36 Burst results for "Fourteen Years"

The Return of Playoff Rondo

The Lead

05:58 min | 3 d ago

The Return of Playoff Rondo

"So Bill Game One against Houston was Rozan rondos first game nearly six months. Can you break down everything that he went through with injuries? Yeah. It was interesting because this is a guy who has been slowly it feels like kind of breaking down as he's gotten older he had two broken fingers on his right hand last year his first year with the Lakers. This year he had a calf injury. He had an aversion fracture in his right ring finger and this is all before we get to March and the shutdown from the pandemic. So the Lakers are off for four months they go to. ORLANDO. Rajon Rondo is with the team their first practice inside the bubble Lakers guard Rajon Rondo has suffered a broken right thumb in. He's expected to return to full basketball activities in six to eight weeks, he's going to undergo surgery to repair the fact fracture this week. So he leaves the bubble has surgery. He's out for another six weeks or so the Lakers have a first round series against the Blazers Rondo, comes back to the bubble and is actually cleared to play for game three against the Portland Trailblazers, he's on the court getting ready. For that Game Rondo was listed as active tonight for the Lakers but was a late scratch with back spasms that happened. So, by the time, we got to game one of the second round against the rockets. There was kind of this sense of porcelain Rondo forget about it what level, but is he just going to be healthy enough to play and be able to stay healthy to make a contribution to this team? What does he had to say about all of these injuries he basically downplayed the injuries and said that these are the sorts of things that are going to frustrate. Anyone was very frustrating injury and step back I'm my career fourteen years have. Everything happens for a reason. Obsolete man says talks we. Still for the moment but the timing of this latest injury, the broken thumb and the back spasms I think particularly frustrating for him because this is a guy whose entire reputation and career is built on playoff performance on being a guy who really ramps it up in the postseason. Early, in his career uses a second your point guard with the Celtics out of Kentucky playing with Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen and Paul. Pierce and he ended up playing an instrumental role. You remember the two thousand, eight finals against the Lakers decisive blowout game. You know he had twenty one points against Kobe Bryant and the Lakers twenty one point seven rebounds eight assists six steals to give the Celtics a championship for that story franchises nearly ovation barrage. You've seen it win Lebron was in Miami. If you remember game three of these conference semi finals Rondo dislocated his elbow. Oh. Wow. Left arm hyper-extended boy. Didn't see it on that I replay certainly. Saw It there. When back to the locker room pop back in came back onto the court to help the Celtics with game. Time is pad. Rajon Rondo expired the crowd rare Boston. We've seen it time and time again in his career in these big moments, it's not superhuman. But when you take a player who is seen as a high level, but not superstar player can a hitting that superstar switch when the playoffs come then obviously a legend starts to grow. And for him did have another injury right when the Lakers were expecting to get him at his best was extremely frustrating. But the timing actually ended up working out he made it back for the second round series against the rockets and as we've seen was really no worse for the wear the Lakers got blown out by the rockets in game one. They're all going to be in a good mood tonight as the Houston Rockets when it one twelve to ninety seven. But after that, they rattled off four straight wins how much credit do you think Rondo deserves further taking that series. So easily I think you could make an argument that without Rajon Rondo certainly that the Lakers wouldn't have off the next four wins, but he was instrumental in games two and three and four also, but specifically games two and three with his performance in the fourth quarter game too. He knocked down a late jump shot to kind of hold off the rockets and what was a close game Rondo two. Point jump shot that's Rajon Rondo with a bucket right there ten points nine assists for Rondo and then engaged three. He was actually the guy who is Lebron James on the bench to start the fourth quarter in what was a close game at the start of that period he either scored or assisted on Lakers I eight possessions of that quarter to help kind of turn what had been another tight close game into a rout for the Lakers. Rondo. He'll three and Rondo hits another one largest laker lead tonight Rondo has. Been Spectacular and a nice Lee for Kuzma. This is sort of how his reputation has been built. But this also is kind of out of line with the way he's played for the Lakers over his first two years. He hasn't been the guy who has come up in the big moments or been clutch. You've seen the decline of a player who's in his mid thirties and has been in the League for fourteen years, but there has always been this belief from the Lakers that when the playoffs come that he. Would step up and have those sort of vintage Rondo performances and so what you saw was sort of this return to form that the Lakers have always promised would be there and you saw not only offensively. But also defensively when Houston started to make runs, it was Rajon Rondo who was picking up James Harden full court and pestering him into turnovers they double team Arden and get a steal and another round of bucket. That's a ten old laker run hard was trying to go behind the back Rondo was right there. In both game two in game three second-half possessions where rondos picking up James Harden. The former MVP of the league, hounding him into a turnover, taking his pocket and going the other way for layup that completely shifted momentum and those both are Lakers win. So when you look at what Rondo did in those two games, I, think you could easily say that the Lakers could have been down two. Oh, two one in the series instead of kind of romping to a five game series victory.

Rajon Rondo Lakers Lebron James Celtics Houston Rockets Houston James Harden Rozan Kobe Bryant Portland Trailblazers Orlando MVP Pierce Kuzma Kevin Garnett Blazers Kentucky Miami Arden
Fresh update on "fourteen years" discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

00:54 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "fourteen years" discussed on SOFREP Radio

"The big question was what President Bush was going to do with the high value detainee Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and those guys. And that time they were in the CIA black sites and the CIA. Felt that they'd gotten all the information they were GonNa get, and they didn't WanNa, keep holding them. and. So for the first several months, the big debate was whether. To take them into the federal court system here on in the US or whether to send them to Guantanamo. And put him in the military. Commission system. So. The spring of two, thousand six when President Bush made the decision. and. Then in September two, thousand six is when the plane landed in the fourteen guys got off the airplane that day and. You know it's unfortunate that now it's. You know it's A. Fourteen years later. and Khalid Sheikh Mohammed still hasn't been tried. WAS JUST A. You haven't lost any sleep for him but I think to the nine eleven victims families have been denied. You Know Justice and maybe some closure for all these years and the only detainees that got off the plane that day that's been. tried. Convicted sentenced and the case has been all the way through the US Supreme Court and is over and done. Was I'm Ed Golani who is involved in the East Africa. Embassy bombings. In Galanti is the only detainee that was ever brought to the US and he was tried in federal court back in two thousand and ten. You got a life sentence. He's got the supermax in Colorado. And you know. A decade after he was convicted, the other guys are still sitting Guantanamo floundering in this. Process that we just bungled. It's a it's really unfortunate that We really did a lot of damage to our credibility Guantanamo. and. I read you know. The administration. You know about the use of the evidence and pensive torture. And he's talking about that. Yeah. When I when I came into the job, I was the third chief prosecutor I think the thing that the chief prosecutor's still there. When I. came on board the person who had been there before me there had been. Some of the folks on the prosecution team felt that they were being pushed to. Step over the ethical bounds and and so when I came in, there's concern on what what's the new guy going to expect of us. I told him that I'm I'm sixty two years old and and I can remember you know for my generation and we look back at Nuremberg with with with pride. That, at the end of the war, you know we didn't take the Nazis shoot them. We we had trials and some more convicted and executed, but others were acquitted and if you remember, Robert Jackson step down from the US Supreme Court to go to Nuremberg. And be the chief prosecutor in I. Think we're rightfully proud of the way we handle that. I want us to do Guantanamo in a way our kids and grandkids will look back at the way we look back at Nuremberg. So we're not GONNA use evidence. was obtained by torture. Course back in those days I couldn't say torture I'd say enhanced interrogation techniques says it sounds nicer. What I went through sear school. Right. Laboratory, they called the enhanced laboratory. That was when when there were three of the detainees tried to kill themselves and you can use the word suicide. It was self injurious behavior. So, we had all these terms to make things more palatable. They really were but. But. The folks in the chain of command above me supported my decision not to use evidence obtained by torture and to be quite honest like Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, there's ample evidence of his guilt. Without using anything he ever said member custody. which doesn't really excuse what we did too that it makes it irrelevant his criminal trial if we're not gonNA use that that evidence. So, over time the folks above being chain of command career uniform military. Retired, and they were replaced by political appointees. So the person that took over, it was a lady named Susan Crawford. They never served one day in uniform, but she did serve Dick Cheney's inspector-general when Dick Cheney was secretary of defense. And that's when things began to change by the summer of two, thousand, seven I was being told that. President. Bush said we don't torture who say that we do and all that evidence that you're not using need to get into court and use these guys convicted. And that's what I said. You need to find somebody else to do this job I quit. And Like I said unfortunately I was too I was October two, thousand seven. So we're coming up on thirteen years later. and very little has happened since then. While to mazing Emmy. When you think about that, it doesn't seem like laundry though. I remember reading all the detainees time. Their Guantanamo now was I. Know They let a lot of? Those will go. But they still people down there. Yeah. Kevin. Do. Either, a total of seven hundred, seventy, nine men to were sent to Guantanamo. If you remember, we were told that they were all the worst of the worst. End that would they chew through the hydraulic lines on the airplane flying to Guantanamo just to kill them Eric. And other seven, hundred, seventy, nine, they're still forty that are there. and..

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed Guantanamo President Bush Us Supreme Court Nuremberg United States Prosecutor CIA Colorado Susan Crawford Dick Cheney Ed Golani Galanti President Trump Kevin Guantanamo. East Africa Robert Jackson Eric Secretary
Officials battle online misinformation along with wildfires

The Beat with Ari Melber

08:11 min | 6 d ago

Officials battle online misinformation along with wildfires

"Are these historically large wildfires continue to rage out west fifteen people have already died a whopping four million acres already devastated across California as well as Oregon where you can see right here why the mayor there declared a state of emergency, the governor also publicly pleading. For the trump administration to support its governmental emergency response officials on the ground, say Donald trump failing them through fashion. Some critics compare his sort of public denial of even admitting what's going on with the wildfires that posture to of course, is deceitful approach to cove it. Who reports today are the things are even worse than all of that because right wing conspiracy theories supported publicly by Donald, trump are leading to dangerous activity. Again, we're living in a time where misinformation can be dangerous to your health and officials are warning. They're getting flooded with false phone calls fanned by Q. Not which incorrectly try to blame the fires on trump's perceived opponents. Translation what happens on facebook doesn't always stay on facebook a real world emergency political propaganda is making it harder for these firefighters to get the real information warnings they need as they go out and do their work and risk their lives. That's why sheriff's departments are pleading with people with messages like this just stop spreading rumors stop calling nine one one with political pranks. They say it has now gotten to the point where it is hampering their bandwidth to respond to the fires in real emergencies. It's twenty twenty. So sometimes, we have to state the obvious around here. Do not call nine, one one with Q. Non trumpy fake news propaganda. You do have the right to say whatever you want. Typing it up on the Internet you do not have the right to deceitfully thwart firefighting in the middle of this very real crisis for those calling from the West Coast some of these calls have been traced. If you need to think about it like this. Misinformation is expensive in the house you save could be your own. As mentioned, we're thrilled to have married trump live in the hour but I want to begin with some of our analysts, Jason, Johnson professor of politics at Morgan, State University and Katty Kay Washington anchor for BBC News. Good evening to both you. Evening Jason There's much talk about misinformation and people don't like lying even when it's just verbal if you want to be that specific. But given these twin crises, your view of the cost of this kind of misinformation. Rex It's massive. I'm in California right now and the difficulty the difficulty that local officials are having in managing people when it comes to these wall fires is immense and is partially because accused on, it's partially because the president basically sort of thumbs his nose that these sorts of Issues v rate of destruction that is happening out here. Basically, the size of central park is being burned every other day in northern California Oregon Central Park. Every other day is being burned devastated. varies a haze over the sky on a regular basis at the bottom. Of A pool, you can see ash settling after every single night. So the idea that people are wasting public resources with crazy conspiracy theories because they think that the fires were created by you know five G. or invading Muslims or George Soros doesn't help the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of people were either going to be out of their homes or not able to stay safely in their homes. During the time, we have a pandemic where rescuing people in putting them into shelters is all the more difficult. So yeah, this is propaganda that's Live when trump lies people are dying. Well. Caddy at the White House has often tried to reposition the Cova conversation in the election as well. This hit everywhere. This is global thing. it seems that this week there is a rightful focus and scrutiny on the president's leadership on his honesty on his approach, which is relevant. As, you go into election about who you want to continue to deal with this crisis or do you want to change the commander in chief? Yell the the virus has hit everywhere but my fourteen year old daughter is an online schooling here in Washington. Her friend in France in class. A. Friend in London is in class her friend in China is in plus her friend in Senegal. is in class and a friend in Germany is in class they're all going to school. And the reason they're going to school is because those countries have handled this better. So that's a direct comparison and in a globalised world. Our children here in the United States make no mistake about it that losing out because those other kids are in class going to school at advancing while orchids not advancing. So we're kicking this down to the next generation as well but. We elect leaders to be able to walk and Chew Gum at the same time. It is totally possible that you can give people a facts that you can trust the American people with the facts of something it is at also be inspirational and motivational and lift them up with a plan and show leadership. Those two things are not mutually exclusive and I think that's what the president is mistaking when he says, he didn't want people to panic and so he downplayed the virus. And gatty talk about how that stacks up in a global context that I think is very interesting to remember, and then how people are receiving these messages reporter. Jim Acosta spoke. To some people going to the trump rally take a look. Our about him because there's no. It's a it's a fake pandemic created to destroy the United. States of America. The president said the Bob Woodward there is a virus but corona virus that it is devil that's his opinion. Chatty. Where do you start i? Mean you stop by asking all of our leaders to come out with consistent clear accurate honest messaging when I really felt for Anthony. FAUCI. In that interview because I've interviewed g and he is so careful not to wade into political waters where there's going to be a difference between him and the president because he said that will be the only story and he is trying to get out the public health story doesn't WANNA make it a political story about. A disagreement he clearly feels now he has to set a Mauka. He has to wait into the politics of this and say, no when the President says, we are turning a corner. We're not actually turney. We're in this for the long haul because when the president says, we're turning a corner when he says, we're about to get over this or that is magically going to disappear what happens that guy doesn't wear a mosque when he attends a rally because he thinks it's not there. That's the risk. Door Jason. Trump can say you know he can see the light at the end of the tunnel. All we once it's a train right it's a train coming at us. We are about to head to fall which is flu season. This is a time where you have kids going back to school but you have people who have to shelter in place more because it's cold you can't eat outside and that makes us Much more difficult and I think are the real danger here is that as we recognize that the president is grotesquely incompetent, right easies driven by sort of racial malice and paying off his friends and everything else like that. At the base of all of this, we cannot forget to key things. One that the president is still trying to steal the election with the post office that you still have. Right. Wing Supreme. Courts in Wisconsin right now that are trying to people get absentee ballots. It's you have the president, the Republican Party suing in Iowa to prevent people from getting their absentee ballots that he's still trying to steal the election at the same time that you have literally millions of. Americans. Now, out of work who be out of their homes who are being evicted, which will make it more difficult for them to. Actually vote. So as much as the president is, is a horrible human being and trying to bankrupt this country and pay off his friends and stay in office. He is also doing things isn't competence has disrupted the ability of regular people remove him from office in a democratic way. We can't ever lose sight that because we can't get rid of him everything that's happening. Now we'll be ten times worse by nature.

President Trump Donald Trump Jason There California Facebook George Soros Oregon Jim Acosta Washington California Oregon Central Park United States FLU Wisconsin Chew Gum Bob Woodward
Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

Fresh Air

20:21 min | Last week

Novelist Donald Ray Pollock On Factory Work And Finding Fiction Later In Life

"Today's first guest is author Donald Ray Pollock, whose novel the devil all the time has just been made into a new netflix movie premiering next Wednesday. It Stars Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson, and here's a taste in this clip. A young boy has just watched his father pulverized two guys after they made lewd comments about the father's wife, the son's mother. Afterward the father gives his son some advice. You remember what I told you. On. The buzzer gave you. That's what I mean. got. To. Sir. Good sons of bitches out there. One hundred. These that many. Cannonball. In, both the movie and the novel the characters in the devil all the time are driven to extremes whether their fathers and sons, serial killers or preachers. The story begins in the small town of knock him stiff a real place in southern Ohio where Donald Ray pollock grew up. He didn't become a writer until he put in over thirty years at the local paper mill and got sober. But. Once he did start writing. He was noticed quickly receiving both awards and critical. Acclaim. Terry, gross spoke to Donald Ray pollock in twenty eleven when the devil, all the time was first published. Donald, Ray pollock welcome to fresh air. I'd like to start with reading from your new book, the Devil, all the time It's about the second paragraph from the prologue. So would you just set it up for us? What we have here is A young boy's name is Arvin Eugene Russell and he's following behind his father Willard and there and place called knock him stiff and they're going to Willard's prayer logging as a log in the woods where he Wants to communicate with God and So this is where they are. You know early in the morning and their. have finally reached this log. Willard eased himself down on the high side of the law and motion for his son to kneel beside him in the dead soggy leaves unless he had whiskey running through his veins Willard came to the clearing every morning and evening talk to God. Arvin didn't know which was worse the drinking or the praying. As far back, as he could remember, it seemed that his father had faulted devil all the time. Arvin little with the damp pulled his Co. tighter. He wished he were still in bed even school with always miseries was better than this but it was a Saturday and there was no way to get around it. Through the mostly bare trees beyond the cross Arvin could see whisper smoke rising from a few chimneys, half a mile away four hundred or so people lived in, knock him stiff in nineteen, fifty seven nearly all of them connected by blood through one godforsaken clam or another be it lust were necessity or just plain ignorance along with the tar paper shacks and Cinder Block houses the Holler included two general stores and a Church of Christ in Christian Union and joint known throughout the township as the bullpen. Three days before he'd come home with another black I I, don't condone no fighting just for the hell of it but sometimes, you're just too easy going Willard told him that evening then boys might be bigger than you. But the next time one of them starts his stuff, I want you to finish it. Willard was standing on the porch changing out of his work clothes. He handed Arvin Brown pants stiff with dried blood and Greece. He worked in a slaughterhouse in Greenfield and that day sixteen hundred homes had been butchered a new record for RJ Carol meat-packing. Those boy didn't know yet what he wanted to do when he grew up he was pretty sure he didn't WanNa kill pigs for eleven. Let's Donald Ray pollock reading from his new novel, the Devil, all the time. You know in the reading that you did the father tells the sun that the next time. So many beats him up the sun has to fight back and that seems to be. A recurring theme like in the opening story of your collection of short stories, the collections called knock him stiff. The opening sentence reads my father showed me how to hurt a man one August night at the torch in when I was seven years old it was the only thing he was ever any good at. You certainly seem interested in the idea of a father. Kind of indoctrinating a sun on the need to fight back and then egging on to do it even when it's inappropriate. so was is this a story that played out in your life? Well, not so much in my life I. Mean as far as I don't my dad really didn't push me to fight or anything like that. But you know when I was growing up my father and I had a very Uneasy relationship. You've got to understand my dad was born in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty he's still alive. You know he's eighty years old and he's still kicking but He was born in. Nineteen thirty grew up in the depression I went to the eighth grade. He was working on the railroad by the time he was sixteen, and then he was in the navy. And, my dad is a very tough. Hard. man Stra very strong man. As and in contrast to that, my mother is very shy kind. Small Bone woman. and. Either fortunately or unfortunately for me, I took after my mother and I believe. When I was a kid, my dad was. Maybe disappointed for not taking after him more. So. You know that's where I guess part of that comes from it and part of it also comes from. Lived in stiff. That's where I grew up and I saw a lot of other fathers who were you know drinkers and hell raisers and they didn't treat their families very well You know maybe they went and worked for a while and. I got enough money to go on another band or whatever, and pretty much left the family to take care of themselves. So, yeah father's have a pretty rough time and my work I just. It's just. You know I'm a father. You know I have a daughter WHO's I'm thirty years old now and I have always felt that I. Wasn't. As good as I could have been. Her mother and I were divorced when she was very young she was like a year old and and I wasn't around that much and. That's probably the best explanation. I can give for why treat father's like I do my work. Were you bullied in school. You said you, you took after your mother who wouldn't hurt a fly. So and if you were bullied, would you fight back? Did you know how to actually I wasn't bullied in school I? Never really had any problems with that and yeah, I. Mean a would fight back if I had to but. That situation you know didn't come about very much probably you know just. No more than any other normal kid you know might face that sort of thing. But. Yeah. I mean I wasn't really interested in Working on cars or farm or anything like that was more of A. I won't call myself a bookworm because we really didn't have that many books but you know I like to read and watch old movies and drawl and stuff like that and My Dad. Just you know he's a very practical man I mean, even today you know his idea of success is. Owning your own farm, starting your own business or something like that and I know that he probably looks on what I'm doing now is. A pretty useless way to spend your life trying to write books. Would you describe what the town of knock him stiff was like when you were growing up well, when I was growing up there it was. You know relocated for us. Ok we'll knock him stiff. is about thirteen miles west of chillicothe Theo, which is you know southern Ohio. It was its own little place. You know there wasn't much else around there but it was a community There were three small general stores and a bar and a church, and probably four hundred, fifty, five, hundred people now I probably was related to. At least half those people. So did you find this nurturing being in a town where half the people in it were related to you or incredibly claustrophobic? I think when I was a kid when I was a kid I was claustrophobic for me. You know I was one of those kids I was always unsatisfied I always wanted to be. Else and somewhere else. And so from a very early age. You know I was thinking about escaping from the hauler. I just Thought that I'd rather be somewhere else are somewhere else. But where you are as in Chile coffee which is. PHILADELPHIA, which is about thirteen miles away like you got out but you didn't go very far. I, really didn't get out I mean that's the weird contradiction of that whole thing you know i. Wanted to escape and them what I finally got my chance or whatever I. I chose to stay I'm out at knock stiff at least once a week even today Ladder parents go to visit. My parents are still alive. You know I have a brother and two sisters and they all live fairly close to there and So I. Think though as far as escape goes what happened with me was I quit high school when I was seventeen. And I went to work in a meat packing plant much like Weller work, Dan? And then when I was eighteen I moved to Florida you know that was going to be I was going to get away that you know by moving to Florida and I was down are working a job in a nursery and I wasn't making much money or anything only been there a few months my dad called and said. Hey, I can get you a job at the paper mail if you come back up here so. I chose to come back. You know the paper Mills Calling it was union job and great benefits and. And I knew you know for a high school dropout that was probably going to be the best job I. Ever got. You had that job for. How many years did you work at the paper mill? I? was there thirty two years and you didn't start writing till you were around fifty or is that is fifth well I'm fifty six now and I started writing when I was forty five. Okay. So how come it took so long did you know? When you weren't writing did you know that you had that in you? Well. You know I'd always been a big reader as I said and I love books. And I think maybe in the back of my mind, you know always thought writing would be a great way to get by in the world and you know, of course, I was very naive about it. The principal reasons for me you know as far as being a writer were one, you were your own boss. To you could do it anywhere. And three, you made lots of money. Wasn't until actually began writing it. I found out. That was a real true. But I. Think you know Sorta like maybe a fantasy that? It was in the back of my mind for a long time. I had a problem with drinking and for a number of years and you know it was one of those fantasies that when you got half loaded and You started daydreaming or whatever it was. One of those things that you thought about right thought about. But it wasn't really. You know I went to school when I was in my thirties I went to college I went to Ohio University and I ended up with a degree in English and You. Know even while I was there though I wasn't thinking about being a writer I never took any writing workshops or anything like that. But then finally when I was forty five my dad retired from the paper mill. And there was just something about watching him retire and go home. and. You know that was you know pretty much the end of his career and it really. Bothered me and I. Just. decided. I had to try something else you know. To some other way to. Spend the rest of my life. So. When you decided, you wanted to learn how to write what did that mean? Any. Writers or anything in for a while I just sort of scribbled and struggled. And then I'd read an interview with a writer and I can't recall her name now or no it was a lady. But she talked about typing out other people's stories as a means of maybe getting closer to them or just learn how to put a story together. and. So I started doing that. Who did you type out? I typed out a lot of different stories I. I was typing out a story at least once a week and that went on for about a year and a half. So John. cheever hemingway. Flannery. O'Connor Richard. Yates Dennis Johnson the you know the list just goes on and on if it was a story that I really liked and it wasn't. Long I, type it out, and then I carry it around with me for a week and you look at over and you know jot notes on stuff like that, and then I'd throw it away and do another one. Typing a story out, just was a much better way for me to see how you know person puts dial together or you know. Moose from one scene to the next that sort of thing. Was it hard for you to find your subject matter as a writer? Well when I first started. Trying to learn how to write. As. I said like maybe I would copy out John cheever story. So then I would try to write my own story about some East Coast suburbanite having unfair. Something like that or maybe I'd write about a re Rita Andrei debut story, and then I'd write about a Catholic priest. and. So I did that for maybe two years or so and it just wasn't working at all for me. and. Then filing maybe at about two and a half years, I wrote a story that's included in the book. Knock him stiff called back teen. And it's a very short story. and. It's about these two losers sitting in a donut shop. And that was the first thing that I had. Written that I thought wasn't too bad. And so then I increasingly started focusing on you know the people that I knew about instead of nurses, lawyers, that sort of thing that I had absolutely no idea. How to write about There's a passage in your new novel that's about a bus driver and the bus drivers father had gotten a certificate from the railroad for not missing a single day of work in twenty years and bus drivers. Mother always held this up as like what you could do. If you really you know were strive and tried to accomplish something when the bus drivers father died the bus driver hope that that certificate would be buried with his father's. We didn't have to look at it anymore, but instead his mother just like. Put It on the wall, display it in the living room. And then the bus driver thinks it wore on you after a while other people's accomplishments. I love that sentence did you ever feel that way I mean he kochman here seems. So relatively small like a good attendance record and not to knock that. But for that to be like, you know the zenith of somebody's life is. You. but did you feel that way that a war on you? Other People's accomplishments? I don't think that I paid so much attention to other people's. Successes or whatever. But I, know that I was aware you know by the time. I was thirty two or so and I've been working at the mail for about fourteen years. And I knew that all the guys that I had come in with you got hired about the same time as mayor guys even much later than that. You know they own their own home. Maybe. They owned a boat and they had two or three vehicles and they were married and had kids and on and on and on. You know in contrast to them. I've been divorced twice. I'd filed bankruptcy when I got sober I was living in this little very small apartment above this garage. Of. Motel Room and I've been living there for about. Four or five years. I owned a black and white TV that my sister had given me and I had this seventy six chevy that had the whole side of smashed in and that was it. You know for fourteen years of working there. That's what I had. And so you know there was that sense I guess of me just being a failure. Wasn't really that I wasn't jealous of those people or anything like that. I, mean I had enough sense to know that you know where I ended up was my own fault. But there was always that that idea in back of my head that. I could have done more you know I could maybe went to college or something you know. I'm sure you know if I'd wanted to go to school when I was eighteen, my dad would try to help me. and. That's not the route that I chose though how has your life changed? Now as a published writer, you have a collection of short stories. You have a new novel you got a thirty five thousand dollars cash prize, the pen, Robert Bingham Award. So, what's different about your life? well, I have a lot more time to just set on the porch and. Smoke and daydream. Think it's a legitimate. Yeah well, at least that's what I tell my wife. But my life hasn't really changed that much I. Mean I get a lot more emails. Now you know that sort of thing, but you know I still live in the same house I still pretty much. You know my daily routine is. I really can't say that it's changed that much. It's a good life and I'm thrilled that you know I've got a publisher and. You know had at least a little bit of success. You know I know a lot of writers out there a lot of writers out there who are much better than I am. And would. Probably give their left arm. To be setting, you know where I'm setting today. Well Donald Ray, pollock thing you so much for talking with us. Terry I appreciate. It. Made my day. Donald Ray pollock speaking to Terry Gross in twenty eleven. The devil all the time a new movie based on his novel of the same name.

Writer Donald Ray Pollock Willard Terry Gross Ohio Arvin Arvin Brown Netflix Ray Pollock Donald Trump Donald Ray Arvin Eugene Russell Robert Pattinson Tom Holland Robert Bingham Chile John Cheever Ohio University Dennis Johnson Greenfield
What Does The Science Say

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:46 min | Last week

What Does The Science Say

"Welcome to kids, myths and mysteries. Stores were strange and unexplained people, places and events. I'm your host Kit crumb today fringe science. Sciences defined as intellectual practical activity, encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical natural world through observation and experiment. Fringe Science is considered an inquiry into an established field of study and departs from mainstream theories in that field and is considered to be questionable by mainstream science. Now. Don't confuse fringe science with pseudoscience, which is defined as a belief in some person place or event that is mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method but many categories once considered the product of pseudoscience have slipped into the category of fringe science and many fringe science categories are now consider pure science. A short list of categories considered to be a fringe science, include cryogenics reanimation, and suspended animation. Now, let's take a quick look at each of these. cryogenics is generally the practice according to Al Core cryonic center in Arizona of freezing people who need a cure for a disease or perhaps are in need of an Oregon and will be thought at some later time when there is a cure or an organ available. Now Look at the second fringe science on my list reanimation. That is usually thought to mean restoring life. Finally the third on my list suspended animation that would be closer to the cryogenics. Separately these three would be considered by science to be way out on the French but alcorn does freeze patients and that would seem to be suspended animation, and if indeed the patients brought back to life, you would have to call latte reanimation. Still Science would scoff at the concept yet in Japan Cell Nuclei and DNA were taken from a woolly mammoth that live twenty eight thousand years ago and implanted by scientists into the cells and Ogm of living. Five showed essential biological reactions needed for cell division. This could lead to the reanimation. Mammoth. From the frozen north where the woolly mammoth was the unsuspecting subject of natural cryogenics to lab in Japan where the mammoths DNA was brought from a state of suspended animation. To a reanimated state and planted into the oval ma-ma mouse I'd have to say that's cryogenic suspended animation and reanimation that have slipped from fringe science too pure science. Now, let's plunged down the list of fringe science to the much-maligned topic pre cognition. Simply precondition is considered the fore knowledge of an event. Let's take on a huge event debt even titanic in size, and that's pun intended. It's common knowledge that the titanic was the largest cruise ship of its time. It was considered unsinkable and perhaps because of that Monica unsinkable, it didn't have enough lifeboats for all the passengers when in mid April nineteen twelve on its maiden voyage, it hit an iceberg it sank taking with it over one, thousand, five, hundred passengers but fourteen years prior to the sinking author Morgan Robertson wrote a book titled Futility described the largest cruise ship in the world he named Titan in his book he described his ship as unsinkable and not carrying enough lifeboats for the passengers. When it in his book struck an iceberg in mid April over a thousand died strangely there are well over one dozen similarities between Robertson's Titan and the titanic. And remember he wrote about the Titan in eighteen ninety eight. Pre Cognition. Well, what else could it be? Moving along the list of fringe science, you'd find past life regression hypnotism Bo scoffed at by science at both used by licensed and highly educated counselors around the world although the list of practices an event that fall under the shadow of fringe science as long one I couldn't resist looking at artificial intelligence. You probably heard of IBM's corporations creation Watson. But Watson is program to teach itself in whatever endeavor it is directed. Intelligence natural kind you and I possess is not the same intelligence. Watson has watson can look at a room elementary students and evaluate. Standing Body language which students are following the teachers teachings which are confused and which are distracted. But the natural intelligence that you and I possess would not only separate the students in those three categories mentioned. We could probably figure out why those that followed the teacher could why those that didn't couldn't and what distracted the remainder.

Morgan Robertson Watson Titan Japan Al Core Cryonic Center Alcorn Oregon IBM Arizona BO Monica
Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

Babes and Babies

04:46 min | Last week

Pelvic Floor Therapy with Melissa Dessaulles

"Would love for you to tell us to start just a little bit about yourself and how you got into all of this. Absolutely. So I live in on the west coast basically of Canada. So in British Columbia I've been I might sometimes they physio because in Canada we refer to ourselves as physios but I'll try to physical therapists came. I've been physical therapist for fourteen years never thought by calling would be talking to people about their vaginas. Or like peeing and pooping, and then I had a baby out of China and That was seven years ago I had my first and I would say that as kind of snow, I was like smacked in the head with all these things that time seven years ago. No one even talked about this. So even as a physical therapist, it was not on my radar very active I was very fit I thought I'd Kinda just strong power through this and I was totally raw onion. So it was when I started getting help that I thought this is really important and ever since then that's that's all I've done that's what I do now. In my clinical practices, see lots of. You know. OC. Men some women and you're right mostly pregnancy and postpartum related issues but lots of people that have never had babies to. Have Two kids. Now I have a seven year old daughter and a four year old son. So you're probably a lot more prepared with the four year old then pelvic floor. I would say that it was less like I wouldn't say the birth that. And I would say my mindset about it was different I in. In. At least this time feeling prepared and I wasn't so overwhelmed by what is this GonNa look like and I knew what to do after I. Felt a little bit more confident and afterwards when I was having weird symptoms like peeing or pressuring my Vagina Felt. Weird. It wasn't so scary as a golf course I'm having this based on what happened and here are some things that I can do. So, I would love to kind of dive into a lot of the misconceptions because when people think public four health, the one word comes their mind key goals or K. goals. How do you say it? I say. So. In I think that there's tons of misconceptions about that as well because there's a right way to do it but there really a wrong way. Well. You're right. It gets a lot of it gets a lot of talk but I think a lot of people don't understand what it truly is. I always explain the public floors very similar to other muscles in our body, and we know, for example, are biceps because we can see it all the time but every muscle in our body, let's use the by for example, needs to be able to go from like a relaxed position to a tight position. Okay and it spends its day doing all all movements in between there some when we when we do things like lift something heavy to set past the titan when we go to bed at night relaxes and the pelvic poor, very similar when we do things like the cause pressure cough or sneeze or lift something heavy or jump, the pelvic floor needs to respond with tension, but it needs to tighten like and stop us from the beginning p. But when the pressure is gonNA. Stop coughing redone are jumper what we put down the heavy object pellet worshiped relax so it's very similar in that way that it has to tighten and relax it does this behind the scenes it's very automatic. That's why people don't know much about their pelvic for. US doing a Keitel is our way of controlling those muscles and tightening them a win. The pelvic floor heightens the holes close. So kind of the P. Tube and the and the NS clothes and everything s bottom up. There's no name for relaxing the pelvic floor though so Heels tightening. There's no name for relaxation. But as you know from every other muscle in the body, both are important. No muscle in the body wants to be high all the time or it doesn't. Work very well if you came into the clinic Mosa. My neck is so tight like is would that be you wouldn't be coming in writing about that it would be giving you problems and I think that that's one of the biggest misconceptions is that. All symptoms are result of weakness, and so therefore, we think we should just be tightening tightening tightening. But sometimes again, if you came in with pain in your neck, you'd probably have tension in your. If I told you to keep tightening, you'd think I was crazy. and. So when we keep tightening and tightening autour perpetuating the problem

Canada United States China P. Tube Keitel
Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

Latina to Latina

04:48 min | Last week

Why Gianna Nino-Tapias Embodies Labor Rights

"Yana. Nino thought BS planned to spend the summer before her first year at Stanford Medical School doing contact tracing working retail. But when her job search a dead end, she went back to seasonal fruit picking work. She's been doing since she was fourteen. At the end of one long day she tweeted about farm workers like her being paid seven dollars for two gallons of blueberries. She then asked how much do you pay for your blue various? I had talked to her I did and learn so much about her path to medicine as a first gen college student indigenous rights farm worker's Rights on. We'll consumers need to know about the people who make their food possible. Jeddah. Where are you right now? I'm Linden from California Palo Alto our new you're back at school ivax going out here. I always remember those summers during college going home in it's. It's so strange because you have all this independence when you're at school and then you come home and your parents. Treat, you like you're still in high school, right? Right and every time I go home. It's just there's just a large expectation fairly for my mom is my own expectation that I should be like helping my mom in linked doing some chores and like lightening her load guy at school it's like you're right like complete freedom I do whatever I want whenever I want. Do you perceive your mom to have a heavy load Yeah absolutely. I think she's our only period and. I think that you know we go to work and she has to come home and make them some meals for everyone. There's five of us and she kind of like cleaned for Yooglie of she loves house being cleaned. So I help out with all those things whenever I can. To Lot Yeah You're born you're born in Eastern, Oregon, you grew up in eastern Washington state. Told me about where you grew up. So Eastern. Washington is very different from Seattle. I think that's why. Like columnists conception that I. Get is that the thing it's just like satellite super rainy it's actually not. So eastern Washington Eastern Oregon both desert in the rain shadow of. E mountain range. So we get like very little rain, it's very conservative. There's very little diversity out there I think the main communities of color that live out there my farmer communities in the needle in communities I think it was a great place ago by the you grow up because it is so rural. There's so much nature around there so much like the outdoor activities to do Saigo peron alarm really enjoyed around a lot of fields. So my working in the field I love Eastern Oregon eastern Washington I would love to go back someday is that the plan to go back? Yeah. Absolutely. How old were you when you started working in the fields? I was fourteen years old. What was your first day of work like? I. Think I was super excited for my first year. We're ten years ago. And they all super excited because I would get to contribute. Tie Household I, think the causes for me was like, okay I can use this money to go to my mom to make your life easier and then she would let me keep some of it so that I could spend it on what I wanted to nature's like take my siblings than I on a shopping spree for for school. So he went to buy school supplies in. We were very excited like Bonnie backpacks unlike brand name markers and stuff like that. I have three younger siblings. So they were all little and they were excited because we had never done that like I think I'll. Getting. The bare minimum that we need for school and now it's finally like being I was able to get them whatever they wanted. Is there a story from childhood that captures who you were as a kid. I think one story though remembering like me, my mom and my sister was. Going to do this activity called Battle of the books where there's a selection link. Eight books that read it's handling a quiz bowl style where you just like recall parts of the book and I've always loved reading and so we were remembering that I read all the books like my sister was on my team even though she was two years younger than me in the elementary school and she was like, yeah, you just carry the team and you like because remembered everything and I think that that was super emblematic of just who I was of like my love for reading my. Or. Competitive data. Just like a real enjoyment for school and like why The promise of my mom always wanted to go to school didn't get the chance to and so. She was always telling me and my siblings like, Oh, you go to school a you do all in school. It's GonNa take you to a Lotta places in. So I guess those just carry me through life

Stanford Medical School Washington Oregon Yana. Nino Yooglie Eastern Jeddah Saigo Peron California Palo Alto Seattle Bonnie
David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

The New Yorker: Fiction

06:26 min | 2 weeks ago

David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

"David. Hi Deborah Welcome back. It's great to be back. So three days came out in two thousand, six more than fourteen years ago but you told me that you think about it at least once a month. I do think about this story I mean, I, Love Samantha Hunts writing so much and and all of her stories tend to kind of sink into me and remain in my body because she's such a visceral physical writer and. This story in particular has always stayed with me and. The the feeling of the story will just kind of percolate in strange moments and sometimes I'll have that feeling around like I don't know where that feeling is coming from. They'll be like Oh. Yeah that's right. That's that's a three days Samantha. Hunt feeling. What do you think without giving too much away what do you think is driving not feeling well, I think it's her writing in general, which to me just gets under the skin in a really interesting way that I don't see done very often and writing, and she's doing so many interesting things with time and memory, and also I love very tightly constructed the matic stories and I think this is one of those stories too. So it was such a pleasure to return to it in a way in which I was trying to really take it apart a little bit because. Often with those kinds of stories they can be airless and they can kind of take out the feeling quality that you want but she does that come reckless thing where it's thematically so tight but it also is just full of emotion So it's one of those stories that I just marvel at like much of her writing or like how did she do that and? So it's it's both like jealousy profound jealousy I like, Oh, I didn't. I can't do the Samantha Hunt thing and also just the memory of the situations that she comes up with that are always kind of dreamlike So they kind of become part of your own subconscious What's interesting to me about three days as it is so tightly constructed, but you don't realize it when you read it for the first time until you get to the end. And see everything was was leaning you there. For sure and then just how she uses family and myth in such an interesting way and just the level of control that she has going back through it I noticed more things whereas like, oh, that makes so much sense to have that particular paragraph right there. As editor, you get to page three and you think why on Earth did they do that here and let's take it out and then you get to page fifteen and you have to put it back. Yeah for sure. We'll talk some more after the story. Now, Here's David Gilbert reading three days by Samantha Hunt. Three days. It's starting to get dark. Beatrice Fox along the highway from the bus depot up to her family's house. She avoids the Roadway by walking just outside the guardrail in the long dry grass. It's been mad down by road salt and rain strewn with trash and the surprisingly bloated body of a dead raccoon. Beatrice imagines that car and truck passing hold someone she wants new in highschool. Inside their cars, they're shaking their heads and asking his that Beatrice with allergy she doing with a bloated raccoon carcass. BEATRICE TURNS UP THE DRIVE She hasn't seen the farm and more than a year. After her father died, she moved away to the city not for any good reason just I change and now she likes it there. She likes the fact that all the humiliations involved with entering her thirties as a single woman are happening behind her clothes department door out of the view of her family and everyone she has ever known. There are some weathered plastic, dwayne Reed Easter, decorations a hip high bunny rabbit and a bright green egg wired to the front. Porch. It is thanksgiving, and so from the road where Beatrice stands, it appears that in the time she's been gone redneck clones of her brother and her mother have moved in and had their perverted redneck way with the house. The farm is now an island in a sea of big chain stores. While the surrounding firms were plowed under one by one and turned into shopping centers, her parents had stood by. They had waited rather than selling their land as neighbors all had, and now along a ten mile strip of parking lot stores, gas stations, banks, and supermarkets. Their form is the last one left. It isn't much of a form. Beatrice his parents had given up farming seven years before when when morning beatrice his mother had told her father. I don't feel like getting out of bed. He looked her over and holding her John His hands. He studied her face for a long while before saying, yes, I can see it right there in your forehead as if there was some word written across her brow, a word that excused her from farm work for the rest of her life. Within a few weeks, Beatrice's father had become an expert crossword puzzle solver. He'd even considered writing a novel before realizing that soon, they would be broke. Beatrice his parents had to start working or sell the farm, and so they made a decision they leased their land to a conglomerate soybean operation and applied for jobs in the new industrial park. Her father got work as a loan adjuster. Her mother got a job in advertising working in the satellite. Office of a company called mythological development which turned myths and sometimes history into marketable packages used for making new products and ideas more digestible to the consumer public. Her father didn't like having an office job. He used his sick days as soon as he got them. But Beatrice, his mother had always been very dramatic someone who swooned or leapt without provocation. The sort of person who would sing while grocery shopping and then wonder why people were staring at her. She flourished during the brainstorming conference calls that were a regular feature

Beatrice Fox Samantha Hunt Writer David. Dwayne Reed Easter David Gilbert Editor John His
David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

The New Yorker: Fiction

05:04 min | 2 weeks ago

David Gilbert Reads Three Days By Samantha Hunt

"David. Hi Deborah Welcome back. It's great to be back. So three days came out in two thousand, six more than fourteen years ago but you told me that you think about it at least once a month. I do think about this story I mean, I, Love Samantha Hunts writing so much and and all of her stories tend to kind of sink into me and remain in my body because she's such a visceral physical writer and. This story in particular has always stayed with me and. The the feeling of the story will just kind of percolate in strange moments and sometimes I'll have that feeling around like I don't know where that feeling is coming from. They'll be like Oh. Yeah that's right. That's that's a three days Samantha. Hunt feeling. What do you think without giving too much away what do you think is driving not feeling well, I think it's her writing in general, which to me just gets under the skin in a really interesting way that I don't see done very often and writing, and she's doing so many interesting things with time and memory, and also I love very tightly constructed the matic stories and I think this is one of those stories too. So it was such a pleasure to return to it in a way in which I was trying to really take it apart a little bit because. Often with those kinds of stories they can be airless and they can kind of take out the feeling quality that you want but she does that come reckless thing where it's thematically so tight but it also is just full of emotion So it's one of those stories that I just marvel at like much of her writing or like how did she do that and? So it's it's both like jealousy profound jealousy I like, Oh, I didn't. I can't do the Samantha Hunt thing and also just the memory of the situations that she comes up with that are always kind of dreamlike So they kind of become part of your own subconscious What's interesting to me about three days as it is so tightly constructed, but you don't realize it when you read it for the first time until you get to the end. And see everything was was leaning you there. For sure and then just how she uses family and myth in such an interesting way and just the level of control that she has going back through it I noticed more things whereas like, oh, that makes so much sense to have that particular paragraph right there. As editor, you get to page three and you think why on Earth did they do that here and let's take it out and then you get to page fifteen and you have to put it back. Yeah for sure. We'll talk some more after the story. Now, Here's David Gilbert reading three days by Samantha Hunt. Three days. It's starting to get dark. Beatrice Fox along the highway from the bus depot up to her family's house. She avoids the Roadway by walking just outside the guardrail in the long dry grass. It's been mad down by road salt and rain strewn with trash and the surprisingly bloated body of a dead raccoon. Beatrice imagines that car and truck passing hold someone she wants new in highschool. Inside their cars, they're shaking their heads and asking his that Beatrice with allergy she doing with a bloated raccoon carcass. BEATRICE TURNS UP THE DRIVE She hasn't seen the farm and more than a year. After her father died, she moved away to the city not for any good reason just I change and now she likes it there. She likes the fact that all the humiliations involved with entering her thirties as a single woman are happening behind her clothes department door out of the view of her family and everyone she has ever known. There are some weathered plastic, dwayne Reed Easter, decorations a hip high bunny rabbit and a bright green egg wired to the front. Porch. It is thanksgiving, and so from the road where Beatrice stands, it appears that in the time she's been gone redneck clones of her brother and her mother have moved in and had their perverted redneck way with the house. The farm is now an island in a sea of big chain stores. While the surrounding firms were plowed under one by one and turned into shopping centers, her parents had stood by. They had waited rather than selling their land as neighbors all had, and now along a ten mile strip of parking lot stores, gas stations, banks, and supermarkets. Their form is the last one left. It isn't much of a form. Beatrice his parents had given up farming seven years before when when morning beatrice his mother had told her father. I don't feel like getting out

Beatrice Fox Samantha Hunt Writer David. Dwayne Reed Easter David Gilbert Editor
A strange Blue Flame

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:31 min | 2 weeks ago

A strange Blue Flame

"Welcome to catch myths and mystery signer host kid chrome today a little insight into a different kind of fire at the heart of many seafaring stories going back hundreds of years detail of a blue fire coming up from top of a master crackling along the railing along the gunwales. Some sailors described how they had watched a blue crackling light move along the top of the water climb up the side of this ship wind around the mass where would vanish into thin air. Today we would refer to a sailor's description of a blue light moving around their ship, a saint elmo's fire. This is a weather phenomenon where a sharp or pointed object is passing through a strong electric field in atmosphere not dangerous if it can be an indicator of a charge difference around you making lightning more likely to strike you despite your location in eighteen ninety. Nine Colorado Springs and experiment by Nikola Tesla that utilized undoubted waves caused horses at the livery stable because suddenly Bolton kick free of their stalls, even the insects felt the effects of the electrical barrage butterflies became electrified helplessly swirling circles, their wings, sprouting Blue Halos of saint almost fire during World War One Germany had dozens of rigid airships called Zeppelin's they could travel eighty five miles an hour and carry up to two tons of bombs by the Nineteen Thirties Dr Louvred cder who overseeing the design of this upland step aside to allow the head of the company Hugo. To design the huge Hindenburg class airships in all tour bill designated L Z one, twenty, nine. The HINDENBURG was one hundred, three feet long with a diameter of one hundred, thirty, five feet is gas capacity was just south of seven million cubic feet I I flew in March nineteen thirty six American Airlines contracting with the operators of the Hindenburg shuttled passengers from Lakehurst Newark. Connections to airplane flights she carried thirty six passengers with a crew sixty, one and two thousand, nine, hundred trainees. The airship was hours behind schedule WANNA passed over Boston due to these headwinds landing at Lakehurst was further delayed by foul weather that included thunderstorms the captain opted to pass over. Manhattan. At six, fifty, five PM, the storm had passed and the captain directed the Hindenburg in the direction of it's more at Lakers were the ground crew waited. At seven PM local time the Hindenburg made his final approach from an altitude of six, hundred, fifty feet. The ship would drop rope in cable and be winched tied to more in tower. It began to rain the ground crew grabbed the mooring lines at seven twenty, five a number of individuals on the ground witnessed what they later would state look like a blue. Flame climb up the back of the HINDENBURG seconds later it burst into Flame Werner France was a fourteen year old cabin boy who is dazed by the fire. But when one of the ship's water bladders burst, he was drenched and managed to get out of a hatch used to load food into the kitchen once on the ground, he ran from the burning inferno. The only survivor to escape without any injuries he was also the last surviving crew member and died at the age of ninety two in August two, thousand, fourteen, another survivor was Joseph Spa. ADVIL COMIC ACROBAT. When he saw the first sign of trouble, he smashed the window with this movie camera which had been filming the landing. The film did the disaster by the way that's ship near the ground. He lowered himself out the window on hung onto window ledge letting go when the ship was perhaps twenty feet above the ground his acrobatic instincts kicked in and spa kept his feet under him attempted to do a safety role. When he landed, he injured his ankle nonetheless days Woodley crawling away on a member of the ground crew came up, swung the diminutive SPA under one arm and ran him clear that fire days lady during an interview and investigation was determined that sabotage was. The, cost of the flames but Saint Elmo's fire and that had caused the initial spark that caught the gas on fire. A different

Hindenburg Joseph Spa Saint Elmo Dr Louvred Cder Nikola Tesla Lakehurst Newark Lakehurst Boston Germany Advil Colorado Springs Lakers Woodley Werner France Manhattan Hugo Bolton American Airlines
Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

The Daily Boost

04:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

"It is Monday. On Monday. Fourteen years I've asked a question. And if you've ignored me for fourteen years, God bless you you are good. You're awfully good because I've been doing this every single Monday. Have you done your homework? Just sit down and just take a few minutes. Maybe five minutes just today maybe after this program has done. And look on yourself just to see how you doing. It's like your mom opening the look at any after she took piano at night right? You know she opened the door, but you pretended to be asleep. You can look at it on yourself say how how doing? Marolles my family roles, my relationships, roles, spiritual roles, my physical rolls, my financial world how many doing my life? Are there things in my life I just really love and he just want to keep so much gratitude for. WanNa make sure they stay in my life or the things that I don't love that much and maybe I'd like to have them go someplace else. But you haven't thought about how to do that yet. When you take a few minutes to self assess where your focus should be. I'll make you this promise. Next week when you do it again, a lot of the stuff that you are concerned about this week that you discovered, it'll be different next week it'll be you'll be on your way you'll be transforming moving in a different direction that's how it works. When you become aware would you like what? You don't like you start making natural changes its natural, right? So do homework. You know what are the ways it all begins is taking control of your time and allowing yourself time to well to be yourself and to spend time with yourself in the do things that are important to you. If you haven't picked up my perfect week planner, go get it. It's motivation and we've DOT COM or perfectly finer dot com. It's a quick little pdf download watch the video. It'll teach you how to gather control of your time and give your life back. It's fast it's simple. You'll see it it a change everything and just a couple of days I promise that. So you rockstar. Or you'll member the band which went are you it's Ok does it really matter which role you play I don't really care. I just WANNA make sure you're moving towards your goals a long long long time ago I remember this I was raising kids. Those of you that are. Probably remember the old George Carlin. Album called am and FM. What happened? Got A kid. What are you GonNa do with a kid. Going to raise them. So I was done I was raising the kid. Micah folks raise my kid I thought what he's eighteen. He's Outta here. He's done right well, that didn't happen. They never go away those who've had kids. It doesn't ended eighteen those you have older kids you know that never stops. But he was gonNA. Move Out. It was time to go out on his own. Conversation about that. The rockstar conversation. So he he's staying out to four in the morning being a rockstar every single night trying to be a rockstar keeping his mom up kind of disrupting the households twenty one years old he wasn't really working or anything. I don't do roommates. Just don't I mean I. Get it. But but this is a little bit disruptive. So because it's okay, I'M GONNA move out I'm going to go to Hollywood and sing on Sunset Boulevard. Yar. Now's a guy who's been all kinds of big dreams in my life and done a lot of things. A lot of experience a had some perspective and I just wanted to say it are you willing to do what it takes to get you to the top? To be that Rockstar. And if you don't get. Do. You think you want to be. Are there any other options that might make you happy I mean what if you independence as as a background player with that? Happy. He said, you know I don't think I would I think I gotta go for my dream said great as long as you know where you're going to go but then we talked a little bit about what may may occur on down the road but he said I gotta go from dreams at on I think you probably should his dad did that I did that I got out of high school and took off and I said I'm going to be a rock and roll radio DJ do morning shows I did all over the country everywhere all kinds of cool stuff had a great time is a Rockstar on the radio star back in the day when that's what they were back then. But you know what? I kind of learned something. My son learned to. As, much as it was really enjoyable as much as I really had a good time doing it. Then frankly as much as I was good and he was good to never forget him. Shooting facetime say hey, look I'm on stage on sunset boulevard singing the song is it how was it goes not what I expected

Rockstar George Carlin Hollywood
‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

Gaming Ride Home

01:47 min | 3 weeks ago

‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

"A resident evil show, it's coming to net. Flix. NETFLIX's has another video game show to add to its weirdly growing video game TV show roster with the announcement that a resident evil show is in the works, the twitter account and on Netflix which shares all of Netflix's official announcements shared a picture of a script titled Resident Evil Episode One. Oh one welcome to new raccoon city. The accompanying tweet reads when the West kids moved to new raccoon city the secrets they uncover might just be the end of everything resident evil A. New Live action series based on Cap comes legendary survival horror franchise is coming to Netflix something about the phrasing of the whisker kids just makes it feel like it's going to be a kid show. I don't think it is, but it just feels like it's going to be like an animated spinoff or something following the whisker kids. Bradley Russell did some additional reporting on the show for games radar and wrote as per Netflix's the resident evil series will on two timelines and the. First Time Line fourteen year old sisters, jade and billy whisker are moved to raccoon city a manufactured corporate town forced on them right as adolescence is in full swing but the more time they spend there, the more they come to realize that the town is more than it seems and their father may be concealing dark secrets secrets that could destroy the world. The second time line has a serious time jump sixteen years into the future and with a whole lot more zombies on. The scene, there are less than fifteen million people on. Earth. Reads the synopsis of the Second Time Line and more than six billion monsters, people and animals infected with the virus. Jade thirty struggles to survive in this new world while the secrets from her past about her sister, her father and herself continue to haunt her

Netflix Billy Whisker Bradley Russell Jade Twitter CAP Official
The Thing About Maintenance

A Slob Comes Clean

05:07 min | 3 weeks ago

The Thing About Maintenance

"All right. Let's talk about learning from gardening. I'm not talking about actual gardening. You know when I picture gardening, I picture my mom who is the Garden Club Queen. Like I think if they have a queens, she's actual Queen I mean that's that's what she did she basically that was her. Empty Nest what she turned her focus toward. And she is has always been. She grew up her dad was a farmer. And so she loves outdoors she's always put a lot of effort and time into the yard. That's not me. So knowing anything about plants. That's not me knowing what I'm doing that's not me. I basically have just been trying to recover my yard. From pretty much not doing anything to it for like fourteen years so. There you go. I'm not at this as someone to tell you how to garden. I'm just telling you. This is what I've been doing to try to recover from fourteen years of basically ignoring my yard now when I say that. We know we have. Nice grass. We did put out grass at one point, but the the woman who had the house before. Loved reminds me of my mom you know she loved. Working in the yard, and so she spend time every single day going around and watering everything. So there were tons of plants and small trees and all these types of things that needed to be maintained but I didn't understand they needed to be maintained. Do you see what I'm saying I just thought Oh that's nice and then over the course of fourteen years of me pretty much ignoring those things they grew into their own jungles basically. So thought of that. was on the side of the House and we had taken out some things in the front yard. My husband would get frustrated and he would chop things down and you know try to deal with it and we so it's not like it was a complete and total jungle, but it wasn't maintains like it wasn't Nice at all okay and he is great about mowing the yard not. I. Don't. I don't want you to think that I'm bashing anything and I. Were talking about gender roles and inside outside and Blah. Blah Blah and whatever no I mean it it basically. Both of us has all vision about our flowerbeds and stuff like that. That were completely overgrown and all that kind of stuff. So Like I said, I decided to start working on it. So what I'm doing here is I'm just GonNa, tell you what I've done and what I've learned because here's the thing. I. have. Watched my mother forever work in the Yard K. as a child she would spend time out there. You know going over, she would walk me around her yard in and show me things and I'd be like great okay. but at the same time for me I didn't care enough to actually retain the information do saying so i. Just kind of went out there and I said, what is it that I need to do in these? flowerbeds and I said well, there are. Leaves in the flowerbeds like we've. breaked leaves from the yard but there's just a build up of leaves in the and the flowerbeds. And so I was like, okay. I'm going to start by getting the leaves out you guys. That is the same as trash in the decluttering process okay. It was the most obvious. Wasn't supposed to be there needed to be removed. And gotten rid of Steph. Okay. So I went through and I literally would go three feet by three feet. I would basically just go outside again this was back in March in April when it wasn't hot yet and I would say I'm just going to kind of go as long as I can go I would just work. Some days, it would be twenty minutes some days it would be two hours, but I would just do as much as I could do, and my whole goal was just to get across the front of the yard getting the the leaves taking care of. Okay. Now, how does this relate to maintenance? Well? Let's talk about this idea of maintenance and let's talk about why it is a real trip for so many people like us. Okay I've taught before. A lot about how I have a project brain if I have a project brain. then. By reality is that I view things as. Tasks as having a beginning a middle and an end. So I look at my house. Use to look at my house still do 'cause you know that's just where my brain goes, but I would look at it and think. I need to get my house cleaned up and the word maintenance didn't fit into that because I thought that was what came after

Garden Club Queen Steph
The Last US Civil War Pension

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

The Last US Civil War Pension

"Triplet was born in Nineteen thirty in Wilkes County North Carolina Sixty five years after the end of the civil war. How she ended up receiving civil war pension is one of those stories that you wouldn't believe if it wasn't true. But when you do the math, it actually does workout. Her father was most triplet was a veteran of the civil war. He had the distinction of having fought for both the confederacy and the Union. He was a member of the fifty third North Carolina infantry who fought in the battle of Gettysburg. On the way to Gettysburg most fell ill and was hospitalized the illness probably saved his life because most of his unit was either killed or wounded during the battle. After he recovered, he deserted the confederates and joined up with the third north, Carolina mounted infantry which fought for the union. The unit was known as Kirks raiders after commander Colonel, George Washington. Kirk. After the war Mos- returned to North Carolina got married and started a family his wife Mary passed away in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. As with many older civil war veterans, they would often take younger second wives especially during the Great Depression as their pension was considered a source of stable income. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four at the age of seventy eight MOS married his second wife Alita who was twenty nine years old Mohsen Alita had five children. One of them Irene was born in one, thousand, nine, thirty when Mos- was eighty-three. Irene was just eight years old when her father died at the age of ninety two after returning home from a civil war veterans reunion. Irene had a cognitive disability which made her eligible to continue to receive her father civil war pension after his death as a quote, helpless child of a veteran. She received her father's pension of seventy three dollars and thirteen cents every month from her father's death in one thousand, nine, thirty, eight to her death in. Twenty twenty. The amount was never for inflation. The entire time it's estimated she received approximately seventeen thousand dollars over the course of her life. In addition to having received the last civil war pension, she was also the last child of a civil war veteran. The second to last child of a civil war veteran also had an interesting story in two thousand. Eighteen Fred Upton passed away at the age of ninety seven. His father was William H Upton. Who is a civil war veteran and the former governor of the state of Wisconsin who was elected in eighteen ninety four. Because of the occurrence of young women marrying much older men with pensions, the passing of the last civil war widow wasn't that long ago either in two thousand and eight motty Hopkins died at the age of ninety three in thousand, nineteen, thirty, four at the age of nineteen she married eighty six year old William Cantrell who served as a sixteen year old soldier in the confederate army. Blast Union widow was Gertrude Janeway who passed away in two thousand three. The last surviving documented veteran of the civil war was Albert Wilson who died at the age of one, hundred, six in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six he was a fourteen year old drummer boy in the first Minnesota. Heavy. Artillery Regiment. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six there was an episode of the TV Game Show I've got a secret with a ninety five year old man named Samuel Seymour. The panelists had to guess what the guest secret was. Samuel Seymour. Was the last surviving witness to Abraham Lincoln's assassination. He was a five year old boy was taken affords theater and said in the balcony across the theater from the present it. there. Is a clip of the appearance on Youtube and I highly recommend viewing it if you're interested in such things. The. Last surviving person who was born as a slave in the United States was Peter Mills who died in Nineteen seventy-two he was born into slavery in eighteen sixty one and live to be one hundred, ten, one person was both born into bondage and live to see the moon landing. The last surviving veteran of the Revolutionary War was John Gray who died in eighteen sixty, eight at the age of one, hundred four he's one of the only people who live to see both the revolution and the civil war oddly enough he was born on George Washington's estate Mount Vernon and his father died in the revolutionary. War. The, last surviving veteran of Napoleon's army was a Polish man Vincent Markowitz who died at one hundred and eight in nineteen three and the last veteran of the war of eighteen twelve was Hiram Cronk who passed away in one thousand, nine, five at the age of one, hundred and five. In Two thousand eleven at the age of one hundred and ten American Frank. Buck was the last surviving veteran of World War One in the world to pass away. Demographers estimate that the last veteran of World War Two will pass away sometime around the year twenty, forty four. It will probably be someone who fought at a very young age and lives to be at least one, hundred and ten. It's amazing how the lives of some people can span such incredible lengths of time and how we can have lives that overlap them. We think of the civil war is being a long time ago. Yet we're only two or three generations removed from people who lived through all of these events.

Midnight Moment 4 - Voter ID and A Conspiracy Theory - burst 1

The Midnight Patriots

09:56 min | Last month

Midnight Moment 4 - Voter ID and A Conspiracy Theory - burst 1

"Jury of Nation. Part hair and it's time for another installment of Liberty Virus via the midnight moment delivery system. that. I was night three of the Democrat National Convention Day One, hundred, sixty, fifteen days flattening curb. It allows unlucky enough to over here made me throw up in my mouth a little bit I gotta be honest with you wanted to wash the taste out with out. But. In the end, I settled for for a Nice Cup of coffee. George Carlin one said I don't have pet peeves. I have made major psychotic fucking hatreds. So in the spirit of both George Carlin and my complete total annoyance with current events, we're going to cover two topics with you. Tonight the first is a voter ID, and the second as a self developed spiracy theory that I would like your indulgence to entertain as strictly a mental exercise though in our society, there are things you. Have to show ID for buying a gun getting prescription painkillers buying alcohol buying. We'd words legal of course, a buying porn. You have to show ID at the DMV the board, an airplane to board trained drive an automobile the list goes on and on and on survivor is going to be required to do any of the above things or you know conduct adulting in any way as it always is lot why states not have a? Statute that requires valid identification busted as yourself that question for a second, you may not like the answer I mean Article One section. Four of the US Constitution states the times, places and manner of holding elections for Senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof. But the Congress may at any time by law make or alter such regulations except as to places of choosing senator I mean there was. An assumption clearly present in our constitution that citizens right to vote is protected under free speech under the First Amendment. But in a citizen right the but I mean article two section one clearly spells out that our founders framers specified who could and couldn't be president no person except the natural born citizen or citizen of the United States at the time of this adoption of this constitution shall be eligible to the office of the president. Neither shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained? The age of thirty five years have fourteen years been a residence within the United States our founders and framers carved out specifics. Do you really believe they had any intention any intention at all for non citizens to vote in our elections? Give me a break. So if they're going to push the agenda and by the way I'm speaking to leftists and liberals who seem to think that showing identification at a polling place is somehow minority voter suppression Oh really then I say, well, no, I devote no idea by guns no background checks ever for anything. No idea to buy booze or weed. Or board a plane. Is it. Any wonder that liberal states have started issuing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants? Because if somehow some way. We restore common sense in order to our republic and require a valid form of identification vote illegal immigrants will be their voters and their voting block. I'm not suggesting we give up the right to an anonymous ballot that's absolutely protected by the First Amendment I get it. No. One has stating that your driver's license number be attached to your ballot. But. If you can't get into a bar without id if you can't buy liquor without ID, why should you be able to access the polling place? I just want to point out and make it clear the blatant outright shitting hypocrisy and quite frankly left racism in the claim that somehow requiring an idea vote is minority suppression really I mean here in Colorado most liquor stores that I frequent require id for every transaction and believe me I do not look twenty one or younger bars and nightclubs in this area often use a barcode scanners. Id and I know that it's that way in some other states, somehow all of this is okay but somehow requiring an ID to vote arguably the most violent in the world voting is minority voter Suppression Racist Bull Shit. So as the assertion that minorities by the way don't have an ID or don't have the ability or somehow incapable of getting one, I mean the bring specificity again. Zona adults over the age of eighteen are required. To carry ID at all times. That's whether you're walking down the street driving your car or otherwise, and that has been in effect since World War. Two, this is not something new. This is not something that the Clintons or the bushes or anyone else do any time in recent history this has been the law of the land for literally decades. Whether that laws right or wrong as up to you. But really do we really need any more outside influence in our country regardless of what the political spectrum you stand on our guys we've got another segment coming up right after this break. Stay tuned. Midnight Patriot nations spartan here with a shameless plug for our new gear shop shop dot midnight Patriots Dot Com. T shirts, hats, hoodies, mugs, phone cases just about everything else in between we got you covered whether you're looking to embrace your insomnia, show your patriotism or make a liberal hood. Explode. Really. Shop. Dot Midnight Patriots. Dot Com for a limited time. You can save fifteen percent on your order starting now. And now back to the show. So what are the talk about now is? A conspiracy theory I fully admit it. I have no evidence of this except what may be going on around us and some thoughts that I have from the Golden Age of talk, radio in the nineties I sometimes get what I refer to as nuggets of Universal Truth from what most people would consider fairly odd sources. You know movies, songs, sports, overhearing pieces of a conversation, etc one of the things that was kind of profound to me and rain true didn't I didn't really understand the time was the movie captain America the Winter Soldier. Now there's a scene again. Tomorrow will because they're fantastic and I'm going to kind of summarize here there's a scene where they're in a bucket in they're talking to basically an all German scientists. Brain is good put on on a computer and all creepy but isn't that scene they talk about humanity's freedom came. and. One of the things that they said was if you try to take that freedom, they resist humanity needed to surrender. It's freedom willingly. And they finally created a world. So chaotic that you vanity was ready to surrender it's freedom for its own security. Now I know that sounds bizarre and maybe I'm maybe I'm just being paranoid maybe I'm suffering from the Kobe. Kobe lockdown paranoia or whatever you want to call it. The understand this if you wanted to usher in a gestapo-type National Police Force. It had no loyalty to the constitution but only the politicians you know Kinda like Nazi Germany. What would you do? Well. First of all, you'd have to get the police to quit. So if you control the purse strings for the police, department what better way to get them to quit than it, cut their wages, cut their budget and then make them liable for I. Don't know everything. What if he told them to stand down while like Portland Eighty. Three nights of rioting destroys property assaulting assaulting citizens decade the police to quit what about like new? York. They cut the budget of Major Crimes Unit and shootings have gone up. To three hundred percent. Since that happened now, I wanNA make it clear that I do not support a national police force now. Yes we can argue that yes, we have we have federal agents the DA's the ATF the FBI etc. But none of them are actively patrolling the streets but how do you do it? How do you implement a Gestapo of social justice warriors that are essentially thought police, which is what the what's the leftist seem to want anyone that that goes contrary to their narrative anyone that disagrees with any they say politically. Well if you get all the local cops to quit, you have to have something because your citizens will not bag. For protection somebody did is friendly to that idea wins the White House than the Federal Police Force. Is created and then we end up like Nazi Germany. They're already talking about making kids where buttons identified that they either have or have not been vaccinated for Covid. Nineteen. One. Just go out and do yellow stars. Pink triangles. Any sense does you have to question yourself and even do the mental exercise of what's the end game now? This Shit I. GotTa Tell Ya None of it looks good. That was your mental exercise in your midnight moment I'm Spartan have ago. Thanks. Thanks for joining us for another edition midnight moment. Be sure to join us for the main podcast, every Monday night and every Thursday night for more midnight moments. If you like what you hear and support what we do about subscribing. Go to listen Dot Midnight Patriots Dot Com Cook Support and subscribe. Be sure to pick up some merchant gear store shop that midnight Patriots Dot Com. From the Mile High, command. Center. Dot Com studio. This is sport reminding you that the Constitution is not just a suggestion.

ID United States George Carlin Germany President Trump Senator Painkillers DMV National Police Force Congress DA Colorado Federal Police Force Portland Clintons Major Crimes Unit FBI
Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:23 min | Last month

Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

"Hello this Zimran Ahmed founder, and CEO of business to fashion and welcome to live. On this episode I am thrilled to have with me a face that I. I got to know when I first started sneaking into fashion shows here in London about a decade ago. lily. Cole was an up and coming model and those days and she's gone on to have. A career in the fashion industry. But in in addition has become an activist of sorts has studied. At some very very well known universities and has recently published a book which is called who cares wins reasons for optimism in our changing world and so I'm delighted to have lily here with us today. Welcome Lily. Thanks for having me links to see. To, see you to Of course we're GONNA talk about your book, but you have such an interesting backstory that brought you into the fashion industry. So I thought we could actually start there and then get to how you decided that writing a book was kind of something that you wanted to do and how it connects back to some of your experiences and fashion. But so to begin with, you want to just tell us I'm sure it's you know everyone has their origin story and I'm sure. You're you're tired of telling it but. How how did you first get into this weird and wonderful industry? Irish a group in London. and. I was fourteen years old. Just, doing my thing hanging out with my friends in central. London I one evening and a scout from stool agency CRA Benjamin. Hart. Came over to me, he was very looking model himself this very handsome oatman was approaching. And then he talked about the agency had did I want to muddle and gave me business cards and within a year I was kind of flying around the doing I mean even that year I, started walking the next things really took off. The moment when you? Feel like you really realize that you're going to become quite a big deal. In fashion, Industry Missouri Specific Opportunity that you you come. Yeah. It's probably a few. Sixteen A. Nose Service Fifteen. New York and opened anesthesia legis show a campaign with Steven, Meisel and at the time I'd never heard of him. You know I didn't know anything about fashion. So I didn't I didn't know what the meaning of of that was. But when I was in New York for the show kind of sense, the buzz around. Him and his work that I'd worked within. A sense of it and and then I was remember another moment when I was in back in London. And was. was on a motorbike going between shows, which were as you probably know, tons of shows I was trying to fit like five a day sometimes, and so is getting annoyed between shows like it makes them and I had this moment on the back of his motorbike probably fifteen sixteen years old going through central London and seeing my face on the side of these red buses. What? It was quite made it feel real in a very surreal way how I went from Bash into writing a book, which is obviously a big jump by the book writing about fashion and how the experiences I had in bashing took journey along winding journey that I'm still on in which the book is a product. So after a few years working the fashion industry, I started to become more and more wet of some of the challenges with different supply chains I was made aware of the few the companies I was working with they were having are damaging impacts on the people or the environment within which is working. With a charity, Cool Developmental, Justice Foundation who still work with WHO drew my attention to cotton and how cotton farming can be really destructive but I feel very. Conflicted I guess because I thought quite responsible. So what I was appetizing into watching. And I decided instead of focusing on the negative which you know of course, we can I wanted to focus on the positive and the fact that there are different ways that supply chains can be set up and managed

London Meisel New York Hart Lily Zimran Ahmed Cole Justice Foundation Founder CEO Steven
Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:13 min | Last month

Chris Korfist on New Advances in Sprint Training

"Christi Man it's good to have you back. I know I think you have a story about you. You are Carlos now right aren't you writing like a kick bike around and you're getting a hamstring workout what's going on with that? Yeah. So we have three cars which in most families is plenty But my daughter has taken a car up to Minnesota and she usually works during the day. She's GonNa go to Iowa the. Sun's. Going to be a junior but he said his license since December and he has volleyball every day. And then tournament sound the weekend, which I don't know is legal or not these this day and age. But basically, I'm a fifty one year old person that doesn't have a car I have a licensed but most my days and evenings I am Carlos. So. A couple of years ago more than a couple years ago I saw Franz Basch was playing around with the kick bike and John Prior. told me about it so. I've become the kick bike master of Chicago I am the. Middle aged guys zooming around on a red kicked bike. My record so far is fourteen miles. which. Is Pretty good on a kick bike I did it in forty minutes but I. Go Grocery shopping go pick up Britos things like that. Throw in my backpack and I kicked bike around the western suburbs of Chicago, which it may look easy. But kick biking is much harder than riding a bicycle It's your one leg is peddling through. So there's a ton of hamstring involved in the other leg. It's like in this isometric squad before. So. He can get low enough to get your foot on the ground. So. That's been my summer so far kicked. biking around trying to get food or go get whatever I need. I. It's awkward like I go to the wine shop, which isn't too far away but we're a backpack in my backpack I got a bottle of wine in a Burrito like. This is Kinda messed up. Usually, it's like a fourteen year old something like that but it's not often you see a fifty one year old how ask you do you? Do you take that thing through timing gates? How fast is that thing go all well, I have these hotshots because sometimes I just go out for the exercise and there's all these trails nearby and you got these hotshot bikers with all their gear on. And I always like to wear street clothes just to make them feel bad and zoomed by the bikers. So I guess I can go fourteen sixteen miles an hour when I get it moving. That's that's not too bad for non motorized. Yeah. But that's a that's a that's a short burst hold that for awhile. You tired really fast. Yeah I was just GonNa say this is a good segue innocent things that you've been some recent sprint ideas and human locomotion ideas but like the spiralling nature things, right like you got one leg, that's has one job and the other leg has the other job and I know you've been talking about the Lila Somme symmetrical stop there said you feel do you feel like you get a little like spiraling action or how long do you go on one leg before you switch to the other see don't like start running circles or do you care does it Usually I do just because I get bored I counted ten so I do ten pedals But then sometimes I go let's see how many I can do on this leg before my. My metric leg, the leg that's on the machine or bike completely is burning and then I'll switch so. Something like that, and I'm usually listening to a podcast. So I'm doing that too. So I'm. To me, there's nothing worse than doing aerobic work I. Think it's just mind numbing. So between going fast and kick by listening to a podcast and. Worrying about crashing in which legs burning word that usually is enough to keep my mind off the fact that I'm kicked biking and it does get to pissed at my children for taking all the cars and using the a kick bite. I think life is interesting. We don't have a car you know. It definitely I feel like there's always something to be learned I I I was Gonna say I will say as I've gotten older too I. I definitely appreciate having a good aerobic system but finding creative ways to do it not just running and in one direction and all that type of thing. So I did your bear crawl push saying this morning. Nice and that's hard it. Oh Yeah. No, it's super hard. It gets it gets tough like it's it gets logarithmic. You know like one, two, three, four whatever. But then he's getting five, six seven I need to come up with a way to make that more like 'cause everyone's GonNa get stuck at like eight you know or you can just rest the really longtime. Yeah. It I thought it would be easier than it actually was. Yeah, for me. I would do if it was me and someone else doing push ups and it was like you could either do two competitions. One would be just how many push ups can you do in two? Let's do that crawl thing. I would do way at the crawl thing because I get to rest and I'm way better read and it gives me a chance to like the take a break and I've rule more aerobic and all that the last stick. So I I think I, just kind of a cheater way for me to make it look like I'm a little stronger, my body or something I don't know. I feel like it's got I was thinking. It's like you do get the gait cycle in between every bilateral. So I agree I felt that same thing I you know I think the crawling huge is everyone's lack down. And we're lucky because we have gym center basements but still you start cranking off pushups just for something to do and. You can it gets a little numbing after a while and you can feel the impact that? Are Great. I crank off one hundred fifty push-ups but I'm not walking as well in my shoulder kinda hurts now. What am I really doing here is it really important to do that many push ups or is it more important that I feel pretty good after I do the exercise? Yeah. I was doing one of the last traditional strength programs I down for a while and ever since all the lockdown stuff and the weight rooms have been a little more sparse. I didn't have a barbell for quite a while, but one of the last programs that I was doing was just easy strength just two sets of five everyday basically three sets of three and I was Barbell benching every day and I haven't Jack, yeah I'm getting older but I haven't I haven't jacked my shoulder up that bad in a long time like my left shoulder was dying after awhile and every time I do those crawls like it's just like it's all good. You know you just a way to mitigate the same stress and you're back in your shoulder blades being pinned. You know, of course too

Chicago Carlos Biking Franz Basch Iowa SUN Minnesota Lila Somme I. Go Grocery Jack John Prior.
How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

CodeNewbie

06:31 min | Last month

How live coding can level up your development (Jesse Weigel)

"So I, want to switch gears and talk about live coding, which is something that you do. You are a youtube live coding streamer for free coat cab, which sounds terrifying. How did you get into voting? So when I was at this job, it was at a university I. decided that I wanted to collaborate more with the computer science department. I wanted to help the computer science students start to build a resume before they graduated and I thought it would be cool to get some of their ideas because I knew my own gaps in my learning, not having a computer science degree. So I thought we can kind of help each other out in the maybe they would have a lot of knowledge that I didn't, and I would have more practical not. That, they hadn't yet acquired about just like getting things done in making live in applications. So I decided to record myself doing some work and then put a link to it in the the facebook group for the Computer Science Club. And My boss thought that was a good idea and you said, yeah, let's let's do that and I had always been developing everything I. Could Open source on get hope anyway. So that wasn't really an issue and I did some live streams and I didn't I'd never livestream anything before like I really didn't know what I was doing the first live streams were. You couldn't see the code even the the the video quality was terrible the phone I had two small. So it was, it was pretty bad So I went on the Free Co Camp Forum and I a post saying. Just. Here's what I'm trying to do, and I don't know what I'm doing. If anyone has some time, please check out one of my live streams and at appreciate any advice that you have. And I ended up getting a bunch of people watching and giving advice. But probably, the most important view that I had was from Bo Corns who's in charge of the Youtube Channel for Free Code. camp. Alcohol. had asked if I would be interested in doing. Some live coating on the Free Co Camp Channel and I. You know, of course, 'cause my channel, add maybe three subscribers at the time in the Free Co. camp. Channel at the time had maybe somewhere between fifty thousand, one, hundred, thousand subscribers gone up significantly since then we're over a million. Maybe three years ago. So after I did that Quincy who's the head of recode camp also, ill, he watched the stream and he said I really like this and new said, you know you could do this? You know however many times a week you one. So I started live coding for at least an hour a day five days a week. Monday through Friday. How? Is a lot of time that is dedication yet in would really helped was I lies streamed my work. So it wasn't prepared beforehand or rehearse. It was whatever I had to work on that day. I would try to pick whatever I thought would be the most exciting in helpful for other people to see. And I would lie stream that portion of my work. And they were real projects that I was working on, and thankfully you know my boss was just super excited about it and saw this as a great opportunity for publicity for the university. which it really was for a tiny university in Ohio, the logo of the university was seen by people all over the world. So we definitely got some publicity and we also got a lot of people contributing code. So since it was open source. We had a nice community of developers from all over the world that would contribute code. Actually, add a developer. Believe was fourteen years old when he started watching the show from the Himalayas was one of the top contributors on most of the projects and he was so good. He's fine. The Best Coder I've ever worked with. He was so good. I would be in the middle of a livestream talking through a problem of. So here's what, I'm trying to do and I would look over the live chat and there would be five or six messages in all caps saying check my request. And I would look. In, he would have already solved the problem in submitted requests. Yeah It was so. He would often call me out on things. I was doing wrong and I tell you I. I kept in mind all the time. How young he was. I if it were an older person, I may not have taken it so well. A. Little Bit. Yeah. It it did. But I just imagined that he was young. US very excited about what he was doing us very skilled. With it and to be honest, I love what up so much during the live streaming so much more than I ever thought I mean, well. I never thought anybody would really watch it maybe a few computer science. So like. Like maybe one or two people watching to now having hundreds of people you're watching, live all typing and contributing code, and then my work day changed dramatically. It went from me coding most of the day on my own to me spending my mornings, reviewing pool requests in merging them, and then spending my afternoons live coding. And that was like my daily work, we would regularly have you know maybe. Somewhere between like five and a dozen contributors to each one of the projects that I was working on and I, I'd like to think that it was a pretty fair exchange that I would. I would give a shoutout to everybody that contributed in review their pool requests on on air just to let people know what they had done. So I kinda helped. These people who were volunteering their code, build up their portfolios and get some exposure on the Free Code Camp Channel, and then in turn they helped make my projects better. And and I learned so much because I couldn't merge

Computer Science Club Developer Facebook Himalayas Youtube Ohio Bo Corns Quincy
Rediscovering Your Sense of Self in Motherhood

Triad Moms on the Mic

06:40 min | 2 months ago

Rediscovering Your Sense of Self in Motherhood

"Really deep personal question for you guys, boy. We're GONNA get existential today. Ready. The question is. Who Are you? A. Feeling that was coming. On. Are you. Along do we have? Forty minutes by Mike Walk. That's a big question, right and. I think you troll some of the Parenting money facebook groups like the tried mom's on main community. Chad. Or some of the other ones. I see all the time all the time people saying things like. Well number one. How do I make friends as a grownup? And number two what do you guys do for yourself? What do you do for me time But in. That's those are two things that are part of a larger question about who we are as women. Right? Because we have kids a lot of times. Um We forget that we're people. Right. I mean, who who have you guys identify as yourself as so and so's mom. Ideally yeah. Even signed my emails that way. Will you know I was thinking about this because before hours nays mom. Mom Hours Zach's wife, and before that I was jailed daughter and Travis Sister Light. It wasn't just I'm CODA. You know like you always. Me Personally had someone else attached to explained. So, how do you? How do you identify yourself like if you were gonNA, write your bio for tried mom's on main. which we've all had to do right had how do you identify yourself? I honestly, like mine I think starts with my three kids like a mom to ally Caleb Violet, I home school which. Like crazy ton of my time Lake sometimes I'm runner. Sometimes. I'm not very motivated and not a runner. I guess like when I when I identify myself I tend to focus on the things they spend a lot of my time line. And at this point in my life, a big proportion of that time is my children and baked proportionate schooling them and a big like a large amount is my work. And there's not a whole time left. After that. If that makes sense. Yeah, and we'll end. We do kind of tend to identify ourselves as what we do and not who we are. Right. So what happens 'cause we've all gone through different. Stages of our life. What happens when what you do? You don't do. I was a teacher for fourteen years. And that's one of those professions that is very all encompassing. And I left when we moved to North Carolina and I was ready to leave and it was time But even now, I still sort feel like people in order to know me need to know that I used to be in middle school to. That makes there's an. That was times up Laura if not getting. It's a spam caller. Imagine that I am also a person, his screams SAM calls on myself. SMART. They WanNa talk to your car extended warranty. Really important or it's the the blood donation placed in Cincinnati where I no longer live and I have told them not like forty seven times. Like Oh let me update that and They still have. So you're also blood donor. That's good. Yes. TYPO. So. Laura in code I mean you guys have had kind of a shift of identity recently because your kids are little. So it wasn't very long ago that you were just. People. People. So, how did how did that feel when all of a sudden you were? Secondary I guess or who you were was secondary. Trying to think how to like formulate this into words because it's the most enormous shift of your life because you know when you get married, you're still yourself just with someone else but when you're a mom. There's just so word of that. And I don't really know had a had a explain that and it's just. That's. I guess I still feel even though may as two years old that on. A mom not anything else I guess I'm still trying to figure out how to. Make time for myself and figure out who I am now as opposed to who I was before I had kids if that makes sense in how to maybe like put those two people. And Still Bomb Tom for myself but still also. Give my kids as much as I can. I don't know. The other day and that would go so care at in a while. You know like it's just it's just different especially with a teeny tiny one in the house is still trying to navigate. How to not only be a mom but be a mom to more than one person. and. There's no going back, right? Right. You're never going to be the person you were before you had kids. You're never going to be the person you were when you were among to one you're. This constantly evolving. Thing and you think about your kids more than you think about yourself at this point in Tom, and I'm not sure if that changes as they grow older. Or. If it. Was Off at school and you talked about that before just how you you still worry about your kids? No matter what.

Laura TOM SAM Travis Sister Light Mike Walk North Carolina Caleb Violet Chad Zach Cincinnati
"fourteen years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

06:41 min | 10 months ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on KTRH

"I know here we are fourteen years later said where these are of talking he's not here hold on the moon didn't have you plotted out Melba nobody made all our requirements well I'm I'm an old lady I'm over eighty years old how are you when I was dating him back in September so you just you just barely qualifies yeah I've been waiting to qualify okay you've been getting the senior citizen discount for twenty five years now well I didn't actually I'm from Texas originally I've lost my twine but that's when I started listening to you and you start talking about Beaumont and for our turn around a month ago actually hello okay that's where a George Jones spent a good part of his life Ernie words and where do you live now our room and Damon hello David Houston I'm surprised hardly anyone knows where Damon only reason I know is there's a guy that owns a place called Damon lakes and I've been out there fishing it's a little pricey it's it's nothing fancy missile private fishing club a new journal in Bucks a month or something any come out there and he encourages father son fishing is a super nice guy and that's on a we're Damon is he's got he's got a bunch of lakes after yeah well it it is going to be mailed to you know Damon man if you come in and not look like a great big city you know was not then throw it at all how did you end up and Damon here in the nineteen fifty I think my family and we kind of we would stay near a wall then we would go back the sex and funny one of my sisters married someone from here and I came down in the summer in the morning tommerritt Hammond St rest known stayed in East Texas who was the fellow you met I'm sorry what was the fellow's name that you met I'll tell you just tell us first name almost everybody knows who I am anyway well just tell his first name first name is James James is he still with us I'm sorry is he still with us he passed away three years ago my destiny a long time there are some pretty much by myself do you have kids for yeah for do they come visit one that lives here and one is in Idaho and more than usual I don't see them very often so what's a day in the life flight for you member what time do you get up what happened to him who are here now we're hearing aids in both ears and and for some reason I'm not hearing you real well okay what time do you get up in the morning what time I go to bed if I take a nap in the day I go to bed late if I don't I'll get up early this morning I got up at four o'clock and then what do you do well the whole world this will would you will for me in Ramon to put here in the studio sure that we can say mobile made that for us do you ever go to convention no because that I don't drive and I have to get someone to take me and you know that goes yeah how do you address right do what how do you girls right you go to that delayed delayed delivery of groceries to your how do you do that I can go I can go to the small town is give him all the way I feel proud but I don't drive traffic what town grocery store they have their I love grocery stores thank you very okay I like the old I like when people tell me they have a little like a Piggly wiggly era you know an old market basket or a Brooks brothers was it not Brookshire brothers I like the little grocery stores in little towns that have been there yeah well the start when a key VK late what everybody else out of business right now the please tell me you drive a Buick no have you ever had a what do you drive all right now brown for the escape I think my mail to your room and I had you an Oldsmobile I did at one one when are my husband I first got merry leads all on in nineteen fifty five a brand new when yeah no you know what I stand for no people always say stand for some but I never figured that one out so do you listen our show everyday mobile I'm sorry to keep that they listen to our show every day every day yeah what does that mean well if I go to the doctor yes said go to the tourney so let it go to the dentist well I usually near do you go to the doctor to would you go the lawyer for redoing my way only and is in a trust everything that across the road I have to go the the one that made up the trust do you do you sometimes change will depend on how people behave in now no one's own I when I first made it well I didn't realize that I needed to put put stuff in there that couldn't be changed because it's the irreversible trust so they certain things that I wanted certain kids they have and if they'll get mad about it with instead of to do it well no but thank you for calling and thank you for listening to the program yeah we enjoyed it all right have a good day the smell she's sweet I didn't have her in a Ford escape though did you I act was not what I expected mobile would be Dr.

Melba twenty five years fourteen years eighty years three years
"fourteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Fourteen years they're going to grow up thinking involves sports they're gonna be involved boyfriends girlfriends are gonna learn how to drive to do this who's got the dog not them so I said the question is do you really want a dog and you're right you're not the child and then they go and call it a move away a lot of the dog very few colleges allow you to bring your dog to school with you yeah and then the kids going to be so busy in school the dog's gonna be ignored anyway yeah yeah visions I mean yeah but the lady who we thought was going to be your membership card back in or social thing which you might as well have gotten an English bulldog but couldn't go on the walks just because a good brief I mean would be happy and sociable but wouldn't do all that checklist things and then there's the other aspect of it is choosing the right breeder mixture slippery so many people see our dogs and we have the trainers here kindred spirits there's a lot of herding dogs and the hurting ducks I like herding cats because they're smart they're bendable they love to train they love to work they love to do stuff they're incredibly loyal they watch me like I'm a goddess I mean who else is going to make you feel like that and people say our dogs that are well trained well behaved patient work in the class look absolutely awesome and they want to talk just like that how many times they come to class I want my dad to do exactly that okay so I heard this story and I am sorry that I did not take note of who said it okay but I absolutely love it trainer was working her dog in public and a woman came up to her and said that's wonderful what kind of dog is that I want one just like that and the trainer looked her dead in the eye and said it's trained no no I know but I won't what is that she goes it's a trained dog and I think she said she repeated it for five times yeah before the woman kind of got it yeah and then wandered off but that's the discussion we have is yes bones and hero like us are great dogs they're wonderful dogs for me yells is both and he couldn't could not have gone to a pet home and be happy he's a working dog he's a hard core working that he's smart he's tenacious hero softer but he still wouldn't be happy in a poodle he wants to do stuff and so they are trained dogs in I know what their needs are and I meet their needs I take my Jack Russell terrier to the nursing home and sometimes the staff for other visitors will stop is that a Jack Russell just like me right Eddie on Frasier those are such good dogs and call one going to get one of those wait wait no I don't want to do yeah well we see it lately with the the husky so many hats because I believe the game okay there and I was talking to one of our new students students who adopted right rescue the husky and that that's what she had heard which is looking around that love these are turned in because the game of thrones I said yeah but those are trained dogs they don't come to you that way yeah and so many now are being turned in because turned into rescue yeah yeah yeah your vision I mean I used to feel bad but I have my rob later if people would say oh well that's she's wonderful we'll get one like that no rob letter is a very specific kind of breed.

Fourteen years
"fourteen years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Will I have about fourteen years in the mortgage business? And I started out as a loan officer cut my teeth learning in the subprime world. Which was a little scary back. Then decided that wasn't where I wanted to this day. So I became the account executive for a nationwide lender. And did really well there then we had the meltdown in two thousand eight. So I went to a national mortgage Bank. And I was the lending services manager for the entire company to you know, how this works. I know how all this works. I've done basically everything in the mortgage business except under right? Yeah. Yeah. I would be it would be very very wise of me to recommend to the listener trial care as first time homebuyer, I don't care if somebody that self employed. I don't care what you're doing. You're thinking about buying a home, and you want some is individual attention. Write this number down. You'll be glad you did four six nine four eight zero seventy seven ninety. Nine four six nine four eight zero seven seven nine nine now, John. Thank you for that little background. You're welcome DeAnne sellers. What what kind of advice, do you again them marching for in two thousand nineteen in the end of two thousand eighteen well, I think that, you know, salaries have to reassess their situation and have to be very on point when it comes to pricing condition in their in their web presence because most buyers are going to start their excuse me start their search online like ninety to ninety five percent are going to look at the homes before I even have a chance to even discussed the home with them. So they're going to form an opinion. So, you know, you need to be careful about who's taking the pictures. What the pictures look like because I mean, I've seen some bizarre pictures that I'm like what three year old took that picture need professional photographers, you need to spend the money for that kind of stuff. You know, this is a very large financial transaction you you don't get by by cutting corners. So you have to be off from the seller about not only we're going to do professional pictures. You might wanna bring a stage rain, you might have to bring a stage to help get the house into into shape because you literally have one chance to celebrate you come through and they leave and they don't think about your house again. It's over. You want them to come back for the second showing look at it again. So you've got to make sure that the house is is spit up and in the best possible condition, and it's a hassle. I know you got to pick up the toys, you gotta keep stuff off the counters. Yeah. But you know, we're talking hundreds of thousands of dollars transaction here. You know mean why wouldn't you go a little extra mile to make sure that right? It's not too, you know, and so you have all these people that can be your support group of professional, photographers, stagers, even painting. We have painting services that will come in and recommend, you know, freshening up some of the rooms to make him. Look like what buyers are seeing today in the new housing market. They're using a lot of the grays and whites so bars are kind of gravitating towards that. And so now, we're seeing people having to start painting their houses before not so much. They could get away with a lot more because there was just not enough inventory and too many buyers circling around those homes like sharks. Sure, sure. Ona talk about get your opinion on this as an advice category for the seller. How important is it to listen to the agent one that's pricing. It's staging is putting yourself on putting your best foot forward as.

DeAnne sellers account executive officer self employed John ninety five percent fourteen years three year
"fourteen years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Fourteen years and over seven hundred transactions and he's still. Because every house let's face. It is unique every property is different. Every seller is different. What if someone who's been in that house for forty five years added happen? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, the electricals not today. Well, the thing you have to realize you could take a house and have the exact same problem come up. You've got an electric panel situation in a basement wall crack, and you're going to have a buyer and a seller in one transaction that are going to deal with it one way. And then you can have a different buyer and a seller. They're going to take the same house with the exact same problems in deal with the differently. And that's why as an agent you need to be able to adjust to what the buyers and the sellers what their emotions are like what their Bank account allows. You know, there's all kinds of different things that come into play. It's not just how you feel. But do I have the money to fix this? What I'd do. I care if I fix it. Maybe I don't really care if I move, you know, there's all kinds of emotions that come into play. And you got to be able to roll within emotions are very important. But that's why you have an agent. Involved in this that they can take the emotions out of it manage it real amend a little bit. That's actually a great point. Because that's where the problem comes in with the for sale by owners when the buyers and the sellers deal with each other directly, the emotions are butting heads in the transaction. And it's hard for anybody to separate themselves from it and as an agent that's a big part of our job as we can stand in the middle and say, okay, okay. Think about this a slowdown now sleep on it overnight. And then we get back to the other side the other parties, and we say, okay, you guys think about it this way or let me give you another suggestion. Offended by an offer. I know a lot. Defensive because it's. A lot of blood and sweat equity and do that maybe they did the remodeling by themselves, and they take a lot of pride in that. How when you're on your offering me X amount of dollars. Yeah. Well, and that's a that's a big part of why I'm in the office more than these guys. These guys are very good at dealing with the people, and I'm more good at staring at a computer and dealing with the numbers. And I realized that over the years that you're banking. I love to be out there with the people and meet the people and put the deals together. But I'm not good at dealing with the emotions Craig and dawn and all the other agents, we have they're very good at at the hand holding sometimes that needs. Sometimes you need, you know, put your foot down and draw a line in the sand to, but they're very good at going to both sides of that. And I think that's normal. I mean, that's human nature by were golden. We get emotional about the Packer games. Castle.

Craig forty five years Fourteen years
"fourteen years" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

I Think You're Interesting

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on I Think You're Interesting

"I was thirteen or fourteen years old or things that I saw about my dad when I was eight years old that I didn't even realize I was grabbing onto and one of the things that this book underlined for me was that I had a really hard reset point. When I was thirty years old. Why realized man I am not going about this in a way that I'm really totally proud of and realizing that made me take a step back and kind of re-embrace a lot of the values that I learned when I was a kid, and I don't know that I'd ever put that puzzle together about myself so much. I don't think I ever realized that a lot of the things that were very positive guides and like a good moral compass for me about how to approach my career had nothing to do with things I learned doing comedy but more about like seeing how hard my dad worked in how he treated people around him seeing. How much jobs I had when I was eighteen or nineteen taught me about things how much music. Became the model that I replicate it way more than comedy, you know. You know, being thirteen years old going to my first ever concert, which was a punk show in a church basement. And watching these bands where I was thirteen in all the kids were sixteen remembering oh, these kids just went and made it happen that that directly goes back to why I went to public access, and it's not something that I had fully put all of the puzzle pieces together on before sat down wrote this. What we end every episode by asking our guests some of the same questions. Okay. Ask you some of what whether you saw a movie watch TV show watched a standup said listen to a song. What's the last kind of pop culture thing that you did? And what did you think of it? The last thing that I experienced let's see the most recent thing. That I experienced I know I just saw a movie, but I can't remember what I because I see too many moves I will say the the thing that jumps out is not the most recent technically I've seen a movie since then, but I saw David burning concert. A well, the King's Theatre in Brooklyn..

Brooklyn David fourteen years thirteen years thirty years eight years
"fourteen years" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The question was fourteen years ago right but i want to make the point for listeners that partly which was a game changer and the reason why he's a criminal investigation was reopened in two thousand fifteen was the fact that the associated press ap requested that the depositions so let me back up or second so fourteen years ago when all of this so what's the statute if this was within the statue what is the statute in pennsylvania like how long the top my head to be honest it is it i i don't know they were clearly within it but here's the thing that fourteen years ago when this went down and there was a civil lawsuit right andrea content to bill cosby like i just mentioned he paid three point eight million dollars to settle it during the course of that loss those were there were depositions take it and the at requested that the judge unsealed those depositions so the other judge that presided over that case and that and the judge mentioned the fact that copies of public moralist that he goes on these rants that he traveled around the country how his stature as america's dad unquote and as a public more or less to release the deposition portions of the deposition statements because they found it relevant and because of the release of those portions of depositions work be you know confessed basically confirmed that he drives these women and had sex with them but the issue in his mind was just consent that is what reopened the criminal investigation in two thousand fifteen so it wasn't just about that that the that she filed charges recently it's that new evidence came to light in two thousand fifteen and naval criminal investigation to be reopened and chargers subsequently brought so that's the most important i i was just what i was asking about the statue of limitations i was just thinking out loud that he almost got away with all of it it's really pretty remarkable when you think about it i mean how how much predation this guy engaged in based on all the accusations now he's a convicted sex offender but he he almost got away with it all i mean almost but it speaks to the tanaz two of the da's office.

pennsylvania america bill cosby fourteen years eight million dollars
"fourteen years" Discussed on Fictional

Fictional

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on Fictional

"An hour later and the priest wrote off lease far enough away. Edmund took off the track corn had long coat far. You had been right the whole time. And after eminent been taken away. It'd become so much worse for not a war hero Singlers a barren in the millionaire. His old boss is your morale had ruined his reputation. Trained free Emond was now down to his last ship. Therrien. The one on which Edmund have been the first mate. The one the US post captained fifteen years ago. It was late two. And if it didn't make it morale. Edmonds patron. And the one from that had remained in petition long after the of others given up well Monroe be destitute. In Mercedes. Mercedes was the worst of all. As for Catera Sir, Edmund knew the type of man so was at least he knew who Karros had been years ago. Now, he had a test before him. A sudden influx of wealth doesn't change a person. It reveals them. The priest shocked by the betrayal of the poor poor captain had given cataracts, the diamond worth fifty thousand francs, which was a literal boatload of money. Back at the in Paris, his wife car from the stairs. As she descended looking, wide-eyed and in all at the diamond. This could save them. Karasin narratives eyes at her. Of course it could if it was real Dolan left. The gift give it was a priest. Of course it was real cutters shook his head. His eyes charged the wind bottle the back. He was late afternoon. But if you Road quickly gimmick each town. Get it appraised. His wife was too sick to foment side. But over the questions. Why he needs to go today and what would happen if they had a guest, corrosive brusquely put on his coat and shoes? She had to go back to bed, The excitement and the sun salvation had exacerbated aromas. She was asleep by the time he wrote off in the opposite direction of town. Uh, Mr. Morales finger fiddle but the trigger eleven AM to debt by eleven AM heat receipts worth three months ago from an Englishman named Lord Bull more that the stranger's from have bought his debts and they will be payable on September. Fifth, It was minutes later at morale warned that his final ship, The ferry in a gone down on the way back from Calcutta. And with it, It took all hope of miss your morale being able to pay his debts. He was Twitter, an eighty seven thousand francs in the hole, And he gone into even more debt payments sailors final salaries. It was the right thing to do. He didn't need to make his misfortune their misfortune. He had tried desperately to Cohen any leads of credit could in any assistance available from friends. But once beloved businessmen had no one left. Everyone had abandoned him at because was poverty is politics. He knew was left. And that had been communicated. In his not at all subtle final words to his creditor, if he lived, he would have the man's money. Now, he sat on his bed, listening to the shot Bustle beneath them. When the shot rang out this Finley will board, Uh, but they will be saved. His death would die with him. And the family would be pity for their loss. Not scored from Morale's failure. Blood wash away, dishonor. Look at the window, took one last look at Marseille and raise the pistol to his head. That was when he heard it something between a screeching, the laughing downstairs, Then dozens of feet pending up the stairs and making strict for door morale stashed Weltman her the door wasn't gonna stop them. His Finley bounded in beaming. They were saved years ago. Miss Merle had give him up when he could spare in his favorite purse. To an old friend of Edmond on tests. It was to a perpetually dump his look Taylor. But then new of Carozza Boro was a little perturbed did not get the purse back. And he had no way of knowing that in exchange for diamond an enigmatic priests had secured that read-back. Donned a suit. The British accent. Embody the apartment or Edmonds father died that same. British businessmen was also represent the from that bought most of morals debts. And you'll have to note to Morales daughter saying that in three months time when the debts came do Is she received a letter from a stranger named Sinbad-the-sailor that she should do it. It said. She did the note that morning let her alone some old apartment. There said none. The metal was a red purse containing the entirety of Morales business debts. Rural asked with the address was froze. The fifth for that apartment building was when the he knew very well. He hard to think about it, but was rostrum thought by even more shocking news. The ferry in the ship that the entire crew have watched sink at returned. Knowing that that news had to be a mistake. Morrell his wife, son and daughter ran out the docks. But their sit in at Anchor with the entirety of its last cargo on board was the ferry in rural couldn't believe it. He was saved dropping to his knees with tears streaming down his face. He praised God. Mid-sentence something cut Morales I. e. couldn't explain it. But you just get used to seeing the way someone stands. And the man standing far off on a yacht. Look just like someone hit once known. A brave and talented. Good man. The was at the strangest back. Some rural Kentucky anything other than a silhouette. He didn't know if the man was an angel. Or Edmund, somehow returning from the dead to save him in his time of need. But to him, There wasn't much of a difference. Hewlett The ferrying them back to the stranger must already at the helm of his yacht, sailing it at a harbour of

Mr. Morales Edmund Edmonds Mercedes US Emond Singlers Twitter Monroe Carozza Boro Dolan Finley Miss Merle Paris Kentucky Calcutta Karros Cohen Marseille Edmond
"fourteen years" Discussed on Fictional

Fictional

07:18 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on Fictional

"Six months later, he sat back inside Italian, his ostentatious Paris mansion, bought the grand every so often hit remind himself that all of this was real. That he was here that he's NAFTA fightened scheme any more. We lost the commander, the ferry and all those years ago and had a go away. He thought his wife was over that he would never be free All because of that stupid letter that for non hits into Villa Fort. But now Now he was free in every possible way. He used his initial income to invest in grows worth in such short time that everyone considered him blessed that in care who he was aware, he came from, all they cared about was the money. He sold the bag of go onto a drawer, close the desk. It was new. Everything was new surrounding himself in luxury and beauty opened, forget his past. He even had a title of nobility. Now. It's so much money and power that no one would ever tell him what to do. Again. There was none of the door as a servant, their let himself in denounced that the guests that arrived count, the Morse of the Countess were here, dangle are smiled. It will be good to see for an again, even after all these years. Seem phenomena. Go remind dang. Lars of Marseille after Napoleon returned, anglers had left and made millions investing, speculating he'd married, which made him even more millions and had given him the title of Baron. Anglers, he'd moved to Paris, torn of the biggest houses on the was fashionable streets, and he was surprised that Fernande was already there. The killer was been a bit of a coward but it paid off for him when it mattered most without fighting for Napoleon. He followed his general and defected to the British the night before the battle. After Napoleon fell and the king was restored. Again for NAM's lauded as a hero. He was promoted, took a station in Spain where by a stroke of luck, he helped turned the tide of war. He was that promoted to colonel. And given the title count the more stuff. Next, He went to France and at the service of a very rich men who probably died in left him an absurd amount of money. After that. He set himself and his wife up in Paris for him, vested with his friend Bernd anglers. They were friends with writers, journalist bankers, politicians, and kings. These two men who had grown up far from Paris for now with our sent to his name and anglers with only a few now not only survived and Prejean high society, But thrived. They'll sweat something else in common they more so than anyone else responsible for Edmonds imprisonment. But unlike Edmund burned with anger for them ever since for you help them peace altogether. They didn't think about Edmund at all. I'm an honest man In keeper said, he was Forty-five it looked like to his sixty the precedent across from him. His only guest drained glass of wine, so much better for you. If what you say is true sooner or later, the good will be rewarded. The wicket punished. Now, I believe you're exactly the person I was looking for. Monsieur. Cutter Rosser. Is it. Pat Rousseau nodded the priest asked with he knew young Ciller for a few years back in Marseille before Catterson move the middle of nowhere to burn all was money own unit in Karisoke asked his eyes ignited with a kind of feverish intensity at the mention of Edmond. Yes. He in Edmond having good good friends. They were neighbors once he been arrested. What had happened to the poor sailor? Priest hung his head. He was sorry to inform such a dear friend of Edmonds. But the young man died in prison. A shiver down Katter of spine. He to liquidate from the price for a moment. What he had always suspected. But he had always feared had happened. They had done it, Then they killed him. The press continued Same that he had been with Edmund the day he died. Many phones confessed their crimes to their pre-summer deathbeds. Even ones that had been so insistent on their innocence. Edmund though was intransigent to the last he remained completely ignorant of his crimes. Carazo Suga said. That was true. The priest gasped. The you know cat research shifted uncomforably in a seat. He took another long. Look at the wind bottle. Priest continued Edmundo Santos had at Aston deliver something to the only four friends that he knew. The priest to cut a small box and placed on the table. It was a diamond. On the inside, Edmund have made friends with an Englishman who had the good fortune to be released after Liu, the eighteenth took the front. Again, he had gifted to his friend for administer new life with Edmund left. The time came when Edmund knew he would never get out. Knew was dying. Edmund asked the priest to sell it, divide the money between the five people he loved most in the world. Edmonds father is patrolled, his dear dear friend Katter Osa, A man by the name of dangle ours. And another man who was almost as family. Fernande Mondego. Terrorises eyes went to the floor, The continued saying that he had already been to Marseille. That list of five was already done before the older done tests Evans father had died while he was in prison. The priest couldn't help, but ask. How did he di Cadore saside. In the end, it was starvation. The priest had to hide his hands, they shook with rage starvation dogs, living on the street, don't die of starvation. Cutters explained that it was a different time after the second restoration of the king. Everyone was scared Negm. It had gone to prison for helping usurper. No one wanted to be seen helping the father of a traitor to the guy wasted away. The preset back in the shadows, tied the loan. Tear that strict on his face. Took another look at the box that contain the diamond asked for the other three people. They weren't Edmonds friends, and they didn't need the money now. They had millions and surely they would crush Karros they should they ever when he talked. But looking around. You Isn't that far off mean crushed anyway. And for the sake of Edmond He had to say something. He had been haunted by that day for fifteen years. And if gotta lot move another fifteen. It would still keep. Up at night, He had a story to tell. Woo. An

Edmund Edmonds Paris Marseille Priest Napoleon Fernande Mondego commander Villa Fort Spain NAM Cadore saside Cutter Rosser Katter of spine France Karros Carazo Suga Lars Bernd
"fourteen years" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

I Am Rapaport

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on I Am Rapaport

"People say you don't take enough risks or i should take more risks or that's not who took me a risk i don't know i don't know i'm just i'm just saying that you know if for me it's like i've never taken it for granted that the show is coming back i just now recently feel like you know because i know were probably just going to do two more seasons in that will be it would have always felt like the show king the ratings king dive at any minute look at these tv shows one minute they're hot the next minute nolan's watching ratings skin go from twelve million to five million overnight i mean those ratings on empire dole's yours doll you don't know you can't take anything for granted evernote so i try not to so so i mean there's been actors come goal in this show i mean there's been so many different uh you know obviously there's guest stars there's you know there's the mic dreamy part in you know what i mean there's so many different people that have been on the on the show in for fourteen years when i say great actors that you've stood across even going into you know films who are the people that like have stuck out few a during the fourteen years like when you're across the number like real like oh shit dismal fokker's really good well i gotta tell you the one that's coming to my most recently is because they just finished wrapping it was i just didn't episode scott speedmen okay and on who hasn't been on the network show in a very long time right he's on that show animal kingdom which he just is is not on that show anymore but he just finished his his tour on that show in came to graze for one episode and and i was like i had a great time with him i had a great scott he was really good really connect.

nolan dole scott speedmen fourteen years one minute
"fourteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Pet care as they get older and you need to combat eight that end and the other part about it is people say well my my cats twelve years old now yeah i understand that it sounds horrible you're going to get another one because you're cat person your dog's fourteen years old yeah you tell me you're not going to get another dog rather plan for another dog in your life than not have one because more likely than not you're going to do it you're going to you're going to break down in you're going to miss that remember michael i mean you're how does your kid twelve twelve remember when h three h four h five you would walk in and rank it's this right now day when he walks in the house the kids get the happy feet with their feeder jumping up and down in the runup daddy daddy daddy your dog does that to you every day you come home it doesn't matter of that dog is two years old are 17 years old i'm the imagine your fourteen year old i don't know how we have experienced a mind where fourteen mostly it was a grunt unless they want something right right right here and even the dinner time where we sat down the dinner together and even that's half the time was point t to get them to say anything that they other than or are growing up or which school or a but the dog your cat they're always happy to see you and you're gonna want that bonded you're going to want that relationship to rekindle a new relationship just like that and you're going to want to take care of them as they get older just like we want to make sure you're taking care and it's an important part of the budget these are the type of things that you're looking for from your financial planner if it's more than just tell me how to invest your money because you know what i'm telling you right now somebody who will tell you.

michael fourteen years fourteen year twelve years two years 17 years
"fourteen years" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on WLOB

"Announced its plan on facebook and users did not take kindly to the fact that the holy donate partnered with the salvation army to help children in need commenters took issue with the partnership alleging that the salvation army has a history of discriminating against the lgbt community the salvation army has denied that it described it is against anybody for any reason the salvation army has a page on its website that addresses the rumors that has an anti lgbt agenda we need your help in ending these rumors the post reads they can persuade people not to give which in turn diminishes our resources and our ability to serve people in crisis we serve any where there is need without discrimination a west bath man who furnished a fatal dose of heroin to a former girlfriend was sentenced tuesday to fourteen years in federal prison mickey geli aged thirty five was sentenced in us district court in portland after pleading guilty on august first gillies supplied heroin and fencing all to a former girlfriend with whom he was prohibited from having contacts because of bail conditions stemming from a previous domestic violence case the woman died from using the drugs gillick failed to call emergency personnel because as he admitted he feared being arrested for violating his bail conditions sports in the forecast next on newstalk w l o b one two one him trump jerry i just can't my muscles are so sore what you need is some soothing relief when i get aches and pains i just reach for the tiger balm tiger balm does that really work you bet it does tiger balm's blend of essential oils is fast proven pain relief tiger balm works where it hurts jerry rice after all these years you still get sore you.

facebook salvation army heroin portland gillies jerry rice mickey geli domestic violence gillick fourteen years
"fourteen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"I don't know if i would have used the that language but i was aware that he was line to get with me sexually end of quote now kevin spacey also came out with a uh goes his about six hours ago posted on twitter at his official account i have a lot of respect and admiration for anthony rapids an actor i'm beyond horrified to hear his story i honestly do not remember the encounter it would have been over thirty years ago but if i did behave then as he describes i owe him the sincerest apology for what would have been deeply inappropriate drunken behavior and i'm sorry for the feelings he describes having carried with him all these years that he goes on to basically come out of the second paragraph in this statement was him addressing his personal life of many a have questioned him about his personal life and he hasn't said anything but he says quote i choose now to live as a gay man and so couple of things here is a bench appear owes was tweeting about this as the right after it happen it happened road this statement from mr spacey just before we went ombudsman shapiro was already on a thing it'll be interesting to see what the coverage is because this actor was fourteen years old that means a law was broken potentially if the allegations were true and beyond that the question is did that happen at any other the point uh was there anything else going on but is what is the take on this today what will be the coverage the idea that kevin spacey has come out of the closet or the fact that he allegedly committed assault against a boy an underage up child at the time which should be the league that should be.

anthony rapids shapiro kevin spacey assault official fourteen years thirty years six hours
"fourteen years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Amy jo johnson it will come to you they'll come to you i want to embark my dad fourteen years old or are now on thirty seven now it would top i mean i it was hard because i really didn't really you know fourteen you don't know a lot yet they'll go i can't say for sure how i feel it more now because i have a little kid now and i feel like i wanna be wouldn't look much can with my kid and just now and how time is short by bitch alone yet i chose the hard work hard big knock go down hill i work hard right out of high school because that was hacked the icecool working i i i mean i've that would have learning he really got a hard time to lose the dead yeah i yeah i would have to say what i mean i i again it was hard but now we go carnival guerin happening so i don't really have much to elaborate on my my worst but i would it was a terrible were why could be any time my mom looked very well jerry with all of the mutual this art was what what was it something that happens suddenly to your dad or was he six in the new diabetes so you know obviously act what you have you guys have but now more widely can get the beef and all that it's a lot easier to control no awadi correct than what it what back then obviously and it was just a whole undertaking could i ask you one thing before we have to break for traffic and ask you.

Amy jo johnson fourteen years
"fourteen years" Discussed on Thompson & Trudell

Thompson & Trudell

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on Thompson & Trudell

"Practices are super competitive a lotta time here and guys who at each other and it's not that uncommon how many times though did you witness somebody throw an actual punch other other and portland san only or the lake thousand basketball for fourteen years in the nba and we had some real physical battles and not once that i see of tea may go another made physically i see now lot of trashtalking m f of this m f for that you can't this you can't do this you can that this kind of stop and you knock on track based basketball talking but not to who had came to fisticuffs of saint never seen it oh my forces no and portland i'm a claes he seen a doubt it and go and say now he's out he says he's he he has a lot of cousin out of the of the anybody through punchline what jury modesty on are not going to say we all know that come on at that is widely reported 'dream dra have i have exchanges of ideas whose lives okay so just two days for the seasonopener against the raptors michael this is what happened according to sports illustrated congressional heritage in bobby portis were involved in an altercation apparently they were shoving each other and they were talking whatever and then portas now it says in here shamsher us rainiest said this it says sucker punch suck up what i heard two now caught him off guard at would you love so so there is pushing and shoving and everything but apparently portis wasn't plane and punched mira titian the face michael now they say concussion and a macs in max larry fractures that means that your job right yeah so we'll congested broke his jaw amchan cost him with one punch his teammate now breaking news apparently he has been suspended for eight games by the bulls i'll i wonder you you're you're inpractice situations as army deferred you on this how should the bulls handle this at what was her as a reaction.

nba raptors bobby portis michael bulls basketball rainiest fourteen years two days
"fourteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Not not working i because i have the mute but they understand all sides seat us in content to leave us and act two surviving children in these problems but we can only ask him pray that someone we recognize process matt carry out against us as cell called the taliation their invited hypocrisy i children has seen other fire we asked quickly in our collective fourteen year prison urged the government on both sides to reach some agreement allows free collective fourteen years leaving office is probably indeed our lives in these children on to us said please of becomeanex jimmy carter give the offenders something so they and you can save face and you can leave the region permanently you you have to see the city hall i guess i don't know how to link it up at the website karen sat on vacation but it the cancer like yet nicely luke coats on and no one kid has pacify or in his mouth i mean they don't look like the been held captive by the her connie network i i'm just i'm very puzzled very very puzzled well it's amazing just the aftermath of john kelly the chief of staff death at this press conference they are trying to parse his words to the point of being ridiculous on cnn breaking news chief of staff not quitting not being fired quote two day and quote i mean that's not what he says did he said i'm not leaving i'm not quitting and i'm not leaving unless something were to change meaningless the president kicks me out but jim shoot oh and all of the national security correspondence on cnn are having a field day oh that why did they even said about their oh my god this is the end of the road chief of staff my job isn't to control the president actually's job is to control the president which is kind of a fascinating concept that this at one point i was going to be the chief of staff of a on the congressmen and my role would have been to basically control the schedule and the interaction between everybody except his family everybody and that congressmen and john kelly is role is to control donald trump it's just that he's not easy to control.

jimmy carter karen cnn president john kelly donald trump chief of staff jim fourteen years fourteen year two day
"fourteen years" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on WSB-AM

"A natural salesperson i wore pretty mac and but that being said i'm a little on and converted cried wit and are not a member and concrete clap i don't have a huge database within ninety percent of raila and getting lane and within then how have you been because you've been successful for you said fourteen years yeah yeah that's working for you now i've been a member ever came before i have hat doubt my network on work experience people have got hadn't appac and you know they've at any fat um you know you get a certain level and unless you're in backing karna manning in lean generation now it kinda difficult survive found am i get my founded on our final and gone you know if difficult it well i i would i would i hearing you is that you're selling you yourself short because you're fatigued from what you've been doing because let me tell you something the bernau in real estate is usually because somebody you'll get in it and they don't have that sales neck if you've been in fourteen years you've got it you just don't want do it any more you might be right about that and i'll be honest with a current market this market has brought out the worst and fire and fowler and it it browbeating in our knowing i'm sorry what kind of things make you say that well seller they are egg that thing get way over the market value for their home and that will turn around and a fat pig ac he hurt you for below market value i mean at the gun smiling right now because and who said renou paying a high price give it see that's always been the way it has p when they're they're wearing their cellars hat they think they're houses worth zillion ones yet the buyer they wanna find somebody's going to sell their house for much less than what it's worth.

raila karna manning real estate renou fowler fourteen years ninety percent
"fourteen years" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"fourteen years" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Them know this is what we while what you up to alpay yesterday really mind walled on this on the way it a great and i can't believe that iskoe long they thank you mike i couldn't agree with you more look my father k a fled communism came to canada he was i think fourteen years of age he finished high school sixteen seventeen he couldn't go to college yet work here to help feed his family my grandfather and grant all the kids went to work the my dad worked on a factory floor at seventeen years of age and so i remember growing up my father would always say this to me and my grandfather if you go to university you better study son because you have no idea what an immense privilege it is i never i never had the chance to go to university grandad never had the chance to go to university your great grand death and we can profoundly of peasants back in eastern europe in the old country you want to privilege it is to go to university and if the parents i don't think they're paying or to wish i think the parents either the there in debt or the parents are footing the bill so i'm thinking if your parents are working this hard to pay your way through your part of the way through university and this is how you behave i forgive me but sometimes they need a good walk they really do they need a good wack journal you want away in a willing betcha the student loan bill gets addressed to a g soros somewhere picks up their student loan deals on the island lin in myth through in go ahead lin thank you for the crown a little fake hammamet attract.

canada europe alpay seventeen years fourteen years