31 Burst results for "Francine"

"francine" Discussed on VS

VS

06:39 min | 5 d ago

"francine" Discussed on VS

"That was francine j. hairs. Everybody yes allies. I can't believe we make the most brilliant people in the world come on play stupid games. Wow living really vibe with In the interview. That i that i've been thinking about i think for awhile has been on the anonymity you sort of lose as you become a public writer at maybe putting some of that is because i am such in such a hunger for live. Poetry are you. Are you planning on going into some stuff. Oh man it's always been so important to me. Ever since i knew to think of myself like like felt like i could call myself a poet. I was a poet in in-space with people who are reading their poems allowed to each other. You know whether that was an open micro slam or you know a group of students in sitting in a circle or or dark noise. What what have you. You know as a teacher. And so evans so craving and so missing at in a way. That i didn't really expect i think also like i just so miss being a patron of an open mic space and like not being a focus of attention but just like going and like listening. I just miss it so much. You're right at a certain point. My attention started to become. Oh i gotta read these poems in a second like let me start to get my mind there. I didn't recognize it when i thought when i was avenue. But right like. I missed sneaking into the back of the poetry slam I used to do the time here. In minneapolis writes alight. Does a bunch of collar slams and like sometimes. I'd go just go and like you know often when like the feature was somebody that i wanted to see i'd get to see all these kids slam right and then i get to see a really great beach and i just like be in the back and that really thinking about how precious that was going to be. But i'm just so excited to one day Hopefully soon back into an open mic community. Even at right like not as a participant But like what you were saying when you come with patient of the space. I think what i really loved about. Many of the open mike slams that came up in was not just the spaces themselves with the fact that you got to see people develop over time right. Maybe i'll kavak a little bit more of a perspective on that. Like i just wanted to let go to open mic like see like after year like that person's writing better you know you know or like they're getting weird and i'll also what i miss. I'm gonna be so excited to see again. It's like the young person who's like reading a poem for maybe like the first or the third time and they're like really nervous and then they do a really really good job and everybody claps for them and has really supportive and the on their face. Like oh i am loved a little bit here. Shoot that shit directly into my veins right. It's so beautiful like you know like all of us. Become poets by building occurs. Right our names on a list you know and then you and then and then seeing the like another like youth poet then go up to them be like. That was really great. You know. I've been doing this a couple of years and i listened so much i can't wait to smell all those musty poets. Oh my god well. If you're listening i hope you're you're bathing and ready to get back into that. World may all be bathing. yes Thank you francine for such a great conversation today. Thank you offer listening Brainy while we think folks in get the hell on out of here Ya i would like to think in the spirit of open mics. I would like to thank Philip thanks them before but the blue nile here minneapolis. They are gone now and now. There's a karaoke bar. But the blue nile was the first over mike that i was ever like at and it was eighteen plus and i would show up an hour early or maybe sometimes two hours early because they before they started to card. Let's i wanna thank To women who ran that space desdemona and then later the black pearl. Thank you for like never asking too many questions about the young kids who are obviously there For never car and also for making sure we saving space shuttle looked out for us too. I know i can speak for myself. We gave me so much inspiration. You know ya'll even let us do dumb shit like try to rap Why did let me wrap I love that space. And i will. I don't i wouldn't be an artist. I wouldn't be doing when i am today without being able to sneak into. That's basin watch. Everybody sometimes participate too so they you to the blue now thicket. Has the mona love. Y'all i just want to thank everybody who is running writing spaces open mic and reading spaces in like not major cities you know and like small cities small towns kinda like suburban areas rural areas. Where maybe sometimes like you're open mic or your poetry space or whatever is like kind of sparsely attended. Or maybe like there's like a slow monther or But you know that there's like a at least a good handful of people who really need that and so you are working to keep it going thank you. After making the facebook event for setting up the mic for sacrificing a piece of your notebook paper for the sign up list. it's true nobody ever has loosely. Pavement these things like never what to do about the misogynistic dude who just went up all that little space Shout shout out to the people running the open mics in the slams out here. Y'all make the poetry go round. Yeah how we also want to thank our for dessert. Daniel kissling are always and forever Thank you to you donna. Riga nakas the poetry foundation. Thank you post loudness. And thank you to all of you for continuing to us. Here is even mixture. You like rate and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Follow us on twitter at s the podcasts and make sure that you stay stay Make sure that you do some good in the world. And but you love yourself. i'll know same bullshit at the end of these episodes. Where are you listening to this. We're just talking but it's cute though or maybe you're cooking and it's just like in the background and you can't get to your hands and covered in flowers turn it off or maybe i wish they would shut up so looking just roll over into democracy now which you actually donate to audi honestly again all. They're always taking money are everybody. Let's stop listening to verses and go donates a democracy now one two three immigrant..

francine j kavak minneapolis mike evans francine Philip Daniel kissling Riga nakas poetry foundation facebook donna twitter audi
"francine" Discussed on VS

VS

04:28 min | 5 d ago

"francine" Discussed on VS

"Could are collections. It was nice for last. But you know like like i was. I was just say for myself like with home. You like glass on is like it. But like you know like i had problems with the and i was like waiting i was like i wanna write the slander review of me. God dammit i want to be like you know what goodwill honestly ex ex and ex like could go and i was like you know i think as artists. It's almost like you know when people don't take the gloves off for you in the workshop. Right and i think as writers like that are like now like at a particular stage walking the career. I know i can call my home for help but actually it would be helpful. Sometimes you know like if reviewers like felt the space to be a little bit more like a you know who's got some nerves nigga did reads you know. They don't care they will tell you. What the buck they think. They also know how to connect things too like. None of this is about aesthetic choice life. I don't give a shit rather you liked it or not. But if you have something to say about like what it's doing or not doing in the lineage. Or if you have something to say about how it connects or doesn't connect to something that it's responding to like. That's all interesting to me. But the problem of course with this is that it requires some understanding of the crafts going to make a fair critique. The people it's kind of like the dues the hit on you the dues that have the most gall other ones that are most unqualified. I love that you have all this doll dude. Like but no or you have to know the frigging lineage. Right like some of us. Don't come directly from whitman or frost sir dickinson right. I feel like i've heard other poets color struggle with that right. It's like when they talk about me. They don't talk about me with my correct ancestor. that's right. They're seeing sexton when they should be seeing somebody else. You know you know like you said like we can sometimes appreciate people drawing those lines for us right and be like. Oh shit actually. Never gonna work in that way. But the american academy Is just not up to speed on what we've been read. That's right Until those were viewers come from our same communities right because we need people to think about books as much as we need people to write the books. I would love to see more people that are just from our community right. That can say like i hear what The last poets were doing in this word. I hear amiri baraka in this work. I hear that yeah and then based on that. Here's something that you denies didn't know about your book like i feel like that. Seems like you have to be very knowledgeable and really understand things about the craft. In order to say to francine jay harris. Hey here's something that you didn't know about francine harris's book like in a in a real way like to really give new information but like of course like why wouldn't we as artists want to learn about the things that we're doing. It's just the negative criticism that does exist about poetry is. It's not saying anything new about a book. It's like reiterating often like a lazy complaint. That a doesn't actually have much do with the book. Blake yet the alternative really interesting actual new information very hard and like of course it would be valued. i think. Be a smart hater. Be a smart yet. He married her But like what some of the most interesting conversations have come out What we do feel safe critiquing right now or feel empowered to critique which is about white supremacy and laziness and racism in poems that we recognize and sort of call out on social media and then really interesting conversations. Happen after that like you know. This has nothing to do with rather not homeless good or not. That's a whole other decision to make. I don't even know is really the point. But i think what happens is that it's in those conversations that you wind up being able to talk about what things mean and how people interpret things which different than saying yet. Here's another smash hit you know. Go get it from a not. Barnes and noble. Go scorcher your local bookstore image..

frost sir dickinson francine jay harris francine harris whitman sexton amiri baraka american academy Blake Barnes
"francine" Discussed on VS

VS

07:40 min | 5 d ago

"francine" Discussed on VS

"Right now. This is called the primitive streak. Maybe the of all circles is a small common point at which you admit you are. Nothing short of periphery. You are not what moves around to not the battlefield or it's shorn helmet not magnet to the spikes attracting. You are not the meat around which the ants you are in fact defense and the border the shrub hiding all the snakes if circular you're a wheel inside primitive hub one of many keeping truck on the road the you are a circumference of travel. You are bright and rounded sunspot in the oldest cell of your eyes you in a distance you take note of distance truthfully. You ruined the center break. The yoke hugged too hard. Move toward it with your lips and then back from your own ass. I can feel the game skewing in our favor. The cards coming down. The sun is so bright. Let's look i can stand outside of it if you'd rather me check our field for moose for sign of elk. If we believed monsters would have to believe in the ones who are chosen for node you. Who knows what happens at the edge of this. You know what it tends to center so let us stand there in watching dawn. Move around us. Imagine borrowing nothing from the middle anymore leaning not against it. If you want to touch this tree again. I'll go first there in primitive. Not if neither of us find it particularly in the way like an obstruction to be trimmed pruned until we finally have to poison out the root dick it up with a crane. Cut it out at its core. Then maybe we stand a chance. Build the whole thing around it and reach for brain who fuck that ending just like. I'm lit something inside me frenzy. I really there's so much of this home where i was just like in it and experiencing it and not exactly sure how to like. Read it in in some ways and then something in that last line just like clicked clicked into place. Thank you i feel like. That's part of the experience of being a france. J. hairs reader. One is like let me ride these sentences and these biz music and like. I know i'll get it if i stay. Which allows you to really like abandoned. Yeah i think it takes a lot of trust but there are certain poems were like i'm i'm i'm not exactly understanding with like my topmost brain what it is and so therefore i'm like i don't know what this is like. I'm i'm scared. I'm just gonna like i can click out of it but like because of your like many towns unseen. I feel like i. There's a kind of trust. But like i think that is offered to the reader. I just always as a reader feel like i'm okay with going along for the ride. That's really interesting too. Because i feel like that's something i try to talk to students about sometimes when i don't know what to say to the students poem that's usually what i say something along the lines of trust what you're doing it's hard for me to say go this direction or that. Because it's you know it's a little bit new territory. Take that as a compliment. I think it's weird in a way. Like i almost feel like that's the thing you want. Maybe more so than the thing that i think we tend to privilege about votes. We have this idea. I think with the lyric poem that it's the poet's voice that's most important and that's true too but there's there's something else about getting readers to trust your direction the kinda just lets you do whatever the fuck you wanna do. As long as they trust you to kinda go along with it because then it changes. I think the relationship like singing to the reader and then just like i'm gonna let you peep in on my singing you know like i was rereading Here sweet hand up. Prepare for this interview. Y yeah i was just like fuck feels good you now and it was just like oh the first few times i've read it. I was right. This is the one you know. But i also felt like and i say this as a company i was like oh like i feel like i'm just starting to like catch up in like you know francine's been walking francine's lane for a while and that is a mean that there's not my gosh that doesn't mean that we don't see you. Thinking responding to an loving other writers and thinkers. But there is a francine jay harris sentence at this point right You know or away Of being in a poem. That i think if you as a poet or as a reader in poet right you want to respond to that with like what the fuck do i have to say that only i could say you know and that of course makes sense but also allows the possibility of getting lost in our freakish into so fucking weenie ways spread. Maybe it's because i'm a hater though. Well my friends know this. That i can be very grumpy about things. And i distrust a lot of things. And i talked to a couple of friends about the difference between a visionary and a administrator difference between a visionary administrators that visionaries tend to dream up things and depending on the visionary sometimes they dream up shit and then they send out their workers like okay. Go build that they're like. Whoa that's exciting. I'm not a visionary administrators. Which i consider myself in administrator. They look at the thing that got dreamed up in there like you know. How are those windows gonna work. Come on dude. But the thing is i couldn't have thought the windows until somebody else did it in a way a little bit of a worker so when i say i'm a hater i mean i'm an administrator i see the thing that's been dreamed up and i think that's beautiful but and language gives you all the opportunity to do that. You know like sentence. Structure is functional and beautiful. But there's just so many issues with it so many issues with the way that syntax is created a dozen. Allow for so many things you know. There's no part of me. That thinks i could have dreamed up the syntax but then when i see the syntax. I'm like but wait. I can't there. I don't understand you know like and in my mind. I really see it as an alternative that makes total and complete sense to me. It's so it's not like i'm trying to do anything new. I just i. i'm trying to make sense to me because it doesn't quite click in my head. Does that make sense it does. I would say you're visionary. But i think it's because i see you seeing i love said alternative it right because it's like you see another way through through the thought through the sentence to the sound when i'm hearing you saying is that like i've always seen you as innovative as a writer but that you see yourself as basically like innovating on rather than just being in this like like lemme stream up the new.

francine francine jay harris france
The Music of World Showcase in EPCOT

The WDW Radio Show - Your Walt Disney World Information Station

08:40 min | 4 months ago

The Music of World Showcase in EPCOT

"If i say the music of epcot what's the first song that comes to mind. Probably something from future world and as we covered extensively back on show six nine six ten future world has background scores and attraction and so show themes that not only. I think resonate with us but are enjoyed by us beyond just our time in the parks. They are on our playlists and in our ears when we drive run exercise. I'm obviously like reaching and assuming those last two or whether we're just relaxing at home but why which is my favorite word. And i think it's probably because so. Many of these songs were created by disney for disney they are original themes built around the theme using the time-tested recipe of what makes disney music so memorable but for the other half of the world. Showcase much of the music is not only traditional but helps to set the stage and represents the culture of the participating nation. And these aren't songs. I think that we would normally associate with a theme park experience. Either that is like if we're talking about walt disney world But some of my favorite songs. That dizzy songs are found in many of these background. Loops of not just future world. But some of these world showcase pavilions and they always seem to bring a smile to my face as they hear them. Whenever or wherever i am and i said on the intro to the epcot show that that the music is very much a melting pot of so many cultures ideas ideals technology and different flavors. And it's a place that you can hear music that is as diverse as the pavilions and cultures and speaking of diverse. I want to continue our musical journey from future world to world showcase once again with friends who helped kick off this musical odyssey so i'd like to welcome back to the show. Lisa denote glasner from the castle. Run and core memory candles dot com to be back. Jason connect from here with the magic and the after our show on the facebooks. Hello it's good to be back with you guys and the one and only zac brown from the one and only the zac brown show. Everybody excited to be here. So i am excited for this. And i'm curious to one because i want to see if hopefully we can beat or not break record long. Our future world discussion was. But i think and i'm curious because we don't talk about this ahead of time how this may differ. Because i think again so many of those future world songs and themes are ones that we can mention by name. Papillon came up again. I think exactly you know if it was a drinking game and papillon was your word. You're in some serious trouble but so much of world showcases different because one. We can't pronounce many of the names the songs they don't necessarily roll off the tongue and they're not one that we might necessarily know by name but we know in terms of how they make us feel and they are there are some pavilions that have themes or some that. Just have background music that we enjoy very quickly. When and they'll round in the same order. When you think of world showcase when you think of world showcase music what is the first song idea pavilion. Thought that comes into your mind for me. I remember when we sat down to do or when was sitting down to prep for the future world. Show i joked that. I've never felt so prepared and so unprepared at the same time for a topic because it was like it was a topic. That's just sort of ingrained in my soul but at the same time i didn't know quite how i was going to articulate it and This show said hold by juice because like the rest of disney right is supposed to sort of insulate you from the rest of the world and i think the unique thing about showcases that it has the opposite job. It's supposed to transport you into the rest of the world. And so while you know so much of the music throughout disneyworld otherwise as supposed to sort of encapsulate you and bring you into this place. You know. the imaginary kind of didn't do their job right right if they did. If that's the result of in world showcase because the point of showcases to make you feel like you're not in central florida. It's supposed to make you feel like you're traveling around the world. As you're walking around world showcase so i don't know if i have a quick good answer to like what song first comes to mind. it i mean i could say something. Easy like golden dream of course. Which is you know sure. We'll talk about that more But now i think it's it's like background stuff. Like le vian rose and like the stuff that green and like that. The the the music that i just associate. Because i'm here. So much with walking around world showcase but at the same time you know like you said in the intro. It's not necessarily music that you're supposed to associate with a theme park. Don't you have a green sleeve. The greens leave story to which will have to get to. Because i remembered crossing the bridge an international gateway with you and i said isn't the screen sleeves using it yet and then you told me a story from your childhood is i am. I am right. I mean who doesn't have a green sleeve story like there's a green sleeve story and i want to don't jump ahead of ourselves but that really from my childhood i whistle. Inslee leaves all the time and it makes my mother crazy. Maybe i was just hoping it was from your childhood. Okay i i mean to answer the question. What's the first song pavilion jumps to mind. It's gotta be mexico and it's got to be the three cobb heroes right like that's got to be no actually. It's not that i think. The the for me world showcase had an anthem and no it can't be eliminations but it had an anthem. It would be basically the soundtrack to impress his france. Of course which. I am super excited about francine far away i know he s- t and wonderful. We'll get there For me it's kind of an unfair answer. I think about the international gateway. It's kind of this. Great little collaboration of everything that you're going to experience it's kind of the coming attractions. You know like lisa said you've got le vian rose and you've got a little bit of music piping in from like the china pavilion and everything just kind of blends and it just sets the overall tone and of prepares you for the pallet. That is in front of you whether it be musical or food you kind of preps you and gets you in the mindset that is world showcase and for me you know if i was to close my eyes and just say world showcases a couple of songs that jumped right to the top but one of them and this is actually a great way for us to begin. I think is. There is a world showcase background loop and being disney enthusiasts that you are. I'm pretty sure. It exists on your iphone or ipod your spotify playlist because this is one of the ones that i think people do have an play when their home or even in their cars or when they're working or walking or just relaxing and while you might not necessarily know the names of the songs if you were to listen through it and serbia following along this. This item list of the music yelich like. Yes inca dance by cousteau. That's my favorite song. Although you wouldn't walk into sam goody's not that there's a sam goodies but go with me here. You wouldn't walk in goodies and say i need incan dance on forty five guys have that. But i love the world showcase loop that you can hear on both entrances to where you could. We'll talk about some of the changes that came about relatively recently but those are some of the songs that i hear that like the future world entrance mentally

Disney Zac Brown Lisa Denote Glasner Le Vian Rose Walt Disney Papillon Inslee Jason Florida Francine Mexico France Lisa China Sam Goody Serbia
WHO's David Nabarro on the speeding up of COVID-19 vaccinations

Bloomberg Best

01:47 min | 7 months ago

WHO's David Nabarro on the speeding up of COVID-19 vaccinations

"On Bloomberg Surveillance with Tom Keene and Francine Lacqua and Tom kicks things off here by asking the borrow About the massive problem of not getting shots and people's arms fast enough. I want to speak not about cases, which I can't count or death, which I don't trust. But the hospitalization surge in this insanity of it. We can't get vaccinated fast enough. What is the new borrow solution to jump start the rate of vaccinations? And double dose vaccinations. Thanks very much. Indeed. There is no alternative, but To make vaccines available as widely as possible as soon as they get approved. I don't want any corners to be cut on the approval process so each vaccine must go through their phase three trials and then be properly assessed by national regulators, as well as by the World Health Organization. That's the only option we have. If we're going to rely on vaccines to get this pandemic to subside, just one last point. Vaccines won't be enough on their own. We will need to continue to pay attention to the rules that were set over the last few months about physical distancing mask wearing isolating when sick looking after those were frail and vulnerable. Because these basic principles backed up by strong public health work at local level still will be key for the coming months, even years. To enable societies to get on top of this pandemic.

Tom Keene Francine Lacqua Tom Kicks Bloomberg World Health Organization
"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

05:15 min | 7 months ago

"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

"Down. Does that take a toll on you. Does it come into your house. Like i always wonder if you know actors who are portraying. Maybe something really difficult and hard. How do they come home. And then have dinner with the kids. You know when they've been portrayed. Is that ever an issue for you as an author well it was in the masterpiece really took a toll on me and i thought when i turned that book in that was it. I wasn't going to be writing anymore. And then of course. The united took a nice long break then. I ended up writing another manuscript idea. Remember rick saying at one time who today the good guy or the bad guy. So i may not have thought i was really taking it on but people around me new and then of course when you're finishing your manuscript and i typed by originals you in the old. It's and rick. Said he'd just keep the kids out of the way because you had to have it letter perfect and you couldn't move things around. I mean yeah if you want to take an extra month and retype another seventy five pages but yeah. That was grueling. Time pleasant for me or for anybody that live my husband. He's a songwriter. But he's written a book and it was a historical fiction and it was on charles and suzanne spurgeon and you're going to hear me to houston just like my husband rick when erin turned in that book. He's like are you proud of me. I said i'm so proud of you. And i'm so happy to have my husband back not inkling. I felt like charles and susanna. Where with us in everything. We did like woke up thinking about them. He went to bed thinking about them. I said i'm just glad that they're out of our marriage for right now. This is just the two of us again. Because you do have to take on this whole you get into this new world. Yeah well the other thing is when i take a long break. Rick says you're happier when you right. So he's kind of waiting for me to serve you in a project right now. I finished one and turned it in two and a half months early because a covert look you yes. An eighteen seventy s silver mining town. And you know the question that started this one was can one person really impacted community for good especially when that would be like bodey california if you're familiar with that. It was just lawless crazy silver mining town. And that's the town that at not writing about bodey. I've got this created fictional one. But i thought this is my kobuk too because you know the town burns and there is a cholera epidemic and there's political upheaval. And all your twenty. Yeah and i. I want it to be fun and have a lot of humor in it so it does have a lot of humor in it because i think we're going to have to laugh someday about all this i agree i agree so if you just turn that in early. When does that come out. What does the process look like for. You probably not until two thousand twenty two okay because of everything that's going on in two thousand twenty one with redeeming love. They'll probably hold off. And then so you turned it in. You haven't been writing. Do you feel something coming up. Or how does your brain work for that. Well right now. What's really interesting to me is studied the middle eastern culture and christ and how we thinks from a western point of view and we missed so much of what's going on so i took a bible study over the summer with a group of gals christie mcclellan. And she's back in nashville. She's professor back there and it was fascinating so i asked for the bibliography list books. When i'm going through one by one just thinking about maybe doing nobel's on like taking a parable or taking one person in scripture and kind of filling in that middle eastern aspect of your hope we don't know about. I love that. I'm here for that. If you need an early reader francine. i'm your girl. I just volunteered myself to be your early reader. So there's that about like the good samaritan and you think about the the different parables in what's going on and they understood you know. The people hearing the stories that jesus was telling them they understood but we miss a lot of what he was trying to teach them. It's so interesting how we can take our american culture and ideas and put them on top of the bible and think that's true. I'm going to israel next year for the first time. And i'm super excited to have some dots connect in my brain because people have said you'll see the things that you read about and it makes things come alive. Have you done. Israel been there twice and you understand what they mean when they say going up to jerusalem up to jerusalem so princeton good shoes. You're telling me to yes by all means way. It's it's really a great trip to take. Well i am so excited about the release of your book and is a great gift for people. And i knew i was going to talk to you for a couple of weeks. Asking some friends and every single one of them had read this book. And so we're thankful for you doing the work that you do and i've loved getting to chat with you. Get into no you. Ritual isn't your typical multivitamin rituals clean vegan. Friendly formula is made with key nutrients informs. Your body can actually use no shady.

rick suzanne spurgeon bodey charles susanna christie mcclellan erin houston cholera Rick united california francine nashville Israel jerusalem jesus princeton
"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

06:49 min | 7 months ago

"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

"Com slash ivy today okay so do piggyback on the success of your book as an author as someone who. This is how you spend your days. This is how you pour out. This is your creativity this is your contribution to the world is your words and i'm so thankful for that. Have you had and this is just a from a person to a person. Have you ever struggled with every book you now right going. Is it going to be as good. As this disliked me know francine who struggle with every project. The first thing. That goes through my mind. When i'm starting out on this would ever made me think i could write anything that would make sense. I mean i did courage to me actually. So there's that you know it. Just i'm not a plotter and i'm not a panther. I'm kind of in between so. I have to have some kind of idea and it usually starts with a question I usually. that's what launches the ideas. I have a question my own life. And i'm struggling with it. I'm using the writing as way to kind of work through its quest. I have different characters playing out the different roles of how to handle that question. And then there's one struggling christian dealing with it. And i'm just trying to find god's perspective what do you want me to do. How do you want me to think how should i- reshape my thinking to match what you're thinking. Yeah well the redeeming love. The i have that right here. I'm so this is such a beautiful addition just released and it comes with a companion study and then also a forty day devotional. And that's out right now that you guys can get and so i would highly. It's a great gift redeeming. Love is for any woman in your life men to. i'm sure but we'll just. We'll say that as well. I heard that this is being made and it might have already been done with the way that things work a motion picture next year. Yes it's done it's finished. Is this like the thing that's ever happened to you. That they're taking some of your words and make it into a movie. Well it's been a long process. This spr almost fifteen years with different companies and it was discouraging because a lot of the scripts. I was reading written by men. They did not understand michael. They wanted him to ride in at the end and rescue and they would get off on the abuse that she went through and i thought they just don't get you know what is going on here so i thought okay. I'm going to write a script. That would show the company. What i'm looking for and so i got final draft and i got books on writing script and i wrote the script redeeming love and i turned it in and they said well. We like this one seriously now china. Now you're a script writer. France eight nine one and only time. Tj so is the director. And i wrote it as linear story. Well if you went into the eight and you watched all that abuse of the child upfront. I mean i'd get up and walk out right it really restructured the screenplay we work together to strengthen scenes but cut the length. So i feel like i really was co writing with him or the end and then we were able to to south africa where they filmed and watch the filming and meet the cast and that was really neat but you get to a point where this is their thing. Now on the right track cindy bond from mission pictures was the head of it and she was really great gatekeeper. She had the same vision and deejay did too. I mean it. Was you know there were a lot of people involved. That really wanted the book to be translated properly british film dealing with heavy duty topics. So it's you know it's really not for kids. When does it release is should release two thousand twenty one. Okay spring yeah. The original hope was valentine's day. But it's not gonna happen with covid. I'm sure that had to be a little stressful for you. Take something that you put so much of yourself into and then like you said and then it's their project so you give them a script. Here's what i would like work together and at the end of the day you're not there for the direction and you're not the director. You're not in charge of these things. And i'm sure that was a little stress. Have you seen the final. I have seen the final with the music and everything and they kept. The story has got all the major scenes got them. The heart of the story was what i was concerned about. Yeah sitting there is a real difference. When i noticed is there's a difference between reading a book which is a lot more evocative in some ways. Because you're in the minds of the characters you understand what's going on but to see it on film can have even more impact. Yeah and it's really aimed at a broader audience than christian. Were trying to reach. People have done anything about god. Well i have not seen it. But i always stand by the fact. That books are always better than movies. And so we'll have to see. I always tell me. I'm like don't watch the movie. I always read the book versus always better. You mentioned that the screenwriters at the very early stages had a hard time with michael's character. You're writing. How did you choose zone in on creating a michael and angel was. I mean you're talking about the pictures of the girl but how did you really make them come to life reading scripture every day and concentrating on the character of christ and also i. Because i didn't come from the background of angel and i feel like i didn't do a lot of research about that side of life and i feel like god kind of revealed things to me as those writing just imagining. I wrote the first fifty pages probably three or four times. Because i did not wanna get inside that little girl at Feeling and i had a writer friend rated and she called me on that she said you have to go in like you on your others. You have to go in and feel everything. She's feeling so just kind of imagined all the way through it I wrote the masterpiece in masterpiece. I did a lot of study on the psychological aspects of of trauma and abuse and young children and how it affects their adult thinking. But i didn't have that in the beginning. Really with redeeming love. I felt like jesus was in the room. Have been striking me because it's really. It's his story it's not mine. It's stray dog bible. So there's the plot line there you know it's interesting how you mentioned you know not doing a lot of on that subject with your character angel but having to enter into what she felt like and as a writer when you're writing all of your stories and your entering and you really have to feel what they feel to write it down. Does that take a toll on you. Does it come into your house. Like i always wonder if you know actors who are portraying. Maybe something really difficult and hard. How do they come home. And then have dinner with the kids. You know when they've been portrayed. Is that ever an issue for you as an author well it was in the masterpiece really took a toll on me and i thought when i turned that book in.

cindy bond francine michael south africa France china valentine angel jesus
"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

07:22 min | 7 months ago

"francine" Discussed on The Happy Hour with Jamie Ivey

"Lord and savior. Jesus christ that you are finding some peace and joy in the fact that god sent his son to put flesh to be the light of the world for us to be our salvation to be our savior so i hope you're able to celebrate that even in the midst of a difficult season if you find yourself in one today show is a great one. And i'm so excited. I got to sit down interview francine rivers. Which if you are christian girl. You probably are familiar with brandon rivers. Because she's written over thirty books over thirty years. The one that you might for sure know about is a book called redeeming love. This book has sold over a million copies. I've read it. I am most definitely think that you've probably read it but if you have it. This is my one hundred percent recommendation that you need to get your hands on this book asap in fact if you got an amazon gift card go buy this book for yourself. Right now. francine and i talked about what led her to this journey of writing this book that has been so profound as a christian fiction book we talked about the characters and what they meant. We also talk about marriage a little bit which made me happy her and her husband. Rick had been married over fifty years. You guys let's sit and listen to what she has to say. We also talked about how she writes. We talk about the fact that this book will be released into a major motion picture in two thousand and twenty one. I cannot wait to see this book as well guys. You're going to love this show. Can i ask a favor of this week of holidays. Can i ask you a favor to go rate and review the happy hour. Podcast if you listen to the show and you enjoy the show a rating would mean the world to us. Think of it as your christmas gift to me rating interviews are not just so that i can feel good about myself or we can give us self so big thumbs up. What we're doing. But they actually help more people find the show entrust the show. So it's super easy. However you listen to podcasts. You can give us a review. We'd love it over on the apple. Podcast page just five stars. We'll take them guys. You can do it. Here's my conversation with francine rivers francine. Welcome to the happy hour bank. You could be here. I'm super excited to have you on the show today. In fact i get the unique wonderful. I love my job opportunity to talk to. So many people and i woke up this morning and immediately texted my mom and i was like you are not going to believe who i am chatting with today and so she and i are both big fans of your so. I'm so glad to have you today. How thank you for asking me. Great to be here. Well introduce yourself to my listeners. Tell us about your family where you live. We know that you're an author but give us a little tidbit into your personal life. Well i'm a wife of over fifty years. We have three grown children five children. We live in santa rosa california northern california so the new normal acuras fires every year. It's been a very interesting year with two thousand twenty or go down in the history. That is so true. That is so true. You said you've been married for over fifty years now and my husband. We actually met in fifth grade. Oh my goodness and then. He was a marine and vietnam. I went off in college. My brother was serving in the army and was in wave fell the ten offensive and so rick's mother wrote him every day the whole time he was serving over there and he heard about my brother captured and then my brother was down. With the marines came into the city he was repatriated so he wrote to me and we start writing back and forth and he came home in december nineteen sixty eight. We were married. December nineteen sixty nine. Oh my goodness gracious. We were really good francis. He'd be dating other people. Come down and we talk about our dreams of travel and all kinds of stuff so we had a really strong basis of friendship before we got married. Not that we didn't have our problems because that's true for everybody right. Do you think. I hear you talk about friendship. Do you think that's one of the keys to a long lasting marriage. Oh definitely definitely. He is my best friend and i think you know if you don't start out being friends and you don't know each other well that you develop that friendship in your marriage. Yeah i was talking to someone the other day. My husband and i have been married for almost twenty years. And so we pray that we get to see what you guys have seen but we were talking the other day about friendship and my husband did look at media and he's like you really are my best friend and i can say the same and it's not that i mean i have my friend amy. We've been friends since ninth grade like we're best season. We talk every day on the phone but to think about that. I get to spend the rest of my life with the man that i like. Because here's the deal. Francine you're fifty years in. I'm if you don't like this person that's going to be difficult. Am i right absolutely better like going to like. Write somehow. My goodness change. We're different people and we were when we got married but you grow up together. Yeah altogether so yeah. That's what i've seen. i remember. We're at the stage in our marriage where we're starting to see some marriages fall. You know your kids are getting older. You see marriages where they've had this kind of partnership of raising kids and all set and the kids are kind of doing their own thing and then they had this lack of friendship. And i don't think i really understood that as a newlywed as to what the about what we would have to put into our marriage. You know ten fifteen twenty years later. So i'm going to throw this at you got thirty years until i'm where you are. What is the best thing about your last thirty years of marriage. Oh my goodness well. Just the way we talk to each other one of the things we struggled in our marriage we almost scudamore divorce. I think our late thirties thing. That really brought us together as starting in the morning with reading devotional together and praying together and talking together. I sing warning. Because he had his own business. He had to be at the office at seven o'clock in the morning and then raising children we had no time alone together so we had to carve that time out and we still do it. I mean rick is up four four thirty in the morning. I'm usually up by five or five thirty. And then we have that quiet time together to start her day and it kind of sits the whole course of how your day's gonna be love that i love. That made all the difference. God together that intentional setting time to be together without like planning or doing kids stuff just really really being with each other. I read somewhere where you talked about. How you and. Rick almost got divorced. Your marriage is really struggling. Can you talk about you. Just mentioned basically one big thing that got you through to the other side of that. I know you mentioned the struggling. Your marriage at a point. And so i would love just to hear about your faith journey and what that's been like and how that's played into your marriage being what it is today. Well i grew up in the church but you can be in the church and in the pews not be a christian you know that was that was me yes and then rick did not grow up in the church so we did actually join a church in southern california and he was chairman of the board of trustees and they didn't know he wasn't a christian and we didn't know we weren't christians was crazy that i had started my writing career at that time and we went out for a walk monday and he said you know if you had a choice between me and the three children and you're writing you'd take your writing and it really stop in my tracks because i thought that's true my probably wouldn't because i had that illusion that i had control of my life that one area of my life and so it really got me thinking He started a new business in northern california because we wanted to get closer to our parents. We thought you don't being closer to family. Make a big difference. And i stayed.

brandon rivers francine rivers francine francine rivers francine Rick rick amazon santa rosa northern california Lord scudamore marines apple vietnam francis Francine california army amy
"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"But then. All of a sudden there was like a commotion behind me and I turned around definitely the first thing that went through my head was I'm an older person here. I want to start myself into the situation to turn around and to kind of assess and see what was going on, and to kind of make sure everyone was okay, and then when I turned around. He saw me I saw him. And I knew that he was gonna come to me I mean. And just new, and so he came over and. He was just yelling. Fuck you. Fuck you the Internet, let it rip. Van podcasts are? Fair game, you can let it rip I was really afraid I was GonNa Curse at Michael Holmes on CNN, when I did my first interview. Because it's the effort is very. Prominent in my vocabulary been so proud of you if you did. I think my parents would have been. I tell you what if anybody ever tries to get me for national media. It only happened once because I feel like I, would intentionally. As I'm signing off like you. Know you never never mind. and. So he was in my basis yelling. Fuck, you fuck you all lives matter I'm servicemen, you black lives matter okay. It's not a serviceman. Yeah, I mean. The only thing that guys servicing is a pizza straight down his throat. Yeah like. So he was doing that and In that moment. I dislike took off my glasses. 'cause I wanted him to look me in the eye and that's what was captured. So and not something that my father instilled into me at a very young age Unfortunately, that's not the first man to treat me like that or a second or third, or the fourth and men have been pretty awful to me throughout my life. My father was actually abusive person as well when he was using so. I've kind of been training for that moment for most of my life and one of the things that my dad used to tell me and my brothers when we were kids. no matter threat, no matter who it is or what it is, make sure that they have to look you in the eye, so they have to acknowledge human, and then not moment i. my Father Passed Away Sixteen years ago this month and I don't think about a much just been sixteen years and. The bitter, sweet aspect of all of that, that's just a different story, but in that moment I thought that my sunglasses and I made him look me in the eye. And You know he the look on his eyes. He is the most piercing blue eyes I've ever seen. Greg never forget his eyes. But it was like he did. He did acknowledge I was team in that moment, and then he kind of likes doubled over his words, and then you know went towards the teenagers, and at that point picking an easier targets. And, so then at that point you know, then it was moments than the police kind of finally stepped in and escorted him out of there you know. And he went kicking and screaming and you know he didn't get arrested till the next day which. He went back the next day. He got arrested the next day he..

Michael Holmes Greg CNN
"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"I really don't care what people politics are unless they start getting fringing a little, crazy and pushy. It's like. Do you do your thing, right? And then we were living in San. Diego and we bought a house down by. About halfway down flathead Lake Okay, and it was a VR be. Oh, and we came up in my wife. My ex-wife was born and raised in great falls. I mean so she and I don't know well you. You know you're pretty much from Montana. Yeah, you talk to people who are from Montana and they're like. I'm going back there. There's nothing it's like a gravitational pull. It is I mean. I mean there's this I mean you can travel around the state forever and still be in St. there's so much to see and there's so much beauty British. Don't go east of the mountains right over here. I say that I would describe. Sorry Montana's. But I would describe the beauty of Montana goes like this when you get Easter different. Different you mean flat by flat I mean there's no difference for hundreds of miles, and you're going to gain three million. This is basically when you go to these mountains. You're like Oklahoma and I. have nothing bad to say about. Oklahoma I'm just saying. The topography changes most of the pictures you see of Montana. Are Not traditionally from. Let's say the eastern portion the northeastern. Air Enough they are enough, but so we move. We're looking at moving up here. We bought the house of your be Oh and we came up in. It was awesome I. My kids outside, and you're just loving it, so we made the decision. To, move up in when we got up here. I was just googling the Cowbell I. Don't know how I got onto it, but I started seeing a lot of. Hints at White Supremacy issues. In the valley because I. Thousand, seventeen sixteen seventeen. Yeah, that was one of two thousand seventeen. Nazi marches. That's that's what I stumbled across an, and we traveled to whitefish a little bit and I'm reading these articles and like I don't understand I. Guess I just didn't realize. that. It had its hooks is deeply in this area. Yeah! Yeah, I mean. Unfortunately like even the mayor of CALICO put out a statement in the daily Inter Lake about how you know, racism is just on a problem here..

Montana Oklahoma Lake Okay San Inter Lake CALICO Diego whitefish
"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"Acquaintance. Thomas Niveau. We talked about him a little bit in the podcast, so it will be that explanation for that, but. Samantha is actually from where I currently live or in the flathead valley she. Rose to national prominence. Due to a picture, being captured at a black lives matter protests in Whitefish Montana. which is the northern end of the flathead valley? And Thomas found this picture and send it to me. And said here's somebody who could be should be a very important an interesting person to have a conversation with. Thomas is a smart man. I immediately said that I agreed, and he connected us and I can't tell you. How glad that I am that he did. Samantha is awesome. She is obviously like I said a woman. She's an activist. She's a woman of color. She grew up in this rural town and now she is. Shifting her focus towards educating and making change her opinion to me is incredibly important and for me in times like. Now. That all of us are either watching are directly participating in as we see our country, hopefully, change and change direction towards something that is better. I think one of the most important things that you can do is sit down. Ask questions. And most importantly listen so so incredibly grateful that this woman lives near where I live and. That she is doing the things that she is doing. Now, I'm going to shut up and let Samantha Talk for herself. Episode One thirty, four with Samantha Francine enjoy. Was Smoke. Walk. To the smoke I'm looking at danger close now. including. How do you know? Mr Niveau I don't. Okay then he actually just took another. Step up in my. Level of respect I've met him one time. Yeah in. Where we were, we were in Kong. I met him for breakfast. At a buffet at the Marriott and Hong, Kong through a mutual friend, and he's been amazing. Yeah, and he was just like Andy You have to talk to this woman. Is Crazy it gets no, he. He's in the Congo right now. And he just studying star Covid nineteen stuff. Yeah, and he saw my story reached to me. Talk a little bit and the next thing I know. He's the talk to this person this person. This person. I was like okay. Thank you. Bye Me, but love it. You know I mean this has been so surreal. Yeah I'm trying to think about the the best place. Instead I know we have to me the picture which I'll. Put up in Youtube. That picture to me captures. Everything that is wrong with this country..

Samantha Talk Thomas Niveau Samantha Samantha Francine flathead valley Kong Whitefish Montana. Congo Mr Niveau Andy You Covid Thomas Hong
The alpha generating opportunity for the second half of 2020

Bloomberg Surveillance

05:58 min | 1 year ago

The alpha generating opportunity for the second half of 2020

"Of K P W as we enter the second half over this year, I think we have very little clarity, Visibility whatsoever. Government e Year and well this economy and the pandemic situation will look like from New York City this morning. Good morning to world alongside Tom Kay. Together with Lisa, Grab it some Jonathan Farrow, one hour, 12 minutes away from your opening about We roll over just a little bit. A mild move lover, down six points. The S and P 500 off by 2/10 of 1%. That's the equity market is the bond market for your Treasury yields have been lower. The curve has been flattered through much to the morning so far, your 10 year yield comes down to basics points. You're 30 year down almost three and a foreign exchange muted price. Actually, G 10 through much of this morning euro dollar Going absolutely nowhere. Poundsterling just a little bit weak. It's on the pound. Just a little bit lower. Well, interesting in the pound. Maybe Francine Lacqua, driving the pound weaker with her conversation with the chancellor of the exchequer earlier today, right now to have you reset for the second half of 2020 a guy who writes an incredibly interesting short research note. Michael Purvis is great because it six or seven or eight pages instead of the 30 pages a boilerplate that your eyes glaze over on. And in that he always tries to get out front of the trend. He did that to a tea with the Asia currency dynamics about 23 years ago. He is tall back and we're thrilled. Michael could join us this morning. Michael Purvis real simply. Where's the opportunity? Right now? What do you writing about is the truth. Alfa generating opportunity for the second half. You know, it's it's a tough question. Tough. I think for any of us, we were shifting. I would start by answering that question. If we were the first half was very fine area, you know, almost sort of wrist on wrist Call Allah 2010. The second half is going to be a much more nuanced sort of less binary set of analyses. And there's a lot of things that are just to come into the foreground. Just after we clear the Fourth of July holiday, which is all of that right around the corner. They're so I think the framework shift there, you know, in terms of how one position For the second half. I am looking, you know, opportunistically to sell volatility. I did that a couple of weeks ago when we had that big spike after the FOMC. There. You know, I'm looking at, you know, on my long equity portfolio toe have sort of a core ballast of what other people have. Which is you know the big cap tax, which is sort of an all weather type of Equity investment. It's almost a separate after classes to itself. There. I think the areas that are very interesting into the second half is looking at this potential sort of pivot where Europe, the European condition. Maybe moving into a into a more interesting place with stimulus slowly coming together and at the same time writing political risk in the United States. With a whole bunch of uncertainties. But what kind of policies were going to get out of D? C in 2021? There's no like I expect. I expect for the f B X, you know, to be most likely rangebound. I think it's gonna be hard to be a committed bear in the second half, but the same time it's gonna be hard to be That they committed bowl and then I think not too much that answer, But I would also suggest that look, you know it's it's arguably a consensus trade right now, but I've been Very constructive and precious metals for some time, and I continued to be so I think we're going to see a lot of pick up their particularly in the minors and silver. Well, Michael, that's basically a whole book. So let's pick out part of the story gets a Europe Do you think we could see re allowed performance on the continent? Well, I you know, Look, European equities have been the mother of all value traps for some time. We've all been there revolved and you know, sort of excited. You had a glimmer of hope in 2017 that lasts about 6 to 9 months. There. But I do think that there's something that investors have to keep their eye on here. Which is that there is, um you know, perhaps a bit as the catalyst has brought together. The new sense of European cohesion, and you're saying that with this with this very large 750 billion grow stimulus plan France, Germany over Anchoring there, and it seems like there's slowly getting old 26 countries on on board with it, but it's very important because it underscores declining. If it happens, it'll level harmonized. Interest rates across the eurozone. Um you know the spread of TB. The bones will come down and arguably, O'Neil should come higher as well. But at the same time, the political risk premium that's always exist in the euro should come down. I think I look, there's a lot Can happen between now and that you know whenever that might become a reality, but it represents a very, very important chefs in terms of training it, you know, it may be The long euro trait is the easier crazy and say my along the equities right now or or or the widow maker of sorting fun, but I think it's very, very important because over the long term mechanic tracked Very substantial capital flows that have been very US focus. Back into the eurozone, and that has implications that will ripple across. I think the whole the whole investment landscape. Again with the caveat gifted when it comes to happen, But there is a moment of building there that We had not seen before. Michael purpose

Michael Purvis United States Europe Tom Kay New York City Jonathan Farrow Treasury Eurozone Lisa Francine Lacqua Fomc Poundsterling Chancellor Asia France Germany
Hope and Worry Mingle as Countries Relax Coronavirus Lockdowns

Rush Limbaugh

14:05 min | 1 year ago

Hope and Worry Mingle as Countries Relax Coronavirus Lockdowns

"Again just to repeat I had to run through some things pretty quickly Germany is re opening all of its shops and allowing soccer Italy Spain and France have eased their lock downs after the hot spots in those countries have now seen a record low number of coronavirus cases something that my my point is that lockdowns are being lifted all over the world not just here in the in the United States and there is mounting pressure to keep states close to keep the lockdown on and in place in the United States primarily in Democrat run states and we all know what the reason for this is there is an ongoing effort to **** the American economic recovery if you want to call it that whatever the renewed economic activity is and it's it's breathtaking to behold it really has a people talk about we got across the aisle we gotta show people that we can work together we gotta have demonstrated that we can make sure the government can work and we we can't even unified on a pandemic we're not it does not actually does surprise me at all because I know Eric and laughed I know the backwards and forwards I know today's Democrat party and I and I know what their political objectives are I'm just telling you they don't care capitalism is taking a hit that's in fact there's some of the some things happening in this in this situation that they have been secretly hoping would happen some day somehow main socialist by design don't like capitalism they've been looking for ways to damage and destroy it this thing is come along it's a godsend to many people on the left and so your your your if you if you have people who consider the United States is the problem in the world because the United States is too big it's too big a superpower it's too big economically it's just not fair something like this comes along and can cut the United States down to size twenty people in this country most of the Democrat party who are all for it I don't believe me I don't but it it it may be something you don't want to just take a look at where states are shut down I will continue to be shut down where governors don't want to open them up ask what party they're in and ask what could the reasons for this continued lockdown and the continued destruction of people's economic fortunes and watch what could that be about what purpose does it serve because believe me it serves a purpose keeping a state walk down keeping people in financial ruin with no opportunity to go back to work it does serve a particular political objective and that objective of course beating Donald Trump in November it sounds simplistic to some of you but it is the case I was reading I mentioned earlier in the program you can guardian is a column here my somebody named Francine prose I never heard of her I don't even know she's a real person is a sort of name or whatever but the piece is entitled what Americans ever forgive trump for his heart was lack of compassion the some heavy is while the nation grieves the US president has spent less than five minutes expressing compassion for those who are suffering we can't help thinking how much less worried we would be if a humane competent well informed adult was making the decisions that affect us all now that intrigues me because I want to ask you just just point blank take everything that's happening and leave it in place everything that has happened everything that is happening and what you think the immediate future all the words do you think Major League Baseball will play this season do you think the NFL will kick off with fans in the stands whatever you think yes fine if you think you know whatever whatever you think of the current circumstances would you be thinking differently would you be less worried if somebody we're in the White House expressing compassion for people who are stuck when it change your attitude about any of this what are you against compassion all I'm not against conventional put words in my mouth I'm asking what good does it do in the context of what we're talking about here what by the way that what Americans ever forgive trump for his heart was lack of compassion where has it been established that is heartless so there's a there's a gigantic presumption this whole thing off which is companies are heartless SOB about Americans know it and trump needs to get their forgiveness quick because trump is making this worse trump is making those wars because he doesn't have any compassion for the people suffering the nation is grieving now what is trump doing what do you define compassion a whole bunch of different ways but can optimism being compassion I know that trump refuses they get caught up in pessimism he doesn't like it he doesn't want to be identified with it he want he doesn't he doesn't want to be involved in things that create panic so trump well often times be optimistic because he thinks that's far more productive and far more helpful for people then just sit there and wring his hands together and talk about how sandy is because there are certain things that you just assume nobody is happy with the number of people who have died here nobody is happy with the number of people are sick should you have to save that for people to understand that about you what we give you an example this happened when I was out you remember the brouhaha that erupted after trump at one of the briefings talked about the possibility of injecting Clorox or whatever was you remember the outrage over this you remember people talking about how dumb and stupid all my god how embarrassing trump actually all dirty looked at the score of queen and he's asking her to confirm they could someday shook people up with Marshall it's dangerous this guy is an absolute these stupid people were saying now what happened what happened is the trump was briefed on some news that was announced who who's the guy who was the what department wasn't wasn't FEMA somebody made an announcement at that briefing that they had discovered the virus doesn't do well in high temperatures it doesn't do well on services it lasts thirty seconds with disinfectant Clorox whatever it was well trump had been briefed on all that a mere couple of minutes before the briefing and start I don't believe Donald Trump actually thinks or thought or to shoot anybody up what Y. sol rocks what Donald Trump is is I can do what kind of person and if he here is that this virus is wiped out in thirty seconds with exposure to whatever it was Clorox then his mind is going okay so how do we apply that and he thinks out loud how do we apply that if that if that kills it then how do we apply that to people who have a deep thanks out loud he's not literally thinking of shooting people up with one of these disinfectants are and yet the assumption was that he was thinking that the assumption was that he saw store but any such a fool that he literally want to go grab a patient and get a syringe and put some parts in there and have doctor works should the person up in sap the virus he's not and yet everybody reacted to it as though he is that stupid the is that heart was that he is that I have encountered that side of Donald Trump won the day all of the state of the union and which Catherine I were his gas and I got the presidential medal of freedom you would not believe what all had to happen for me to get to Washington that day and none of it what happened were it not for him making it happen things that you would say are impossible to get done in two hours or three cannot do he did it all he's just he's a can do kind of person he doesn't have no aunt or something negative in his it is make up so we goes about these briefings yeah the briefer was the homeland security undersecretary for science in fact the bill Ryan was built brand came out told everybody what happened to the virus in high humidity and high temperatures and certain kinds of disinfectants and so forth all Donald Trump as a problem solver and he likes to encourage people he likes to inspire people he likes to get people moving and he does think things that a lot of people that can't be done candy any doesn't just sit there one second if he's dealing with somebody who thinks something can't be done he's going to try to tell it can the mistake here was to do this impromptu ad libbing in front of cameras but I guarantee you that had the cameras not been there had trouble learn this so he would have been asking the boys are some way we can apply this is there some way we can take what you've just learned here and apply it to the way we're treating people with the virus he doesnt mean shut him up with this impact of poison is there something to learn here whether we actually this was just so over the top you remember trump any of trump's foolish trump this trump slap it was so bad that trump himself his staff got you got to go out to you got to fix this so I went out there the next day in trump said I was being sarcastic I was being sarcastic with the media I was asking a sarcastic wit that's obviously not what he was doing hi I wish I had been in the meeting to formulate the strategy the procedure here for dealing with with this because believe me it could have been converted into a total positive the reason I bring all this up is because it we have a piece here in the UK guard it will Americans ever forgive trump for his heart was lacking the last thing Donald Trump is as heartless and the last thing he has none of his compassion it is the exact opposite Donald Trump believes everybody's capable of greatness he believes it everybody's capable of accomplishing things he doesn't believe in sitting around and rubbing people's shoulders and saying it's okay you suck you're never going to amount to anything but I'll make you feel better about it he doesn't believe in that inspiring people getting the most out of people particularly people work for him particularly for people that can't do the things that he needs done it is that he can't do himself he needs those people come through we can't help thinking how much less worried we would be if I humane competent well informed the doubt was making the decisions that affect this there's another pull cord from his face and yet we've learned that Franklin Roosevelt turned away refugees from Hitler's Europe we can still imagine how comforting it was for those who lived through the Great Depression hearing his radio speech also people were suffering in the Great Depression and lost everything but somehow listening to Roosevelt on the radio made him feel better maybe you've made them feel better but it did not change their circumstances my mother used to get real mad at me she make me eat everything on the plate I'm sure yours did too and if I didn't do it she would say things like you know there are people there are people on the other side of the house over in China starving they would let us is also mom let me ask if I eat everything on his plate or some Chinese kids going to be rubbing your stomach I feel so full now you know smart aleck you'll be quiet you don't set your mother that left I'm sorry this one to me how my eating something is going to fill up a bunch of chai com Bally's wow right sure really I'm just missed through real real folks and I know exactly what troubles with this idea here that the American people cannot function we

Germany Spain United States France
"francine" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"This is the catch table truck. That's Matiz here. Well all these problems were were having because virus. There's gotta be some good news around us. This morning is a very good friend. Francine LAKNA successful businesswoman distinguished philanthropist a fighter for empowerment of women's rights. And she's out there working hard to make sure there's a better life the people less fortunate than The morning francine how you to Sunday morning. Good John Power used so nice to hear Your Voice Beckham. Well now you. You've been working very hard for women in Africa. He started a program in New Jersey for women that were in jail and got out of jail. Tell All New York is about seven philanthropy sick. You're on a working hard to. It's well as you said I started working with. Hiv Positive Women in Rwanda with my charity same Scott and ex offenders doing job training for women and then I started working at the women in need homeless shelter to do computer training and business training. But I have seen what's happening and for every person that's died of Calvin virus. Five hundred. People have lost their jobs in our hungry. Three people have committed suicide so I had to pick what I was doing and really focus on worrying about people's next meal so this is as soon Nami. This is not a rain storm. This is unbelievable now. Your family originally is quiz. Did you originally tacit trade on Queen's preside? I promise you know. My father built left Frac City and he built many affordable housing projects. You know Like Donald Trump's father in queens. He focused on the common man. Any focused on affordable housing. And when I saw what was going on with those long lines across the country but in Queens too and I saw that Queens was the number one area the epicenter of this virus. I had to do something so I started to work with the New York. The Food Bank of New York which has been around for thirty five years and has deep roots in the community and town will what were they actually doing distributing food. They're distributing food setting up a pop up pantries they doing food trucks and they're going to these areas that you know they weren't planning on going to but the need is so great it's triple in the last six weeks and I've been able to a denton. A those people been fed. You know what I can't say it's Dan. My Foundation supported five hundred thousand meals. And I'll tell you on your show that I'm going to do another five hundred thousand meals because the need is so great. I mean I think they need ten million meals. So it's the least that I can do and hearing him and here. We all are sitting at home. We don't have to be on the frontline and go out and you know what can we do? We all feel so. Powerless and food is so important. And the fact that these people are on food lines. It just breaks my heart with you now. I if there's any people in the audience that WANNA help. What do you suggest they do? Well listen I think it would be great if they looked up the website the Food Bank of New York City? It's a great organization. But then there's other you know if they're not in the New York area. Feeding America is a great organization and they support all the food pantries and help run them and they have volunteers. And you know it's been a disaster with Food Pantries John. Because a third of them had to close. They were the volunteers with the elderly and also with the demands at three times. It's just been extremely hard for them to to function so this organization has support from the city and the state and the National Guard. And they're out there helping and get doing a really effective job. I really support them and I did a lot of research so I suggest it's the Food Bank of New York City for New York City. Yeah New York City is it dot com or DOT ORG or Food Bank for New York City Dot Org. It's very impressive. I wanted to help and I wanted to be smart about helping because I don't want to be the kind of person that you know you donate money. You never know where it goes but right now they are on the ground and we are so impressed with how they were able to mobilize and function right away and use the donations from the supermarket. And and help these food. Pantries Ron and so I just WanNa say that you are one of the most philanthropic people and I just wish that your listeners knew how much how philanthropic and how your supermarkets help and what you do for New York America. You're one of the Great Americans John and I just want you to know that you're appreciate it. Thank you oppressing now. We have another minute left. Tell us about how the New Jersey project is doing but goes women that were getting out of jail. You know we just started this amazing program where we're doing business training for over a hundred women who were recently you know were formerly incarcerated and then this happened so we're trying distance learning but it's complicated. You know you have to make sure they have laptops. You have to make sure they have wi fi and you know it's it's not that easy so we're trying it and this whole soon. Nami put up sort of a pause on what we were doing so we are trying and where involved with the women and trying to make sure they have what they need but food is such a huge issue John. Nobody's thinking about business training. I told you so what he it's. Please go to give the website again. Food Bank for New York City Dot or war will definitely thank you. Pack your so much less racks. Thank you for your doing God's work and we'll catch up again real soon and thank you for everything you do. Your amazing decide that's roundtable. We'll be right back..

New York Food Bank of New York City New York City Food Bank of New York New Jersey queens John Power Francine LAKNA Frac City Matiz Rwanda Donald Trump Africa Nami Calvin Queen denton National Guard Scott
Greg Jackson Reads Where You'll Find Me by Ann Beattie

The New Yorker: Fiction

11:31 min | 1 year ago

Greg Jackson Reads Where You'll Find Me by Ann Beattie

"We're going to hear where you'll find me by an beady which was published in the New Yorker in March of nineteen eighty six. What's wrong with me? Howard says it's almost the first time he's looked at me since I arrived. I've been trying not to register my boredom and my frustration with cates paddle. Maybe we should get a tree. I say I don't think it's Christmas. That's making me feel this way. Howard says the story was chosen. Greg Jackson whose debut Story Collection Prodigal was published in two thousand sixteen. Hi Greg Hi Deborah. So you once a student of. Nbd's right. I was wearing. When was that? I was her student at the University of Virginia in twenty eleven. Two thousand. Twelve I had a workshop with her and she was then my thesis adviser and I chose her as my thesis adviser because she never liked any of my work and I thought what better person to learn from I I knew in some sense that She was right in that. My work wasn't very good but I didn't really know why I thought if I just hung out with her for a really long time. I'd figure out what she knew that I didn't did that. Work you know it's funny. It didn't really work and I think this is like the side of teaching writing. That's impossible but she did. Tell me a number of things that were so true that when I was able to understand what she was saying I realized if I'd gotten it at the time it would have helped a lot but it's one of those things where you have to actually experience. The truth fit in practice. She was dead on. But it's just it's hard to like here maxim and be like. Oh yeah that's what I should be doing my writing. Yeah and at that time. Had you read a lot of her work? I'd rather fair number. Her stories partly coming into Virginia. I knew that she was one of the people I was really excited about studying with but I can't say that I had a kind of comprehensive career. What was it that appealed to you about the stories that you dread will. They were so different from what I was doing and probably different from in some ways from what I've gone on to You know I think sometimes people apply. This term minimalism and I think she rebels against that term and I understand why. I don't think she's minimalist but I did. Think of myself at the time as maximalist trying to kind of fit as much of all the nuance at any given moment into When I was writing and I felt like with her there was some ability to just say less than I ever would have been comfortable saying and somehow in saying last two or something that so kind of rich and mysterious in just itself kind of discipline that I didn't have him still don't really have. Yeah and when you chose this story where you'll find me which I think you said you now teach. Was that a story. You knew back then. Is it a story that you came to later? It's one of my probably two or three very favorites of hers. I've loved teaching this story because it seems on the surface very straightforward But it actually has such depth and reservoirs of symbol and metaphor in sort of deep structures. That it's very fun and interesting to work with students to see how something can kind of work just completely on the surface level and kind of have these steps that you drop into. Well maybe we should drop into them now and then we can talk a little more. So now here's Greg Jackson reading where you'll find me by NBD where you'll find me friends. Keep calling my broken arm. A broken wing. It's the left arm now folded against my chest and kept in place of the blue scarfs. Sling that is knotted behind my neck in ways too much ever to have been winglike. The accident happened when I ran for a bus. I tried to stop it from pulling away by shaking my shopping bags like Maracas in the air. And that's when I slipped on the ice and went down so I took the train from New York City to Sarah Toga yesterday. Instead of driving I had the perfect excuse not to go to Saratoga to visit my brother at all but once I had geared up for it I decided to go through with the trip and avoid guilt. It isn't Howard. I mind but his wife's two children a girl of eleven and a boy of three beck either pays no attention to her brother Todd or else. She tortures him last winter. She used to taunt him by stalking around the House on his heels clumping close behind him wherever he went which made him run and scream at the same time. Kate did not intervene until both children became hysterical and we could no longer shout over their voices. I think I like it. That their physical. She said maybe if they enact some of their hostility like this they won't grow up with a habit of getting what they want by playing mind games with other people. It seems to me that they will not ever grow up but will burn out like meteors Howard has finally found what he wants the opposite of domestic tranquillity. For six years he lived in Oregon with Pale Passive Woman. On the rebound. He married even Paler. Pre Med student named Francine that marriage lasted less than a year and then on a blind date in Los Angeles. He met Kate whose husband was away on a business trip to Denmark. Just then in no time. Kate and her daughter an infant son moved in with him to the studio apartment in. Laguna beach. He was sharing with screenwriter. The two men had been working on a script about Medgar Evers but when Kate and the children moved in they switched to writing a screenplay about what happens when a man meets a married woman with two children on a blind date and the three of them move in with him and his friend. Then Howard's collaborator got engaged in moved out in the screenplay was abandoned. Howard accepted a last minute. Invitation to teach writing at an upstate. College New York and within a week. They were all ensconced in a drafty Victorian House in Saratoga. Kate's husband had begun divorce proceedings before she moved in with Howard but eventually he agreed not to sue for custody of Becky and Todd in exchange for child support payments that were less than half of what his lawyer thought he would have to pay now. He sends the children enormous stuffed animals that they have little or no interest in with notes that say put this mom zoo a stuffed toy every month or so giraffes a life sized German shepherd and overstuffed standing bear in every time the same note the bear stands in one corner of the kitchen and people have gotten in the habit of pinning notes to it reminders. To buy milk or get the oil changed in the car. Wraparound sunglasses have been added. Scarves and jackets sometimes draped on its arms. Sometimes the stuffed German shepherd is brought over propped up with its paws placed on the bears haunt imploring. It right now in the kitchen with the bear. I've just turned up the thermostat. The first one up in the morning is supposed to do that. And I'm dunking a teabag in a Mug of hot water for some reason it's impossible for me to make tea with loose tea and the t-ball unless I have help. The only t bag I could find was emperor's choice. I sit in one of the kitchen chairs to drink the tea. The chair seems to stick to me. Even though I have on Mo- long johns and along Flannel nightgown. The chairs are plastic. Very nineteen fifties patterned with shapes that. Look sometimes geometric sometimes almost human little things like malformed hands reach out toward triangles and squares. I asked Howard and Kate got the kitchen set at an auction for thirty dollars. They thought it was funny. The House itself is not funny. It has four fireplaces wide board floors and high dusty ceilings. They bought it with his share of an inheritance that came to us. When our grandfather died cates contribution to restoring the house has been transforming. The baseboards into faux marble. How effective this is has to do with how stone she is when she starts. Sometimes the baseboards looked like clotted versions of the Kitchen. Chair pattern instead of marble cake considers what she calls parenting to be a full-time job. When I moved to Saratoga she used to give piano lessons now. She ignores the children and paints the baseboards in. Who Am I to stand in judgment? I'm a thirty eight year old woman. Out of a job on tenuous enough footing with her sometime lover that she can imagine crashing emotionally as easily as she did on the ice. It may be true as my lover. Frank says that having money is not good for the soul money that is given you that is he is a lawyer who also has money but it is. Money earned parlayed into more money by investing in real estate and urban farm as part of this real estate boxes of herbs keep turning up at Frank's office herbs and foil herbs and plastic bags dried herbs wrapped in cones of newspaper. He crumbles them for Omelettes ROASTS VEGETABLES HIS OPPOSED TO SALT. He insists herbs are more healthful. And who am I to claim to love a man when I am skeptical even about his use of herbs? I'm embarrassed to be an employed. I'm insecure enough to stay with someone because of the look that sometimes comes into his eyes when he makes love to me. I'm a person who secretly shakes on. Salt in the kitchen then comes out with her plate. Smiling as Basil is crumbled over the tomatoes sometimes in our bed his finger smell of Rosemary. Tarragon strong smells sour. Smells whatever Shakespeare says or whatever is written in culpeper complete herbal. I cannot imagine that herbs have anything to do with love but many brides to be come to the herb farm and by branches of herbs to stick in their bouquets they their wrists with herbal extracts to smell mysterious. They believed that herbs. Bring Them Luck. These days they want tubs of Rosemary in their houses. Not fakest trees. I got in right on the cusp of the new world. Frank says he isn't kidding for the Christmas party tonight. They're cherry tomatoes halved and stuffed with peaks of cheese mushrooms stuffed with pureed tomatoes tomatoes stuff with chop mushrooms and mushroom stuffed with cheese caters laughing in the kitchen. No one's going to notice she mutters. No one's going to say anything. Why don't we put out some nuts? Howard says nuts are so conventional. This is funny. Kate says squirting more soft cheese out of a pastry tube year. We had mistletoe mulled CIDER. Last year we lost their sense of humor. What happened that? We got all hyped up. We even ran out on Christmas Eve to cut a tree. The kids Howard says that's right. She says the kids were crying. They were feeling competitive with the other kids or something. Becky was crying. Todd was too young to cry about that Howard says why are we talking about tears? Kate says we can talk about tears when it's not the season to be jolly everybody's going to come in tonight and loved the res on the picture hooks and the food is so festive. We invited a new Indian guy from the philosophy department. Howard says American Indian Not Indian from India if we want we can watch the tapes of jewel in the crown. Kate says I'm feeling really depressed. Howard says backing up to the counter and sliding down until he rests on his elbows his tennis shoes or wet. He never takes off his wet shoes and he never gets colds.

Howard Kate Saratoga Greg Jackson Todd NBD Cates University Of Virginia Frank Becky Virginia New York City Beck Oregon Medgar Evers Stalking
"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

"With known husband killer but he said he knew right away. There was more to the story. They were married six weeks later and continued raising France. Kids plus one more together. Robert Helped francine bring her dream of becoming a nurse into fruition. She graduated from Nursing School as Valedictorian of her class and went on to work as an LPN at several nursing homes a few years after after meeting Robert She spoke with people magazine at the time she was living in a neatly kept sparsely-furnished tract house. In Jackson Michigan Journalist Joya Dila Berto described her voice as girlish and tentative noting that is conveyed a distrust of strangers. People still look at me like they're trying to figure me out. Francine told her. I don't feel like I have to explain myself to anybody and I don't. I don't need pity or sympathy. I'm just an ordinary person but ordinary is far from how other people have described. Francine her widely reported case helped transform public understanding of domestic violence redefining as a crime versus a private affair and spurring the nationwide establishment of battered women shelters which helped pave the way for shelters for other genders to the story gained gained more attention with the release of the burning bed. Book in One thousand nine hundred and the derivative film of the same name in Nineteen eighty-four the intense drama became one of the most revered TV movies of all time reaching more than seventy five million NBC viewers Francine became one a faira faucets most acclaimed roles in response to the film. Mickey's Cousin Betty Phillips Till the Lansing State Journal. Our family has never denied the violence. But if he could have gotten help it would have made a difference. A lot of the things in the movie really did happen but did he deserve to die no. The system failed both of them. Mickey's father Berlin and his brother. Donovan both died by suicide in the years following the fire while Betty did not like the film. She said she hoped it was making a positive impact. Adding I know that it opened a lot of is after decades of working as a nurse and loving her family francine died of complications of pneumonia at age. Sixty nine afterward. Her daughter Nicole who is seven when Mickey tied spoke of her mother's ability you to make people laugh even in times of distress as a kid. You know something is wrong. But you're taught to run and hide. She said adding that she and her siblings do do. Their Dad was on a path to kill them. You just have to listen and cry. Mom was strong. We never went hungry. Never went without anything we needed needed. I believe she did it to save his kids and herself. She changed so many lives changed the lives of people we will never know musicians to who were impacted by Francine story which inspired Martina McBride's hit Song Independence Day in Nineteen eighty-five singer-songwriter Lyn. Hardy had made a commitment to not perform any of the old time murder ballads detailing violence against women instead. She decided to write a song in which a woman murdered her abuser. A friend alerted her to the Francine Hughes case and she was baffled. By how closely matched earlier ix she completed the song a Smithsonian Folk Song America Anthology selection with Donna Hiebert. It's called the ballot a Francine Hughes use. My name is Francine Hughes. I'll tell you will come. Listen to my story. I'll try to okay from crying. I'm murdered my husband own. It goes on to depict the night. Francine burned the family family home with Mickey inside the trial and the verdict ending with a message about the many cases of abuse and differently. Really given me my all liberty. Thank you said me free. But every eighteen seconds of Woman's beaten just like me and every day in in court another batter goes free today. Research shows that a woman is beaten or assaulted every every nine seconds. This has been murder minutes for true crime anytime. Download the murder minute APP or follow us on Instagram at murder minute..

Francine Hughes Mickey Robert She murder Betty Phillips Joya Dila Berto Martina McBride Nursing School France Lansing State Journal Donovan NBC Jackson Michigan Donna Hiebert Nicole Berlin Hardy Lyn
"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

10:32 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

"A sense of accomplishment compliment for getting her homework done. She felt unusually happy but after school. She gave a classmate a ride which pushed her arrival time. Unharmed ten minutes late Mickey was livid as he criticized her. She grabbed the welfare check. She'd been expecting from the mailbox. They were out of groceries yet again so she told him she needed to run to the store. She was furious about that too. He yelled at her for wanting to leave without making enlist first one. He insisted on seeing an approving. Most food seem to make him vomit but he consistently blamed francine's cooking by the time she finally made the store run. She was exhausted so she decided to serve frozen dinners when she pulled them out in the kitchen. Mickey threw a Tantrum cursing at her and calling her lazy bitch. She didn't think he would eat anyway. She recalled telling him to which he replied. That's that's the trouble with you. You're always thinking sensing a physical attack. Francine's searched her mind for a strategy anything to lessen the literal blows. He demanded she dropped out of school. tore her books instructing her to burn them when she resisted he grabbed and shook her his eyes frenzied. Do you want to break your neck right now. He asked she sobbed the taste of blood lead filling her mouth as she succumbed to his demands. Burning her books in a trash can when she said she would go to school anyway. He threatened to use a sledgehammer to destroy her car. Francine tried to run outside but he blocked the door. She called her daughter Christie to fund the police when officers arrived home. They said they couldn't arrest Mickey because they had witnessed the attack laws of the time. Required that later deputies would testify that the man told his wife quote it was all over because she called to report him they also testified fight that he verbally abused francine threatening her life. And those of officers after they left Mickey beat her again when she made dinner for the kids. He threw the food on the floor then rubbed her face in the sticky mess. He demanded she making dinner and bring it to him in the bedroom she did her. Best with limited ingredients her shaky hands foreign patties out of canned salmon potatoes after he he had finished. He called her back into the bedroom where she found him lying on the bed. His pants unzipped. I hated it worse than I ever had. Before she said of the rape the idea of him inside me owning my insides shoving deep into me made my flesh crawl. I looked down at him and I had an impulse to put the pillow over his face and smother him. But I knew I wasn't strong enough. I clenched my teeth to keep from MM screaming. When he was done she moved to the living room and sat down feeling like a quote helpless frozen frozen fury of Qena blocked before directs? She heard the kids moving about stairs and remember that they hadn't eaten all day. She could almost feel their stomachs hurting but the kids swore they weren't hungry appetites. We're likely numb like hers so they watch. TV together and activity. She hoped might calm them down. Distract them as she sat there. Her Daughter Nicky's head on her lap up. She thought of school and how hard she had worked seemingly now for nothing. She considered how horrible her life had been since meeting. Mickey and the hopelessness of her future house she had suffered. She began mentally coaching herself. You don't know him anything Fran you never did. Don't let him ruin the kid's lives the way he has ruined yours. Take them away. You've got to take them away. A plan flashed in her mind. She would sneak out with children and drive them far far away but there was a problem one of her kids. Dana wasn't home home yet. She couldn't let him return to their father at the very least that would mean she would return and she had already caved too many times. This time had to be different. She stood up and started pacing considering how much she hated her life with Mickey and how she had to get out erase it and never looked back. That's when it struck her later she recalled thinking. I wasn't going to come back because there wasn't going to be anything to come back to because I was going to burn the house down as for Mickey she would burn him to suddenly her dark emotions gave way to excitement. She forgot everything else. Dana the consequences the reality of taking in life. She plays the kids in the car which was parked just outside carried a jug of gasoline. To the bedroom I stood still for for a moment hesitating and a voice urged on. She said it whispered do it. Do it do it over and over and I just kept on on with that. She poured gasoline around. Mickey's bed and lit a match. As the fire blazed raised flamed swallowing the home she drove to the county jail and turned herself in declaring. I did it. When firefighters reached the home they found Mickey's body amid the charred rubble? He died from smoke inhalation. Francine was promptly charged with first degree murder and felony murder which brought a maximum sentence of life in prison later. The felony murder charge. I was dropped that November eight months after she lit a match. Our life the MO- sensational trial. In the county's history began thirty years old at the time. Francine seemed soft-spoken nervous her court. Appointed Attorney Aria and Oregon is a former prosecutor. took the case after others refused. He believed francine acted in self defense. Uh Psychiatrists who spoke on her behalf. Testified that something snapped in her that night making her temporarily insane and prompting her to kill her ex-husband husband to Francine's kids took the stand testifying that they witnessed their parents arguing throughout the day. Their father hitting their mother multiple a couple times and threatening her with a knife. They described Mickey's violence as commonplace. The case drew national attention. Attention feminist groups banded together to form the Francine Hughes Defense Committee with hopes of a landmark decision for a new legal interpretation of self defense sense especially as it applied to women. Protesters fill the cement staircase outside the courthouse holding signs touting messages like free francine shoes battered women need support and stop violence against women. After seven days of testimony. The trial ended a jury of ten women and two men took only five hours to come to a unanimous conclusion. They found Francine Moran and Hughes not guilty by reason of temporary insanity meanwhile relatives of Mickey Hughes maintained that Francine and got away with murder leaving the courtroom for City Hall. She and her attorney held a press conference when a reporter asked Francine and seeing if she had ever considered herself a liberated woman she replied. I don't think I've ever been liberated. But I'd like to. After francine team was acquitted. Having spent nine months behind bars. She received a bouquet of roses with an anonymous note that read to a battered rose. which blooms again Dan but not? Everyone felt she deserved blossoming. One of Mickey's brothers sent her a note during her jail time threatening you are next. Newfound fear accompanied her making even simple tasks such as running errands. Daunting readjusting to Motherhood posed challenges to. Oh I thought I was going to have to stay in prison so I blocked off a lot of emotions toward my children. She said it was really hard for me to get close to them again on top of that her kids have been traumatized by their fathers gruesome death. Despite their mixed feelings their daughter Christie who was was twelve at the time of the fire said she spit on his grave and described him as a rotten son of a bitch for awhile. Francine struggled struggled with demons. She hadn't yet processed. She partied and drank heavily attempting to escape her feelings. Finally she realized she had to stop trying to self-destruct if only for the sake of her family gradually they got back on their feet found healing and grew closer. Meanwhile francine cross paths with country. Music singer Robert Wilson. Just six before. Robert had been released on parole bill after serving time for armed robbery during his time behind bars Robert completed a degree in psychology. Maybe they understood something about each other. What a person might do when they're pushed beyond their limits and the desire to make something more of your life thereafter whatever? The reasons there was an instant connection. He asked Francine to dance at an outdoor concert. Then serenaded her friends warned him not to get involved.

francine Mickey Hughes Francine Hughes Defense Commit Francine Moran Christie murder Qena attorney smoke inhalation Robert Wilson Dana rape Nicky Fran Oregon City Hall Dan first degree murder
"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

"Welcome back to murder minutes today. The story of Francine Dancing Hughes unless otherwise noted quotes in this episode derived from reporter faith. McNulty's book the burning bed. Which tells the story Ori Francine's life one infused with pain controversy add rebellion some called her insane others a hero? Suddenly the seemed very simple. Francine recalled I wondered why I hadn't thought of it that way before before I had made a discovery by losing everything I had been set free. There were no chain around my ankles all the things that it seemed seemed important before the House Payments Car Payments Welfare checks leaving my mother and sisters leaving the only place I knew none of those. Those things mattered minutes. After this revelation her family home went up in flames. Francine grew grew up in Jackson Michigan in the nineteen fifties. The town known as the birthplace of the Republican Party and the Coney Island hot dog sits thirty five miles miles from lansing and fosters dense. Urban feel most of the residents owned their homes. Most of the homes hold families born Francey Moran one of four children. Her mother named her after a famous French musician. Her father worked as a farmer. Struggled with alcoholism and routinely abused his wife. FRANCINE'S MOM by age fifteen francine was popular popular among her peers. She had a vivacious personality a flair for comedy a dimpled smile and insecurity that she often mashed with humor on Friday and Saturday nights she and friends would dress up and go out driving or gather somewhere to listen to records on one of those nights she met eighteen year old Mickey Hughes a tall thin man whose apparent confidence and worldliness set him apart from other boys. He's he fell hard for Francine pressuring her to date and have sex with him. She resisted time and again Dan but he kept to showering her with romantic words suggesting he couldn't live without her. No one had ever loved me like that. She said it was is a very powerful thing. A powerful thing. She recalled feeling guilty about as though she must have done something to make him love her soon. She grew tired of fighting his sexual advances one day while sitting in the back seat of his car parked in a cornfield she gave in so it wasn't good. She said it hurts and I felt dry inside. I didn't know what to expect. Not even the basics. I remember feeling of have been used of giving something I really didn't want to give. I did it to please him. Immediately after Francine gene feared she was pregnant she also believed that to remain a good person especially a good woman she would have to marry him after dropping out of high. The school to do so francine found herself in a virtual replay of what she witnessed throughout her childhood. Mickey's abuse started shortly after the couple. WED when he ripped her clothes off for dressing too provocatively. He feared she might attract other men in an interview with people magazine using in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. She said she was shocked because she had never been treated in such a way adding. But what do you do when you're sixteen years old and you had to beg your parents to let you get married at first Mickey seemed remorseful and apologized swearing. He would never do it again she she believed him but it did happen again. When he caught francine looking at a man's hands he flew into a violent rage at the time they were living above his parents who heard the commotion and confronted? Their son. Mickey threatened his dad and his mother phoned the police around Francine's family. Her husband behaved more like a gentleman. The abuse escalated while the family grew you. The couple had four children. Christie James Dana and Nicole mouth difficulty feed given that Mickey spent most of their money on an alcohol at the time. Divorce was taboo and very few people spoke about abuse. In most legal systems worldwide D- domestic violence wouldn't be addressed until the Nineteen Ninety S. There wasn't really even a term for it yet. On top of that such violence was all Francine we knew growing up. It might have been easy to chalk it up to wretched but normal within a marriage even so francine wanted Out a fresh start for herself and her children so with the guidance and support of a local social worker. She filed for divorce so once it was granted Mickey ignored the fact continuing to show up whenever he wished and beating Francine over the course of several weeks then a serious car accident nearly took his life leaving him with multiple fractures and a head injury when he woke up from coma. He immediately immediately asked for Francine Feeling Awash with guilt. She visited her ex-husband then took him into her home to care for him as he recovered. I really felt trapped after his accident. She later told press. I don't know why I felt so obligated to that man but I did then the real how began. Once he had recuperated Mickey stayed in the home and refuse to seek employment. He started drinking more heavily and beat Francine every few days sometimes for a few minutes sometimes for hours before leaving for bar peaceful days weren't the only sparse but overshadowed with fear that he would strike her at any moment moments that inevitably came if she fought back he grew angrier and more violence in her darkest hours francine considered suicide but if she killed herself she worried who would care for the kids. She conjured up multiple plans of escape most ending with visions of her and the children having nowhere to go and terror that that if they fled he would find them and the violence would intensify six years after the divorce. In early March of one thousand nine hundred ninety seven Francine it was more than halfway through secretarial school which she had pursued with support from her mother she prayed that stamina and luck would help her make it through the rest with each day. It seemed more difficult to drive to school and stay up late finishing homework while Mickey chastised and tormented her she later described feelings of everything building up. Though she was falling behind academically she worked hard on a paper on the topic. What I know? Oh about myself now. Delving deep into her inner longings at the papers and she wrote it is hard for me to make changes in my life it is easier to leave. Things are and not disturb anything. I know I should disturb things more. I know that I am capable of much more than I have been doing. And I was waiting for something good or someone to happen to me now. I know that nothing ever happens from luck and that you have to make things happen. The morning of March ninth. Francine woke up early sipped coffee and read her term paper over with a sense that she had left a great deal and said then she left for school noticing a sense of spring in the air between that and.

Ori Francine Francine Dancing Hughes Mickey Francine gene murder McNulty reporter Coney Island Francey Moran Republican Party lansing Nineteen Ninety Dan Jackson Michigan Christie James Dana Nicole
"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Murder Minute

"Welcome to murder minutes today. The story of Francine Hughes but I your true crime headlines. A California was sentenced last week for the two thousand eighteen stabbing death of his supervisor manager at the Domino's pizza where they both worked thirty. Two year olds. Rafael Sanchez will serve twenty six years to to life in prison for the attack. which claimed the life of assistant manager Daniel Anthony Sanchez the victim? Who is not related to his attacker? Hacker was a twenty one year old college student who hoped to become an English teacher someday according to a news release from the La County District Attorney. Rafael Sanchez snuck up behind his supervisor and stabbed him in the neck and back after having been told to do his work. His victim was rushed to to a nearby hospital where he was pronounced dead speaking to reporters after the sentencing. The victim's family announced that they had filed suit against Domino's Domino's pizza and the owner of the franchise. They alleged that Rafael Sanchez was a problem employee at a different store and should have been fired instead of transfer to the La Puente location where the murder took place the suit also alleges that the general manager of the franchise knew that Sanchez had threatened and harassed other employees royalties but took no action in Philadelphia. A seventeen year old boy is in custody charged with two murders I including the stabbing death of his foster mother and the beating and stabbing of a twenty year old man who lived with him in a previous foster home. Police believed that robbery was the motive in both killings in charging documents police accuse seventeen year old Xavier Johnson Johnson of stabbing his foster mother sixty four year old renege yard to death in her home. Geared was the mother of two grown sons. He's one of them a Philadelphia police officer and had been a foster parent for twenty years. Johnson had only been her care for a short time and called called police the night before her murder. After Johnson missed curfew and broke into her locked house she told the responding officer that Johnson could stay with her that night but that that she could contact the foster agency next day to have him placed in a different home. Police believe that Johnson murdered the woman sometime early. The next morning after relatives were unable to reach her. Police paid another visit to gi yards home where they found her stabbed to death in her bathtub. Bloody footprints lead to a bedroom where her purse had been emptied onto a bed as police search for geared stolen car exhaust. You're Johnson. Hang out with friends. He's tried to buy weed and went on a shopping spree with keywords debit card. When police found him he attempted to flee before crashing? The stolen car yards. Debit card was found in his pocket at the time of his arrest. Johnson is also accused of the beating and stabbing death of twenty year old. Jimmy Jimmy Mao whose body was found in a Duffel bag at the bottom of a ravine and West Philadelphia. Police believe that Mao was killed sometime before yard a yard though. They were not sure when they're also investigating Johnson's potential involvement in the disappearance of sixteen year old Jacob Merit Rich Berg an acquaintance of mouths who has been missing for a week. A South Carolina woman pleaded guilty to charges that caused her husband's death by poisoning. His water with eyedrops fifty two year. Old Lana Clayton pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter. Ladder and tampering with human food. In the death of her husband Stephen Clayton who died in their home in two thousand eighteen at the time of his death. Lana told investigators that. Her husband had been suffering from Vertigo for the past few days and that she found him face down in the foyer when she came inside for mowing the lawn post mortem examinations determined high levels of Tetra. Hydro xylene and Stephen Clayton System. which led investigators to determine that he had been poisoned after her arrest? Lana Clayton confessed to police that she had been poisoning. Her husband's water with eyedrops. She was sentenced to to twenty five years in prison..

Xavier Johnson Johnson Daniel Anthony Sanchez Lana Clayton murder Philadelphia Domino Stephen Clayton supervisor Francine Hughes officer Jimmy Jimmy Mao Stephen Clayton System. assistant manager La County District Attorney California La Puente Vertigo South Carolina
"francine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Francine look what according to the World Economic Forum global inequality is going to worsen unless governments do more to ensure those most affected by rapid technological technological change arms just cast aside and forgotten we're doing is now with more on this report suggests a heating a world economic forum's managing director our government's taking on board the fact for social mobility is it re training what did you learn there is possibly the threat of rising income inequality and I think we're starting to see that that's being perceived around the world so we try to find out is one of the pathways to social mobility how do we actually get our economy's going again in a way that provides people opportunity and so we can start closing the income inequality gap we need to ensure that people have better health care education we need to ensure that people have better education what what has become really critical in today's economy is one we need fair wages to we absolutely need social protection systems given that there will be all of this technological destruction and frankly also destruction due to climate change in industry transitions we also need lifelong learning mechanisms and that is something that has become a non negotiable in the current economy we absolutely need that to change because if not it doesn't matter if we do the investments in primary secondary and university education for the three billion people that are already part of the world's workforce the need lifelong learning and then finally working conditions those have to change to hear more interviews like this one on Bloomberg television streaming live on Bloomberg dot com and on the Bloomberg mobile or check your local cable listings everyone from the World Economic Forum in Davos on Bloomberg radio Bloomberg television thrilled you're where this time came with John as always John I want to take a look back twelve months yeah we were shell shocked from Q. four of two thousand eighteen and then the fed came out and if I came out hard three rate cuts and now we have the big debate as to whether they're doing two way as to whether the note doing key way by alternately the end result was a market that is much much higher than when I was twelve months it was in the market for the lead Sir can we say there was a distributor effect on everyone and for the last ten years invest it in assets great you're doing okay if you know he missed out on this it's been extraordinary the turn here this year and I'm really must say do do you would you suggest to the two days three days we've been here that there's really not much focus on the markets have to stop us I don't feel that now but I think they should pay I'm waiting to think they should pay we have got a market now to an eighteen nineteen time for multiple in the United States credit spreads a very very tight still doubts about the economy in the coming twelve months in front and center one Baker of support it's a central bank of the veterans of tell we will see you started here on a a good service to the store and then move on to good conversation Lawrence Kudlow is scheduled to be with us here in a minute right now New York City is always Lisa brown was Lisa good morning good morning a Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell planning a tight time line in president trump's impeachment trial is getting under way today McConnell give house managers just two days were that their case against the president has proposed rules also allow the president's team to seek a quick dismissal of the charges still many Republicans say they should at least hear the case there's a truce the dispute between the US and France on digital taxes a French diplomat says that means the the president trump nor present macro will impose punitive tariffs this year the battle was over a French tax that hit American internet giants such as Google apple and Amazon meanwhile over in China the outbreak of a deadly virus has now gotten worse at least six people have died in multiple health workers have been infected that's a sign of the disease is more easily transmitted than previously thought here's British researcher Derek gatherer we were losing from a position where we thought that perhaps this fight is wasn't readily transmissible from person to person to position where we knows knows that it is transmissible and and in reasonable numbers as well the China viruses reminiscent of sars the pandemic that killed eight hundred people in Asia seventeen years ago the bank of Japan is taking a brighter view of the economy the central bank reduced its growth projections for the first time in a year and left its main policy settings on change as a further indication the bank of Japan is unlikely to add to its dimly surveillance global news twenty four hours a day on Erin on quick take by Bloomberg powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than a hundred and twenty countries I'm Lisa brown whites this is Bloomberg back to the piano bar over in Dagestan a laser thank you very much that's why Tom will be not made at least to get it right this year stand back in the old flawed fleur did this right she's the writers here's the list was I need to address just a little bit of did a little bit like mark it's very warm as well the next guest with us some place the site the south African central bank governor said check can Iago joins us now is next to Tom and I here in Davos Switzerland got a great to see you good to see you I want to talk about the reserve bank a sense of south after just a moment I want to begin with your role as the chairman of that policy advisory committee to the I. math for the money to bring together those finance ministers the central bank is as well any concerns about financial stability right now looking at wet markets all worldwide well the issues about global financial stability as some of the stuff we we discussed that to our to vote off to a meeting but in other forums these things are coming through and among those things that I in a dollar denominated debt in the emerging markets and some of which have come from a from the company and it also has to do with the fact of that money to put the thing that bothers the economy became southern watch that people expected it to the to to to to be and there might be some changing on a cheap at Donna debt and you just all time highs and doctors tended to be a on the fed with respect to find his house to be defending without is waiting for the financial stability the the perspective that thought among the issue was it come through they have been able to get a wee with coven and lights a at dead and at some point or the other the album to experience husbands and dot there could be a set of a of a lot of the sub governor many people listening to this taking a look at this into the moment will be sitting here thinking well that's the role of the central bankers estimate that fold but we have the situation financial markets right now is a situation we're talking about for a long time I'm wondering what the policy prescription is what is it well it depends on where the focus is on at the moment of the full house amongst as something of a beautiful house on what we called the home of the financial system which is and that that did not component of the financial system that what he had to buy did you buy the regulation for yeah and without a doubt that one end of the global financial assistance it's one easy and fun we had seen in the run up to two thousand eight and what should I do it looks like a TV to had moved elsewhere add to the benefits and that is where the sort of concerns and concerns would be well the point here is that today to move on with their hands off the national authorities whether the federal bench all of the treasury and not as a group I live in these things have been amazed at eighty that and when you look at the different countries you may find the different countries face different challenges than you would find a lot in the discussions of the I. M. F. C. we tend to think that those companies that are facing the following situation must do the for those with space must utilize the bait the space of those without the space must actually thought from the office of consolidation governors of raging debate among the developed nations of course within the United States and other major central banks about the efficacy of monetary policy give us an update within South Africa we're moving rates.

Francine
Man whose info found on Jersey shooter nabbed on gun charge

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Man whose info found on Jersey shooter nabbed on gun charge

"When the authorities partisan went battle to a meta lines are Hadi's hardening pawn as Washington shop in New Jersey braces he for this admitted week's owning expected weapons house but denied vote to they impeach were there president a search trump of a shop Democrats at home turned are defending up three the necessity A. R. fifteen of impeachment style assault even rifles if president trump three is not hand removed guns from a shot office gun while and Republicans more than four are denouncing hundred rounds the of ammunition integrity of the process including hollow point senator bullets Ted Cruz so far tells he's A. not B. C.'s been charged this week with supplying I think any this of is the the killers beginning five of the guns end the FBI for is their investigating show trial the shooting that we've seen as domestic in the house terrorism I think it's going to come saying to the Senate David Anderson we're gonna have and fair Francine proceedings Graham and who then died and at then the it's scene not going hated anywhere using because cops the facts three aren't people there in the but Jewish Senate marker minority were leader killed Chuck while Schumer the police is officer raising doubts was shot nearby after Senate Majority and delivery Leader Mitch driver McConnell found told dead fox in a car news trunk last week may also he was be working a victim as one with the I'm White Julie House Walker and there's zero chance the president will be removed from office so far McConnell has not come to me and I'm worried that we won't get a fair trial where all the facts and all the truth comes out the house plans to vote Wednesday on two articles of impeachment abuse of power and obstruction of Congress Ben Thomas Washington

FOX Officer Schumer Jewish Senate Francine Senate Senator New Jersey Washington Ben Thomas Washington White Julie House Walker Hadi Mitch Driver Mcconnell Senate Majority Chuck Graham David Anderson FBI B. C.
Jersey City shooting victims and suspects identified

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

04:07 min | 1 year ago

Jersey City shooting victims and suspects identified

"Curious about what happened in Jersey city very sad to see thousands though who did come out to honor the dead the orthodox Jewish community just they came out in droves and Bravo for them not a surprise because what you had here for these funeral services for the two victims of the the shooting you had a thirty two year old who owned the store and you had her cousin more you should Deutsche just twenty four also in the middle of that and they were honored by the people in the orthodox enclave in Orange County New York for one came out then you know what so many said was they were young couple they were dedicated to what they were doing they were people who were moved to Jersey city to have a place they wanted people there to have a place to shop for groceries and the community love them whether they were Jewish or anything else they just were well liked people doing their best and were they targeted because they were part of this community you heard what the president said anti semitism except for a and today was talking to somebody in in New York and they were talking about the the shooters and they said to me that you know one of the shooters left behind a note and they were two people who a man and a woman who were together were partners they lived in a van so one of the one of the nose with a note that was found in the then the two suspects who are dead I David Anderson and Francine Graham one of one of the note said this that I do this because my creator makes me do this and I hate he hates that's what the note said and the the message was found inside the stolen U. haul van that they were living in and they drove to this kosher supermarket with a gun down three people and they were identified as something called black Hebrew Israelites it's a French nadie religious movement not associated with mainstream Judaism that's been labeled a hate group by experts who track extremist we know this is a big target for the F. B. I. any kind of homegrown extremist in the US so Anderson had posted anti Jewish anti cop messages to social media before the attack and then it all unravels very sad juice of seals the Braves Jersey city detective who simply was going to question them about the the you all they were in he was going toward them to question about that and then they shot him in the head and of course is the father of five children and and then everything just unraveled from from there and Jersey city is trying to pull together and are trying to bring the community together and it's just an atrocity in a tragedy beyond not belief but beyond the boundaries of what is is acceptable certainly in in humanity and so these people targeted them for only one reason and these were people that were beloved people who were friends to people no matter who they were whether they were black Asian white whatever whatever religion they were they didn't care about the labels they were young couple they were trying to do something and they were trying to do it right and for that effort they get murders so and there's no there's nobody to fry for the crime must put it that way they were gunned down but that's it and their message of hate lives on and other people of course are passing that on very very

Jersey City Thirty Two Year
Amid criticism, Trump signs order targeting anti-Semitism at universities

Nightside with Dan Rea

08:47 min | 1 year ago

Amid criticism, Trump signs order targeting anti-Semitism at universities

"President trump signed a an executive order which I'm going to get to in a moment it deals with anti semitism and a radic kidding anti semitism here in the United States of America it comes a day after a horrific crime in Jersey city for those of you who have not heard about this crime in Jersey city apparently there was a couple of individuals whose van was suspected in the US what turned out to be a murder over the weekend of an individual and yesterday a New Jersey a Jersey city police officer I spotted what he thought might have been the van that was wanted for questioning that they wanted to people who own the V. and obviously for questioning in connection with this well this police officer early yesterday morning approached the band the band was in a cemetery and the the police officer who had been on the force for fifteen years detective Joseph seals a veteran and a father of five was assassinated by these two individuals these two individuals that allegedly rolled one mile very deliberately and stopped outside a on a store that would be described as a kosher store a store that essentially a kosher supermarket and allegedly David Anderson forty seven and Francine Graham fifty with long rifles started firing into the store killing three people of the three individuals have been identified as the woman who co owned a store window for hunts who I believe is Jewish a twenty four year old medical student moisture Deutsch in Miguel Douglas who worked at the store of the individuals it wild shoot out in all of this and finally the the Jersey city police department for a road a drove a a of an army truck into the store and it would appear that the two suspects kill them kill themselves we'll figure that out that will be figured out so essentially there are five people will six including the police officer who are dead two of whom were the assailants the suspicion is that the individuals who attacked this store because it happen to be a kosher supermarket we believe are connected to what's called the black Hebrew Israelite movement for those of you who don't know what the black Hebrew Israelite movement it is a is an anti semitic organization and I at last we last heard about the mystery member last January when the group of high school students from Kentucky got into the what was called a confrontation but it really wasn't with the native American gentleman if you saw what led up to that there were these some members of this black Hebrew Israelite movement who were protesting apparently on the a mall in Washington the a students from Kentucky wearing the mega hats would been there for a right to life rally were verbally assaulted by the black Hebrew Israelite movement is pretty disgusting what was said and I am not at all convinced that the native American gentleman who also became embroiled in this did not try to introduce himself into this situation to defuse it but suffice it to say this group in the black Hebrew Israelites despite the name has been characterized as a hate group and is published anti semitic post online and this is serious stuff I mean in this country for a long long time anti semitism virulent anti semitism was limited to the far right the American **** party party there was a there was some real black jobs in the in the fifties in this country and the sixties instill some today by the way on the far right but a lot of the anti semitism has been the pastor sized as moved to the left so today the president siding if I semitism on college campuses are there is this program on college campuses now that you're maybe of heard of it's a program that is beyond college campus called boycott divestment and sanctions I which is intended attended according to CNN to end international support for Israel's oppression of Palestine's Palestinians and boycott Israel for its activities in the west bank and Gaza this global movement is gain traction some college campuses across the US which criticized has led to Jewish students being targeted this reading now from the CNN report trump's executive order would trigger a portion of the federal Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four that requires educational institutions colleges and universities who receive which receive federal funding to not discriminate based on national origin according to senior administration officials the department of education can withhold federal funding from any college or educational programs that discriminate based on race color or national origin it does not say religion this is according to the Civil Rights Act from nineteen sixty four religion is not covered in that law so the administration now is attempting to interpret Judaism as a nationality in order to potentially punish universities for violations of Muslim Hindu and skins to a six students are also protected from discrimination under title six based on the shared ancestry and ethnic characteristics now there the president's receiving it's a sort of it an interesting reaction a John of the green black who is the CEO of the anti defamation league says this reaffirms protections of Jewish people without infringing on first amendment rights there are others on on the other side here of these the Simon Wiesenthal center is supportive of this Israel's foreign minister Israel cats welcome the upcoming announcement called on other countries to follow the trump administration's lead they said the Simon Wiesenthal center said this is a good idea it sends a global message at a time of surging anti semitism on both sides of the Atlantic meanwhile the president of Jay street was which is regressive Jewish advocacy group for that matter it's considered progressive Jewish lobby argue the executive order was designed to have a chilling effect on free speech and a crackdown on campus critics of Israel rather than fight anti semitism well his statement this fellow statement Jeremy Ben I mean up on me we feel it's misguided and harmful for the White House to unilaterally declare a broad range of non violent campus criticism of Israel to be anti semitic especially the time with the prime driver of anti semitism in this country is the xenophobic white nationalist bar right well I disagree with that my question is this the president in signing this executive order do the right thing or the wrong thing I think Donald Trump did the right thing and I think that our moderate to conservative Jewish organizations Alan Dershowitz with at the White House today for that ceremony see it that way so called progressive Jewish organizations apparently they're seeing it differently I am someone who is very concerned about free speech on college campuses but I also want to make sure that the Jewish students are protected on American college campuses for that matter college campuses around the world and this boycott movement the boycott divestment and sanctions movement is nothing more that a cover group for a progressives for progressives a particularly those in the Democratic Party to undermine undermine the state of Israel which is our greatest ally in the Middle East six one seven two five four ten thirty triple eight nine two nine ten thirty we'll open the phone lines up right now whatever your point of view is on this one let's

Donald Trump President Trump Executive Twenty Four Year Fifteen Years
"francine" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"francine" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Ninety three FM dot com we're talking socialism communism fascism forms forms a government with Francine hard way here most of us I think have been the most of these places I want to run through kind of a litany of of countries and again the principal was it's I don't care what they call themselves what are they probably the most communist of all these countries in the world right now is probably Cuba and still it was right in bowling I think to a history and if the castros have had you know kind of control haven't wanted to let go and their face in okay such as I know you talked about this before on a show but just go through some of the issues people think communism doesn't have that Cubans do have or the Cuba coming well they do have hello they have three thinks there's three things that everybody gets handed it despite that is a poor country everybody gets healthcare and the life expectancy is higher than ours now I think that's not all health care I think they have healthier lifestyle to but everybody gets healthcare number to every nobody stars everybody gets food ration is meager and you're not gonna win eight rice and beans alt rock rice and beans and one chicken among okay you can you could you could sell the chicken on the black market exactly and pretty much housing and education so the bait you sort of your basics are met in a minimal sense and I do mean I do mean minimal after that the people who do okay are in are not in the communist but there is this burgeoning I wouldn't call it capitalist in the sense of big capital but there is this free market economy was small stuff small restaurants Airbnb Abby's one of the sad things the education system I think I mentioned kids in the school or saying I don't want to study did a doctor and all that I want to make some money and be it that would be a cab driver our tour guide because a cab drivers make more money than the doctors a lot a lot now or more than the doctors make as a doctor they can sell art or do other things on the side but that their government salaries for everything are minimal and then there's this whole private economy of Latin America okay so that's in some ways like China China purports to still be a communist country what I think the difference it the difference is human rights human rights China has fewer human rights maybe because the government is just more efficient I think that's probably a bigger and more sent for me I mean they have a control over technological media and things like that they they're technologically savvy I don't I don't think either scores very high and human rights aspiration only okay but but I think the difference that I see in in in in China is you can have a large enterprise in China you can't in Cuba but if you have a large enterprise you better cut the government in on the action and then you can become big you can have the the you know some of these big so I wonder if Jack mama didn't cut the governor I think he did and I think you want to because by cutting the government in on the action you kind of insure your own success and so so there is there is absolute private stuff with major government you know people getting paid off basically well that's how people like Putin get rich yeah well there there's another case I I think the Russian system is not I think the Russian system is based on the fact in the nineteen eighties the American television show Dallas was big and all the all the Russian bureaucrats looked at that and said I want to be J. R. right and that's what they they produced a a form of dirty capitalism that is kind of the caricature of our capitalist system you know so so there really are no pure you know there really are no pure communist countries you know that the exception that I think is is a silly example right now is that as well that's what everyone keeps saying and it is that you know it is a meme I haven't been there so okay it's awful it's awful there there there's the economy is a shambles it but but but people people to quit that was socialism then I want to give you in that case owns the means of production that's just I think the state does okay but but but here it looked at the I think that's a horrible analogy that's it Hey number one character it is an authoritarian system where everything is top down and that is about as relevant to a discussion of American politics as you can say to their to the right you can say listen I got the perfect state for you very very low government lots of guns duct that is the nation of Somalia okay all right that that's about as relevant if you want to talk about it any country that has democratic traditions and you want to talk about whether or not so sh degrees of social and I think we're talking matters of degree here right the analogy is western Europe because they are like us in other respects they have democratic traditions as do we and then you kind of negotiate within a kind of a gradient range how much government do you want in what area and they're a little further along that scale than we are yeah but you again everyone thinks that in for instance you know Germany of because it's in western Europe or France because it's in western Europe there is no entrepreneurship the one thing I do know about around the world is entrepreneurship which is probably why I've never been to Venice with that you know there's entrepreneurship practically everywhere in the world and it somehow doesn't seem to matter who owns the means of production or whether the the country calls itself socialist or communist there is opportunity for people who are willing to take risk and some of the biggest opportunity for people who are taking it who are willing to take risk is in China or Russia this suppose it communist countries I mean all I'm trying to do here is way out the fact that what we say and what actually exists are often not the same words were clouded by what people call things that's exactly what I want to pursue the western Europe analogy when we return we think tank because I think that's the most relevant for what us in that it is the country that is most like us in most respect in the region yeah the whole entire region of western Europe will return Francine heart away talking socialism and the thing.

Francine
Japan exports fall for 10th straight month in September

BTV Simulcast

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Japan exports fall for 10th straight month in September

"We did have some dismal export data out of both South Korea and Japan earlier this morning is our two economies firmly caught in the U. S. China trade for cross hairs south Korea's exports during the first twenty days of this month falling twenty percent manis from year earlier Japan's exports for all of September drop for a tenth straight month by five point two percent does not bolster Christine Lagarde assertion that trumps trade policies have debt it damage the world economy that's what we'll be discussing later on in the show only mountainous absolutely and if we are fed back of what mark Carney said to Francine a in this state somebody the I'm and we are in a precarious position I was built up over a number all for months

South Korea Japan Mark Carney Francine China Christine Lagarde Twenty Percent Twenty Days Two Percent
Pregnancy & Childbirth: Then and Now

Babes and Babies

06:11 min | 1 year ago

Pregnancy & Childbirth: Then and Now

"Mom we were talking about compiled birth earlier and first of all i feel like if i run a marathon i can have a kid yes but also we're talking about how when she had her first two kids the guy's really weren't in the room and with the second to my dad was but i too you're alone and i can't imagine being alone during the yeah well nineteen seventy two dads weren't allowed in the room at all so i mean they could come in and out while you're in labor probably but they weren't in there for the delivery at all know that is so crazy and you can tell what the baby was is there anything like that either you didn't know you had the baby really they could guess just by a heartbeat may be or something you know but no there was snow accurate way of knowing i cannot imagine not having a support team in the room with me they're also wasn't like sonograms sounds like that we could see the baby actually with your brother my first pregnancy i was so big they thought it was possibly having twins and so and so but there wasn't they couldn't do a like a ultrasound or anything so they actually did an x ray during i was about seven and a half months long they did an x ray and they said there's only one there but it's gonna be a big big baby oh that's so interesting did you ever think with me i guess where i'm at in my life they've you know don't i are going to start trying to conceive soon and i mean did you think i'd be as hesitant it has i have been no not at all i'm very surprised light he thinks that is well i told you before i think you and your sister crane kind of switch place says i figured you'd be the one married not too long out of high school and have a family you would have had few kids by now but kerlin and i figured she'd be the one that would have a business or you know beyond that pat pathway or whatever but you were in any series relationship and so you travelled and everything and the lord brought somebody in do curran's life that was perfect for her and she got married at twenty one and has four kids so in total opposites yeah yeah well and i i honestly thought that right when i got married that soon after i mean don't get me wrong i do have baby fever like i'm excited to be a mom i think that there's just some fears surrounding some things and i also have to accept that you're never gonna be fully perfect or fully ready and even with diving into my health stuff that i'm working through like you can't wait till every test comes back one hundred percent clear no that you're one hundred percent healthy because we're always kind of going to be dealing with stuff yeah i mean you're never gonna have one hundred percent on anything whether it's waiting to get married waiting to have a baby have all your ducks in a row for whatever because there's just never going to happen that's not life right generals so yeah we're all waiting francine ir it'll it'll happen for sure i mean maybe i actually don't yeah no that that's true so we will try for sure okay unless god takes those down a different path and we've talked about those options and what we would do when if we ever come to that bridge as well so you will most likely have a grandchild whether it's biological or adopted into family but yeah i don't know i haven't really talked since i like doing podcasts solo and not having a co host i really don't talk that much about the journey that i'm on as far as wanting to have a baby or getting into that place emotionally physically and finishing the half marathon was on my bucket list to do before i started so now it's like okay what excuse do you have next no i mean it's there's been a lot more that has gone into it and i have talked a lot on the long haul podcast more in depth where we're at with it in behind it and how you know we're we're definitely i'm more ready now than i was even a couple of weeks ago um and i think a part of that too has been just working through some stuff in my life one thing for me was i don't want to bring any bitterness or anger or feeling things that i may be harboring into that next phase of my life right so going to therapy and working through some heartache that i've had has been big for me to be open i guess to that right because i think that that's super important to at least for me it was like okay i'm still dealing with these emotional triggers i don't wanna bring not into pregnancy yeah like trying to conceive and that and then ah getting pregnant put so much stress on your body like whether it's easy for you or not like being pregnant is stressful on your body your baby taking so many nutrients from you and you are fueling another life and your body is working so hard to keep your baby healthy and you the-they and you know so i just wanted to be mentally healthy right and that's important yeah going into that so now i feel like i finally getting into a mentally stable not that i was like unstable but just being great as you through and then the growth that you get from going through painful experiences right and it's yeah it's important for pregnancy but it's important just for you

One Hundred Percent
Rising dollar knocks pound and euro

Bloomberg Surveillance

10:16 min | 2 years ago

Rising dollar knocks pound and euro

"Can use a single sentence you need to know I continue to think that cutting is not necessary in may prove to be a mistake as time goes by will speak to that strategist here in a moment Mr just a vote of alliance burns dean opposed to what we saw yesterday I love it the economist Francine request said she said it was a bizarre meeting and that really captured what John and I observed as Michael McKee was in the press conference yesterday the bazaar move John is dollars strange this morning is a key story yeah that is the continuation of the thing from yesterday the shock absorber in G. ten right now is the US dollar euro dollar breaking down to one ten one ten thirty three cable very briefly with one twenty handle one twenty one fifteen and there are now many watching your away from the brick city cable dynamic governor currently speaking now of the bank of England meeting Bloomberg surveillance this morning brunch but cone Resnick checkout business of baseball and original MLB video series exploring the business side of America's pastime visit Cohn Resnick dot com slash MLB corner as a kid visor re assurance tax and we think charisma is well Germany you bring in Gershon here with that fiery first sentence in his research we love having guests on the show let's bring in Goshen distance out alone spends thing co head of fixed income question just what me through your initial reaction to the last twenty four hours your morning jog your morning Tom that was a bizarre bizarre press conference I think I was on your show a couple weeks ago we talked about how you know maybe Alison how higher drugi to do his his press conferences because that guy's a maestro in terms of how we present thing so let it again in the house is not a very polished speaker he was he struggled big time yesterday that the government's messy speak to his intelligence but that he got to consideration but the thing the other two things are the fed is confused here it's just not clear why they're doing what they're doing and the the do you look at that against the backdrop of the longer term issues in the fed there's a lot of debate in the fed now about what is monetary policy supposed to be right does the Phillips curve even work anymore it certainly doesn't appear to work at least in the U. S. right how much are they willing to move in terms of overshooting in either direction how much they care about asset prices these are fundamental questions that haven't been answered so they're trying to make like a cyclical move within a secular confusion as to what they're really trying to accomplish over the long run thank goodness in a mid cycle adjustment what is a mid cycle adjustment made to you with the team at alliance burns thing right now well I had I we get you to think you know it when you look back at the school if all the noise in the market place you look back years from now and of those twenty five basis point either caught or hike really mean much in the real economy it's kind of around the area so it's more psychology than anything and you know it's it's we could see the think if they were going to call it it's going to end up being seventy five a hundred basis points something meaningful obviously not all at once but you know this this twenty five basis points were not for we're going to go I think it what's interesting is that everyone talk about now you know what's the data going to be starting of course with with payrolls tomorrow it's not just the data I think they're looking at it's also the flow of information and and the political scene what's going to happen on trade in the next couple of months what's gonna happen more globally globally political gonna happen the M. countries to go to insulation is one of the great doctrines it we've got the idea of goods disinflation maybe all right goods deflation and we've got service sectors the ability of a higher inflation are you in any kind of a camp that service sector inflation begins to diminish and come down towards the lower goods inflation well I think we're in we've been in a kind of secular change for for how the economy works for a long time that room because inflation and one could argue has been coming down for a very long time pending how you measure it and it's going into into service inflation I think inflation is a very hard thing to measure certainly the by the measures the fed is using it's not high enough and that could be a possible reason why they're trying to do this but again you know it if we don't expect to see major this of this this card is not going to change you know main street economy such that we're gonna see a big change in inflation why they do it is I'm struggling you know I think the best the best reason you can look at is if you look at kind of where the tips market has has really that were break even have gone there gone way down and check it yesterday but no one for the ritual of one point five on the ten year to pick back up to one point six one point seven break even rate and you know that's just that's below what they think the normal level is at a time when the economy is strong so if you think about it that way real rates were let's call it sixty seventy basis points and given how worried they are maybe they thought that was too high that's the best that desperation I can have the other the more cynical explanation as they're responding to the political winds and so you know they don't want to be seen as it I think the the I want to say that the fed ex central banks in general worldwide I think they have a lot more control over cycles but we actually do suggestion what does that mean for the yield curve right now because yesterday we saw some significant planning on Tuesday tens little bit of state Miceli this morning just how you guys position Goshen with that in mind at the moment yeah I think if you look at the you look at the totality of what happened yesterday equities lower the Kerr flatter as you site and the dollar much stronger that's exactly the opposite of what you want to cut rates actually tightening financial conditions so yeah what does it mean I I I I think it's a very hard to predict this in the short term I think investors continued the theme we've been talking about for awhile have to continue to expect lower returns across most asset classes going forward and the other I don't think this in itself changes much within the key is going to be not so much with a cut in September which I think clearly from the press coverage yesterday you have to conclude it's a coin flip because I'm not sure they know what they're going to do but or is this just a mid cycle kind of whatever that means of twenty five basis points or they're going to continue to cut we're gonna go closer to the old town of one to one and a half percent level wondering down Kirsten to a new terminal value a new terminal value for GDP for interest rates maybe the glide path of what the fed does where they have to bring it under two percent inflation target I mean is that really what all this job openings about well okay it's hard to say right consensus has been that rates are too low for a long time and it seems see begin now are saying yeah we're going to be in this apartment able to use one of our competitors for either the new normal wear just you gonna have loads ever heard that phrase me either I don't know that it I don't know how smart those people were but good morning but look at I think you know the we we're we're always so confident in in where we think markets are going to go now we think things in the low forever we really just don't know in the long term and you know it the it was it was less than a year ago less than a year ago we're sitting here how many times the figure the height the ten years on a four percent and now where the other way we should be a little bit humble yet activists the hunch your TV show just the other week it is the only industry where people can be wrong again and again and again and people still want to hear what they have to I remember some big name saying that once we cross three to sixty to sixty five on the ten year treasury that was it for the secular bull market guessing just a final question for you I hear on the grapevine the U. like loans at the moment can you just give me some clarity on that well hi I think that you know people investors bought loans for all the wrong reasons well they thought the yields are going to go up and we are we to bond how long do honestly outperform other forms of credit when when when rates go up and now that rates of man and no one expects rates to go up to a one to one point I mean floating rate debt anymore and that's also wrong in fact there's been some like thirty five straight weeks without flows from that the class that actually has on the way underperformed other parts of credit and there's some more value opportunities there so you know we're yeah we have more loan exposure in our broad funds and we've had in probably a decade this is an excellent person to say so thank you with this you can see him on the real yield it's important property of Bloomberg very soon afternoon maybe even called the real dollar maybe we need a foreign exchange program this week the way things are going good for the strength is well I want to go back to your one ten thirty eight it is really remote and we we've talked enough about it because of the brexit focus and sterling but nobody euro all one nine and your would be extraordinary just allows the last twelve months in the broken at this really tight trading range of in stock in it around one twelve between one twelve one of fourteen I would say for the most of this year Tom and now starting to break out and not with all the weakness with breaking out with all the strength and I don't know how many people were looking for that a month ago got into what they thought would pay anything cycle from the federal reserve shot of the David bloom he just we see in others that have talked of dollar stability in even a dollar strength I'm looking at the first strategist he hasn't tweeted on dollar yet this morning the wealth in Chile well he's he's open about his goods are doing something to Kentucky Senate comes today but we know the press got is still some foreign exchange I I can't imagine again when I look at their the simple D. X. Y. the mathematics of the Bloomberg D. X. Y. is excellent but the it's one ninety eight point eight four is a stronger U. S. dollar this is

John Francine Ten Year Twenty Four Hours Twelve Months Four Percent Two Percent Ten Years
"francine" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"francine" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"I wanted to point seven kiss of it Francine is on the phone but we spoke to were just before jingle ball but her daughter who's going through a tough time got an update from March we met them at jingle ball two first years house he without me on one of two point seven kiss FM did I catch you just what you do Z. without me.

Francine
Working Women: Why The U.S. Is Behind

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:34 min | 2 years ago

Working Women: Why The U.S. Is Behind

"Last week, the indicator was in Atlanta for the big annual conference. It's put on by the American economic association. This is like one of the big biggest meetings of the year for communists. The no not one. The this. Is it just in case? There was any ambiguity. There were thirteen thousand communists, there you could spot the conference goers because they were all rushing around in their suits, and they had named tags around their necks like these red Landers and their complementary eight eight-year conference tote bags and also, you know, you kinda spot them because they were mostly they're mostly men dudes. They were mostly dudes economics has been an overwhelmingly, male occupation. For a long time. Francine Blau is a female economist at Cornell, I got my PHD in the nineteen seventies. And at that time, I think women were getting about seven percent of PHD's economics. And now it's way up there at thirty five percent or something like that. How many years have you been coming to this conference over forty years? Yeah. I look at the crowd. And it looks very mitt mail to me when you look at this crowds. All these people walking around like, what is what is your reaction to it has it changed? Yes. Yes. I mean, it looks so much more female than so I guess it's your standard of reference, but you know, sometimes now there are lines in the female restaurant. Lines for the ladies room in economic indicator all its own side of progress sorts. This is the indicator. I'm Stacey Vanik Smith, and I'm Garcia this year. A lot of the discussions at the conference were about gender and about the metoo movement within economics, but Francine has been studying gender and economics for decades. She's done groundbreaking work on women in the workplace and on the gender pay gap. Klett, Francine says there is this particular economic indicator that's been on her mind lately. It's the female labor participation rate. For instance, says it's been kind of stuck for years now and after decades of leading the pack. The US has started falling behind. Support for NPR and the following message. Come from we work. How do you feel about your office? Is it just a space for your company? Or is it a space to help you grow your company from new HQ's two satellite offices with we work. You can find a space that works for you. Visit we dot co slash space matters. To learn more. Support also comes from NPR sponsor male champ. Male champ does so much more than Email. They've outgrown their name with automation, ad campaigns and audience management mail chimp. It helped your business outgrow its name to not just male male champ. The labor force participation rate. That is the percentage of US adults within a given age group who either have a job or who don't have a job, but are looking for one. So you can break down the labor force participation rate in a bunch of ways, including by gender, and that was what Francine Blau has been doing. So if you take all the women in the US ages twenty five to fifty four the percentage of them who are in the labor force is. Is its best. Seventy five percent that is today's indicator about seventy five percent of women ages twenty five to fifty four in the US are in the labor force the comparable figure for men would be about ninety percent. So ninety percent of men ages twenty five to fifty four are in the labor force. Seventy five percent does represent a huge gain. By the way, back in the nineteen seventies fewer than half of women were in the labor force that number climbed steadily up and up for decades until about the year two thousand but after that, it kind of flattened off for a while we've stopped progressing in the US while other countries have continued to see rising female labor force patient and the US used to have one of the highest female labor force participation rates. And now we have one of the lower ones of the Vance 't economies Denmark, UK, Canada, Australia, all have higher female labor participation rates than the US in that. So. China and Thailand, which lead us to the question. Why the US has obviously a huge economy, and for example, women go to college at higher rates than men go to college. So what is going on? Why is the labor force participation rate for women in the US so much lower than it is for men. Well, there's a lot of reasons, but I'd say the major reason is probably at family family more than eighty percent of women will become mothers at some point in their lives. And when they do they hit a bunch of different obstacles in the workforce the first obstacle being employers discriminate against mothers. It was a fascinating experiment where they sent resumes to employers, and they indicated in the resume that a woman was a parent by saying her extra activity was PTA. Whereas they suggested the woman was not apparent by saying her extra activity was block association. Neighborhood associations, and these were just fake resumes. That were equally qualified people that the ones that the employers believe were mom's got got lower call backs and Francine says this did not happen for men. But Francine says she believes people tend to stereotype what a mother is a mother puts her family first. So she won't be as dedicated to her job. Whereas she says a father is providing for his family. So he will put his job. I in fact, meant and to see their salaries go up after they have children, whereas women tend to see their pay fall relative to women who don't have children. So the end result is that it's harder for mothers to get hired. But once they are hired or if they already have a job when they have a child they face a different kind of discrimination women with kids are less likely to be promoted or to get assigned important projects. This is a specially true for women with advanced degrees in high paying professions like finance, and then there's just a pure home economics of it all the. Thing is child care. Childcare Francine says the US is one of the only developed countries that does not have free care for young children. As a result women will often stay out of the workforce to care for their child. Childcare can be expensive and that cost can wipe out or nearly wipe out any economic benefit. The woman would get from working also men tend to get paid more than women even for the same job. So if there's a man in a woman making this decision together, it often just makes more economic sense for the women to stay home while the man works, then add to that the fact that the woman is likely to be held back from promotions. And bonuses when she does go back to work, and you have a system where a lot of women just choose to stay out of the workforce entirely. For instance, says that to change this the US could try doing what other developed countries have done countries like France, Sweden, Germany in the UK an offer state-funded care for young children. I think these initiatives to provide free public preschool care. Would be very intriguing. So I mean, I care about this issue because I am a woman, but. Is this an important issue economically? We talk a lot about economic growth. But one way we grow is really by bringing more and more people into the paid labor force where they produce items that are counted in gross national product, also if he working within the home, you're producing things about you that aren't counted. So that there's a little trade off there. But basically economic growth is furthered by the entry of people into the labor force. But I think the most fundamental thing is by not fully utilizing all the talents of a major segment of our population. We're not fully realizing, our efficiency and productivity. Francine says this is a specially true in fields where there aren't many women in the first place tech economics where a whole part of the population that could be contributing isn't at least not on the level that it could be. There was women who proceed. It'd me who I look up to. And I think she was entered the field in the nineteen fifties. And she said her husband dropped her off at an an American economic association meetings. And he said Karen, this is this is five thousand men, and you know, I mean, so it's kind of hard to be when I was first coming in. It was very hard for me. I was very small minority, you know, in grad school, and it was very hard. And it just is not hard for me now. Because a lot of the guys are my friends. I don't see them as male or female, see them as friends, and there are just a lot more women than than there used to be. And it looks like there will be more women ages twenty five to thirty four have seen a big jump in labor force participation in the last couple of years. Young men though have actually seen a decline during that period. The indicators produced by Constanza Gardo edited by Patty Hirsch and his a production of NPR.

Francine Blau United States NPR American Economic Association Atlanta Cornell Stacey Vanik Smith UK Karen Klett PTA Garcia Constanza Gardo Vance China France Patty Hirsch
Bank of England Raises Interest Rates Amid Brexit Worries

Politics and Public Policy Today

04:17 min | 3 years ago

Bank of England Raises Interest Rates Amid Brexit Worries

"Home goods retailer would be folded into HSEN Gina Cervetti CCOO in Minneapolis I'm reporting, that a, Chinese hospitality provider, is weighing the bid for Radisson hotel I'm serenity on WBZ 'em in Chicago locally based HR firm. Challenger Gray and Christmas reports announced layoffs were down in July by twenty, seven percent from the previous month for on KOA com got, a ham from mother nature as farmers rebounded from the start Thank you Courtney today the Bank of England raised its benchmark. Rate to the highest level since two thousand nine as governor, Mark Carney played down concerns that Brexit could be a disorderly process just after the decision Carney spoke, with Bloomberg's Francine LA I think important thing is that this is the right. Decision for the economy given the track that it's on their, obviously there's, a wide range, of Brexit outcomes that are possible and we all hope that by the end of the year will. All be much better informed on which the UK and you're taking In a variety of those potential outcomes They would be. Consistent with, rates at their. Current, level if not if not higher certainly there are could be circumstances where, it would make sense to adjust policy but I think we'll all know what the. Circumstances are in the at that point we'll. Take them into account and take? Decisions what did you not say that actually a disorderly Brexit would automatically will. Wait cuts, because it doesn't automatically follow I mean certainly a set, of circumstances like what happened post referendum where the balance of what happened to the future supply of the economy Demand which was more of a business hit a consumer hit if you recall the time and the exchange. Rate the, combination of those things made sense for us to extend, the horizon over which we brought inflation pack the target support the economy To two years, to today I mean I would, say this but it. Does look like the right call we've got inflation, coming back to target we've got a record employment growth we've got real wages starting to grow we're in. We're in a better position But there are circumstances where, the balance of those three factors would be to inflationary for the tolerances. Of the in the end we? Can, stretch the, horizon we can support jobs and activity but up to a limit and we have to make those judgments at at at that time if. There is a hard Brexit are a crashing out toward ugly Brexit what would happen to the markets well I mean the markets will determine it depends how much the markets have. Pulled forward that situation how much, they then -ticipant as with any market event what what I will tell you go directly to our responsibilities more broadly within the Bank is it's our responsibility to anticipate a very bad version of that. Cliff edge, disorderly Brexit what could, happen to the markets how that would affect. UK financial institutions that we supervise and. Regulate and make sure they have. Enough capital enough liquidity there on top. Of the, risk management prepared for it We had done that we did, that with a brutal stress tests last year and they are capitalized for that and I'm gonna be here when it happened so I'm not if it happens I should say Jeez As a consequence of that, year we, have we have the confidence. There the other set of issues relate to cross cutting issues and the derivative markets insurance markets having to do with personal, data And for those we're very. Clear checklist of he needs to do what and where we are in terms of solving would you extend your tenure given. That it looks like that won't be finished by ninety, leave the well the crunch point really is between the crucial period in the negotiations of see between now and. The end of the, year there needs to be parliamentary approvals by the Brexit day the twenty ninth of March and, the most intense set of. Issues around Brexit or in that in that horizon so as I say it'd be here and.

Brexit Mark Carney UK Bank Of England Gina Cervetti Ccoo Hsen Francine La Gray Courtney Bloomberg Minneapolis Chicago Cliff Edge Seven Percent Two Years
Asia, Singapore and Europe discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

02:11 min | 3 years ago

Asia, Singapore and Europe discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

"Asia pacific index retreated at the start of the session g to trade concerns about it's called back some of those previous losses to still try though in negative territory but only marginally so at this stage japanese shares just shutting up shop the nikkei two to five index has dropped into negative territory off by zero point one four percent the hang seng index also off bomas two tenths of one percent investors caused digesting the inclusion of two hundred and thirty four chinese ashares to mci's emerging markets indices over in asia treasuries have been slipping overnight the ten year treasury yields they're trading at two point eight six five percent role so looking of course at the opening of european cash trading when it comes to bonds will bring you any opening price as and when we get it just looking at the dollar this morning building on gains from yesterday the bloomberg dollar spot index higher by more than a tenth of one percent the euro on the back foot trading after one spot sixteen seventy four francine america's some of our top stories and let's start in italy populist parties will sweep to power nataly later today with a spending program that is a direct challenge to european union rules bloomberg's kevin costello has this report from rome career as a professor economics in rome and he has called for a debate on the euro common currency both in italy and in the rest of europe giuseppe kante a law professor will be the prime minister in the new populist government content and his cabinet ministers will be sworn in later today they are expected to challenge some of the key rules of the european union with higher spending and tax cuts in rome kevin castillo bloomberg daybreak europe upheaval to in spain where mariana roy heading for defeat in a vote of no confidence the parliament will vote later friday and opposition parties all joining forces against him the socialists have the backing of two antiestablishment groups and one catalan party another catiline group on the basque nash nationalists are also expected to vote against roy the prime minister says he won't resign now let's cross over to singapore where finnerty from.

Asia Singapore Europe Kevin Castillo Cabinet Rome Nataly Italy Bloomberg Nikkei MCI Finnerty Mariana Roy Spain European Union Prime Minister Professor Giuseppe Kante Kevin Costello