3 Burst results for "Fran Arctic"

"fran arctic" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

11:20 min | 2 years ago

"fran arctic" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Hi there. It's me. Josh clarkin. I will be taking the end of the world with Josh Clark on the road this January. I'll be appearing on Friday January eighteenth at cafe du Nord in San Francisco as part of SF sketch fest and on Thursday, January twenty fourth albeit the bell house in Brooklyn. So come see me talk about just how likely it is that humans will be wiped out by some existential catastrophe of our own making and what you can do about it. Tickets are available SF sketch fest dot com and the bell house NY dot com. Guess what mango was that? We'll see, you know. I love a good ATM story. Right. We we've talked about ATM so many times in the past like there's the ATM in the Vatican City. And it's the only one in the world that operates in Latin which is pretty cool. But I have a new favorite ATM fact that I wanted to share. So there's actually an ATM located and and Artika, and it's operated by Wells Fargo, and it's in the Guinness Book, and they call it the world's loneliest ATM was because it's the only one actually there is a second ATM on hand. And it's hidden in a closet or something, and it doesn't actually work. It's just there to cannibalized for the spare parts. Once even weird is that Wells Fargo only services the machine once every two years, and that's when well sends a repairman out to give the ATM a little checkup. That's crazy. So why don't they service more frequently like don't they have to replenish the cash? Well, that's the beauty of banking Antarctica. There's no need for this. The you know, the population. There is so small that the money just keeps recirculating but learning about that ATM did make me wonder like what are the other peculiarities of living in Antarctica? How do everyday things like plumbing and internet work down there? And that's what today show's all about. So let's dive. Welcome to part time genius. I'm Wilkerson and his always I'm joined by my good friend man gash ticket and sitting behind the soundproof glass. Vigorously shaking snow globe any each hand as our producer trysted McNeil. Get those things making it blizzard. Ango? I'm gonna ask you right off the bat what what's your interest in visiting the south pole. So I mean, it looks beautiful, but they're so many beautiful places in the world. And you know, I hate the cold additive, plus some of those early expeditions to Artika sounded so miserable. It's kinda scared me off. I know actually wanna talk a little bit about those expeditions later in clearly we both like warm weather because we live in warm places. But I kinda wanna see the landscape in person. At least once I I started looking tours this week. And I found this group called white desert luxury tours have you ever heard of this company because they basically do like glam Fran Arctic. Let's how do you glance Artika? Well, I was reading this article in wired, basically, white desert is set up these luxury camping pods and this beautiful Mars like area and Artika the pots have solar panels and propane heaters and their eco-friendly too. But you know to keep you safe. They're also designed to withstand a hundred. Eighty miles per hour. That's how windy it gets there. And you know, the pas are beautifully outfitted. But the whole camp must have cost a fortune to build. Why's that? Remember getting stuff day Artika isn't cheap. According to the article, it costs thirty eight dollars a pound to fly furniture there and the pas themselves weigh three tons apiece, which is insane and trips that always something rich people do just because they're looking for new ways to spend their money. It's like God's telling you have too much. Well, you know, the camp only services around a hundred clients year. So it's definitely exclusive, but you'd be in some pretty classy company. So Pat pass travelers include Saudi princes Prince, William and also, Buzz Aldrin, wait, Buzz Aldrin, glimpse. But you know, what you experience Artika is also insane. Once you're Gulfstream jet lands on the ice heat runway. You'll get to explore neon blue ice tunnels lakes and go on guided hike. See Pinga up close. Visit all these science bases. They even take you to the south pole. I mean, everyone who's gone says the beauty of this. Untouched land is just overwhelming. Plus, you get unlimited champagne, so I just pulled this up on my computer, hot showers firs draped on all the dining chairs, it looks so fancy I I'm definitely an all right? Well, the only catches it cost eighty thousand dollars a person. But I've always said I just don't like the cold that much and I have to be true to myself. So I'm out again didn't take long speaking jars remind me of this event that takes place Artika it's called the race around the world. Basically, it's this fun two mile race that takes place on Christmas day at the south pole. And it's for the scientists there it's called around the world because you're actually racing through every single time zone. I didn't think about that. So you would touch every single time. Wow. That's amazing. It's pretty awesome. And while some people run, the course you can actually do it on skis or snowmobile. But the reason. I mentioning it is that the prize for the winning runner is a five minute hot shower. According to business insider residents at the south pole station are limited to two two minutes. Showers a week. So a bonus five minute shower is like a huge treat. I guess that makes sense. I mean, it's funny. How you just expect things like hot showers are everywhere by now. But you know, one of the things that so cool about Antarctica is how environmentally friendly. The camps are the treaty of Antarctica which was signed by twelve countries back in nineteen fifty nine. It was this was this agreement that the land there would be used for science, and peaceful purposes and part of the agreements that you can't dirty the landscape relieve any contaminants there. In fact, if you want to organize your own expedition, Dan, Artika, the process involves three things. So first showing that you'll be completely self-sufficient second is that you have a good reason for being there in third is that you have little or no environmental impact on the land and their special attention paid to this. And if you can't lay out your plan for creating zero waste they'll deny you permission to go there. That's pretty interesting. So I was actually reading about the recycling and Artika, and it's like at Portland year levels on the spreadsheet on Boing Boing from America's McMurdo base. And they have this matrix for where to recycle or dispose of what? And it's pretty intense like, pens and pencils. Have a specific been drained radiators have their own been and mops and brooms have been everything is clearly chart out where it goes and how it gets separated, but they also poke fun at themselves. What do you mean by that? So one prankster put all these joke signs up of what can and can't go into the bins? And they seem to have stuck around. Like there's a recycling bin that's for glitter and in the rules for what's recyclable glitter. It lists red glitter blue glitter ground unicorn horn, wizards hats, but into no section. It lists no child beauty pageant sashes. Mariah Carey movies. And that's fair enough. We sort of dove right in the hot showers and glitter recycling. Somehow it before we talk about things like how? Plumbing work. Why don't we talk a little bit about who lives in Antarctica? Definitely. But why don't we do some local slang? I God you immediately track. Again, I do like Antarctic's length of what are some of your favorites? One of my favorite terms as city mice and also country, mice like city. My stay put on the McMurdo station. Well, country Mayes wandered other camps and travel around. That's pretty cute. So you got the others. Yeah. Gomba lls or tiny snowballs that stuck to dogs for so two decompose. When you rub that loose snow off before you come inside. And also Hollywood showers. Those are when you take a fantasy shower that's more than a lot of two minutes out. God, why do you keep bringing up showers here? You know, when I studied abroad in Tibet in college it was freezing. And you didn't take hot showers that often? So I took like ten or eleven bucket showers during the trip, and they were mostly with lukewarm water. It's strange being there. I realized there's so many things I could live without I don't really need TV or a lot of clothes a lot of amenities. But hot showers. When I came back to the college. I stand in the shower and praised American plumbing. I can understand that. All right. Well, here's a bit of jargon. I found on mental floss it's shock. And this is the idea that no matter how crazy everything seems an article while you're there, it's this knowledge meant that the rest of the world is even crazier. Let's get back to who lives. There obviously Antarctica doesn't have an indigenous population. Do you know the cool and article dot com? I can't say I'm familiar with educational that's run by a former and Arctic marine biologist. And now, he's a schoolteacher and puts out great information. But on a site, he writes there around sixty six scientific faces of which thirty seven occupied year round around four thousand people live in article during the summer months, and that reduces to about a thousand over winter there. It's also rare that someone will stay there for two winters in a row, they might do one winner wrapped in two summers. But to winters in a row tends to be bad for people's mental states and the McMurdo station. Has about like a thousand or so people during peak season, right? Yeah. This right. And what's funny is that I didn't quite put together. How large an article is. And how far some of the bases are from one another. It's barely the fifth largest continent. And because ninety nine point five percent of it is covered in ice the size of the continent actually changes like according to live science the quote size varies through the seasons. Expanding along the coast nearly doubles the cut incised during the winter. Isn't that crazy nearly doubles it that is crazy in speaking of geography? I was stunned by the geography, and I didn't realize that the land is basically all desert in the inner regions of Antarctica get less than two inches of precipitation each year, and this is less than the Sahara desert, and it's also cold there. I don't know if you knew this about I didn't the Russian Vostok station there recorded the lowest temperature in the world at negative one hundred twenty nine point three degrees Fahrenheit. I mean. I guess. Is that extra point three that really gets to you? It's cold. But it's dry coal. I know we're supposed to be talking to people and not penguins here. But one of the things I thought was funny was that the male emperor penguins are the only warm blooded animal to stay on the continent during the freezing winters, apparently when the female lays an egg. It's a very where pregnant situation like the daddy bird sits on the family Egge, keeping it warm while the mama penguin goes out to sea for nine weeks. And and then the moms return just for the eggs hatch, which is because you know, male penguins are so woke class you're able to work. I actually have a funny paying win story to talk about. And I also want to discuss the crazy ways Chile and Argentina have tried to each claim part of Antarctica as their own territory, but before we get to that. Let's take a quick break.

Artika Antarctica south pole Wells Fargo McMurdo station Josh Clark Josh clarkin Vatican City Brooklyn San Francisco cafe du Nord south pole station Sahara desert Mariah Carey white desert producer Buzz Aldrin Wilkerson
"fran arctic" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"fran arctic" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"To the immune system in several in Arctic bases in our two guys amount. And so some of the interior bases like south pole station or concordia you get this sleep. Alterations, the security and lost this twenty four hour darkness. And you also have a persistent hyperbaric poxy a- coastal an Arctic winner over you have a normal environment, but you also have that extreme environment. And so yes, in flight sleep is important. It can affect the immune system and these are the tools we would look us to look at this phenomenon on the ground and Arctic. Oh, wow, I, I mean, if I was going to go to Antarctica, I'd probably choose the twenty four hour light that would probably make me feel better. They have that during the summer. Yeah. And then you get to the winner. They get the twenty four. I don't know why you'd sign up for the NRT winter trip, but how long are they staying there to to really get enough data to to understand this circadian change crews performing a winner over in Antarctica in most of the bases. The typical mission Gration is about a year that makes it a fantastic ground-based spaceflight analog where we want a pro- prolong mission duration. So the the year is dictated by the calendar year. Generally during the summer period in art ago, you have resupply of these basis, crew swaps happen. And then the last cruise leave for the winner over period and the crews do their one year duration with the middle of the NRT winner being the three months or so of twenty four hour darkness. Do we have enough data to understand what's happening to the immune system because of these sleep studies were are? Is there still a lot that we'd still need to look into? Well, we've been if you're asking me about Antarctica, yes, we're, we're learning more. People have been looking at the reactivation of latent herpes viruses, which is a nice biomarker for immune dis- regulation in entered a winner over and during spaceflight for decades docked. Wayne Pearson, an Esa was one of the pioneers for using viral DNA in saliva as a biomarker for immune dis- regulation. But more recently studies I mentioned with with our European collaborators are helping us to really define comprehensively what happens to the immune system during Antarctic winner over. And so a lot of the same essays that we use to characterize immune changes in astronauts have non is s we simply translate those essays to Antarctica and employ them there. And it gives us a very nice flight to ground comparison right. What's interesting is the different ways you have to change things to implement studies in these two different locations. And so for spaceflight, it's very difficult to take our laboratory there or or get a lot of crew time to do a lot of processing these samples. So we'll draw blood sample. We'll bring it back to earth and we can get ambient blood sample in our hands and about thirty seven hours that was collected during spaceflight Fran Arctic winner over you don't have a rapid return for samples like this, and so you have to, but you do have the ability to deploy a little more equipment and so it concordia station in particular, we deployed flow Saitama, tres various sample processing apparatus, and we'll have the crews do a little more remote processing samples during their winter over activities. What we're chasing the same data flight to ground comparison is very important for validating ground based analog, which is a nice tool to help you understand what's happening during flight, and also a nice location then you can probably use. Test your countermeasures, right? Yeah, there's a lot of other Bill watt of other research going onto. That's you. You use the word analogue this. That's these sort of studies where you're putting them in a in an environment. That's, you know, it's not like you're taking a vacation. I wouldn't call that a vacation at all, but you're really just putting him in this environment early understand what is like in this in these hostile environments in article is one of them. There's another one called Mars, five hundred to what's happening there are we are we doing similar studies Mars. Five hundred is a very interesting spaceflight Annalong that's happening in Russia at the institute for by medical problems in Moscow..

Antarctica Fran Arctic concordia station Wayne Pearson Annalong Moscow Saitama Russia twenty four hour thirty seven hours three months one year
"fran arctic" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"fran arctic" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"To the immune system in several in Arctic bases in our two guys amount. And so some of the interior bases like south pole station or concordia you get this sleep. Alterations, the security and lost this twenty four hour darkness. And you also have a persistent hyperbaric poxy a- coastal an Arctic winner over you have a normal environment, but you also have that extreme environment. And so yes, in flight sleep is important. It can affect the immune system and these are the tools we would look us to look at this phenomenon on the ground and Arctic. Oh, wow, I, I mean, if I was going to go to Antarctica, I'd probably choose the twenty four hour light that would probably make me feel better. They have that during the summer. Yeah. And then you get to the winner. They get the twenty four. I don't know why you'd sign up for the NRT winter trip, but how long are they staying there to to really get enough data to to understand this circadian change crews performing a winner over in Antarctica in most of the bases. The typical mission Gration is about a year that makes it a fantastic ground-based spaceflight analog where we want a pro- prolong mission duration. So the the year is dictated by the calendar year. Generally during the summer period in art ago, you have resupply of these basis, crew swaps happen. And then the last cruise leave for the winner over period and the crews do their one year duration with the middle of the NRT winner being the three months or so of twenty four hour darkness. Do we have enough data to understand what's happening to the immune system because of these sleep studies were are? Is there still a lot that we'd still need to look into? Well, we've been if you're asking me about Antarctica, yes, we're, we're learning more. People have been looking at the reactivation of latent herpes viruses, which is a nice biomarker for immune dis- regulation in entered a winner over and during spaceflight for decades docked. Wayne Pearson, an Esa was one of the pioneers for using viral DNA in saliva as a biomarker for immune dis- regulation. But more recently studies I mentioned with with our European collaborators are helping us to really define comprehensively what happens to the immune system during Antarctic winner over. And so a lot of the same essays that we use to characterize immune changes in astronauts have non is s we simply translate those essays to Antarctica and employ them there. And it gives us a very nice flight to ground comparison right. What's interesting is the different ways you have to change things to implement studies in these two different locations. And so for spaceflight, it's very difficult to take our laboratory there or or get a lot of crew time to do a lot of processing these samples. So we'll draw blood sample. We'll bring it back to earth and we can get ambient blood sample in our hands and about thirty seven hours that was collected during spaceflight Fran Arctic winner over you don't have a rapid return for samples like this, and so you have to, but you do have the ability to deploy a little more equipment and so it concordia station in particular, we deployed flow Saitama, tres various sample processing apparatus, and we'll have the crews do a little more remote processing samples during their winter over activities. What we're chasing the same data flight to ground comparison is very important for validating ground based analog, which is a nice tool to help you understand what's happening during flight, and also a nice location then you can probably use. Test your countermeasures, right? Yeah, there's a lot of other Bill watt of other research going onto. That's you. You use the word analogue this. That's these sort of studies where you're putting them in a in an environment. That's, you know, it's not like you're taking a vacation. I wouldn't call that a vacation at all, but you're really just putting him in this environment early understand what is like in this in these hostile environments in article is one of them. There's another one called Mars, five hundred to what's happening there are we are we doing similar studies Mars. Five hundred is a very interesting spaceflight Annalong that's happening in Russia at the institute for by medical problems in Moscow..

Antarctica Fran Arctic concordia station Wayne Pearson Annalong Moscow Saitama Russia twenty four hour thirty seven hours three months one year