18 Burst results for "Francis Coppola"

"francis coppola" Discussed on Cinemavino

Cinemavino

02:39 min | 3 months ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on Cinemavino

"Number one gross movie. I will agree. I mean, to me, if you look at all the films I watched, which were, and I'm going to throw in films nowadays with series streaming. Streaming that are also going to be like episodes that are going to be hour long. I got to say that I still think Spider-Man was the best and was not nominated. I agree. Yes, that's the difference. Honestly, if you look back at our podcast 2021, you know, we reviewed some of these movies we reviewed. Don't look up. We had Spider-Man: No Way Home. Spider-Man: No Way Home. We were all 9 or ten out of that movie. Yeah. And it didn't get nominated here? Yeah. But look at the academy voters, like, I mean, let people like Brian who are voters in the academy, Brian De Palma, Francis Coppola, Martin Scorsese. Coppola Scott, they vote the bitch about these movies all the time. But things change. The academy does not have a good track record of being progressive. So we were raised on Raiders of the Lost Ark. And the next generation, they will be raised on Maguire or all the Spider-Man films. That'll be their starting point. Yeah, look at Raimi memes on Reddit. The entire subreddit of Raimi memes is nothing but Spider-Man, Tobey Maguire memes. Returning to the original point like that you guys are talking about it's like the Oscars love to mix it up because they've always loved to put like a Rick commercial series of blockbusters like ET next to the movie it lost to you, which is Gandhi. And I want to hear of you guys have any of you guys watched Gandhi. Oh yeah. That's true. Oh, no. No, I have not. And I believe I remember it. I remember watching it on TV. No, no, no. Strike that reverse it. I believe it was rented. Rented it, Gandhi? Yep. Two PHS yikes. Two VHS. It was Titanic style. Rented on two right. I was like, it wouldn't TV. It was to the HSE. I mean, they do love to mix, like, for example, ordinary people in 1980, directed by Robert very much more of a crowd pleasing drama against raging bull, Martin Scorsese. And raging bull did not win, even though that's now being held one of the best movies ever made. They gave it to the more commercial ordinary people. And you see that all the time throughout the Oscars you'll see very commercial movies mixed in with very much like art house movies. You'll see they love to mix and match. And you kind of see that here. You do..

Coppola Scott Raimi Francis Coppola Martin Scorsese Brian De Palma Gandhi Tobey Maguire Maguire Raiders Oscars Reddit Brian Rick Robert
"francis coppola" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

07:18 min | 9 months ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"No prison sequence. That's amazing there was flashbacks to a lurid image of being slammed against the wall and rape. That's it. There was not one bit in david's original script was about the nature of what had transpired in the prison. That had changed him and when we sat down and everything he's the best david is the best and he and when we talked for a long time about all these things he lit up and he was like. Oh my god dude. Like let's fucking go. Let's go and and he said to me he was like let's tear this thing apart. Helped me out. I wanna make it. I want to do with you blah blah blah. And he said just one thing is. This is my first script. It's really important to me. It's a career making moment for me. Whatever we do. I don't care he goes right. Do whatever i need this. You know this is my script. And i was like and i literally put my hand out. I was like dude done right. I it's like all i want to. Let's do much audible done. We worked for like months and months and months together every day. Him writing me writing doing these things. We worked on that and turned it into the thing we wanted to do right. Yes we wanted to do. I would no more betray. David like the rules engagement with us. I want to say on renders. I remember you literally said i remember. We're standing outside the country club. We're the first scene with with you. And matt and the in the long Craftsmanship driveway thing. And and you said if i can find something funnier. I'm going to try to say it. If you guys want me to go back to the script. I'll go back to script whatever and it was like. Hey and like. I say i think there are. There are five or six lines in the movie. That i know david i didn't write and i'm so fucking happy that during the movie and then the rest of it is exactly the script that we wrote and but but the thing is the thing. Is that unfamiliar. Projects was having his new line. We start making a movie with tony. Tony told me told me in. David i have no i. I have no experience with narrative literally whatsoever. He said i'm a. I understand the moment. He literally savings like. I'm a photographer injured in a moment. And he he used to say. I leave that to you guys. I leave that to you guys. I he goes. I think this is fantastic. I know what to do with this. And for all of tony's like what does he did he great. You know it's amazing for a great is a great sense of things. He wanted to use the photo. Sonic cameras on turn and he had. He has like amazing visual instincts right but it was to such a degree on that film that he he would pull up. He would pull up in his car and take. What are we doing today and we would say. It's the scene at the table. With beverly liangelo and elliott gould right edward. Rehearse it for a while to get it all together and when you're already call me right. And then he would go do phone calls and i would rehearse essentially like act like a director rehearse the scene and then we would go get tony. Tony would watch it like an audience. And then he would go right. Great amazing amazing. Don't anybody move. And he would run around. Set up lights. Put the camera on his shoulder and shirt and shoot it and we would and this was obviously an orthodox and we were all young and i remember thinking well. This is great. We're we're all a team where we're this is unorthodox. David are working on the script. I'm sort of handling the the staging of it. Tony shooting it. But tony was tony. Throughout and on into the editing he was a person of great emotion and on many occasions he wept like would he would break down in tears and he would give me a hug and say i have never been this supported i have never had and if i can just i just wanted to. I've never had a collab-. I've never been supported. I just want to jump a slightly ahead. Because we have to end soon. And i just want to say i'm going to deep into this. No no you're not. Because here's i wanna jump ahead because i saw the cut that you had to work from because i was there i wanted to say like the thing about the rap about you in this way and again as someone who's made movies with you and then been around a bunch of them like the cut that exists of american history. X is because of what you did in the editing room. And i know that not because you told me but because i yeah you showed me the cuts that existed before and the cut that you know what's important to just say because i objective also lost people. Don't even understand like tony commercial editor. Who did this really gonzo cut. Nobody can make heads or tails of it. Tony got a little insecure. Whatever tony went off to shoot a commercial it literally in the middle of the whole thing and the whole thing was sort of flat line literally. No one knew what to do and i got on the phones and called around. I didn't go in and and cut it. I i went. I i went in. I did some stuff to reassemble stuff. They're trying to into a more full-throated away totally almost like a script assemblage right just so that so that an editor would know what we had to work with. And i went and got jerry greenberg. Who won the oscar for the french connection kramer versus kramer apocalypse. Now that literally. Those are his credits. I got that guy to come in and work on the movie with me and tony. Many times in the course of that process tony wept and said to me like you know like i've never been supported and everything and i had great love for the guy like he was he was a very. He's very figure and everything. But but you weren't serving your. I just wanna say watching it all you wanted. I remember you show david me that original cut and then later cuts and you're like tell me like you were so open you being told. Here's what we're going to be. We we went through this whole thing and everything. Tony went through Tony went through a struggle. To make a thing go he and he and by the way. I am not saying that critically but it's also one of the things people. It's like what has happened since then. how many. How many films has tony completed since. Then none and i think he's a great artist. I actually really do. I think he's a like a great conceptual artist and a great thing. I witnessed him go a personal struggle to complete a thing of course to complete a thing to let it go extraordinary talent. He captured that. That's it it's a real incredible go and what happened to save. Yeah what's happened. Yeah is not an argument between me and tony. What happened is tony. In my opinion he struggled to let it go. He struggled to do what. Francis coppola says an abandoned. Your film like. Don't you don't finish it. You abandon it..

tony Tony david beverly liangelo David elliott gould matt jerry greenberg edward kramer oscar Francis coppola
"francis coppola" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:25 min | 10 months ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on Future Tense

"This is an abc podcast. Bitcoin i just seems like a scam. Estimated between has a carbon footprint comparible to that zealand. Now ransom payments being honest and make su- we to scam. Ac boiling nations and killing the poll of as the payment of choice for international criminals. Or is it a genius financial revolution democratizing money and enabling financial sovereignty. Future i'm ed. We'd dot and today on future tense. We're going to pick some of the biggest headlines in bitcoin to get to the bottom of what's really going on and what it means rough future. Bitcoin makes the news most days in some form or another but the most surprising story recently. That is why next week. I will send to congress bill that will make bitcoin illegal tender from september seventh. Bitcoin will be legal tender in el salvador. Then the first country in the world to do this are now. This was kind of out of the blue. We didn't expect it to happen. El salvador isn't particularly known for being a particularly. Bitcoin is nation or anything like that. Nick carter is a general partner. At castle island ventures would use a blockchain focus venture fund in the us. He's a big bitcoin. Yes i'm very much pro bay coin. You know there's no question about that. But even he was caught off guard by el salvador's decision. There has been this pilot. Experiment in a town called l. zonta on the coast of all salvador. Which is this kind of. Touristy surf town where through grants and some activism. Much of the town had been converted to transacting on bitcoin. So it's sort of local. Bitcoin standard had emerged in this town. But this wasn't like a widespread thing in the country of el salvador by any means it was kind of a surprise to us all when the president announced who's going to pass a bill in parliament making bitcoin legal tender to understand why president bouquet decided to open the economy up to bitcoin. We need to understand a more bounded. Francis coppola is a financial writer people community this notorious no corner who hates bitcoin. It's actually not true. And i surprised quite by writing a piece can which i gave a cautious. Welcome to what was going on in el salvador. Say el salvador has what's called a dollarized economy now what that means what. A dollarized economies is one which uses the us donner as its own currency. But it's not part of the united states or one of its territories so although it uses humor stoller it doesn't come under. Us tax policy. It doesn't condie under. Us munshi policy. The fed has no responsibility for making sure that it has enough donors so it has to earn or buy or borough the donors that uses domestically has to obtain them from outside the us. And that means that really. It needs to export more than it imports. All if it doesn't then that difference has to be made up in some other way no salvador case. It's made up with remittances from from people working overseas now. The problem with all of this is that when you're borrowing somebody else's money you have to service it in currency and that kinda means you have to keep boring or you have to earn it. You can't create it in the way that modern economies do when they issued their own currencies. And that's a real could straight for el salvador. So where does bitcoin combing tool of this. Well they seem to be doing is launching bitcoin as a parallel currency to us dollar then not at the moment proposing to replace the us dollar with bitcoin. So really it's a way increasing people's options for what currency they use and to the extent they were to attract bitcoin into the country as well as always if it is an addition two dollars rather than replacing it it could actually increase liquidity in the economy of bid. Give people a bit more spending and opening up to this. New currency could also open the country up to new business eliminating taxes on bitcoin. Capital gains would be one way to attract bitcoin entrepreneurs to the country and attract capital investment to the country and then lastly. The usa actually threatened all salvador with sanctions. Not too long ago after. Kelly fired some members of the judiciary and so this is one less discussed potential upside which would be diversifying el salvador away from just their dependence on the dollar becoming less of a vassal state and becoming more independence potentially de-dollarize ing but if that is part of the justification we certainly haven't heard it in now. Salvador around seventy percent of the population have no access to banking but bitcoin could offer salvadorans a new way of saving and sending money in the future. Vj boy party is the author of the bush case for bitcoin. They can now save in something. They can't be debased. So fear currencies like the australian dollar in the us dollar get inflated to governments in slate these currencies inside of purchasing power decreases over time whereas bitcoin provides away people. Keep some of their savings in something. That doesn't account get debase by design. And so i think. The people of el salvador to begin saving in bitcoin will see their purchasing power increase over time and another huge benefit is a lot of the capital in florida. El salvador comes from remittances and they're using services like western union which take a huge fee huge cut of the the amount of money to get sent back to families. Thirty to fifty percent of that money is taken away in fees whereas now people have the ability to send that money back in essentially zero theme outta to their family and keep most of the savings of the woods on for the united states recalls. These wolves come with risks. Most people worldwide have never made a bitcoin transaction. So this system will require a huge amount of education to actually gain a foothold. Additionally bitcoin itself is a digital bearer asset which means that if you are the holder of the asset if you have knowledge of the private keys effectively the password to the bitcoin and you lose those private keys. It's gone someone you know is able to steal that information from you. Hack your wallet or you know with the phishing scheme or something like that. They can commandeer your bitcoin right. That's kind of what you sign up for. You get the nice benefits of bitcoin through that sort of cryptographic ownership principle. But there's also drawbacks that come with that and so if you know many salvadorians star using bitcoin. They're going to be exposed to this risk of.

el salvador Bitcoin united states castle island ventures salvador condie bitcoin Nick carter El salvador zonta Francis coppola abc stoller zealand congress Vj boy party fed
"francis coppola" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on The Film Vault

"Pic in a way. The first one is a movie about the remake around the making of the godfather and Sold it's going to be an fob. Evan i oscar isaac as francis coppola and elizabeth moss as eleanor coppola and per production will begin in the autumn. I don't think it has a name yet. It's based on an article It may it's sort of. I think title maybe thrown around called francis in the godfather. And it's a move me. I was very excited about. I mean the godfather came out and seventy two. And that's when i came out and i've always loved together so that is one of my movies for you. Anderson was just eight years old when it came out so he remembers a funding from another attempt at humor that i will green light this with a bright blinking green. I'm very excited to see this. I'm nervous about jake. Hall plane bob evans at a very specific type like real off. He can pull it off your cool guy. He can pull up. Michael bevan's like you know he talked jilin. I'll be fine. How about this. How about instead of making a movie about the godfather how people set out and try and make the next godfather not called godfather but its own thing based on a great beloved novel. Equality this neagh eating eating. It's fucking tail. Sure about that. We we enjoyed our. Ko to one. Making i i don't know i'm i rob would rather see people throw their their their efforts into actually trying to make a very very good movie. That's maybe not the godfather the godfather instead of making a movie about a movie. That was good. I mean we had a little over one hundred years of cinema. We're getting towards the end. Now is the is. The life cycle distorts the end of no. This is one. This is considered by some to be the best movie ever made. Certainly one of the best. So i don't mind with mink right. We just got to see what was widely considered the greatest movie ever made the making of To an extent the making rosebud over there now making citizen faulk. I like godfather better than i like. Citizen kane's no i'm in for. This'll be mispronounced kane. Its citizen fuck. Oh i'm sorry i've called. I grew up knowing in a citizen kane. A green light. This movie begrudgingly. I mean. at least it's not another fast and furious movie. Bait superheroes isn't it. I wonder if there's a way make marlon brando superhero. There is a way to win. Dad hey you give me some money and give me a weekend able coke and i will figure out a way where you could make superheroes show up in this movie somehow and it would make sense. I guarantee you can do that. The last part you lost me but other than that cocaine. The making sense yolo. Y'all i agree. I agree like though. Yeah green start. Hey is very first movie at controversial albeit but green light. Yes some discussion. Right what's What's the next bio pic. I was nervous. Second one is right now. I think its untitled. And so it's being titled the reagan movie with dennis quaid playing reagan. Sorry dennis penelope and ler role revenue. Yeah and there's a picture of him on the website that i was looking at where he has a cowboy hat. Looked very reagan ish so it looks pretty good Jon voight is in it and kevin dillon. Penelope ann miller and slated to come out in twenty twenty two and it's the story of ronald reagan's ally from hood the hollywood actor the leader of the free world. A love. that kevin dillon..

oscar isaac elizabeth moss eleanor coppola Michael bevan francis coppola bob evans jilin Evan kane francis jake Anderson faulk rob marlon brando reagan coke yolo dennis penelope dennis quaid
"francis coppola" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

09:15 min | 1 year ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"That approaches a bigger budget movie on an epic movie a disastrous. None of these. Things are walt disney so for them to take this on their taking on something. That is way way way way way out of their comfort zone which is why then you see. Oh there are a couple of cute robots for kids. Go like you know. Oh but there's a madman who literally murdered his entire crew. Oh my god. It is a really dark twisted movie. That like ostensibly is for kids because you have these cute robots and like space battles and stuff but then you have like again. The most horrifying was her liquids. As i've ever seen in a movie and this doom this this incredible sense of doom. That permeates the entire movie up from like about five minutes in where they like. See the ship and jon. Barry's score by the way we we have to talk about that. Because john barry score is really a lot of the the. The tension to this movie comes from his massive not like john williams at all or casserole bombastic crazy amazing score with a gigantic production for disney. Took over everything. And and it's this weird like dot kids movie not it's a sci-fi movie but is like dark light like don't even know what to do with it and even to this day watching it's just like it's it's kind of like having a steak dinner with spaghetti on top of it or something it's like it's like weird. It's this weird they it's like okay. It's unique and everything's done well but it's like and then and then there's the ending which is a whole nother conversation which we need to have which nobody even the lovers of this movie like me can really defend this ending. They didn't know what to do. It's amazing that gary nelson this because he was not the sci-fi guy the previous movie that he had made. That wasn't a tv movie was freaky. Friday which is little science fiction. Low magical that kind of stuff. But it's not like he's the steven spielberg or lucas of his day. You know it's not like they're even going to like another like a robert wise. No but this was the disney team. I mean you know you look at frank. Phillips a shot at fairfield is a very renowned cinematographer but he basically did a lot of those cheap as disney movies. That like you know look like you know. They were shot in two seconds. I mean and this all has to do with in the name. You're going to keep coming back to is a guy named ron miller. Ron miller was disney's son-in-law i think is that right. I think married his daughter if i recall league football guy football guy and he was as big like intimidating dude who was in charge. I believe of disney production. For a least. I don't have it in front of me but i had to be at least fifteen years because i want to say. He came out of it in the sixties. When the dexter riley movies kurt russell dexter riley moves were happening. You can see his name on those credits. But he was producing for disney all up through the black hole past the black hole and into the early eighties before he left but he basically his whole thing was. You want cheap. We're gonna shoot it in frigging burbank. If it's not on the disney it will be five minutes drive from the disney lot. At the end of the north avenue irregulars which allegedly takes place in new england. You see clarice lebron and all these women with the big you know car chase passing by signs of literally have the one thirty four on them like literally one thirty four pasadena literally and framed like they did not care. They're just like yeah. They're in connecticut with a pasadena in it or whatever. But ron miller was not some guy who's going to spend a lot of money or take a lot of risks so for this movie to come at a disney. This indicates an enormous amount of of forces. That were all. Probably you know colliding with each other to make this mishmash of a movie and it is that sort of disney house style. The two were alluding to their. That really does define a lots of the technical expertise of this film but also with that the disquieting of the disjointed view of the film of how flat a lot of the cinematography seems. I mean it was describing this film to friends of mine who had never seen him put put in this way. This film was released the same year as alien and yet it looks like it came out a decade before it was made on double the budget of alien and it looks like it costs half as much and so much of that and so much of it has to do with the way it was shot and i'm not counting the special effects and the incredible mat work that was done in this movie because from a technical standpoint. There's a lot of spectacular craftsmanship in this movie but so much gets drawn down by the kind of bog standard middle of the roadway of shooting. And i that it feels like it's so much of a piece with what disney was doing because as you said this was an in house production they they forced none of this. It all came directly from disney. Even to the point of which. I believe in correct me. If i'm wrong in this mike but this is something that i remember reading and i hope it's correct. I believe they tried to license john. Dykstra motion camera setup from that he did on star wars. He either wouldn't let them wanted too much money. Which theron miller would probably be any money and so disney spent a ton of money making their own motion control camera rigs and it was called. I think aces outright or my getting raises was and and it and this was a lot of are indeed. These league motion control shot in the seventies is not something no especially a full like not for miniatures. I mean because a lot of the tie fighters and all that stuff you see that. The motion control cameras. Those are stripped down cameras. That were that were. That had the word on blimps means that they had no soundproofing on them because he didn't need it. All sound is going to be restored for star wars. but it's like the black hole. There's one scene where they're having dinner literally the camera dollies laterally across these people having dinner so it's a full camera and there's dialogue is probably a loop but it was a full camera and it's out the window you can see the background of the gigantic spaceship which moves proportionally to that camera. There is absolutely no way. They could have done that without motion control. You're talking about the flat. Look it's like that. It's it's less about a flat. Look more about a risk averse. Look it's like they. They they simultaneously wanted to risk a lot and then risk almost nothing depending on what aspect you're looking at. It's it's very odd. I mean in those days in the seventies there were still running movies at drive ins a lot. And so if you shot a movie too dark and you can read. Francis coppola talks about this. With gordon willis when the shot the godfathers print those prints out because it wouldn't show up at the drive in which of course degraded the image. So disney was always very especially the disney productions. Were always very very neutral looking. Like everything was properly lit. There weren't a lot of like high contract alien of god. It's like you know all like key lights with shadows and almost fill half the time but the black hole is like this. Everything is lit ev. Even when there are shadows it's like they're grey shadows. They're not pitch black shadows where the spaces even the way space looks. You were talking about peter. Shaw's insanely beautiful work And we we have to go into that because the mats and the models and miniatures on this are i think of legend. I think anybody who ever wanted to get into this kind of special effects. This is one of their movies that they go to because it's just so intricate and gorgeous and lovely but even space isn't black. It's like this purple blue. It's like it's like you look at it. And especially on the transfers the hd transfers if you see a print it's not it's it's not as printed up in it shouldn't be. It's a little too bright on video honestly like even with disney plus and everything. But it's it's. It's this tactile approachable space. Like you know like all of these rooms are like you know they're utilitarian but everything is so lit its own kind of very unique and strange style. I mean i do like the stuff that shot on reinhart's ship where feels like there's kind of a key light way up above and i think that that stylistically very interesting but then there are other parts were just like okay you know when they go into like the cord or some things. It's just like yeah. It is very very flat and even though they are doing some great special effects. There are so many times. I'm just god. This looks like it was shot in front of a blue screen and it doesn't look that good. There's a moment when they're on like a trolley going at ao going along. And i'm just like okay. Yep i can really see those lines on everybody. Having event news hair that the lines of that were really kind of chunky. It's like okay digital composite halo that show around. Sometimes when it's not done quite right..

Ron miller ron miller gary nelson john williams steven spielberg Francis coppola new england lucas clarice lebron Phillips kurt russell gordon willis two seconds five minutes frank john barry peter Shaw two double
"francis coppola" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on RAGE Works Network-All Shows

"In the auditorium They would have Contestants come up to the debt and then give the price invest best one. That's how i met bob. Birds famous. Bob burns i was in my guerrilla sue and he was in tracing ghostbusters and i didn't know he was in the audience and i walked out my gorilla suit the next thing. I knew this big grill jumped up on the stage and started grooming me house bob birds. We've been friends ever since it's awesome. It's great to hear that star trek cons of connecting people even since day one. So that's really cool. I saw i sold spock years a plan. The apes prosthetics there because at that time early career and of course. That's how that's how really two major. Because she came over and she saw my sign that and she said you're might wanna call those just pointed years. They're beautiful as she sat 'cause she was waking enterprises back then basically that was a copyright infringement so she called me the waiting and people would line up the by these then act some of people within the german to apply them. We're gonna come back to those vulcania's and a little bit. But i since i let's go ahead. Let's let's create a little temporal anomaly here. Let's go back in time and talk about steve kneels origins. Where did you grow up. Who were your parents. And what did little steve wanna be. When he grew up in san francisco was a talented artist in her own. Right that you did not pursue that career business. My dad was also extremely versatile artists. They also when worked on nuclear submarines at meal at mare island and he did contracts where advertising agencies with his art and he was a model builder to left slot cars. Like i had a real interest in and modeling slot. Cars aren't all that. Stop so impact. My whole family was artist in musicians and Haters sculptors sigua up in that environment. And then later on After living in the bay area so Canedo upset septa. California mahmoud is down. They are Span that's why i star dragon that led to a real interest in recreating things thrown star trek and making aliens in makings marketers and that kind of stuff. And once i got high school Side from a filmmaking. Interest legit also pursued Ended up at the americans. Atro- brown high school transcript quoted injured at that studio. So that's the short story. The real quick story. Yeah he can tell us a little bit more about francis ford coppola because that's pretty crazy for first internship in the industry. You're now side by side francis coppola who had become quite a big name and wasn't ready at that point. Yeah he was. Pat is anyway Ya done Godfather series jeopardy was starting in. So mario puzo was there all the time. I got to have chinese with really day. It was amazing thing. But what happened is i to start of course in love star trek and then i discovered stanley kubrick in two thousand and that completely blew my mind so any any thoughts ahead about becoming an astronaut or going into astrophysics pilot. Went right out there. Lock speaker and i pursue building become sessile correct bill makings are make known films after i got high school. I saw an article in the san francisco chronicle about the american soldier and george. Lucas was just in production. Will cheating x eleven. Thirty eight which. I love that show and There was article and it said copeland him. John gordy they wanted to help. Young filmings euro filmmaker context. So i literally. I call reminded me down. I showed my films to france's own. 'cause you can imagine that eight millimeter millimeter movies on his pull down screens office. You have to realize that. I knew more about george. Lucas then niger. Years lucas had done cage x eleven. Thirty eight four gb. Which was his thesis. There on graduation college in the ran out on. Pbs nice law. That joan Eh just asamera learned a lot about. We'll gifts so been francis. Later as time went on. I realized that he was pretty big shotgun guy but he was a really wonderful human being very highly me very helpful would Give me a ride. Home sometimes. had an alfa romeo sports car which broke down. why five five-year you bus station. Rotate me homes talaq eldorado. I went to parties with them. Grateful dead concerts. I really got included in Family i was always invited. Hardee's and events in mill valley area so He was really helpful for me. Magic ation I got to meet halston clark. They're sitting fourteen. So i got to meet a lot of amazing people through him as results. I've always been very grateful to francis. We're talking here in the nineteen seventies and learning about things like makeup prosthetics special effects makeup. I it's not something that's really you know at that. Point widely taught. Why the instructed in places so for yourself. Where do you go to learn more about that subject. Well today i had nothing. My salt plant is that was a really whirlwind period. Three years they're situated star trek. Two thousand one way or the eggs waiter silent writing mailman just amazing science fiction girls being paid. But i really think that star trek two thousand one and first movie really really really Influence on me and a lot of other people. I wanted to know. Hey how did you mean why. There's be how they do in the film. I know it was me. I was very interested monster pickups. Because i've always been a fan of hammer films. Universal read famous monsters a red smith. We can get a lot mation. i got some. I knew how you're making them. But i didn't know how they were making the by age amigos They have a making of the apes of j reynolds television. But those days you couldn't recorded so anytime and watch it I remember snapping. Polaroid's off the screen too so i am awang. Look at the molds. They show their point of rubber and from that and some or respondents in buying materials Through the mail. Former in writing gable. In person i met in college. Who was doing sculpting.

francis coppola san francisco francis ford coppola j reynolds John gordy stanley kubrick Three years fourteen today California steve eight millimeter millimeter lucas first movie Thirty eight four gb mill valley chinese german mario puzo Pat
"francis coppola" Discussed on FruitFly

FruitFly

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on FruitFly

"The best reputation you're going to see is an independent filmmaking in new queer cinema right and just because i think the it's important to look at that like lena said who was behind the narrative because up until the mid eighties when you know independent film it can kind of exploded it was all just either studio which is like sixties and before or tours. So it's like the big directors who were kind of in charge in the seventies you think of like Francis coppola those people so in the eighties it became much more democratize That is the word enter nisei whereas if you had a camera in five grand you could just make something and submitted to festivals and it would get seen so the fact that people no longer had to go through the usual channels and get to know and be judged it's at are they could just make their own narratives which is how we got this panoply of of really interesting and beautiful diverse representations because it was us telling our own stories finally And especially if you that against you know. We're talking about nuclear cinnamon. Early nineties philadelphia Three and know at the time. It was widely hailed because if your listeners. Don't know tom. Hanks plays a character with aids. Who is in a relationship with instinct embarrass van der skinny like sorry and it as like of course it was like widely held at the time but it. If you revisited did not age well at all you know. There is barely any any kind of affection between those two main characters and tom. Hanks is a movie is a successful whites. Old money able bodied sis gendered man. Why engendering the like sympathy from all of the straight bore around him. So that's a really good to look at that as a narrative that was being told you know with less voices by a big studio versus the narratives that we were telling for our audiences and to that point though i think like you know that kind of was what brought people in the bush administration to start carrying about the aids crisis because mary fisher's famous speech from the republican convention and nineteen ninety ninety one ninety two or something she was speaking. I am a face of somebody who has hiv. She was She was a single mother of two who had contracted hiv from her ex husband. And up. Until that point it was oh it can actually impact more than justice deviant homosexuals. She's a straight white christian woman. That's a republican and the bushes like our so. We have to do something. It was at that point that you started seeing it gave rise to films like philadelphia. Where but it was. Also you know to make it acceptable we have to make this about. Saddam powell character. Because i don't imagine that that movie would have had as much would much longevity as much. Hopeful significance headed roundabout a queer person of color or a trans person of color contracting ad. And then you know going through the whole legal process because when you watch a movie it really doesn't have a plot like like it. It just kind of focuses on like tom. Hanks has aids in his hot antonio banderas boyfriend to do anything about it. This is like but i think that to your point though like you know yes..

Hanks tom mary fisher philadelphia Francis coppola lena hiv Saddam powell
"francis coppola" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

05:03 min | 1 year ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"It's simply wouldn't have worked now. I agree with that. I know this was this. Is daniel craig's bond right from the beginning to get a new guy. They're gonna start the franchise over the this this vigorously. You definitely need a new actor. Why like about cinema retro. because i there's a period. I grew up. Was you look back at the films of the sixties and seventies and that's to me is was a great period in cinema and it was really kinda like for me kinda like the tail end of the hollywood golden age in a way but yet the sixties were creeping in there and changing the way we thought about things more anti-establishment things thing in fact. He was so perceptive. I'm teaching a course at nyu. New are your next semester Called cinema of the sixties have allusion to revolution. And basically. it's saying exactly what you said. It was the last period of time in which the old guard the old hollywood legends people like john. Ford and howard hawks and alfred hitchcock were making their movies at the same time. People like francis coppola and martin scorsese and dennis hopper and all these new guys coming on so it was just wonderful period of time where you had the best of both worlds. You have this emerging new talent. Doing all sorts of exciting types of films films would never get made today by the way and you also had the old masters and they were still respecting each other and working together in the same industry. It was the last golden period of hollywood. And you know we still get the occasional good movie being made today but there are very few people today in the world that are justified to be called movie stars. And i agree i agree. It's not the same What what is needed about your publication. You know an addition to that is your list of contributors is really you mentioned. Caroline monroe but i mean you have christopher lee. I mean the guy is a legend. Well we one of the things. Dave dave and i thought about this for many years and whenever i go to london fortunate enough to associate with these people go to lunch with them or go for drinks with them and they told us so many wonderful stories. And i always said the dave. Isn't it a shame that we're the only people that hear these stories. If we go out with these old timers so to speak we finally can sit up. We're gonna do it. We're going to put out our own magazine. But we were very concerned about doing it because the one thing we did not want to do was have it look like one of these typical self published magazines where grind groundout in somebody's basement. We want it to be full color. We wanted to have all the production value of playboy magazine or empire magazine. So you know we put a lot of money into it. It is a very rich looking magazine. And the other dream that we had was devote the magazine to the period of the sixties and seventies. It's the only magazine ever dedicated to that period and we wanted to whenever possible to tell the story of these actors and the film's through their own words..

Dave dave hollywood playboy magazine daniel craig empire magazine nyu francis coppola howard hawks Caroline monroe alfred hitchcock dennis hopper Ford martin scorsese christopher lee london
"francis coppola" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

24:43 min | 1 year ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"You're given everything. Working. It's How much are you loving this long holiday weekend is Tracy and Sunny 179. What you doing? Maybe your way having a super great time to tell your friends what we do on labor Day. Get together with friends and have a good time. Celebrate Lord Radha. Get on study 179. You got it. Thank you. Wait. Don't even Study window. 79 West Palm Beach is home for prints. Sweat with me. Holding Blue. Strike. A day, maybe two. A day, maybe two. So what do you think of the idea? Actually idea Happen. Godfather three is going to be redone. It's the 30th year anniversary of the movie, Francis Coppola says. You know what I created a brand new cuts. New scenes new beginning ending stories on my page Sonny one of 79 dot com. Sweet down that way. Either one way Wait. That's the way it's supposed to. Way way too much. Two. Wait. The's greatest hits of the eighties are bodacious. I want some eighties music the greatest hits of the day. Just like your glamour shots. It's an all eighties weekend on Sonny, one of 79. That is a nice feather boa. Every now and then I get a little bit lonely and you're never coming round now, Then I get a bit listening to this down my bar you gun down. A bit of a look in your eye. Now I'm only falling apart. There's nothing I could do a total eclipse. Once upon a time, there was light in my life. Now there's only a total of Like that. Ling. No, only falling Nothing, Tony. Nobody gonna have no Remember? Never Condoleeza. Did.

"francis coppola" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Bloodiest most outrageous city in the world the planetary capital of sun fun the sand sex and secrets my not so humble home town Las Vegas Nevada my name is George Knapp your occasional host designated driver of the airwaves and moderator of tonight's upcoming cacophonous cavalcade of conversation so glad you've chosen to spend some time with us tonight for the next four hours we will take a deep dive into the realms of crime and punishment or in one context none punishment as in a lack of justice we have compelling subject matter to cover tonight gripping stories of treachery skulduggery murder and mystery to subjects but both cast epic shadows having touched countless lives maybe yours included you know I've been reading about missing and murdered indigenous women for a quite awhile now maybe you have as well the stories were a long time coming and it's likely many of your still on aware of it what's been going on because the coverages been scant we're gonna do our best to change that tonight the situation it is simply heartbreaking and maddening in that so many people know what's on going on a gigantic scale but those in positions of authority have done little or nothing or worse they covered it up it kicked it under the rug and and we can't say for sure how many victims are involved because no one's really doing all that much to count them keep track but we know for sure it's in the thousands native American women might as well have gigantic bulls eyes painted on their foreheads when you hear this story many stories actually of what's befallen particular women and what so many others are forced to win door it hopefully will affect you the way it's affected me it just it makes you want to go out to get out of your chair and and slap some cuffs on the perpetrators you know I watch the new film this weekend one that focuses on this exact topic it's a been covered in little bits and pieces here and there a news media but is otherwise been ignored the murdered and the missing and the outrageous lack of response by governments by police by but some of the tribes themselves the film is called somebody's daughter and it's a work I think that will reach out and grab you and won't let go the director and writer the film joins me in the second half tonight his name is rain we'll also be joined by a tribal leader from Louisiana David sticky who will share some stories with us about the sordid history of how something like this can possibly still be happening in twenty first century America but first we got a rollicking globetrotting detective story kind about about a courageous journalist who got hooked on a far flung mystery that kinda has its tentacles in every corner of the globe especially in the CDS darkest most dangerous corners of the world it involves a global internet drug empire that beard wildly into murder for hire and mercenaries gun running corruption cartels an absolute debauchery it's a story that probably deserves a Francis Coppola movie or maybe a Warren's Yvonne song Evan Ratliff is the journalist he's got a good dog with a bone is a story that he locked his jaws around and wouldn't let go of in spite of some very real dangers right since the people who were he was pursuing outright murder all kinds of others over the tiniest suspicions of betrayal the book is called the master mind drugs empire murder betrayal and I'll tell you it's mesmerizing and it's an absolutely true story of a brilliant but twisted criminal maniac who thought he was beyond the law to the point where he figured he'd create his own country it's one heck of a story I will hear it coming up in just a minute or two I webmaster lex loan hood and I have pulled together our usual assortment of items and oddities called from a very is news sources around the world we call it naps news you can find it on the coast to coast website among the stories there tonight an example of how a documentary film can make a real difference the story is about the murder of MalcolmX and now decades after that crime investigators because of this film are saying they're going to take a fresh look at whether the real culprits got away with it whether the two of the men who were sent away for it were innocent after all also a story a follow up about the Fukushima the aftermath of that terrible contamination where people are moving back into the exclusion zone you know despite the radiation and the rest one of the stories in naps news tonight has advice on how to survive a pandemic that's a topic I know so the minds of many people these days with all the conflicting reports about the corona virus coming out of China and we have a story about wolves as we know the reintroduction of wolves into North America really gets people arguing you know when you read about how much of an impact wolves actually have on livestock I think you'll agree or something else of put here in the anti war hysteria that sprung up last few.

George
"francis coppola" Discussed on Adult Beverage Podcast

Adult Beverage Podcast

09:28 min | 2 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on Adult Beverage Podcast

"My my dad's climate fame was be by Jesse Owens in the qualifying round for the Berlin Olympics. One thousand nine hundred eighty six. The ones we're always wanted in front of him. Yeah what a moment. What a Mama I mean. It was up there with his perfect Aryan race. Bullshit SPLAT tuned comes along prison wrong front of the entire world. Tough break few dead though. When did you suspect that rose was in bobbed the final credits? I'm not really good at following. What's going on a movie? You thought she was brainwashed. The whole time didn't well she made such A. It's it could go either way. Because she made such a point with the COP. Seen earlier she was good in that. We're but almost when you're watching a horror movie. You almost go. I know things are not what they appear to be. So you might. There might be people who got it that early but it wasn't really until close to the reveal that I went. Oh she bash bad. She didn't want to record of Things out that's right and going deep into the story on it because you know if that was the case then you know then. There's a record that he was there so initially you're like oh she's really okay. I think as an audience member for woke but I didn't catch the first is second time. I watched it when you catch that. Oh there's the clue that she was giving that you know so I started feeling like you know. First of all you always in a horror film. You're always like questioning everyone your trial. I felt like there was parts where you started seeing like little things that she was doing that. We're giving little indication that maybe she knew a little more first of all she would have if her family was involved in this and this diabolical situation Then she would have some knowing of what's going on and so that part kind of gave me this little like. Oh I know situation you know. She constraint brainwashed visit from her is it from the mother's I sunk in place. thing that things are wrong or was it the flash going off with dude. I think it's the dude. Actually I think it's more whenever he goes and talks to the the way before they even show up when he's talking to the groundskeeper and he's speaking like an old white man like. Oh Yeah Oh. She's one of a kind. That's how it might go something. Everyone talks that way. Connecticut matter every time I went to a body swap and party now then kind of body suit swingers party. You put your keys. You put your keys fish. I've no idea what you're talking about a very pure person. That's what everybody says about trick is hope you're Let's talk about Rod. I'd love Rod and we'll talk about the character. I love the key party man. Oh is that. We're done with that so rod. You think so. He's obviously the comic relief in it and improvise. Most of actually. I read that most of the dialogue in the movie. I don't know if it's true or not was so it was kind of bizarre that won best screenplay because so much of it was improvised. Isn't that weird I've heard let the actor sort of make you know. Make make it your own with him. I would have rod read the lines and then read. He said yet Rodriguez He said that he got he gets better. The more takes you give them so it's like we'll just keep doing it like if if you don't like he got it then like just do it again one more time however you want he like throws in the crazy lines about like the sex the sex slave stuff like some Jeffrey Dahmer. Shit you know like. Oh you're still sucking Dick but you're not attached. It's just the headset. He made up all that sort of like crazy. Shit thing it is a Follow serial killers. That's a very popular. He's the comic relief. So you just Kinda like. But then it's he's such a good friend though I WANNA dig that. He keeps going like he's got to find Chris and he goes to those detectives that that was a funny scene was really funny because I did not expect her to call it other guys when she got a hold on. Don't say I didn't ever do think more well as funny. He's kind of his sounding board. So you know it's a way for A writer to be able to to write back George Jordan. Sounding that's right. He says his sounding board back to Chris. You know of like what's going on and being able to tell the audience he's the audience in itself and he's also like his he's not as nemesis but he's I'm I'm losing the world. his his character that he's related to and sort of like you know he's comradery his friend in this situation So that becomes the sort of telling of the story and yet you know he he gets involved and then of course you know as it comes at the end and he's the hero you know. There's there's some fan theories that this whole movie is all fantasy inroads head because he is the hero in the end. He's figured it. He's the detective and he saves his friend saves them from the evil white people boo. And you know it's GonNa call bullshit on that it's not the original ending but he still does call bullshit he's like that's not true. Yeah but he is. Twa fucking She actually airline. Ucsf airline that doesn't exist or at least three or four decades and today's podcast. We'RE DRINKING FRANCIS COPPOLA ON BLOCK HIGHLY. Recommend this item. Makes you forget your mind and what you were going to say. I don't see you drink drinking a little different. But let's go. Let's get new Belgian nineteen fifty four so do Belgian nineteen fifty four also not a sponsor see how much is really working. Fifteen fifty four. Sorry I'm drinking a dead Guy Ale by road all we should really just stopped with. I'm drinking debt. Guy And all black can yes. So why you gotta be that way. It's racist like it's a white skull mopey A white skull on the front of that too. Well you know. This movie is all about using black vessel And putting what they consider to be a start that they the white people think they're superior they actually think the black races superior genetically because they do they think if they can put their minds into. It's like the combination the best of both worlds to achieve the best possible body. Which is the White Man's driving determination and the black man's body but not at all happy is there even when they're arriving at the party? All the old white people are white people coming in their all black car. So it's white. Yeah bodies and black vessels but isn't it weird when we're at the party and it feels like these white people have never met a black person before at. It's like which is why I think it's yeah. Sorry Connecticut once again. But it doesn't has this weird like you know so. Do you go which we realized laters. They're asking they're looking for a black body for very specific. Every nasty route is looking for is yeah. You don't care black or white but he just needs a body right. That's weird. I wonder if they had in their process of doing this. Body swap thing ever tried some white folks. I don't know just crazy. Yeah white swap with him for not now I. I saw that new Terminator Movie Saggy He's seventy eight years old. Isn't he. Excuses? Well that would be. Nfl Onnell does not age black beer. Blackbeard with Whitehead. Yeah Well Hey. Listen to this podcast. It's free well then really. No one's GonNa Stephen creeped me out. We'll look at it well and that's weird as soon as they introduce a gallery owner and he's blind. I'm like Oh fuck you. That's so weird. That's my assistant. Describes it to me sock my bullshit couples you. Stephen Root rarely plays like fully creepy guys. We only play like really funny side. Here's James Sons of like a loss roles to him. He's a super. I've even ruthless book Stephen High School Principal. Buffy the vampire slayer yes he is. He believes you have his stapler. Do he was available. You Win. I wouldn't mind even route. Mike. Patrick Kane's an extra.

Rod Connecticut Jesse Owens Chris Berlin COP Stephen Root rose Jeffrey Dahmer Olympics Patrick Kane FRANCIS COPPOLA Stephen High School Principal Stephen Blackbeard Ucsf George Jordan Rodriguez James Sons writer
Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

08:38 min | 2 years ago

Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

"We thought we would talk. Hello Classic movie monsters or I guess. A derivative thereof You know all the films like Frankenstein Dracula creature the Black Lagoon and salon boy. Oh boy so yeah so we are. Actually we each picked one classic creature. We're going to be sharing history in details about that creature in the story about the story about them so should we. Should we drinks. Yeah okay so I'm going to actually hand the mic over to Tracy and you because I she has forty drinks that she's going to be sure they're all so I'm focusing on vampires and at total wine there was actually quite a bit to choose from uh-huh depending on how elaborate you WanNa get with the topic. There was even like walking dead wine assume that seemed like sheeting. That seemed like that would be better for his. Obviously yeah it's because it's actually from the TV exactly. So I can't have rick on the cover and be thinking of Bram Stoker works for me with that said that I brought three drinks because being hungover and being two o'clock in me not having lunch it just seems weird like crack. Open a bottle of wine right now but I do have Francis Coppola diamond red plans talk a little bit about Coppola going on. Because you can't really talk about Dracula directly without talking about Coppola and then I also because I don't like I said if I'm going to open that I also brought four. They use my teeth to pull the bag out. I have a lovely temper neo. Oh I love to drag on. And we'll talk a little bit about what dragons dragons relates reverse dragged him the vampire at least in literature but like I said that's a bit heavy so honestly what I think I'm going to start with. Breath is a nice blood. Orange Margarita and S- To serve it in as they said I just live seven houses down I brought on my own Hamilton Sippy Cup when I say Hola pouring that that's awesome chewing that All amazing choices see. That doesn't take a random rationalization cody did you notice that mixture. You have doesn't actually have to kill it in it. Oh I I forgot I also brought my own patrol. Never leave home without it. So the monster I chose today is Where wolves so what? I'm drinking today. Is a Lithuanian heritage. Beer called where wolf it's literally called Werewolf and it has a quite a high alcohol content. So that's so funny because just right before for the show Tracy and I were talking about how we like picking drinks. That aren't just the name. They require narrative. Chris here's where we'll there's nothing with that sound so bitchy all right so Chris is still looking to see what kind of beer is is it. Strong connect have a taste. Today makes one of us. Oh that is delicious is really good. That's dangerous Oh my God. I'm just GonNa Covet this break a command. It's a Belgian dark El okay. I'M GONNA try that too. Yeah so for my drink. I'm actually Old England. I'm actually doing Frankenstein. And so and that was that was what I was GONNA do. I was I went into English. Oh I hear terrible and like you know what. I just can't drink this after my night. I'm going to get something good. Mary Shelley found something actually liked Mary. Shelley well well I whenever you look at all these old stories. I what I think of it is. They all kind of intertwined sometimes in ways and they're just kind of these wild crazy stories stories. So I've found a blackberry merlot called twisted Vine Ohio. Yeah good expected to get a couple. I rolls maybe like really all right so with that I will get into history I didn't want to do anything like Hollywood movie. Poor history because that would have been very long and excessive in instead I thought I would give a weird overview on the history of monsters the word monster itself derives from the Latin word monstrum meaning to demonstrate or monarch meaning to warn There's also the Latin word monstrum which Just means abnormal or supernatural but can also mean wonder or miracle generally speaking monsters are physical whether real or imagined representation of those things society as Dean leaned unknown or unnatural and most mostly those things that we fear and cannot explain physically. Speaking a monster may have some unusual characteristics. In fact one time things such as two-headed cavs or babies born with abnormalities were considered monsters so basically anything that was outside of what society claimed as quote. Normal aw was seen as monstrous of course as we know in addition to the physical characteristics. Munster's we'll do some terrible things or act out on the way beyond the standing of society being set that any one of us in this room could be considered a monster me with my blue hair and you both being super tall me with my gay so monsters there's all of you There are a ton of tons of monsters that go back in history. There were monsters that were found in cave paintings represented by animal human hybrids which unlikely cliches in real life hence monsters or at least at the conclusion that historians drew in Greek and Roman mythology monsters were perceived as a form of displeasure from the gods examples being cyclops Gorgon. Medusa Centaurs Sirens and so on. It seems that in religion like Judaism Christianity and Islam. They avoided talking about monsters aside from stories related to Satan and the power of evil in Hinduism monsters. A lot more prevalent. you see gods depicted with extra limbs or as an animal human hybrid and in native American culture. You have creatures such as the Wendy Go. Skin walkers and even sasquatch after the renaissance period with science becoming a new a fairly new thing. It really tried to attempt to explain what exactly monsters were to no avail in the gothic period we were graced. With two of the most infamous monsters Frankenstein and Dracula as well as some of the creepiest fairy tales by the brothers Grimm in psychology. Carl Jung tried to explain monsters as any central part of development might in that they were seen as the quote otherness within ourselves. I kind of discussed with this with you. Cody Day in that how I was talking how we need to balance the light with dark so I think that's the same thing it's arguing and our gang. We all have a fascination with monsters. This podcast is an example. Cody are armchair. Chair crypto zoologists. That even if these creatures don't exist it's that innate curiosity of the possibility of their existence as society changes the faces of monsters changing. We'll continue you to do so when before we used to be freed of things like trolls and elves. Today's where we fear things such as candyman or to say that once monsters collection of our society and then all the terrible things in it as well as an escape from those terrible things monsters are ever evolving and as long as we have fears and terrible things going on in our world they will. Oh not go away in my opinion. That's escapism at its best interest inc.. I have like a believer skeptic question but I guess I wanNA save it maybe. For debunk okay. But I'm afraid that I'm going to. I'm going to forget it. I'm going to ask now for both of Y'all are there any monsters or creatures that either of you actually believe in. Yes yes. That's probably what got me. Hooked on your podcast in the first place you were immediately talking about things that I have seen with my own eyes so I can only to Chris as a believer in many of the things. He's seen. Yeah I'm sitting there at work. Listen to going. Oh my God I saw that too says yes shadow people. I can't talk about that right now. Is Definitely I've had encounters encounters with shadow people. But as far as what we're talking about today. The closest is a boyfriend who thought he was a vampire. Oh Shit are you talking about that in your story. No I wasn't going to because it's complicated and messy advocates network. Deep Ball Game L.. Dated someone who thought he was a vampire sidelining. I think he was just really sexually confused. Needed to explore some things and that arena. He had seen the horror many

Cody Day Francis Coppola Chris Mary Shelley Tracy Black Lagoon Cavs Bram Stoker Carl Jung Rick Hollywood Old England Wendy Go Munster Dean Grimm Vine Ohio
"francis coppola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"An extra hour tomorrow night this is KQED public radio six minutes now past one o'clock is fresh AIR I'm David Bianculli editor of the website T. V. worth watching sitting in for Terry gross Robert Evans who had a long and very storied career as both a studio head and producer at Paramount Pictures died last Saturday at age eighty nine as a studio executive he oversaw the godfather and Chinatown he also was responsible for generating the film adaptations of Rosemary's baby love story barefoot in the park and the odd couple in nineteen ninety four he wrote a memoir the kid stays in the picture the later was made into a critically acclaimed documentary Terry gross spoke to Robert Evans in nineteen ninety four the year Evans published his memoir they began by discussing his most famous film project I met merry if user is a favorite through delivery agent for the mind enjoys Weezer and you need money to pay of the book is actually the of this treatment call mafias sixty pages and so the word mafia never been used before was found in the teeth of a committee and I was always into that kind of a movie so I gave them twelve thousand just to write a treatment called mafia and the treatment call mafia tune into being the novel the godfather and we own the novel very very little money because I put up the money for treatment even after he owned at any of the X. nothing still more make the picture paramount because too many people said a mafia picture never been successful anything about the the organization of this call before the mafia eleven one successful film made about the mafia before that and they wanted me to sell it and they refused to do it we found the reason why there had been a successful mafia villages it in may by Jews and other Titans there was a secret like that I I I must've been because we had made one two years before Kirk Douglas was directed by Marty Ritt written by a Sternberg study throughout the to the Strasbourg young Kerr does all all written directed and produced by Jewish people and there's a difference in the lives in a Jewish decision and I feel that made a difference and that's why we gave Francis Coppola his decided to do it and by record it only made three unsuccessful films before that these rainbow your Big Boy no rain people I should point out your Jewish so is using the yearly took a stand that had to be an Italian yes because it and I was right and tell you that that if I would have done and I was probably with him in the same way because I want to dispel the spaghetti Terry several directors turned down the godfather Costa Gavras feeling because an Arthur Penn of the yeah no Titans they do and they hadn't been an Italian director second generation talent director in Hollywood at the time as a matter of fact whose pre once was easy either the Titan directors and friends was the only second generation Italian working in films of the time yeah the nod that's how I got the gig as he was doing and tell you where the old only make it one way if you could tell the story as the a family chronicle on capitalism in America that's what he described it anyway but we had no choice at the time and again as I wanted to get in what did.

"francis coppola" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Maybe we should, but the fertile one way to do it the first the first step is usually a sort of broad strokes document Google docs. I don't I'm not sponsored by Google doc. Although if they want to sponsor me, I'll, I'll take the money and then the second step is usually a much more detailed outline scene by scene, and then we'll go to script, but that, but those each of those stages that first stage takes a long time and I know a lot of writing teams because I've heard them on your on this podcast. And I read them in your magazine. They, they will split up and right seen separately. And then send scenes back and forth. We just have never worked that way we sit in a room to it. We have an office in Pasadena. We go there every day. We work five days a week, we work, basically nine to five and we talk it through. And then we win when something sounds when it feels like we're onto something we'll, we'll commit it to paper. It can still change. But we tend to work we worked verbally. We like throwing ideas back and forth. So you're in the same room. Are you both in the document at the same time or as one talk in one type, and Brian usually types, but we're both I have it on my. Good typist. Yeah. He's really good. But I don't know. I can't type kidding. But we usually we both will have it open on our screen so we can either one can jump in and change stuff. But so much of it is what we're saying back and forth to each other. So here's the thing, just we're not gonna stay long. It is. But in Google docs, when, when you're both revising you just get these notifications of revision after revision them off. Okay. So you guys do like oh, yeah. You don't turn revising what you're not digging through layers of red ink and all that jazz now. No. Okay. No. It's nice that you can go back and look at previous. Yeah versions, but no, we don't we don't do that. And the other thing I hear you ask writers about, which I always find interesting is people writers, who write in final drafts. You say how do you keep the master draft when it's next question? I'm sorry. I've listen to this podcast time ramble. I read. Yes. Francis Coppola reference. So we, we use a again, not sponsor, but we use this program called Ryder duet, which has, like docs, it's a cloud based screenwriting program where we are both working on the document at the same time. So there's one master document. There's no emailing back and forth. Accepts each of this changes there. If they're just something that you don't have to accept it automatically in the document. And I can see in this particular software. It's something that you didn't. Like like you check in the next, by the way, we're usually writing together. So you never know when your report not like final final okay down. We will frequently go off to brainstorm separately. Revisions don't matter keeping track of the draft does. Okay. But even if we did keep to keep track of the draft again, it's you can see in this particular program. You can see the change that were made their different color. And you don't have to accept them as soon as you read them chain, it sort of dissolves into black anyway, right? Into it. Yeah. We like to all right. All right, Dave. Yes. Outlining and, and your process. Well, sure. I mine is a is a cycle of self hate and abuse..

Francis Coppola Pasadena Brian Dave Ryder five days
"francis coppola" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:56 min | 3 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"About a bunch of fascinating stories, including the Kennedys and Marilyn Monroe. Let's get to the point. So we'll get the guy Pablo Escobar point Sinatra. And of course, the biggest crime of the century. Right. But we want to get to how I ended up on the set because without the godfather Johnny for you here. So how'd you get up on the cetera? On the set of the godfather. And then you can tell the story, of course, about how mom Brenda wasn't filled. You what ask you a ton of questions? But in the end, you guys turned out to be very, very good friend. What would happen was my ego? I was like twenty five years of age and the book just came out. Mario puzo. Mario Puzo conflict nineteen sixty nine it's the fiftieth anniversary now, so I had someone read it to me, and I wanted to be an actor. And then they had something in the paper. They're gonna use your nose. So I figured this is my shot. So I hired a crew I shot a scene for Michael seem Sony seem for call and submitted to paramount. Then I get a letter saying we shall we misled you, we know you spend some dollars on this. And then I read the Joe Colombo is picking the FBI building. And he's gonna want this movie made. So I figured it's my shock. I know Joe it's always about the book and they were selling stupid lapel buttons a bucket button, red white and green ball. So I go to see him in Brooklyn. Joke. You missing a great opportunity here. How I should. Why don't you take the meeting with them? Because at the time there was a young attorney. So my attorney, Barry, Sean, Nick, I should Barry comes with you. I'll arrange it might enough. I could I shall arrange will go to the Gulf and western building, which is Trump Columbus circle. And what you're going gonna ask for if you happy let them shoot the movie, then you'll have the world premieres in every major city, you could charge hundred dollars a ticket. That's how the whole time. Yeah. But they went there. They fought for certain things, obviously he didn't wanna say Wapping Guinea times there were fights. And even outside the studios will they made a big deal amount. They made a big deal. That was Colombo's. Whole thing is the talian American pride American Italian defamation league. But he was picking the FBI building. He got called down down on one Sunday tone. What are you crazy? This is the secret. Okay. He's the FBI Bill, and sadly, he was dead within a year of that year or two that's funny because the next rally one year later, right? The second rally Columbus, circle, I get a call from Tommy Belotti who's like my best man to weddings, not one. He was of course, Paul Castellanos limo driver gunned down outside of sparks by John Gotti. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. And so he said are you going to rally yesterday's you can't go as are you talking about Monday's, you're not going, and I was saying that the Parkway and even though my palm was on sixty. I I wanted to see we'll come out. So I went out the back door gone. Fifty eighth street took the entering down the canal street, I'm sitting at Angelo's restaurant. And I hear that he was shot that created another big problem. I didn't get into it in the book. Yes. When they saw the investigation photos my seat had my name on it. It was at the only guy that's wild. But you had a prior word. Obviously, I didn't know what it was. Got a sort of a heads up to stay the hell away because all going down. Yeah. It goes you went to Venus between, but what's going on with the Italians and the movie that almost accord secured, you a spot in the film because dot got you got you the game. When we had the meeting the next day my deal with I told Joe, I should we get this on. I wanna play Michael Sonia. Call I didn't know, right. They they they let me know that this is interesting. You may not know this they already I should who's playing Michael they should sunny. I mean, who's playing Michael? James Caan, James Caan was playing Michael I really Carmine Caridi was playing Sonny because he was in a play called man from the mantra. And they thought it should be this big guy which combine was and Francis Coppola wanted Pacino at that time, we only did one movie called panic in needle balk and he fought for him. And they move sunny. I mean, Michael James Caan to play sunny, which was the subordinate role, which to me was pissed at that. Right. And then I got in this movie. I never did anything in my life, which was what you were talking about the rehearsal with Brando. Right. That was not. So he asked you he said, what are we been on theater? What movies? Have you been in all these questions you had inches? Of course, if you are no experience. And then you you kinda let them know. Maybe you should back off just a little bit Marlin. Well, you know. Francis over and he broke down the whole script. I'd never broke down script on even know what I was doing there. And he said, you know, he's got to be great actor undermines my family marriage. My duty breaks it all down with my son. And he's trying to talk me out of this role. So I don't know again protocol him script. I said Francis score whatever minute, which you can't dismiss it director the guys in charge even in the rear, and then they did the next sacrilegious. I put my arm around Brando, and I walked with the rehearsal one hundred nineteenth street Apaches. All right that Tony scenarios joy, you know, he says he put his arm band. Bernie Sanders with I miss like, I miss. They were told don't look at them. Oh, don't make any eye contact Moslem Brando like Saint thing. But the rules didn't apply necessarily the Gianni Russo. Well, no, the only reason was I'm ready to go out the door. This guy's getting me fired. Just had a party like a couple of nights before and everybody who said cannot United of movie get out. Are you going to be in this right now this guy getting me fine? Now, I really good for you. So then I took him to the side and very fine. I did it whispering which I think was more medicine. I guess because when everybody's put now so it's like real. Okay. Let me just tell you something. Okay. I know who you are your big actor you screwed us up for me. I will suck on your you understand what I'm telling. Oh, I love it. You. Yeah. You step back. He's looking at me. I don't know if I was going to call. A cop. That's great. That was great. Nailed it right there. Listen, the book is Hollywood godfather were talking to Johnnie Russo. He played call. Oh, of course in the godfather. And I mentioned a couple of book signings this week Wednesday bookends bookstore. Ridgewood New Jersey seven o'clock on Thursday at the Barnes and noble eighty in Lexington and then next week. East Chester Barnes and noble and the week after that book review in Huntington, folks, look it up, but I gotta ask you this question. Gianni Russo lease the you're instrumental, according to you in the book in the nation of John F Kennedy don't say that I was a messenger. I didn't know what I was delivered. I was money that all the time. But that's all I didn't. I didn't. If I knew the target. I love John Kennedy a hung out. We were in inadvertent player, and you went from clean that up. You deliver delivered a message from a mob boss in New Orleans was Marcel trying to up to Frank Costello. And the message was it's on that was it. Right. And he had a big dish of busted. Lubyanka knows. I like it. Yeah. He's not sitting down. And it's okay. Yeah. Gave it thirty grand and get the hell out of here though. I gave it to him. And he gave me the message. Okay. So so for everybody who thinks Lee Harvey Oswald, blah, blah, blah, you're here to say he was one of the two though he was one of the shooters, but it was a mob hit. It was not it was mob hit. I'll tell you something else. You ain't gonna believe. And I always thought Sanjay and coma killed him. But was involved too. I believe the Johnson born up the target Lyndon. Baines johnson. I wouldn't be surprised if the module was in on it too. The point is though the that it was done by the mob. And then they put you on a boat if you had seen Lee Harvey Oswald, enor- leans in this meeting by mistake, he was right bathroom. And then the next time you saw him was on the boat when you a headache Spain's paper under the verrazano narrows bridge. You saw him arrested as everybody was it was televised. That's right. And that's how you knew what you had done and then hired Jack ruby Jack Jack route we always worked for the mortgage, Chicago. He was running all this stuff in Texas. So he I mean. Most people don't know after that seventy three other people were killed anybody. That was involved. That's why Costello got me. Yeah. The movie that have Akasha. Let's take a short break. Come back. A little more time. We'll hit on Sinatra Pablo. Escobar call it a day Hollywood. Godfather, Johnny Brusca will come in right back. Morning..

Michael Sonia FBI Joe Colombo Mario puzo Francis Coppola Pablo Escobar Lee Harvey Oswald Johnny Brusca Johnnie Russo James Caan Sinatra Pablo Brando Frank Costello Marilyn Monroe John F Kennedy Brenda Kennedys Gianni Russo attorney Wapping Guinea
"francis coppola" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on KCRW

"The White House, presenting the biggest buffet of McDonald's hamburgers you could ever. Imagine you've seen that photo of Trump. Do you see that that that there's a piece of footage will once the players going up to the buffet going? I thought this was a joke. Why? And that happened like if we put that in a movie that would have been so ridiculous. I promise you if we'd put that in one of our movies. It would have been lately we've got to cut that out of there. That's too crazy. Well, my other favorite is when he said, we gotta start sweeping the forests raking the forests. And that's how you get rid of forest. Fires. And I remember just you could see Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom with their heads down. And you just knew both of them wanted to go. Holy God out loud. But they didn't do it. What do you do when that's the reality? I mean that is so much more absurd than anything. We could imagine. I mean, the the cheeseburgers in the White House. That's even in idiosyncrasy elect that's directly from Ideo Crecy. It's it's I never thought I would live to see where the world is. Now, it's it's truly jaw-dropping and horrifying and funny and amazing and horrifying and so's your movie. I can't thank you enough. You're always welcome here. Anytime you wanna come in. And please come back. Thank you all of us. My guests is Adam McKay. He just blew our minds. Letting us know the Francis Coppola just lost the fan. His new movie, of course, his visor recording engineer. Thank you again here here west is arsia call well, it shows mixed by Kat your is at his associate producer. I have no more quote left to make the treatment..

White House Adam McKay Gavin Newsom McDonald Jerry Brown Francis Coppola engineer producer
"francis coppola" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:24 min | 3 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Neo stepping out of the telephone booth right now. Yeah. Yeah. I applauded at the end of this movie. And you know, what would people applauded movies? I always think it's weird because I'm like, you know, that the people in the movie can't hear you, right? But I've been in movie theaters, where people applauded the last time, I was in a movie where people actually applauded was green book. Was the Vigo Mortenson Maher Mahar Asha Ali. A movie there was applause at the end of the movie. Yeah. One of them being my dad. Absolutely loves that movie. So yeah, there you go. That's that's from the matrix. And yeah could have been Will Smith flying up from that from that phone booth in it could have been Sean Connery giving him the advice in the lessons instead of Laurence Fishburne. And that's what we're talking about things that the movies that would have been completely different because other actors were offered or turn down these iconic roles that now you can't think of anybody else to play them. Now this next one. Is an example of like that. Because the the movie itself that we're gonna talk about here. This movie had the most insane casting issues maybe of any movie of all time and the amount of actors who were considered for the roles in this movie is nuts. And it's the godfather the godfather if you if you like the complete set, the godfather, you know, the DVD's or the other Blu Ray or or anything there's a documentaries like a two hour documentary on the making of the godfather, and it's fantastic. And what Francis Coppola had to go through to cast who we wanted to cast in the movie was insane. Paramount didn't want it paramount didn't want. They didn't want Brando. They didn't want Al Pacino. It was it's crazy. And they on the on the DVD they have the actual screen tests for so many actors Robert Evans, the producer back then wanted like Ryan O'Neal to play Michael Corleone. And I can't even imagine. Can you imagine Brian O'Neill now, but he was hot at the time. You know, love story was out was one of the biggest hits for paramount. And they wanted them. And then, of course, Jack Nicholson, this is the one that we're talking about Jack Nicholson was offered Michael Corleone or could have been Michael Kara Leone because the studio wanted the beloved son of Don Vito Corleone could have been played none other by none other than Jack Nicholson who eventually dropped out claiming he didn't feel the role was right for him. We could certainly have bought Nicholson as the murderous mafioso. Although he might have been a bit more flamboyant than Al Pacino, you think. Well, at this point L Pacino is more flamboyant. The Jack Nicholson that's happened over the years. Elvis subsequent performances L Pacino's learnt as screams every not so much anymore. But like right around scent of a woman in heat, screaming everything. And why were glad they didn't get it? We agree with Nicholson's verdict while the role wasn't quite right for him. It was actually perfect for Pacino who Coppola had to really fight for to the point where. If Pacino Coppola fought for me, he's like I wanna Pacino because nobody was because it's a very subtle performance. Especially in the first movie in the in the first godfather movie, so real subtle performance by by Pacino, and it's a great performance. Truly great performance. But they wanted something, you know, flashier. And so when the dailies were coming back, they were like, this guy sucks. They like the Pacino the the producers and Robert Evans were like this Pacino guy. This kid sucks. He's terrible. We gotta get somebody. Who's better known and more popular? And we'll bring more energy to the role, and then and they actually had I can't remember who it was. But they had another director onset because if Achino screwed up again, they were gonna fire Coppola on the spot. Fires ass and then bringing a new director. So they had a backup director onset, which of course, made Coppola fuel paranoid. Like, you know, the producers don't trust them enough to make this movie, and this is a big important movie. And so they had a backup director. And I wish I can't remember who it was. But no, the casting the casting changes and decisions of the Godfather's fascinating. Absolutely. Fascinating. Here's Mike on WGN. Hi, mike. Hey, nick. All right, man. Going back to classical. I think Walson John Houston. We're glad that George raft turned roles in high CEO in Maltese falcon, wait a minute, George George raft was offered those roles. Oh, yeah. I mean, I realized that George ramp was massive, you know, at that time, but those would have been, you know, but those are those especially in the Maltese fan high Sierras great multi falcon, nobody could have played that role than. George raft. Wisconsin generally one node actor. Yeah. So yeah, he was some people got bought a lot to those absolutely. Absolutely. Really propelled him into started. No question about it. I can't imagine. Now, I'm trying to this is every time we every time. I think about these these topics about trying to picture other. Can you picture George raft in the Maltese falcon, I can't even? That's crazy. That's that's crazy. The studio system in those days that was their top dog. Absolutely. Yeah. Absolutely. You sign a contract you work. That's that's what you do. All right. Mike take care now. That would have changed the complexion of those movies completely George raft in the Maltese falcon and high Sierra those are two legendary Bogart performance, you Bogart a lot of people. I don't think bogert gets the kind of respect that he deserves you know, because a lot of people like they did with the horse and the tab was a terrible bogert my God. But he was really a great idea was a great actor Humphrey Bogart was a great great actor. And you know, a lot of those guys like George raft they all kind of relied on their same. Same mannerisms the same little tricks that they would do but Bogart would dive deep. I mean, his performance account Blanca, man. I mean, it's beautiful beautiful. Okay. All right. We got to break. The news is coming up. And then we got more insane actor and actress stories about iconic roles that could have gone to somebody else. And some of these are really crazy three one two nine eight hundred seven two hundred if you wanna comment talk or text news. That's coming up after this. Night..

George George raft Al Pacino Francis Coppola Jack Nicholson producer Vigo Mortenson Maher Mahar Ash Robert Evans Mike Humphrey Bogart Michael Corleone director Sean Connery Laurence Fishburne Don Vito Corleone Wisconsin Brando Brian O'Neill WGN Blanca
"francis coppola" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"francis coppola" Discussed on KCRW

"Also, the thing I want to ask you don't really people in mentioned to you, the style of film, and and not only seeing people like seeing Clark Gable or or Cary Grant. But also Sidney Poitier. Yeah. And and and and and and so many other absolutely Sidney Poitier was a great role model in his film, the first what you've got the award for. Oh, it was. He's wearing the white jeans and a white jacket and doing something wonderful for these nuns. Yes. So it all goes back to the church, the upbringing, and the the love of film be when I was young. I wasn't allowed to go to the movies now now because I was the only child and I had to go with my uncle of when he chose to go to movies. And I remember I was still sitting upstairs in the Carolina theatre upstairs in the segregated theater. Yeah. But then I was only allowed to go see things like the vampire films Dracula. So well, I got to school. I started films the artistic films. I will never forget how much I love Elvira Madigan. Oh, sure. Appeal of the music of the Mozart music and film. I will never forget how much I love that. But Phil was very point to be in film. It gave me of the moment to explore the kind of narrative, but I must say the films that I love the most have been Visconti Lucchino Visconti, it's films, which are very much based on literature. Like, the leopard is based on a great boss, you're apart. And of course, that's advice is based on the. Great musical, Gustav, Mahler and whole thing. That'd be the film's locator because Lucchino is not only is a great film director. But he's a great art director set designer see everything in the film becomes important. The nuances of blue had the pots there in in the lobby of the hotel, everything the luggage, the mustache the clothes. He doesn't one detail unturned that great wedding, which is also becomes the wedding in the godfather Coppola's and his point of departure as to continue with that. Evolution of the Francis. Coppola Sophia in marie-antoinette, everyone said, oh, but that was the masterpiece to be it wouldn't have been a great masterpiece that you've done it. If the silent film, the music was modern, but I think that was a mistake. But the film was to be of Hugh success because she got what Maria was as a teenager. She was a teenage Queen. So therefore, it's frivolous for voluntary parties. Dress candy bumble champagne love sex. She's not allowed to talk about a political treaty or anything. And I thought that was a beautiful film. But you know that field is still one of my favorites. When I'm down in the hotel. I look at marie-antoinette. Oh my gosh. No other films that touch. Also, researchers react to that. I love not the most carrot felt that I love that. I think is equally as important as gone with the wind. But the film today is three billboards ebbing, Missouri ebbing to every Missouri. I think that's an incredible film. It's it's a survival of the south. And that's the way the south is you have to find a way survived to all these traumatic and chaotic moments that we live in now because the world we live in. Now, it's like the world is falling apart. You're going to tell you the world's handbag, and you've got to find your way to survive, you got to hustle for survival. And you've got to find your way to sustain your dignity, and your.

Sidney Poitier Coppola Sophia Visconti Lucchino Visconti Lucchino Clark Gable Elvira Madigan Phil Cary Grant Carolina theatre Missouri marie-antoinette director Gustav Hugh Mahler Maria