12 Burst results for "Francie Sanderson"

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"A pass away. Really happy, really. You've been listening to Francis carry architect we met some at Coachella this past weekend. This is DNA. And I'm phones his Honda ten now. One of the autists who has been watching Coachella Ziva Lucien with great interest is Philip k Smith the third he was raised in the Coachella valley, and he is seen at ton from a cultural backwater to a stop on the global onset. His own work was featured in the first desert acts in twenty seventeen and twice a Coachella reflection field in fourteen and portals in twenty sixteen. I mean, ultimately the power of Cottrell has two things I think one is to be able to implement a project at an impressive scale. And Secondly, I don't know anywhere else in the world where you can have two hundred and fifty thousand people see your work over the course of six days, and by impressive scale, do you mean kind of an architectural scale? I mean, there's pieces out there this year that are seventy five feet almost. Eighty feet tall. And. It is it is a challenge to build a build. Something of that scale for lotteries is that you've got to build it beforehand. You also need to install all of it in eleven days, not eleven point one days eleven days because those doors open on Friday, but it's an amazing opportunity. Right. Well is Coachella playing in the sort of art design architecture community in the Coachella valley? First of all it is bringing international artists, architects and designers to this desert, which you might say is something that's happened architecturally from as early as a forties and fifties. So in a way, there's kind of a tradition of people that have been working across the globe and choosing to create projects and buildings and design here in the desert. But I think that also there's opportunities for local artists like so fi Enriquez who again is primarily a painter. And now has these five massive sculptures out on the field that she's painted. And and those opportunities don't come along very often. So to be able to prove that you can do that begins to open up doors for the next opportunity and the next opportunity, and I can certainly say wholeheartedly that that has happened for me. Lastly every year when his people say, oh, Coachella. It's just got more and more fancied as expensive restaurants. There's kids from private schools in LA going out that buying that branded Coachella outfits, you know, that it's gone corporatists gone, branded do you feel that? And if not tell those that do have how they should understand Coachella. I think that I think that Coachella is what you make of it. That's the beautiful thing about it. I mean, I I was out there for five or six hours yesterday. And I don't think I for the first time actually ever stopped in any of the tents to actually listen to music. I went around and looked at the art. I looked at the people I ate food. I had a a massive communal experience with one hundred twenty five thousand other people that I do not know, and I had a great time. And that is the excitement that energy of being in a place like that that is about creativity and just about. Humanity gathering to have this kind of positive experience for me. It's a place that I desire and excited to go each year with my wife, Lisa and more than ever. It is just it's beautiful everywhere. It's a bit. I say it's a bit like Manhattan. Now, there's there's there's the great has gone, but that's okay because the grits great, but it's also nice to have some quality food and not to have some old dirty pizza, but to have like some really amazing food and some great drinks and beautifully designed venue with amazing band surrounded by other creative people you make it what you want. You can choose to be annoyed by the reality of people have to pay for this thing, such as corporations, etc. Or you can just go out and just be immersed in that like flora of creativity. That was the artist Philip k Smith, I'm Francie, Sanderson. You've been listening to DNA attache LT produced and edited this program the final mix by Guana special, thanks.

Philip k Smith Honda Francis fi Enriquez Cottrell Guana Manhattan LA Sanderson Lisa eleven days seventy five feet Eighty feet six hours one days six days
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"Fi listening bar the music here isn't played from Spotify or some I tunes playlist. It's all vinyl played through giant analog speakers from nineteen Seventy-three. In other words, no digital noise. We want people to to take a break from this highly digital existence that we're all kind of like navigating through and have arrested where where you can have an analog experience. That's almost meditative Ling is a big time producer manager. So he's glued to his phone twenty four seven he and his consultant slash director of sound Zach Cowie who's well known deejay and music supervisor himself traveled to Japan to visit. It's jazz listening bars or kiss us for inspiration in Japan. Like, you know, they'll they'll just go to these places by themselves almost like a. Church like, a sanctuary or something at each table. There's a sign reminding patrons to talk less and listen, more the bars motto. As I looked around the room. I did see people sitting by themselves or in Paris quietly. Just listening. I talked with a young woman at the bar. It's cool. It's an experience. What's interesting is that they have outlets underneath the bars. Look don't use your phone. The tech policy. Here is not as Conan as old lightning people were laptops and text during the day. But in the evening, they reset the room. And if you're trying to take a Skype call or snap and picks. They're probably going to ask you to leave. Anyone knows me? Like knows that I create safe environments for people to kind of be hanging out without the fear of like Lena part of someone's Instagram story before opening old lightning link created no name on Fairfax. It's a celebrity industry only place with a similar no phone, no photos policy, and it's no surprise that famous. People wanna be off the grid. But with Ling and other owners of cell phone free spaces are tapping into is that regular people are starting to want them to for DNA. I'm Darren Cargill, I'm Francie Sanderson. You're listening to thank you to KCRW's independent producer for check for that stowaway coming up after this break. Do you need a digital detox or is your phone the? Cure for what ails you? This is Casey w good afternoon, as you know,.

Japan producer Spotify Zach Cowie Darren Cargill Ling Francie Sanderson KCRW Cure Casey w Conan Paris supervisor Instagram Lena consultant Fairfax director
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"This is NPR news. And you are listening to KCRW. Prescription drug prices have been going up and today the house is going to look at ways of reining them in some people say part of the problem is a lack of price transparency. But what does that really mean? You'll find out in about ten minutes. Then later today to talk here on KCRW. Hi, I'm Francie Sanderson coming up on DNA, a major public art project promises to honor the Crenshaw district history. Stand defiantly against the threat of gentrification. The project is really to create a space in Los Angeles that celebrates the culture and contribution of the African American community. A Los Angeles has one of the last intact African American communities anywhere west of Chicago and the communities made incredible contributions to the rest of the country and the rest of the world the holiday of Kwanzaa created right here in Los Angeles along the Crenshaw corridor. Soul train the longest running television show on the show that really defi. Fine culture and cool for several generations right here out of the city of Los Angeles. And so many other inventions contributions and movements come out of the city hit from councilman marquees, Harris Tulleson and others about destination. Crenshaw that's today on DNA at two pm light after press play here on KCRW. Well, the Tuesday morning getting off to a rather busy start out there starting out in the Gardena area. South.

Los Angeles Crenshaw corridor Crenshaw Francie Sanderson NPR African American community Harris Tulleson Gardena Chicago ten minutes
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"That one wrong. You're the only one in our office that can do it. So NASA, then twenty-six stayed on the project, and he says he figured out how to build it for a total construction cost of eight hundred sixty five thousand dollars when you visit the project now, you're taken back to that time period, the produce soaring space-age buildings like the TWA, Tom no a- JFK designed by Arizonan and architect. Craig Hodges says well, of course, because there's a direct link, and it turns out that Andrew announcer prior to going to engineering school came from the near east in the Middle East in Europe to the United States with a degree and secured a job in Sarunas office. And that job his parents said, oh, please. Please don't become an architect. You'll never make any. Money become an engineer. So he came out to LA went to Cal tech and thereby opened the door to this project bringing with him influences from Solomon's absolutely big time influences. So he became enamored of the thin shell structural ideology and pursued it here. Now. The interesting thing is we've talked to many engineers out here on the coast by associates on the east coast, and they all say the building this project in today's world is basically impossible because of the codes, and the many many many permitting restrictions. Yes. Exactly. And the risk associated with it. But here was entered Nassar with nothing other this stubby, pencil and a notebook engineering this structure, which went through all the earthquakes out here with no damage whatsoever. We couldn't find any. That was quite hundreds of the architecture firm. Hodgson, fun. He was talking about the newly restored. Well, but false auditory 'em at Culver city high school. I'm Francie Sanderson. You've been listening to DNA attache on see produced an edited this program with final mix by way, wanna special thanks to lower condo Atun. Thank you very much listening. We'll be back next week..

Solomon Hodgson Middle East engineer Francie Sanderson Craig Hodges Culver city high school Arizonan NASA Nassar LA Sarunas Tom United States Europe Andrew eight hundred sixty five thous
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"That's architectural. Then also played into how we could frame this. Nelson Coates production designer on the basis of sex. The film comes out in theaters December twenty fifth, I'm Francie Sanderson. You're listening to DNA. Now, let's head to call the city. I'm the site of an architectural mystery the robot false memorial auditorium at Culver city, high school has long been held it fits futuristic design. It has a dramatic concrete roof in the shape of a splayed fan. It brings to mind the LAX theme building all the swooping TWA terminal JFK airport. The nine hundred sixty four building is even being featured in SCI fi films such as catecholamine sleeper. But there's been a lingering question about this concert hall. How is it unusual? We've built and who designed it. It's like a Cinderella story. Actually, this is the architect Craig Hodges he and his wife and design Pondimin Ming Fung oversaw an extensive. We. Model of the theater. Well, what we did was to transform it. From a kind of white elephants space into a very very dynamic full-on performing arts space. So we're very very excited because potential displays for small groups in their blackbox space, and then very large performances in the twelve hundred seat auditorium is spectacular. We were very puzzled about who could have possibly designed to structure because it's amazing and kind of one of a kind on maybe in the United States, but certainly on the west coast, and there's nothing even appropriate. We speculated that it was some young Turk who'd come from elsewhere and just had his way with the thing turns out, that's the truth. Was a structural engineer who was working for company in Pasadena when he was discovered by the architect for this building and asked to help out with it and what he devised is this incredible thin shell structure. It's like an egg. It's very very very thin, but very strong. It's an egg. That's then folded like a fan. That's very good analogy that works, and it covers twelve hundred seats within the auditorium. And it's only four inches thick so relatively. It's like a piece of paper folded over the auditorium. But this young Turk devised a very careful way to build it. Yes in his name is Andrew Nassir and in looking for a way to build it. He said, well, if we make a big hill out of earth that's shaped precisely for the engineering requirements, and then we cover it with concrete. Then we let it dry, and we put another layer of concrete and another layer of concrete country and just lift them off. Then position them around a post. You've got the entire roof of the structure, and that's what he did sounds easy. But we've got Julia Shulman photographs of the process with these guys, you know, on wooden ladders and with their trials and stuff. It's very very exciting, and the unusual or strange part of this story is he then went out of the limelight completely. The architects never gave him the time of day. In fact, NASA went on to have to career he designed experimental structures for aircraft maintenance, he developed a tunneling method and in the nineteen seventies. He became structural engineer for L A's, beloved architect. John Lautner NASA still works on the sheets Goldstein residents. But as well in the Culver city high school auditorium was forgotten. And he says because of a dispute over credit between the young Turk engineer and the elderly architect. Ralph Llewellyn in the nearby firm in Pasadena that his engineering firm consulted to NASA told Culver city school district this story. There was something.

Andrew Nassir Turk Culver city high school Culver city engineer Nelson Coates Francie Sanderson John Lautner NASA Pondimin Ming Fung Craig Hodges Culver city school district United States catecholamine Pasadena Julia Shulman Ralph Llewellyn Goldstein L A
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"Just ahead. We'll look at the case of sin Toya Brown. And why the Tennessee supreme court ruled last week that she's an eligible for release for at least fifty one years. Even though she was convicted when she was just sixteen Brown's case may seem extreme. But our next guest says teenagers in the United States are often tried as adults and fortunately in the United States, and every state there is a mechanism in which a young person under the age of eighteen could be prosecuted and sentenced as an adult. There are a number of states in which legislators specifically say that youth who are certain age and who have committed a certain offense are automatically excluded from juvenile court. Meaning they can't go to juvenile court. I they have to go to court morons in Toyo Brown coming up on the takeaway. KCRW with this Tuesday road report. There is a traffic jam in these past two separate crashes have just been moved to the right shoulder on the four or five southbound before sunset, but the damage is done. The lead the brakes on the one on one you'll hit stop before. Mulholland? Forty eight cases them KCRW sponsors include prime video presenting the marvelous MRs Mazel now nominated for three Golden Globes, including best television series, musical or comedy. The full season is available at Amazon dot com slash Mazel. Hi, I'm Francie Sanderson today on DNA this chace show is new bullring musical about the pop diva Cher and her longtime collaborator the costume designer Bob Mackie. I look at Bob as the sort of Raja of rhinestones, the Sultan. I would say of swarovski he really took that old Hollywood variety show or Vegas act, costume and contemporary seventies. That's today at two why top to play here on KCRW. It's the takeaway, I'm tansy Nevada. How does the teenage trafficking victim end up facing more than five decades behind bars? That's the story of sin Toya Brown who's fifty one year sentence. Reignited the debate over the treatment of young women of color in our criminal Justice system. Brown was just sixteen when she shot and killed a forty three year old man who solicited her for sex. She was tried as an adult in Tennessee convicted of murder and sentenced to life behind bars in two thousand and six her legal team challenged that sentences unconstitutional pointing to a twenty twelve supreme court ruling that protects most juvenile's from life sentences without parole, but last week at Tennessee supreme court ruled that Brown won't be eligible for release until she served. Fifty one years. I spoke about Brown's case with Marsha Levick. The chief legal officer at juvenile Law Center, and Jerry Thomas the policy director with the campaign for youth Justice, it is deeply upsetting that it wasn't recognized that she. She was a teenager. She was underage and being solicited for sex, my organization, along with a number of organization truly believe there's no such thing as as a teenage prostitute. This is a this is a a young girl who should not have been solicited in this way. I do believe that she felt it was self defense. If you listen to her her describing the situation, she was she was in fear for her life. She believed that the man had will she knew that he had many guns that he was a sharp shooter in the military, and she believed that he was going to harm her that night. But unfortunately, that belief wasn't really taken into consideration. I feel to the extent that it, and it should have been Marsha. I want to bring you in here, you could give us a sense of the supreme court decision that could provide a backdrop here, and how Brown's legal team has been using that to argue for her release unsuccessfully. Sure. The United States Supreme court in a series of decisions that began in two thousand five and then continued through two thousand sixteen essentially addressed sentencing for children who are being prosecuted and sentenced any adult criminal Justice system and relying on our eighth amendments ban on cruel and unusual punishment. The supreme court not only ban the death penalty, but also banned life without parole sentences for children convicted of homicide in particular mandatory life sentences, and what has happened in the wake of those decisions is that we have seen a kind of I think toying with the decisions mandate in the sense that while courts are not in fact imposing life without parole sentences on many children across the country convicted of homicide, they are imposing virtual life sentences on those individuals, and by that, of course, it's exactly what we see sin Toya's case to impose if. Thirty year sentence on someone a forty year sentence or even higher sixty seventy year sentences on young people as they go into prison. We are dooming them if not necessarily to die in prison. We are creating a scenario where they will likely come out of prison on a stretcher or they will come out of prison with very little quality life experience left for them. Also wanna bring up the issue that I think is is quite obvious in this conversation which is race and gender sin. Toya was a sixteen year old woman of color, and we know from federal data that women girls of color are disciplined more harshly in school. For example. I'm wondering if either of you could give me a sense of how race plays into her case specifically, and the reason why I'm asking this is because I think about more recent rape cases, for example. Jeffrey Epstein, I think about Brock Turner. I think about Jacob Anderson. These are all white men who while. Are not being convicted of murder their sentencing for you know, sex crimes has been quite light to nil. So how does race play into this? It's it's impossible to have any conversation about our Justice system in this country without confronting race and racism, and the the system is largely populated by men and women young women and young men of color, whether they are black or Brown, and that that legacy the legacy of racism slavery, white supremacy in this country has created a system that has.

Toya Brown Tennessee supreme court United States Supreme court Toyo Brown United States Bob Mackie Brown murder KCRW Amazon Tennessee Jeffrey Epstein Jacob Anderson juvenile Law Center Francie Sanderson MRs Mazel tansy Nevada Hollywood Mulholland rape
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"For DNA. I'm Jenny Hamel. And I'm Francie Sanderson Jenny. Thank you so much for that report you now with me in the studio, and we just want to kind of revisit the context for this pearly, and Joe wound up finding a really happy kind of outcome. But can you put this in context for us as a challenge that a lot of seniors facing the not necessarily ending up with quite such great solutions? Yeah. The Los Angeles homeless services authority in their latest homelessness count found that while homelessness generally went down overall, the only age group that experienced a spike, and it was a twenty two percent spike was the senior population. People sixty two years and older. It comes down to one thing the cost of living. You've got seniors who are on fixed. Incomes are getting one social security check every month, and there's a limitation to how much they're bringing in. So when you've got a landlord suddenly saying, hey, I'm going to reach your rent thirty to forty percent. You just physically cannot do it. And you have spoken with some people who fittings. That profile. I've talked to a lot of seniors about this subject. One woman who had gotten breast cancer so fell behind in Herat for a couple of months in apartment. She had lived in for twenty years landlord. Really showed no empathy and she was out, and she was actually signing up to live in shelters, but found another home share situation that she was able to get into south that that was good news for her. But another man who had worked maintenance for the LA zoo all of his life is his wife had early stage Parkinson's and his landlord wanted to completely cut out the building and build something fabulous and new condos for much more affluent people at he was desperately taking the bus on a daily basis going to the HUD office trying to see if there was section eight. And he was hearing things like we have a years long waiting lists. And you also met someone who was pushed to actually get activist about this issue joined a rent strike command then found himself out of his apartment. Tell us about him. Yeah. So. Last week. I met up with Robert Rodriguez eighty two he had just spent his last night in his apartment five days before a sheriff's deputy had shown up at his apartment at seven o'clock in the in the morning knocked on the door gave him and his wife Maria an addiction notice he said over the next twenty four hours. It was the most depressed probably the worst day of his life. Even though he knew it was coming because he had participated in a multiple building wide renter strike, but Rodriguez lost his case. The jury ruled in favor of the landlord in this particular situation. So he knew the eviction notice was coming boils down to the same thing Monday. One. I don't have enough money too old to go out and work drive anymore. Eight year old I'm doing nothing. And when I met with him again last week that night was the first night. He wasn't going to have a home. And he and his wife were going to stay with his sister. And he said beyond that, I don't know. That was KCRW Janney. Hammel, I'm Francie Sanderson. This is DNA and you just heard the fourteenth episode in our series. This is home in LA from the tenth to the Gigamon Shen and everything in between find Paul segments that KCRW dot.

Francie Sanderson Jenny Robert Rodriguez Los Angeles Jenny Hamel KCRW Janney Francie Sanderson breast cancer Gigamon Shen Joe Herat LA Hammel HUD Parkinson Paul Maria twenty two percent twenty four hours sixty two years
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

13:40 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"And specializes in luxury real estate. So basically in the very time that residential space in LA is being designed smaller down to the scale of micro units. It's also gotten bigger in this most recent building, boom, how sizes have been growing and growing to around one hundred thousand square feet. The gigantic has been nicknamed Giga mansions, the very big say around ten to twenty thousand square feet, all simply mega mansions. But I don't know. Of any specific designation of Begum answer the mansion in the eye of the beholder mega mansion to you may be different than a mega mansion to Jeff visas. You know, it's it's it's where you're coming from and where you're going. So who is building these mega mansions who is buying them and living in them and just push back from neighbors mean we're going to be seeing less of them. We are at the Newcastle and Malibu with developer. And designer Scott Gillan. He's showing us around a house that's on the market for eighty five million dollars. And this is the botanical gardens that we've kinda built for ourself, and everything you see plans here is very specific to butterfly. So this is our butterfly habitat. So we can walk down. And I'll show you you. Call your project the Newcastle, which suggests there was an old car was that there was an old castle. And it was destroyed in a fire which destroyed many many homes here in Malibu. Boo. So I bought the property and I've rebuilt it. And now I called it the new castle because it was the old castle before it wasn't really a castle before it was like a paper machine. Fake castle. Wasn't a good castle. Let's say that. But it is a landmark piece of property is what was here before is pretty famous iconic piece of property. The Newcastle is nearly sixteen thousand square feet, including a four thousand square foot guest has it sits on a promontory high above Malibu creek, and it replaces structure that had been owned by the socialite and philanthropist lily Lawrence. She was the daughter of a former Iranian oil minister under the Shah, and she kind of made it. Namesake? So it became icon conic now, it's your property. Do you feel like a king? No, it's just another house. I mean is it just another house because that's what we want to talk about what constitutes house what constitutes home for me. I design homes that are not just a home or not just a house. Let's say and for me, a home is to have a lot of Cuccia Mancini, whether that'd be the media room where the game room where the gym the spa or the office, or you know, in today's world more more people stay home than they. Then they go out Scott, a spectacular view, you wake up to the sunrise, and you go to sleep to the sunset has a great pool is a good environment. Here. It's got a very very good vibe wherever you go. There's a good something great to look at it. And it just feels good. And that's the difference between I think a house in a home. Scott leads us into the house. We find ourselves in a large open space with hand sanded beams and walls of glass. So this is a great room. It's one hundred and twenty one feet long. And what's unique about this space? There is no upright structural post. And it's very difficult to span a large open space like this. So this room might be one day room as you can see there's a kitchen dining room. There's a back Butler's pantry. There's a living room just sitting area. There's an office is a viewing area. So there's multiple uses in this great room. And it's also even though it's large. It's also very intimate the way that it's laid out the way that it's it flows. So you could have people here talking while people are cooking. And maybe people are having our direction, it's still feels very warm and inviting it's not being in the L down the house and this room by itself is close to six thousand square feet. Just one room. We don't do anything normal. I mean, all the teak. You see is we have well over a million dollars in teak just in material alone. And then the labor all this is all handmade. So it's it's more traditional to what you would see in a Frank Lloyd Wright house or several other architects of the. The day today. People just don't go to this extent to do that. Now, what kind of home or house? Do you live in? Well, I live in a house that I built which is an open space home. This is a very large. Go home is is only about six thousand square feet. This is sixteen thousand square feet. I mean, I I could see myself living here. It's a little large for me. Because I've only got one life and one daughter two dogs and a couple of fish and eighteen 'cause this is Scott gillen's twenty-third has he's comedy building the case, which is five homes on a bluff side-tracked next to Malibu colony before. He got his start. In designing luxury has is he spent seventeen years and commercial filmmaking. He says he left that world because of a contract dispute and dissatisfaction with the industry, but that background. He says had a big impact on how he designs his homes. It's all composition to me. So if I'm framing a shot, or I'm framing room, it's the same. It's all composition, I build it. Like, it's in a in a picture every room in this house has of you of the ocean. I answer pretty massive you, plus the whitewater, the sand the bridge surfrider beach. There's a lot of expanse of Matt white wall is that because you kind of enjoy that modernist kind of pare down since -bility or do you anticipate? State people wanting to put a bought, well, here's what happens I build a house that I like, and if somebody wants to come and paint, the walls, they can paint the walls. We don't paint color. We have nineteen different shades of white white linen saffron. We have Navajos. We have Swiss we have many many layers of white, and although it looks white to you. It's not all pure white there. We don't ever paint pure white because pure whites too cold. This is called dub white in this particular room. This is called milk. So we have different layers white. So if you want color, you could tear the tile apart and bring coloring change out your towels and put a nice bathroom rug in here. And it'll give your color pop. Our beds have color art has color, but the basic pounded of the house should be soothing and white tones are soothing. You're listening to develop a building designer Scott gallon now Malibu property has been experiencing its own micro. Boom, we cently earlier this year Malibu home sales were reported to be up thirty six percent over the same period in two thousand seventeen. So who does Gillan think can pay this kind of money who will buy this new Malibu castle? This is more of a free, easy flowing Malibu view, taking sunshine dinner party. You know, professional. This isn't really this is not going to be a celebrity. It's well over price for any celebrity who's it priced four? It'd be a professional money financial person a businessman. It could be a tech guy. I could see a tech guy in here. But I think it's a billionaire. I think it's somebody who has at least a billion dollars of worth there's a bit of a I suppose one could call it a kind of arms race going on right now, it seems in the kind of very large house terrain in LA. You know, this every few weeks, the here's another colossal property. And here's one that's even bigger. Do you feel like you're in competition with the other spec developers of very large houses? No, I don't think. So. Nissim house that are twenty and thirty and forty thousand square feet. I think that's a little big what for you would be the cutoff in terms of size. I don't think it's the size. I think how how the house sits on the property. How it stands how it faces how the entrances done can it become private is it? You know, there's a lot of things to look at is size is not the issue. I wouldn't build a three thousand square foot house on this hill wouldn't be cost effective. We understand that. This was the last project that was permited by the city of Malibu at this scale is that right? And why is it the last? It is the last project that was permitted by the city of Malibu, we have sort of anti Nansen ization code that has stepped in because this was a fire rebuilding. This house burned down approximately eleven years ago. We fell under the old code the new code doesn't allow you to get bigger than nine thousand square feet with an additional one thousand square foot basement. It's the last two it's kind it's an iconic piece of dirt. And it's a it's a very very large home that was Scott gallon. I'm Francis Anderton. You're listening to DNA. So I think virtually every municipality from Malibu Santa Monica to Beverly Hills to Los Angeles is putting limitations on the size of of the house that you can go back to the wheel to Stephen Shapiro now last year, for example, LA city council approved an anti mansion is Asian ordinance. It applied to lots that are less than seventy five hundred square feet. I'm reduced the percentage of that lot. That can be built on to forty five percent down from fifty percent. They use put new limits on homes built on hillsides. Now, this combined with a possible shift in the market might. Right slow the growth of mega mansions. That's according to Stephen Shapiro. I think we're going to have a definitely a correction. We're overdue and the correction should take place in the many speculative houses are being built that are pretty homogeneous. If you take all those houses up in bird streets above sunset, and don't he people are taking small lots with great viewers, and they're getting as much square footage. And they're they're putting you know white boxes on these houses. And they're probably. You know, twelve to twenty of those houses that are under construction. Now, they're all gonna come on within a similar period of time. And there aren't that many buyers for those houses, so the developers will have to to relook. What they expect to make at the end of the day. We're also starting to see as two thousand eighteen to ends and the new tax law actually takes place when you start to file your taxes, and all of a sudden in the high end, if you're buying a twenty million dollar house today, your property taxes are going to be two hundred and seventy five thousand up until this year, you were able to write that two hundred seventy five thousand off your federal income tax. Now, you can only write off ten thousand. In addition. We've always been able to write off are exaggerated state of California thirteen point three percent tax, and we can't do that. So it's going to require a lot more spendable income to carry the same house than it was before. That was Stephen Shapiro of Westside estate agency. I'm Francie Sanderson. You're listening to DNA. Through burials able to travel to Hong Kong in. So I studied ironically studied are urban density and micro housing in Hong Kong, this is agnostic guess, and then it also helped me understand that I wasn't interested in micro housing. I was not interested in buildings very very small spaces. So I went into the luxury market, which we designs homes that typically range from four thousand to about twenty thousand square feet, the hilly sites in cities and neighborhoods, including Beverly Hills Brentwood in the Pacific Palisades, some are on the winding bird streets above sunset plaza there on streets with the name swallow Thrasher. Blue Jay way now he says the city's new rules. Currently don't have a track record for implementation. So he says everybody is still trying to understand the codes intent versus the actual Whitten language. But he says a modern large has is currently what his plans want. We still. Awesome projects in our officer transitional projects that are traditional but very little detail to it because that's what the clients are interested in. But but for the most part anything hillside that I've seen is contemporary, and you know, in the hillside code kind of lends itself to it. I don't know if you know that, but you know, that you kind of follow the topography of it and to really kind of get these these beautiful sight lines, and they'd get these homes to elongate into really get the feeling of an estate if you go with these really high pitched roofs, the house tends to get very very vertical instead of horizontal. And and so at least from my perspective modern is it's a lot more easier to do in the current code than traditional would you? He gets himself was born into a world apart from high end homes in the Hollywood hills his family moved from Mexico when he was two he was raised in Compton and his dad built temporary structure..

Malibu Scott Gillan Newcastle Malibu creek Stephen Shapiro Los Angeles Malibu castle developer Begum Hong Kong Frank Lloyd Wright Scott Matt white wall Jeff Scott gillen Cuccia Mancini
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:59 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"With dark wood, balconies, and, splashes of color over wack. To linear white stucco forms. Back to Scott Johnson we sort of, accepted the walkability the, sustainable communities that all seem sensible does but. We don't, really do traditional architecture so we were interested in doing architecture and our own time which meant contemporary than. Have a lot of variety in, animation and it so as you look around there's a lot of. Traffic patterns as a lot of scientists there's artwork there's a set of uses. That we try to exhibit through variation how'd, you feel when you come down and here you are in the neighborhood that you've built sort of, out of whole cloth well I. Like to try to imagine whether the people we thought would be here look like the people who are here they're not always in fact, there never, exactly what we Maybe, profiled or imagine but that's all interesting, I think things are changing the paradigm changing so fast now that you. Almost finish a project and it's, already still organically on, some drawing board somewhere you're tweak in the case of this year tweaking retail maybe the. Residential amenities that people have different, things they want to do now when they, have time off that other things now. Since it was completed three years ago the managers of the runway apply vista development decided it needed to lose the calls altogether and. Now the firm designed bitches, is we designing the streets at runway for pedestrians only so. I think, the changes the pedestrianisation kind of retail tweaking the amenities I think. That all changed it to stake her to use a silicon beach term what you're doing is kind of feta testing as you? Go, along yes yes and so I you know we I was in Rome a few months ago and I realized some. Of the churches the great architects they actually the churches It took so long to build that well you know or Amini worked on it and Carla Madeira. Then worked on it for a while then he died, and then in came. Michelangelo and then he passed away and Carl Fontana and they just go on and on that's two years well squish two hundred years down into maybe. Ten years and people are always tweaking and, evolving and, you have to be careful working in your your piece of time and doing the best work you can't that was Scott. Johnson, architects have one way I'm Francie Sanderson, you're listening to DNA this is the ninth episode in our series this is home in. LA from the tent to the Giga mansion and everything in between and in this series. We have been asking all we sing new has an, housing archetypes the. Dough emerging to meet the needs of twenty first century Los Angeles so the question, is all these semi urban destinations in l. a. where you can. Live, over. The shops and, park underneath, in these communities created by developers like runway at Playa vista all they kind of new, archetype I think. This is very much Model, that works supports walkability it creates density. Which will force. The, retail which will enforce the sidewalk activity and security on the sidewalk so need maybe needs. To be done organically over many years it needs to be done strategically but it is the next model but. What about as actual. Streets it's commercial arteries. With rows of. Single-story shops why don't. People live above those well some do I. Purchased the building in two thousand and two and used it as my primary place of. Work it is a business on PICO it's a small storefront walkup storefront office building it was one story and I'd been thinking about adding onto it for years. This is Bradshaw he's an architect and general contractor in LA the building on PICO use to has a secondhand clothing store before it became his office we cently he built an apartment for himself above we talked with. Brett and his partner collect books This basically in architecture dream, to build his, own living space and. I didn't have a client so nobody. To say no to me and just the, budget requirements so you know I just did things that I've. Always wanted to do in terms of high ceilings bridges that. Span from one part of the, space to another but essentially what. You did was you built a? Kind of industrial style loft over a little. Business on PICO in west LA? That, you really couldn't imagine was that from the outside exactly except that I've been imagined it for the last ten. Years so it's like you know. It's like really imprinted into my into my. Thinking but yes surprises most people when they come up here collect you yourself. Have a home. In Malibu which is almost semi rural and you have lots of animals and so on what did you think when you walked into. The space my impression when I walked in was. Oh my God this is so masculine it so Mail it it needs some panties strewn around and some some. Flowers at cetera you know as a marketer because I am a marketer as as a marketer what I saw was the markets is starting to catch up with Brett's vision meaning this? Is. Two blocks away from the expo line to downtown LA it's. So perfect for, the millennial, mentality folks that don't require cars that don't necessitate, parking that, are looking for something more minimal because they're, spending their, lives outside versus inside and yet, this place is completely self contained in its kind of perfect for the millennial. Lifestyle so that's what I saw foam Brett's loft you? Can look towards and laze tree-lined hills, and single family, homes and gardens and closer. To Are you staring at you white outside the windows you can see. Old neon signs for mattress king and PICO each week like Donna Antonio and billboards the billboards. Actually give me messages sometimes I'll get up and there was one I think it was an EMMY nomination and it said consider more laughter Okay, yeah you're right The Bill by the way was. For true TV show, so the question is how did wet? Show. Pull, this off Turns out, that his usual parking was the issue but. In this case because, the building is from nineteen fifty. Six says Brett he didn't need to add extra parking spaces zoning allows for it it's. It's all about the parking so you, have to. Make sure that you've got some your grandfather did on. Your parking so if, you're building is pre nineteen fifty eight Good, good. Chance it'll be grandfathered in and whatever parking you have can be dedicated to the new edition there. Were some other challenges however many commercial buildings just weren't built withstand the weight of additional floors we had to. Reinforce the ground floor, walls which are concrete block from nineteen. Fifty-six we didn't, have proper reinforcing so we had to attach. A grid of rebar, steel rebar and then we did. Shot creek which is a cement application that get comes out of a hose and so. We reinforced all the walls of the ground floor Did your contract is so. You have the skill set. Do, you think it pencils out to this way or if someone wants. To build their own would you actually say you know what's it's too complicated do. This go find a empty. Lot and build yourself a house Well I I would, say. That the the economics are changing, I would say that I'm probably a little bit on the early, side but I think that real estate values are going up When you consider that you've got the land for free You're not adding land cost to build your second story but you. Are reinforcing foundations so that can, kind of offset it and in a lot of instances I think it might be. Able to cancel out pencilling ad is one thing brat. Spent close to a million dollars total. On this project persuading the neighbors is another in LA residential above commercial, has not been the norm for, a bunch of reasons including pushback from single family neighborhoods residents in some. Areas of voted to limit development on their. Nearby, archery's we all going to see more of it however in targeted areas near transit hubs is the. City tries to incentivize construction of hazzing back to shore If you look, at all the cities across the world they all have two three four stories on, their me mean arterial streets so I think it's just, a matter of time LA the land. Has always been so cheap that people didn't bother building the second story, of the third story I think, the land cost now our our values are going up and I it's. Starting to pencil out more I mean why. We, wouldn't follow some of the trends of the other major European cities that doesn't make sense to me They're. Similar forces working on the.

LA Brett Scott Johnson archery Rome Michelangelo EMMY Carl Fontana PICO west LA Giga mansion Amini Francie Sanderson Carla Madeira Shot creek Malibu partner Bradshaw Donna Antonio
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:28 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"Oh right and. It's a it's a great neighborhood and I think it's a great neighborhood for families and for kids But I don't have any kids and being able to do. What, I. Like to do, now as far as. Going out and going out to different restaurants things of that nature It. Wasn't, really conducive to. My preferred type of. Living so that's why no longer living there and I ran. Out the house that was, Anthony win speaking with DNA producer Abbas out see I'm Francie Sanderson you're. Listening to DNA we finished our tour of metropolis at the top of tower one in a two story three, bedroom Pentax condo that they call a. Crown jewel of the development so the most expensive which is this the one that we is a six million most expensive because the size because elevations and, also because of us Fuses a spectacular are you receiving interest facing a lot. Of traffic they, really, feel breath. Taking, about the view. Yeah but you know. It's a big purchase so they have taken some thought about. Making offers but we do, receive a lot of interest yeah and also we have smaller two bedroom. Penthouse and the price, points about two million and what would be the price point for the studio that we, went to downstairs is around six hundred Yeah A big a range of price points for different kinds of buyers to leave in this beautiful project that was Anna, now it is hard to get hard sales numbers from the developers or from the, agency the group that's marketing. It so we reached out to Brigham. Yen he watched the blog who DT l. a.. Rising he's also commercial and residential realtor because I'm not involved in the sales. Team I'm not gonna know the true. Number you, know obviously the the numbers that are provided, our you, know provided by the sales. Team so they are saying that eighty percent of. Tower one sold out at forty percent of power to our. Soul but in terms of those Loomis that were flying around, that this was going to be a kind, of you, know investment pace to park your money in the. Sky you know akin to the Taza New, York anecdotally, speaking is that not proving to be the? Case I don't think. So I think downtown. LA Okay is not in mature urban center like Manhattan, where you can park your money like that you know I mean really even eight years ago there wasn't any place that you can buy like a vacuum if you needed to you know before target open you, know there is a lot. Of missing amenities and services that basically. Are needed before downtown can become mature enough before. The type of residential product will be introduced where fires from abroad like China. Or Russia or you know the ones. That are, parking their money in Manhattan would be attracted, to at, least currently right now they're. Doing anything like that it probably isn't downtown not. On a large scale at least so it is really great. To see that because a lot of fears were stemming from, the idea that it was just going to, become like, where the Chinese are gonna part the money and. It's just gonna be empty but I think, the majority, of money from the Chinese are going to? San Gabriel valley like. Arcadia out Hambro Monterey Park Dan Marino they're attracted to the suburban. Lifestyle so they and. All the amenities are over, there as, well the supermarkets Chinese supermarkets Chinese restaurant Chinese everything in the thank you for valley what they're used to and so coming from a very crowded place white China they come to, the US may think, wow I want, my own house with property, yard who do you think is living downtown downtown is a collection of, everybody right now and what. I mean by that, it truly is demographically everybody different districts. Of downtown Los Angeles will appeal to different people preferences so somebody who's interested in the arts district may not like south park because they may think it's too cookie cutter somebody who's interested, in south park may not like. The arts district because they think it's too heavily curated artistic and hipster light and metropolis how would you characterize that This, is going, to be a refined condominium project that, appeal, to people that would love to live on. The west side like into Wilshire corridor like in the century or you know in. Westwood the high rises that line Wilshire boulevard or what's what they're going to want more refined building the have a lot of. Amenities you know the door Mansfield basically like more like a hotel type environment do you live in Daniel self Brigham. Young I do I live in the financial district because where I live I can get the target I can get to the movie theater. The grocery store restaurants job The, library cultural venues like the road. Up the hill everything is in walking distance then I find that just. Amazing that I can do that, all foot? Would you. Live in metropolis yes actually I would if I could, afford to live in one. Of the unit there I would but, they're a little, bit, pricey That was Brigham yen you watch the block who wising and. He's a residential, and commercial wheelchair now it isn't hard to imagine people wanting to live the sky high life in metropolis the. Penthouse revisited is so sleek and bathed in such panoramic views that it brings to mind the movie, her I also. Jernigan if that movie had helped people imagine a different lifestyle in LA we'll absolutely no. I think it it was a beautiful mix. Of Shanghai and LA combine to be the. City of the future and I think it definitely gave people a. Look or taste. Of what the future will be like and we will we have to densify because urban sprawl is. Really been a killer frost, and enough's enough so it's time for us to go vertical it's time. For us to do vertical? Better, that's, what we need to do that was well Jernigan of LA I'm Francie Sanderson, you've been, listening to DNA and this is Been the seventh installation in our series..

Los Angeles Francie Sanderson Penthouse Manhattan China Jernigan Brigham Pentax Daniel self Brigham Russia San Gabriel valley Hambro Monterey Park Arcadia Loomis Shanghai Dan Marino York producer US Anna
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"The airport you still pay a small fee that goes to support the airport so similarly that may be a model that there is some sort of gio fence at the beach and so when you ruber is when you say your destination is the beach then uber's got a system that attack on an extra dollar an extra two dollars and that that would then support the operations of the beach and one of the big questions that surrounds all this disruption you yourself as the issue of equity and this notion that in the future of of of maximum autonomy where we'll be the public bus service where we'll and where will be the jobs driving the public buses getting to that more utopian and equitable future requires us to have this discussion now to make choices public policy choices at the federal state and local levels support that and how do we help frame not only the debate but also how these technologies are mailed in in a way that allows us to support equity out loud us to support sustainability allows us to be true to who we are as a community you've been listening to and the city of santa monica this dna i'm francie sanderson tonight's forum the age of disruption hosted by the city of santa monica will be live streamed find more information about it on our website at kcrw dot com slash dna coming up after this break black panthers costume design is.

santa monica francie sanderson two dollars
"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"francie sanderson" Discussed on KCRW

"Hey it's garth trinidad coming up at eight your tuesday nights sonic odyssey begins yours truly up first with exciting new sounds from black milk dhabi leon bridges buzzy lee and four at ten travis holcomb has the latest from rising star kelly you cheese and brand new king tough the sounds of tomorrow tonight starting at eight right here on kcrw anger from kcrw this is dna design a doc tektronix francie sanderson is the battle over galleries in boyle heights a genuine fight over displacement or is it also an art happening i don't think the gallery is the primary caused however i will say that symbolically it is a powerful thing that i am thinking about offering them the symbolic and actual closing is my gallery some things do acknowledge their practice if it's in stock and others coming up first up let's go to the streets of san francisco talking over a community that's the sound of a recent protests and counter protests local residents are fighting over proposed state law that could radically change what is built in california's residential neighborhoods let's find out just how from kcrw soul gonzales right so show me the neighborhood very happy to i love my neighbor brad kane is giving me a tour of south car it's a neighborhood between downtown la in the west side filled with tasteful one and two story single family homes and duplexes many with well tended gardens this raw built in the nineteen thirties they were all spanish colonial revival architecture brad who's owned a home here since the early nineties and is president of the neighborhood council says it's local zoning rules that have safeguarded south garth as look and feel over the decades but brad worries his neighborhood and countless others across the state could be soon hit by development tidal wave and now in weiner world developers not only get to do what they want they can do it where they want the weiner brad's weiner world dig is state senator scott wiener of san francisco scott weiner pleasure to meet you the man himself hurry weiner who met me in his district has introduced a bill in the state legislature meant to tackle california's extreme housing shortage he says the problem is just going from bad to worse so something big and bold has to be done that includes opening up single family home neighborhoods to a lot more development we're at a point in many parts of california where we hand just nibble around the edges anymore you can just do a little change here.

garth trinidad travis holcomb kcrw francie sanderson boyle heights san francisco california gonzales brad kane la president brad scott wiener senator scott weiner milk