his fascination. The sense of flavor. Why we love some hate others. Let's get back to our conversations. Why does cooking tend to boost aroma and flavor? It's because way, eat living things for the most part plant and animal tissues and their build up of very large molecules. Proteins, carbohydrates, fats. Which in and of themselves don't have smells. They're not aromatic, because in order for something to have a smell, it has to be a small enough molecule that it can escape whatever it's in and fly through the air and end up being inhaled into our nose. Mm hmm. Proteins, carbohydrates, Fats, they're They're just way way too big. What cooking does What fermentation does is break those large molecules down into smaller ones. Small enough, sometimes that there are actually small enough to leave the the material and fly through the air and into our noses. And so it's that breaking down of the basic materials of the food into smaller molecules that generates that greater flavor. Oh, I'm just saying That's so interesting about how raw things don't typically have that much smoke. But what about I mean, I think about this summer It was a great year for peaches. Um and I just never coming home and just they're being Teaches. I could smell the moment I walk into The apartment or melons. Was about fruit, then. What is fruit tend to have such extraordinarily strong. Roma. Yeah. So fruits are there essentially foods that have been cooked up for us by plants that is to say there Their plant tissues that are designed by the plant to be attractive to animals, so the and animal will come along when the fruit is ripe. And take the fruits or someplace and eat the fleshy part and leave the seat behind the seed, convinced germinate and become a new plant. Far enough away from the parent that it's not gonna be competition. So it Xan inducement and it's just a signal. You know, Unripe Peach has no aroma whatsoever. When the peaches ripe, Uh, this whole system goes into overdrive to generate aroma to push it out into the air. Lots and lots of these small, volatile molecules. Precisely to get our attention and to get us to eat it and enjoy it. It's funny to them, but that awful exceeds Themselves have lots of aroma and flavor, and that's not Really the part E. It's tricky to talk about these industries, because, um What you're describing, I think is, you know depiction of evolutionary advantage or advantages gained through evolution. But you know, fruits and vegetables and plant they don't have agency. They didn't like they didn't like Decide One day. Here's our plan. You know it happens through natural selection, but It's funny to hear you say that because I think of how just been really into eating seeds lately, But that's not actually the part that the plant wants me to chew up and like, you know, destroy. Tell me it's just about how Seeds and spices came to have such aromas as well. Well, actually, let's let's stay with that peach that you enjoyed so much, because have you ever cracked open the pit of a peach and shoot on the scene inside? Yeah, There's like, what is it? What does it taste like? It's not actually a bitter almond, But it's it looks and tastes like bitter almond, right? Yeah. Yeah, it tastes like almond essence. Most people have never had the chance to taste a true bitter almond. But it's the It's that smell of the almond essence you could buy in the grocery store and then add to your your baked goods and so on. And the reason it's actually that we don't have bitter almonds for the most part, and the reason that People sell. That essence is that That aroma. The aroma of bitter almond goes hand in hand in the peach pit with cyanide. Oh, okay In glad I needed that much in the peach pit and in bitter almonds that aroma which we find so wonderful and using all kinds of dishes. Eyes there as a warning signal. You're you're going to die. If you eat this now, you tell me So. So That's why we separate the aroma from the cyanide in order to make the essence in the in the grocery store. So it's true that plants protect their seeds because the seeds air are their offspring. You know they do what they can. But the thing is that we human beings being as inventive and insatiable as we are. Have found ways around those defenses or have found ways actually to enjoy those what amounts to chemical weapons, either by separating the smell from the weapon itself In the case of peaches and almonds. Or in the case of spices. We use spices on herbs to add flavor to other foods. We don't eat them whole. Just by themselves, and it's actually an interesting experiment to do to, you know, take a handful of time and put it in your mouth and see what it's like. It's it hurts. But in in, you know, home idiopathic doses in a stew. It does wonderful things by adding a layer of complexity and aroma. That wasn't there before. So we've found ways to use these weapons, uh, to our advantage and to make eating and drinking more interesting. Yeah. Um My wife. Absolutely despises.

Harold McGee Nose Dive Francis Lamb writer
"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm not yet You know, HASA Next time on Latino USA In the late sixties, the civil rights movement was in full swing, starting a national conversation about equal rights and protections. Way bring you the story of Richard OTs of founding leader in the Red Power movement. That's next time on Latino USA. Hey, it's Francis Lamb. And this week on the show, it's Thanksgiving around the world. Right here in America. We're talking to four amazing immigrant chefs from Korea, India, Serbia and Mexico on how they celebrate and cook for the most American holiday of them all. It's coming up on the splendid table from a P M splendid table tonight at seven right before it at six. It's Latino USA. Then tonight at eight. We have hidden brain. Many of us struggle with self control, and we assume will power is the key to achieving our goals. But there's a simple and often overlooked mental habit. It can improve our health and well being hidden Brain explores the practice of gratitude. That's it eight o'clock tonight here on KQED Public radio. Don't do anything with anybody quite buy everything with anybody quite like you. You, you, you, you you Johnny Holy in.

Richard OTs Francis Lamb KQED America Korea Serbia India Mexico USA.
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Francis Lamb, and this is the chauffeur. Curious cooks and eaters were talking about Thanksgiving today with friends from around the country. And next, we head to L. A The tough the Policia Lopez from the walk in restaurant Gilly gets to I'll be honest. I figured we should talk to her about Thanksgiving because families are some of the most delicious I've ever had. Because of Oaxaca. Turkey is traditionally served in ballet, but it turns out that she and her family usually have different plans for Thanksgiving. All of the CIA. Hi, Francis. How are you? I'm great. Hey, Congratulations on your baby. Thank you. Thank you so much. She's I mean, obviously, I think she's the most precious thing in the world. But she's my baby. So what else is there was a beautiful thing ever. OK? Yeah. I am so excited. Talk to you about Thanksgiving because I am Actual love asking Children, and we're gonna families when they started doing Thanksgiving, because not like when I was a kid. We always went to my grandma's house. So like we always did it, You know, at some point, your family Had to decide to start doing Thanksgiving. So what were your childhood thanksgivings like? My God, It's so true. I never really thought about it that way, Like my Children are growing up with Thanksgiving, and I just sort of took it as one in my teenage years. We started celebrating Thanksgiving. I want to say I was 14 15. I remember the home we were living in. Okay for sure. And it was one of those things that As we were living here after being here for I wanna say five years or so we realized that it was a big deal like people take this Thanksgiving, like very serious and The restaurant was pretty You know, empty that day after a certain time, and we that was like the one day my dad started closing early because it was Thanksgiving. And like, what do we do? We should then maybe we should join in this thing's giving situation happening. On by Mom who's the chef of the family? Obviously, she would, um She took it upon herself to really master. These Very traditional Thanksgiving meals that she would never otherwise learn how to cook. So the store the grocery store, it was Gilson so she would go to Gelson's. And, you know, then the checkout stand. There were ah lot of magazines and others do this whole, you know, Once it gets to be called a daytime, you have these. What do you call that? Like? Hall the day I have holiday magazines, just like all of this seasonal magazines, they start showing up. Yes, so like how to make the best this and how to make the best that and all those, you know, tips and tricks. Very Martha Stewart is so she would buy. Ah, lot to my mom, Would you buy something? It's like she has to have five of each thing. Now I know where I get it from, so she were very much is it and she would get a lot of magazines. She would go through them and she would get very traditional recipe. So when we started our things getting it was very much. American traditional Thanksgiving. I mean, You know this story? That's the cranberry sauce. The more like sour dough. I wouldn't call it white breath first day, but it was, but it was pretty. I would say traditional like what you see on those checkout stand magazine. Very Martha Stewart, right. But for example, this stuffing my mom at Teresa Oh, instead of sausage, because she's like sausages, little bit bland. So she would add that right? Um And you know the cranberry also, like maybe a little bit more of this, and more that if she was at her little nuances to these recipes And as time went by, and you know, in in evolved and we moved from one house to the next we started having more people over and he became a thing. And then one year she started making this green spaghetti that everyone just like. I remember the first year she made everyone was like, What is this? And it became like the star of the show. And it became this thing that that became, like our things, giving thing. Um Which is non traditional, You know. So how do you actually make it To the green spaghetti is very easy to make. So use Grab. Ah, couple poblano peppers, But you rose thumb. You charge them directly over fire. You peel the skin off. You char onion, garlic and the garlic. I'd like to keep the skin on just because I feel like it adds a little bit more depth of flavor like smokiness of that garlic and like burns burns. Yeah. So Just blend all that together with a little bit of milk, Gramma salt, pepper, and then you cook it down just for just like a tad bit with butter. Obviously. Um and, uh, what else would you use on Thanksgiving? There's like no rules, and it's just creamy. There. It Z. I want to say it's like one degree away from being spicy. And again the kids eat this. So they may say, I think you know you have like a two year old every like. It's a little spicy, but they'll have, like three bites. You know what I'm saying? Like it's spicy. It's like starter spicy, right. Correct is what I would call very mild in her home. But It's just as that creamy and you know, hardy, perfect carb. You know, I item that you want to have in your Thanksgiving table. Oh, yeah. You know something, And then there's pureed poblanos charred. Onion, garlic butter..

Martha Stewart CIA Francis Lamb Oaxaca Turkey Policia Lopez Gilly Teresa Oh Gilson Gelson
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Francis Lamb. And this is the splendid table from a key f get it. You know, Thanksgiving is gonna be different this year. I mean, my annual tradition is to actually fly to Minnesota. Stay there to host our live Thanksgiving. Colin show Turkey confidential that rush out of the studio like the minute it's over to catch a flight back to New York. That gets me walking into my neighbor's house, just as the pies come out. I guess my wife, my kid have a slice, and that's my version of the holiday. You know, this year I actually get to be at home because we're pre taping attorney Confidential Thanks to Cove in, But you know what? I'm gonna miss my weird version of Thanksgiving this year because I love talking to you on that day, and I'm sure a lot of you are going to miss your traditions, Your nieces, your uncles, your parents or your kids, and honestly, I think they're a couple weeks ago about this right. We can focus on the things that are going to be different, or we can. We can try to focus on the fact that this year more than most, we have to cherish the things that we have to be thankful for. When it comes to dinner that night. I think you've been leaning into the difference. I mean, later in the show, we're gonna talk with Dan Souza from America's test kitchen. That's a menu planning ideas and tips on how to downsize your Thanksgiving dinner and still keep it festive. And if you're only gonna be one or two or three or four people this year, you don't have to make the oyster stuffing that you know, only Uncle Carlos likes. Why not switch it all out? You've got cooks from Mexico, Somalia, Vietnam. Talk about how they celebrate Thanksgiving and they've got ideas for what we could put on our tables this year. Turns out there's a little pasta. Let's start with Andrea, with Andrew's family came to America from Vietnam when she was a little girl. She since spent a career teaching us about the glories of Vietnamese cuisine just kept her blogged Viet World Kitchen since 2007, which is written great cookbooks on far bond, Me and her latest Vietnamese food any day. Hey, Andrea. Hey, Francis. How do you normally do Thanksgiving? You know what we.

Francis Lamb Andrea America Minnesota Vietnam Dan Souza Uncle Carlos Turkey Colin attorney Cove New York Viet World Somalia Mexico Andrew
"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Can you tell them? It's remarkable? This guy has the kitchen into the three letters O C D coming to a decision in here, man. It's incredible that you didn't see the pile of laundry that's on my bed right now, if you walk into the apartment What I did see was when we ask you for oyster sauce. You brought some crazy, important, beautiful brand from Hong Kong. We sneak it in and pants. Just I'm just saying Francis Lamb lives the life that one would hope the host of the splendid table live. He is. He is the embodiment of the splendid table. I'm glad you said that and I'm gonna go take the rest of laundry down from the shower right now. Okay, So this is something that is probably, uh, worth mentioning your just very calmly cooking this pork belly in the pan. There's no oil in the pan. There's no salt, no seasoning. Awful lot of fat on the report. Yeah, hopefully render out some of that fat from the pork and then cook the garlic in it as much of that. Look fat onto everything is possible. Little behind your ear when people you know, because when a home cook thinks about, well, I ate it. This restaurant has so much flavor and it's right on the facts. So you rent out render out some of that fact that thing gonna flavor all the rest of the ingredients that you cooked them? You know, you're that those were all the restaurant techniques, you know, coming up with extra flavor. Enough that carries the flavor of garlic and carries the flavor of the other ingredients around with every kind of serious you're not really like, You know, you want to render it cook it through, Get the fat out. And if you don't have I mean the thing to do. The thing is, it's like Worked really can be slightly intimidating anything for people the idea of cooking with pork belly, But bacon is more than suitable substitution. You know, it's just thinly sliced pork belly. That's a little more salt, more smoke, but no, not trying, like really brown. Anything at this point Then there was the garlic. It will make a problem. Do.

Francis Lamb Hong Kong
"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You know, polarization is a reality. It's not going to go away. We need to figure out how to have institutions that work and how to find some underlying factual basis. For us to have those very difficult debates. It's normal to disagree. It's normal for parties to fight. It's not normal to reject the facts in front of us, and it's especially not normal to reject the outcome of an election in a democracy. That's Brendan Nyhan from Dartmouth. Thank you very much. Thank you. As part of combating rampant misinformation, Facebook and Twitter are removing groups slapping warning labels on post and reducing the spread of the most egregious false claims of voter fraud. And that's not going over well with some high profile conservatives who are now urging their followers to join a social network called Parlor. NPR Tech correspondent Shannon Bond has a look and we should note Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo had a bone to pick with Twitter. On November 4th. She tweeted a link to an article claiming falsely the Democrats were trying to steal the election. And I got a note from Twitter change me. Hello. We have received a complaint regarding your account, Twitter hit her tweet behind a warning that it contained misleading content. So Bartiromo fired off another tweet, saying she would soon be leaving Twitter. And telling her followers to join her on parlor. She invited parlor CEO John Mates onto her show. And of course, those success of parlor is partly because people understand that they're getting censored. Have Twitter and Facebook gone too far, John. Well, once you start content, curation and you start fact checking. You're introducing bias. Bartiromo's complaint is one many conservatives have made in the past few weeks as Facebook and Twitter crack down more aggressively on efforts to cast doubt on the presidential election. Some say they found a more welcoming home on parlor radio host Mark Levin told his audience he was fed up after Facebook restricted his account for repeatedly sharing false information. I want to strongly encourage you So leave Facebook and to follow me on parlor Thanks to all the attention parlor, which was founded in 2018 is right now one of the most downloaded APS in just the past week, Its membership doubled to 10 million. That's impressive, but still just a tiny fraction of the 187 million people who use Twitter every day or Facebook's billions of users Parlor looks a lot like Twitter with the feet of post known as parleys. One of its early investors is Rebecca Mercer, the conservative donor known for backing Donald Trump, Steve Bannon and Breitbart's news. NPR talk to mates the CEO this summer, he said the APP intended to solve a problem he saw on big social media platforms. We found that a lot of people were experiencing or we're talking about censorship. We also saw that there was a lot of issues with all the rhythms changing meet, says the goal isn't to be a wild West with no rules, but a town square. We take a hard line against pornography and nudity. But if people disagree with one another, we're not there to mediate moderating the conversation, and that means that some of the claims Facebook and Twitter are now removing or slowing. The spread of are popping up on parlor. Hashtags like stop the steel, which is being used to organize protests and perpetuate baseless claims of voter fraud. Shannon McGregor studies social media at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She's alarmed by what she sees on parlor because, she says, misinformation is already thriving. There. What we've seen in the past with some of these other sort of friends or alternative social media sites is, if there's no rules, and if it's really siloed, then we know that what happens is it gets more and more extreme. But McGregor and other experts are skeptical that conservatives with the biggest audiences will really abandon larger social media APS for parlor even as they encourage their followers to do so. All these People have accounts on Twitter because that's where journalists are, and that's where the press is right. And so if they actually left Twitter that he would be less newsworthy, right? Just look at what happened this summer After Twitter first began labeling President Trump's tweets for making false claims. Republican politicians like Texas Senator Ted Cruz said they were leaving for parlor. Today. Cruz is still posting on Twitter and so is Maria Barbara, Mo Shannon Bond, NPR news You're listening to NPR news that you're listening on KQED Public radio. Hey, I'm Francis Lamb, host of the splendid table. Thanksgiving is probably going to be a little different this year. You can still count on us to do our annual calling special Turkey confidential. This year, though we're asking for your questions in advance to send them to us, but recording a voicemail on your phone and email it to contact that splendid table dot org's or he was a voicemail. 1 805 375252. We can't wait to hear from you. Francis Lamb is also featured on the splendid table and that is tonight at seven o'clock, and it's all about Japanese home cooking this week..

Twitter Facebook Maria Bartiromo NPR Shannon McGregor CEO Shannon Bond Brendan Nyhan President Trump Francis Lamb John Mates Senator Ted Cruz Texas Mark Levin Rebecca Mercer
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Francis lamb and this splendid tape the show for curious cooks and once when I was a teenager I got up out of bed in the middle of the night and drove forty five minutes to campus of Rutgers University just a year a semi truck struck I was obsessed with many years later I graduated frankly to the movie version of that I flew to Chicago just to be in a restaurant so I thought I was going pretty high in the how far would you go for food scorecard until we talk to some of the folks on this week's show some of them went literally far to the other side of the world and some showed us the extremes they go to their obsessive style of cooking they all show that food stood for much more yes we'll start with Melanie today she is one of the world's favorite photographers she's the person behind the my last summer series of books she started and portrait photographer which he learned that the key skill really isn't the framing the shot are looking at the light it's learning how to talk to get them comfortable so they can phone because that's how you get a really great shot but a few years ago she went on a trip for issue where everyone felt vulnerable to find Afghani for he Melanie Hey it's great to see you so good to see you so you.

Francis lamb Rutgers University Chicago Melanie Afghani
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And looking forward. and I just I just think that's I think it's amazing and I think there's there's lessons there there must be thousands of free town and I think they have lessons for us today and you know they will into the future how people can come through you know god knows what. ill make a make a life and survive and reach out and touch people. thank you so much it's always a pleasure talking to you too. no Williams the banking runs the child welfare project the national conference of state legislatures and of course is the niece. they're talking about picking berries were on some Freetown made us think of this great simple recipe for miss Lewis for sugar grasp. it's like a fresh raw jam and you can find the recipe that's on the table. coming up we'll talk with Sarah frankly who put together a brilliant book of essays on the set. I'm Francis lamb and this is the splendid table from eight PM American public media. on the next all of it with Allison Stewart singer songwriter author and activist Billy Bragg stopped by to discuss his new book the three dimensions of freedom and performs a few songs in studio songwriter Ross Boland who didn't get out of running a maroon five we're talking about the premiere of his new off Broadway musical collaboration with the Hamilton team of comic Kayla Alex Walker more called the wrong don't miss all of it weekdays.

Freetown Kayla Alex Walker Billy Bragg Allison Stewart Ross Boland Francis lamb Williams Sarah Lewis
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Francis lamb and this is the show for curious continue to let's get back to a conversation with the knees double December disco catering company she started with the help of the nonprofit so how did you learn to cook my farm I when I was little I am addicted to the kitchen yeah I'd love to be in the kitchen if you leave me in the kitchen twenty fours seven I don't say no I feel it's like hell with you Michael like smack you made yeah I'm I'm really happy that we're getting kind of like a continuous clear getting orders that keeps me busy inside the kitchen so right now you doing catering Biasi working toward your next step as a business person right yeah so that's that also one of the really good parts of popular because see now in the beginning they keep asking you what's your dream whatever you like you know looking for what's your future you know so they connected me all that already with at a small kiosk in Emeryville markets plants where you know I'm gonna start as a Palestinian you know food vendor there so the good part about that because the you know when I explain to them that my goal is to open my own commercially kitchen rather than opening a restaurant so I can spend more time and be like having big cat turning you know business that do service from a to Z. it rather than opening a restaurant and part of your time has to go to the customers and being outside the kitchen so hopefully you know we become like a big catering company from a to Z. so we already did and some weddings and we were like really happy that we got amazing reviews from the guest you know the bride and the groom that they love the food they also they would like a man's without the presentation and thirties I love the said you don't want to have a restaurant because you have to deal with but you just love cooking a lot of business yeah the kitchen area I love cooking and I love to be in the kitchen so I'm doing something I love really I love I guess I know you can be with us I'm sorry yeah but I need someone to tell us what I'm going to eat so for the appetizer parts and we are serving today them with a bottle and it's like a roasted smoked eggplants and of course we served usually do it with them homemade pizza brand and we have a finger food cold and John and this is like the most running item in our menu and everyone likes for example I have a kitchen tomorrow the as for six hundred bees yeah and it does a cabbage cauliflower carrots you know fetters as we got also on the honor certificate to from the mayor here in San Francisco is a city and county for this dish specifically there so yes and engine reserve their guys is the best Megyn rise and it's also vegan and gluten free and leases and that's also with olive oil you know at oregano oregano use a lot of oregano and Palestine as with about Reggie process and the mixed vegetables and where we've had a water I'm gonna buttons abuse it to it from scratch so we can give an option for the people who are vegan to give another different type of pretty in beside the bees and they're of this but we have two times of chicken we a have a roasted chicken that we usually you know go through a lot of steps before we cook it so we have to circuit and vinegar lemon Jews sold for a wine and and then we marinated for two days with the chopped onion olive always our spices and after that to be kind of like M. A. Grillet and after that we arrested inside the the chicken skewers also the same thing we very negative for abuse like the more you met in at like two three days the more the flavors gets into the the chicken we focused liked to have kind of like a juicy hopefully we get a gift you see I did then try it and we usually garnish said with a sly Solomon at bell pepper and some mock so we use some mac a lot in our dishes and we got the smoke from Palestine two flavors and raising the merit in.

Francis lamb two three days two days
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Way popsicles, and we're like the idea of the popsicles entirely like salvage oriented, and, you know, whereas like white moustache gets his reputation for being in these beautiful glass jars, like this was bought out because of, like I was trying to be environmentally sound. Yes. Also, being kind of cheap because like what's recyclable taking this jar back in, like steam cleaning it and reading it like I can actually recycle this stuff, and that went into the idea of the popsicles, too, because we wrap them in these likeness knowledgeable like tubes, which might think, counter intuitive, because it's not very gourmet oriented. But like it uses almost. Fifty percent less plastic than a traditional popsicle does that you have to wrap up in package. Breath. So like those are things that we try to do in that inform. Our entire product. But it's exhausting as like to explain, but it's also exhausting, because you just get so many times, we're still putting our popsicles in a plastic that doesn't our caps outta plastic. There's so much energy that goes into, like pressing, one mold of glass. These are almost like paralyzing, but we've, you know, I think we've done really good work in terms of just getting ourselves out there. It hasn't translated into sales. It hasn't translated into like a market for the way or even other over companies doing it. But I just think something like this does take time. And I'm willing to like, give it that, though, we've, we've moved this process along about a slowly as it takes to make us about yogurt. Thank you. Hold on. This is amazing. Talke is the founder of white mustache coming up the French and their complicated relationship with little bag Francis lamb, and this is the splendid table from APM. I'm Richard Hake and to bring you morning edition. I have to get up early really early. But that's not going to stop me from tending WNYC's party at Brooklyn bowl, I'll be there with other WNYC hosts including Brian Lehrer. Tanzania Vega jet plus, folks from Gotha missed and your favorite podcast and it.

WNYC Richard Hake Tanzania Brian Lehrer Talke Francis lamb Brooklyn founder Fifty percent
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 3 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's too obvious to even say that our lives will be shaped by our parents and our children. But what I watched us Macon's episode on the show chefs table, I was literally crying, but her stories of both her family and the family she's made at her London restaurant Darjeeling express, you should really watch. It highly recommended. We're delighted to have her with us today. Welcome chef. Thank you very much. So there is. An intense moment in your story. You've said that your mother cried when you were born why is that? Because it is part of this whole cultural divide in my society in South Asia. The preferred sex of child is always the mail the mail is seen as the true heir and goes, I see the button, it's not just the button of getting them married, but protecting the integrity, you know, making sure that no-one gossips about them this such huge onus about on our, and how are linked to the family owner that it is the biggest lively possible in families. Then you have more than one goal because normally do you need to marry get to those at off. It also means that is that feel the two may not have an air to your family, which is doomed bloom. I mean, it's actually got massive economic connotations in some families. If you don't have a boy because actually in hurt and slow means that the goes don't hurt property. It will go to. Cousin of the goal to male cousin. So it's quite serious. When a family doesn't have a boy. And I think that when second arrives it is devastating for the family because that hope that the old hot that. Okay. I one being ago find we live with it the second one being ago, it's devastating. It's also the fact that they know one family wants a lot of girls because very expensive to get fired off. But then the other thing is everyone needs that boy to carry the family name, the family owner is linked to you know, what the boy does and family assets poss- on just to the point the goes get a minimum amount. And so when you were growing up how did you react to that situation? Did you were you aware of that? I wasn't veteran if the dial it'll get much of problems that come with being a female in my society. I just knew that everybody was extremely upset when I was born and my mother craved. It bothered me a lot. It bothered me a lot because I felt unwanted and maybe not respected. And what I tried to do was to pretend that I loved everybody a lot some some of my own. I knew would always muck kidding me being ago. Tease me that no one would marry me telling me that I was dark skinned. So it was I was very made to feel sometimes that maybe I am this huge liability the family is stuck with. But I refused to allow this debris. Cme is to visualize myself like a bamboo that used to grow in my backyard. The when the wind blew the Bengal bent, but it never I was not good to break because people had their buses, and I convinced myself that one day, I was going to become someone very exceptional someone brilliant as to close by is visualize. My name invites. You know, like you see Hollywood. Broadway. I would imagine my entire name lights. It's very hard. If you're not from this particular culture to understand how deep-rooted the buses people's boss Clements. When they see goes that you have good. It's like what treating the neighbors plants? Flying all the resources are putting into the girl. Somebody else is going to benefit. It's it's very strange culture women of shift as goddesses, but I meant it. It's hard to understand, you know, when we give life life is not celebrated. We'll be back with more from asthma and America's has skin has vice on how to actually cook with young kids. I Francis lamb, and this is the splendid table from APM. WNYC is cutting its spring pledge drive in half, David green. And while there will be fewer days of.

South Asia Macon WNYC bloom Francis lamb London asthma Bengal America David green Hollywood one day
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:35 min | 3 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Eddie from Boston, Massachusetts heady with arm. Hi, how are you? I'm I'm here with Akina. That's the other voice you hear cheese expert, and what can we talk about? Well, I have a question about blue cheese. Right. So I often have a really hard time tearing the right? Blue cheese say with like a chiefs played or like putting on a pizza or using it for cream sauce, because they know they're so many achievements. Blue achievers are like a mystery to me. And when I buy them randomly, I'll say I'll just try this went there. They're super pungent released strong, and it can't really enjoy them. So I kind of want to figure out what are great for like crackers and jam I can use on salads. And what are actually is our milder. Okay. I'm that's a great question. Came to that. So. Yeah. Definitely as complex as as blue cheese is actually. So it's important to think about blue cheese is a very broad category encompassing, mild soft sort of lightly, blue cheeses, and then on the far end, intense craggy, deeply blue cheeses. So I want to maybe shoutout. What I think some blue cheeses that you would enjoy our and I want to talk a little bit about tax jer. Because a big part of how we experience the flavor of the cheese is about the texture of that cheese. So one of the reasons for instance, that people tend to gravitate toward creamier blue cheeses is that the butterfat of a creamy blue cheese sort of helps ameliorate the intensity of the flavor. So I'm gonna peg you as someone who would be more attracted to a creamier blue cheese now when I think about the mildest creamier most sort of user friendly blue cheese and thinking about something like gorgonzola chromatic auto or gorgonzola Dolchai as our milder, very creamy almost sort of floral fruity blue cheese now gorgonzola does come in a range of styles. Okay. So right. So criminal kata would be the mildest in most creamy est- glue. She is now it's a great cheese for a cheese plate. But it's also really good cheese for making sauces because you're kind of already halfway there to a cream sauce cheese itself is so rainy already criminal means like Crema fide. Yeah. Exactly now when you're selecting a blue cheese for sauce. You wanna think about the moisture of that blue cheese? So you don't wanna choose drier harder and often nuttier blue cheeses, those are going to be harder to incorporate in a sauce, and because they don't melt as well because they don't themselves carry that much moisture and moisture is really important factor in the melted cheese. And also, you're going to end up those Jesus tend to be more aged a drier harder craggy era, blue cheese. And so they have like a more intense flavor to those tend to be like, sometimes you a blue cheese. And it's you have that intensive blue mold flavor. But you're spiciness like it almost bites you back. I sure I mean, I think specifically of like some of the more aged Spanish, blue cheeses. You definitely got that like spiciness. We're actually like. Yeah. Going back to Oregon Zola. Actually, there's a gorgonzola called go. Gorgonzola picante, which is a more aid sort of denser, craggy era, blue cheese, and that that gives that kind of spiciness on the finish interesting. This was this helpful. I mean, I feel like I could talk to you for you know, we would need. At least mine talking about Ortiz for days. What would be the use for like a really crackly vol- sort of blue cheese? Where would you maybe use that or well? Yeah. So if you back. Yeah. So, you know, I think putting that on a cheese played is a good idea in my mind. Those Jesus are really finished products. They're meant to be enjoyed as they are that cheese maker and the ethanol have spent a lot of time, you know, six months sometimes a year. To to create that product. And so that can go on a cheese play. But also, I think those are good for salads. You know, just to crumble a little bit just as an accent? Know, not necessarily to make the center of a salad, but to use his punctuation like, especially if you're gonna put fruits, and that salad, for instance, like you would see a cheese like that. I in a salad that has greens that has nuts that has fruit. And then the a little dab will do a little bit of that cheese sort of crumbled. So that it's part of a larger story not like the main the main event. Excellent. Well, thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks for the call, Eddie. Thank you guys. And I'm gonna go to whole foods toil the TV there now really Thursday. Thank you so much. I think we will take a little break. But can you stick around for a little longer? I love that write off. So coming up we have more of your calls, which specialised Keenan and America's test kitchen weighs in on freezing. Your cheese Francis lamb, and we should've seen his face when I.

Eddie Jesus Akina Crema fide Boston Massachusetts Francis lamb Keenan Ortiz Oregon America six months
"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"francis lamb" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All of it on WNYC on the next all of it. A roundup of this year Sundance film festival we'll talk velvet buzzsaw Shiloh buffs tiny boy and the controversial documentary about Michael Jackson, leaving Neverland, plus the owner of the strand on the petition meant to prevent bookstore from becoming a city landmark don't miss all of it. Weekdays at noon on WNYC. I'm Francis lamb. And this is the splendid table the show for curious, cooks and eaters. Imagine you're a chef. How will you run your kitchen if you have no idea what ingredients you're getting that day? Now, not because you're waiting for your favorite local farmer to come surprise you with that day's harvest, but because you have to get your ingredients on the black market because you're cooking in a place where the government can make things like onions or even solve just go missing. And hurt. That's a question that was on on your von Bramson mind when she started writing a book about Cuba now, she's not from there. But she's not really a stranger to the place because I grew up in the Soviet Union and went to school where she was taught Spanish and poems honoring Fidel Castro. It was part of the two countries like international communist romance. And of course, she grew up with those infamous Soviet bread lines and food shortages, so she understands firsthand the special kind of inventiveness that those shortages could inspire in a cook. She's written a book about the politics, the private restaurants, Cuba that are actually in people's homes where the conditions are precarious. The where the cooking is full of optimism and creativity. She sat down with a computer in your time columnist Melissa.

WNYC Cuba Soviet Union Fidel Castro Neverland Michael Jackson Francis lamb Melissa