35 Burst results for "Fourteen Hours"

What is Intermittent Fasting?

Break The Rules

02:27 min | 1 year ago

What is Intermittent Fasting?

"A little bit about why intimate investing is for one and then by one lead again now so. I know that you know it's considered to be. This is a novel concept but if you look if you date back to biblical times it plays readily in multiple religions including christianity and islam. And so i-. I remind people that this is something that's existed for a very long period of time. We've just forgotten the value of not eating all day long and the easiest way to explain intermittent fasting as you're eating within a prescribed time period. We know that the average american eats sixteen to seventeen times a day. Which is just an unbelievable statistic and so if you're eating sixteen to seventeen times a day you are spiking your insulin. Which is one of those hormones that is designed to help. Lower your blood sugar. But if it's spiking all day long you kind of flip into this Less efficient way of managing your blood sugar and limiting digestive breast and things like that. So i'm an advocate of eating within a within a feeding window. I know people sometimes don't love to hear that expression but it's an easy way to explain that you're feeding window could be six eight hours and you just eat within that feeding window so for many people they may finish their dinner at six o'clock at night they breakfast at eight. Am they've already fasted. Fourteen hours a lot of the fasting time spent sleeping and so it is much easier for many people to wrap their heads around when they just think about. Oh i've already done fourteen hours. I can do this And once people have gotten the the knacker the hang of being obliterated fast you can have a lot of fun with it and it doesn't necessarily have to be the same The same schedule every single day. You could have one day where you twenty four hours. You have one day where he do. Twelve you know. Fourteen to sixteen hours you can do it around vacations and holidays and still stay on track and the most amazing thing about intermittent fasting that i've come to find as it even if people don't choose to change their diet fronts once they start shortening this window in which they're eating they feel better. They have more energy. they're sleeping better. Their digestion is improved substantially. And you know with a side of weight loss. I think everyone comes intermittent fasting with a desire to lose weight or lose fat but then they have all these other benefits. That will keep them really invigorated with this. The strategy

"fourteen hours" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

The South Florida Morning Show

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on The South Florida Morning Show

"In the woods they are. Hey we're here to rent land. Deliverance shows up to now she said so far but she has like four little campsites. A great deal of money hers looks really nice but she has a total separate area where people can come in so she doesn't even know that they're in unless she walks go nuts and start like a fire or something. I let the problem. I don't i risk. I'd be you gotta get insurance for this kind of stuff but i just don't want people on proper. I'm totally with you. I get it you know. They've thought about that like buying a lake house up. North north north somewhere to offset the cost. Read it out. We don't want to be there in the winter. So you rented out or something or you know. I will tell you this when you have a second home. No matter where it is you better make sure you know somebody around there can take care of it. That's exactly something breaks driving fourteen hours in a day to get there to fix it and then turn around and come back and when it is houses. Do not like to be empty. Now things go wrong. Oh yes they do. I'm with you there we go. You just ruined the rental market. That's why you should never read your house out. It's gonna drive me crazy thing. Is french interesting idea though. It's it's extremely lucrative. If you don't mind people on your property provide tents or is it. Do they show up. You know you just provide the area like mine would is designed like it's a circle right and on the circle there are four different tent sites and then there's the bathroom here and then there's the shower over here a little pavilion where you can go cook your food and you know and that's really about its electricity water in a place to go the bathroom. Okay but it costs a great deal of money to develop but what. You're just collect money as long as you as you rented out a lot of the time really all so it's paying for itself now. If it separated from everybody i could do that. If i had moorland maybe i would be out by the land next door then. I'll do it unless you get rowdy gruber the berry face it my fault and then my neighbor would end up again against calling the cops and there'd be cops mails all the time so we don't need them all right so that idea. Okay pooh-poohed in the lake house totally out because they can't find a lake can afford lake. That's reasonable i. Literally rickenbacker looked set up a ten. I looked at lake. Houses like in remote tennessee. They're like four hundred something thousand insane. I know it's crazy. Look at the lakes region in new hampshire. Like what's up there razi insane. It's it's it's so if anybody has a nice little lake place like a two one want to get rid of gummy dueling banjos. We care that an active. Nfl player came out as gay. Does it matter to anybody like. Would you stop rooting for that. Do people like that exist. Probably unfortunately but has an effect on me. I don't think so either me neither. Which maybe that's the news. People are like nah. You know we'll tell you that. Isn't this story..

new hampshire fourteen hours second home tennessee Nfl four different tent sites four hundred something thousan two one french
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

Ali on the Run Show

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Ali on the Run Show

"Almost like another written tests I feel like if take your time go. Slow should be a like life mottos as that applies to like on the worst of that too. I feel like i'm always on the go. Oh same but absolutely but in in an alternate slowing down and relaxing right taking our time so you pass the exam you crush it. What happened next. Were you thinking. I've got this new license hand i'm going to make a career out of it. Or where were you at in terms of looking towards the future at that point so about a week before i like passed i still was okay with. They're saying. I don't know. I just didn't give that up. Yeah and then. We had a recruiter come and they. They had like different companies. Come in trying to sell you on the job with sign on bonuses etc etc all the perks and truckers are saying this wrong where need of truckers were in a trucker shortage and we have been so company. They're doing anything but they can at this point to get truckers so they come with the their best spiel and i just. I don't know this winter. Critters really sold on this company. And i was like oh i could just do that for a year. I'm like drive cross country and see this beautiful country and it just sold me so before. I know i actually went to check in school mississippi so i had experienced a winter and over seven years. Who stationed down there. And i love down there and you get used to the heat and the humidity and this company was out of wisconsin and it was in the end of november and they flew to wisconsin. I was like negative seventeen degrees. And i had no answer. Close lou definitely a shock but the people are so amazing wisconsin. If you've never been go. And i think that just sold me on the whole career and you know i was there a year and it was incredible. And then the agenda too and they just kinda nursing america's premier. How prepared did you feel for the actual career coming out of that three week program. Because i'm making again. I'm making assumptions here. Which is that that was mostly about learning how to actually drive and all of the logistics acknowledged that go into that. Were you taught about the industry itself. And what the job would look like. How much did you know. Did you know people in the industry. What was your. What was your background knowledge and your expectations so my uncle is a truck driver. He has been driving trucks for as long. Since i've been a little kid at this time now. It still hasn't hit me that. He's a trucker. I don't even know if that makes sense. Like i forgot that. He was a trucker right. So i had never even reached out and been like. Hey glen attracting school. What are your thoughts. I didn't think about it. 'cause i completely forgot crazy but that's a whole nother story. He's like hey heard you on the podcast. We should chat industry stuff. It's funny because we both worked for the company now over. Gosh amazing yeah i. It's the best thing ever until like everyone knows he's like my uncle and it's like weird 'cause i worked for the company and somehow it's still so small very small world. So what do you remember. I and i'm gonna botch language here. So just continually correct me so that i can get it right but what do you remember about your first trip assignment outing break it down for us about your like yup. Nope you're not getting it right. So tell us about your. I drive your first on the job experience. What was it like all right while i was with a trainer and they drove for like the first day or two. They showed me how the company systems work for mike. Go into a vendor and picking up a load to going to your last destination to drop off the load in everything number between from like fuelling parking for the night logs all the legal things that go your logs and just the lifestyle right just teaching you the lifestyle trucker in how to work for the company be more productive for yourself and then after that i got in the driver's seat anna. I did everything on my own until all the trainer felt good about it basically than i was. Let go of my own so you had plenty of time to make all the mistakes and do things wrong with someone. They're sitting right next to you which was really nice. Yes that's very reassuring. So what is a typical schedule. Like for a drive or have any days of ours. Are you on the road. I know that there's like very strict limits right. Okay so can you walk us through that and sort of explain what that looks like you. So you work seventy hour week and with every day you have fourteen hours to work so within that fourteen hours. Eleven hours to drive and the other three hours are spent. Whether you're fueling whether you're breaking whatever so when you start your day like let's say start at four. Am the second. I start my clock in the truck. It's running until it's done. So i d like time that i'm using to do anything but dr is eating away at my fourteen hours and in that fourteen hours. You have to do certain things. I'm guessing you have to make it to certain destinations right. It's not just up. fourteen hours is up. I'm on the side of the highway. Guess this is where. I call it a night or is that accurate. Let's happened before but parking on the side of the road is like hype prohibited like at least arrest area truck stop and there's so many trucking apps in like the company i work for now You can stop at storm break there. So there's usually trip planning is a very big part of truck. Ed you plan out your day so you know you have so many loads in so many stops you can estimate how long it'll take. And then you just adjust your chest like accordingly.

fourteen hours Eleven hours seventy hour two three hours three week first day wisconsin both seventeen degrees first over seven years second Ed mike end of november america about a week before four mississippi
"fourteen hours" Discussed on NOBODY LIKES ONIONS

NOBODY LIKES ONIONS

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on NOBODY LIKES ONIONS

"In the comments. And where do we go by the way. All these people comedy. I'll never there's joe is like these are just like comics and like just hereon entertainment event by heron entertainment and the winery comedy tour. What is this. Oh no this is crazy. The winery comedy to are traveling. Comedy club in california. What is like what is going on. Who is behind this nonsense. This is courageous town. Okay we gotta get the main event. I got a lot of other stuff. This dog has really jammed up my schedule. So thanks for being patient with and stuff coming out again over fourteen hours a new stuff in the overdose. Use code melinda at checkout to save twenty percent. Never been a better time to join support the show and you'll get access again if you're in the overdose tons to new staff refresher feeds For that let's get into the four twenty four awards. We've done it. You know it. Derek savage.

california twenty percent Derek savage over fourteen hours melinda four twenty four awards heron joe
"fourteen hours" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"On bodies. I probably would not have been the person to design websites to have pages and pages of of flowery rhetoric describing the warm fuzzies. That you'll get when you come into this company then worked fourteen hours a day but since people are doing what i'm suggesting is that in order to maintain and have people want under the age of fifty one to work for you for more than eighteen months. You might want to deal with implications of those you know when you write on your website. Your managing. we'll take an interest in your career when you write on your website. We celebrate pride. You telling your staff members whether they be based in saudi arabia or indiana or london. You telling them that you can come to work and feel safe and you'll boston new kias will not make fun of you if they do. They will be a sanction. So there's implications for these pharmacist on my job is to help people get as close as possible to the promises or reduced promises so the gap is small. What is an organization's responsibility. What is corporations responsibility in your view. They've hired you and they've you for specific reasons so to be their responsibility to their to their colleagues that employees yes to create an environment. Where every single person knows that everything will say they will be challenged deliver their very best. There'll be moments where they will be stretched beyond the point where they thought they could possibly deliver. They will never be broken. They will never be put in a position with damage. Trauma is inflicted on them. They will be in a position where manages cat have empathy for. This is not abou- effusive kind of rolling woods. This is about the idea that as a human being beyond the job description manager sees you. This is the responsibility of organizations because the organizations want to win. And i want to win. I'm not a softer. I'm not interested in warm fuzzy moments sitting around the campfire making smalls. I want to win and if you want to win creighton environment that people never want to leave you do that by creating connections with people so that let's face it not everybody on your staff guest to do the sexy exciting stuff more so on your staff the most of it because frankly off on the screen would never be seen in other shows but most organizations the the essential work is so boring and so onerous zora Then it's impossible to be connected to many authentic way so what.

london indiana saudi arabia boston more than eighteen months fourteen hours a day age of fifty one every single person under
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

Duncan Trussell Family Hour

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Duncan Trussell Family Hour

"At out and then he got furious when we had these power outages. Because i'm from the east coast. I went and bought a generator at. That's what you in the east lizards generators and everybody boy when there's a blizzard. It is iraq. You know walking down the street because they generate. I happen to be the first person on the block to get the generator. When pg and e. started their blackouts and so he didn't like the sound of the generator and the decibels were too loud and and so he became to me the bad neighbor right right and then i just started laughing at realizing to him. I'm the bad davor. And he has no idea that to me. he's the bad neighbor. That's how distrust is so silly. I mean any normal you know if we were smart about it we would actually instead of sending tax and god. He got me through next door. One point win next door. I did and then i came in and the whole thing is kind of funny but if we were truly tribal and weren't living next door to strangest none of that is possible right none of that. You're all you know. There's such communal purpose when you're only needs are true needs food shelter and the funny thing is so we gossip complaining about our social lives right. Yeah that's eighty percent of what we do is gossip as human beings right. Tribal people gossip too. You know what they gossip about out of trees getting eaten by large mammals. They a drought routes that you eat during the time of drought that are slightly toxic. Well keep you alive right. So they gossip about their actual needs in the world to stay alive. We gossip about all this crap because we got our actual needs largely taken care of we move massive amounts of food around the world through our transportation system so drought for most of us isn't a possibility or probability we have shelter and we have close and that's it so most people think they have a bunch of needs. You have three needs food shelter clubs and by the way you don't need them in the long run you need them in the short run right so Living week to week. That's why you've got if you're living paycheck to paycheck. Europe got food shelter and clothing. Yeah don't for the week right. That's fine yes. We think there's something wrong with both our belief that that's enough and our belief that there aren't other needs and so we build up all these other needs and complain when they are difficult to maintain so i don't know about you but i'd say at least half. My life is maintenance of the stuff beyond food shelter and clothing that elected around me right. And i think that i'm getting enjoyment out of them when what i'm primarily doing is maintaining them. It's funny you know. Here's an ironic. One of the most challenging events in my marriage right now is trying to get a fucking fence bill around our yard so that we can keep the dogs in defense right now is is really like i'm not gonna go into by now. My listeners are like i don't know how many lives have lost complaining about fencing. But this is like it's really hard during the pandemic to do this. But yes and i you know i'm one of my dear friends is having a rough go right now. And part of what's bugging him is is that he feels guilty about not being some profoundly tremendous success. Not have you know the what you just said about the week to week thing i think for a lot of people is really going to make them feel a little better because so many people beat themselves up for being in that situation and not realizing that that that that's actually that is you can call that success. You're eating your sheltered. you have close you. Think about it until what one hundred years ago. Hundred and fifty years ago ninety. Nine percent of the world lived paycheck to paycheck the equivalent right. Nobody aid money right. It wasn't an expectation. There're there was some rich people and there was some politically powerful people but most people just kind of live their lives now. Were they animals. No they were self reflective human beings with brains and interests and they had a huge amount of leisure time right. They used it right and we think everybody was a puritan and spent fourteen hours a day at work. That's absolutely not true. Right share cropping farmers. On in in the middle ages worked several hours a day and lived in shacks and and and drank and hung out and talked and watch the sunrise and sunset and presumably went. Holy cow dc. That isn't that beautiful right. Yeah and they didn't have fame and they didn't have money. And i'm not glorifying so people that are going to get on my ass and tell me that i'm somehow glorifying the poor and they have real You know there was poor public health and people only lived half as long as they do today and all that kind of stuff and all of that is also true right now. i don't get that from. I feel like what's the what's coming out of. You is more in along the lines of. Give yourself a break. You're spinning your entire life torturing yourself tormenting yourself over these things that are so far away from authentic happiness. That's what i get from you all not just. These conversations are private jets to and i. It's such a liberating it's such a liberating way of looking at the world and it's a great reminder for me because i always get lost in the things that are so far away from just that and you know the the scary about that. Is that if you're not careful. You're just he'll just be dead. You know you blink and you're dying and you realized the whole time you were doing some stupid. Compulsive masochistic internalized capitalism dance. Your family was at home. your loved ones. We're wondering where you were and then eventually forgetting about you in. That's pretty sad. I mean the weird part. It is sad. I guess although. I have another take on that. Which is particularly if you have the good luck of getting a immortal fatal diagnosis told. You're going to die a year year and a half rather than a sudden death unexpected. But if it's not sudden and you have some warning about it. My.

Hundred and fifty years ago iraq Nine percent one hundred years ago One today eighty percent both One point one a year year and a half first person fourteen hours a day three needs coast half Europe ninety least half several hours a day
"fourteen hours" Discussed on In The Pews

In The Pews

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on In The Pews

"It's not experienced it. I mean now they have to read and everything and you know i. I really like to talk about. This is because the lord Really works in. You know in our live through the different circumstances because can you imagine. I mean me devoting fourteen hours or twelve hours. You know just being in front of a monitor of a computer yep and now i was with kids and with their parents and co workers. I mean now my job live was completely different. Now it was people oriented yes service basically And so it's so interesting. How the lord is preparing your heart. Or what's coming next for what he's going to propose to do For you to do and so I ended up loving teaching to my surprise after probably my third or beginning my fourth year teaching i. I was not even thinking about animation. That point i fell in love so much with with education that i i'm confident to say that if the lord had not called me i would still be perhaps not a teacher in the classroom but i would be involved in the building or something in education. Okay because i was already going towards that i was I was thinking about the priesthood I was my fourth year early fourth year and That came about because again. You know meeting people Questioning me about my faith and And then all of a sudden. I was very involved in in parish life with a lot of young adult groups. Okay and i can tell you young adult groups in this archdiocese there. Very inspiring streamline inspiring. I remember going to catholic. At saint. Vincent the paul and was not even considering the pursuit then And i did not know anyone. And he was hacked while this is you know rico vid so he was yes hacked. I think was probably unawed. Thousand our allies six hundred or something like that paid him a lot. Yes and i remember you know. During that time. I was nine You know my relationship with the lord has has always been good. But during that time i went through not clinically depressed but really down so many changes in my life. Well you had a large family. Yeah and then all of a sudden you're cut off from them. Yes and a and a lot of people. 'specially americans they don't realize this like with the culture of a lot of people is your your family. You're very tight knit with your family. Mexico the philippines is just..

six hundred twelve hours fourth year fourteen hours nine Vincent the paul third Mexico Thousand americans philippines
Ford's Big Bet: Fans of F-150 Pickup Will Embrace Electric

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Ford's Big Bet: Fans of F-150 Pickup Will Embrace Electric

"For his formally unveiled its F. one fifty electric pickup truck the lightning port is making a big bet on the lightning president Biden got to test drive it this way the lightning will be able to travel up to three hundred miles per battery charge CEO Jim Farley says this is the path ahead we know this customer really well they trust us it if there's a company who's going to take them into an electric future it's sorta board may have a hard time selling it to people who build homes maintain lawn to plow snow Jimmy Williams owns a landscaping company in Chicago because we're working from twelve to fourteen hours every day all day yeah we don't have enough time to charge it up quickly here in the starting price for Ford's lightning is near forty thousand dollars I'm a Donahue

Jim Farley Biden Jimmy Williams Chicago Ford
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"I told you went on the dolly parton day works. Good joe lean. Joe leans only. That's funny what's going on everybody. I'm your host tomcat aka tom thompson. In who is my older host. And i'm looking at i'm billy. His name is billy and just because of stupid fucking doug ford. We're going to be doing a couple of streams episode in the next couple of weeks justice. Dan locked down. Because my girlfriend will bitch at me if i leave but gra doing fun smaller cases through streaming what you'd be able to find these episodes on youtube when we get back together and we're together again. We're gonna start covering big bigger cases. We lost up on the docket coming out a computer though longman. I know for a two hours when me and one go into like almost two hours. It's like man my fucking is. You're going nuts. i heard it's i never even. I never been a big computer guy. I could play video games for fourteen hours. That's fine but for sensitive computer actually hurts. I stare the computer a lot though editing and doing the graphics which i enjoy what i'm stone just hanging out i can take my time but staring and talking and having to go through the motions and because of our energy like we're going to keep the same high energy even over streaming By the fact that when we're together it's more that vibe we're getting during actually course it's like having a conversation over the phone is summary phones pretty much like this is the point. This is the point. This is the point. So i got some rye whisky can hear the ice shaken rattler. My my old landlord gave us some rallying. Shake it no the rattler. No i don't wanna fuck up and that's not a wrestling you like these. They're tasty it's a tart. Cherry raza radler as two point five percent. I was like wow. I've never drank beer. Drinking a beer. Drinking a beer that low in percentage ranking or drunken just drank drank drank dank. I've never drank a beer. So i'm back on facebook. Nobody probably noticed. But for twenty four hours. I was ever post posted. Fucking hiller shitter memes. It's fucking funny. It was like i ate off. How do you like your. We'd like dank. And because dan thank you or whatever. It's like dank those so all you can't be posted talking about celebrities like hitler we're gonna be getting in this realism celebrities gang because we kind of done this where we recover some celebrity conspiracies. Well let's get back into celebrity mysteries and rumors about celebrities. I got there said that i got whiskey. I got my whiskey. Beer off cares. Nobody they do. There's some there's someone out there tarim the interests of whether drink and everytime feel really bad. I'm gonna guess sixty percents every time. Tom's got whiskey with. Ob that tar and that he's got that full glass of arca there. I'm waiting for that for him to say that i don't i don't think they're living their lives like batman. I just i just don't think that's what happens. There's always some guy out there with too much time on his hands asking too many questions. Yes what if. What if elvis is still alive. What if the aluminum is really in charge of the entire music industry. We've all been duped into buying music from specific artists for obscure and evil reasons. Whether you're believer or we're talking about or they believe or not we're talking about the music industry and some of the weird theories surrounding the famous fuckers. You guys all of that. We're talking about a bunch of people want to get into it though the famous. I thought you meant like there's a specific. You're already getting specific. And i'm like i think i missed your story. A little tuned out for a minute. We're gonna have a little sippy stable. These are we going to get like i want. I hope they're openness to level of like bam marghera. That's the kind of celebrity. I wanna get into dan. Margiela level celebrity. You want to obama era. But he's not even he's famous reasons like incredibly exactly. I like that that level. Because people that i know. I'm sure we'll do this again. Talking about celebrities later on also but there is like obviously people that are be celebrities that give themselves a lot more fucked up messes. I would think that are the topless always being watched. Right like dolly parton. She's a fucking aid fucking celebrity for sure man. I want to see those zuma's like when in the nineties in like she's never showed them off their big she own them off. I've never seen naked seoul naked. Everyone of her outfits seventy five percent. Oh now you'd actually no. I think i i said saw her a year ago she was. She's singing about vaccinations year ago. She was hosting country music awards. Do you sounded like that. Abbas new brunswick. My dad was watching to comment on. Like is that fucking dolly. Parton still looks fucking good. Nash looks pretty good. I'll hopefully the fucking vaccination kills by his i. I hope that thirty percent people that get vaccinations die. Just just joking is why people to clue into how bad the shit is the cover of the cover art for black sabbath self titled debut album released in nineteen seventy was meant to scare fans. It was released on friday the thirteenth of february to increase the creepy factor. The cover photo depicted a water mill built during the fourteen. Hundreds an eerie female figure dressed in black standing before it and it was known supposedly. You're the one was an actress. Hired specifically to pose for the cover. This in fact did nothing to quarrel the multiple rumors that sprouted soon. After the album was released they always do this. Like you know. There's if you look if you look cages cd. No one's going to even know cage so it doesn't matter you. Can you can trip on acid one of his that the back cover of my cd and see how high you get. Somebody did that. They got a call like i. Guess maybe there's like ten of them code vintage random through remote so fuck in kiss kiss. Put their blood into a comic book. Oh yeah just like one put together and put it inside. This massive ink guy used to do the comic southern. That's kind of cool so crew creepy story stating that. This woman was actually a witch which which you pooh-pooh and then the other. The other is at the photo depicted. her during an actual black sabbath. So it's an actual witch and she's performing an actual black sabbath. So that's one theory. A satirical claim was thrown out there. That it wasn't women at all and it was rather rather ozzy osbourne and drag which i find. Funny i wanna see you think. Watch really not really know. His drags got to be like me. Maybe he adds inches already. Heels air base wears makeup words dresses. Nobody's fumbles around like fuck. You like scoots. Is you know what i mean. Scoot son's feet isn't really. He has already pick up his feet feet. Don't leave the crown yet. Another theory claim that it was no women. To begin with. There was no woman there on the cover at all but rather figure appeared when the photo was developed..

tom thompson dolly parton thirty percent Joe fourteen hours Parton Dan youtube tomcat friday black sabbath seventy five percent twenty four hours Margiela joe lean two hours Nash one theory dolly five percent
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Harvesting Nature’s Wild Fish and Game Podcast

"But Fingers cross say pray for me I would have to switch up my diet to lot more fishing fishing birds which is fine but Yeah just just something interesting. Thought about Definitely treated with some more bug spray. The next day what. What's the stuff you have. The substance So per method is a really good substance to something you can wash your or you know you can spare close down and And it stays within your clothing for over six washes. yeah Yeah it's just something great. It helps out with mosquitoes. It really really helps out with the ticks i feel like more than deet and Yeah it's it's it's it's some good stuff Use it with all my clothes. Yep make sure you follow whatever. Instructions says on the bottle Yeah man. i got toward by bugs. Over the courses i have probably like a dozen gigabytes on me as well really susceptible those guys but back to the topic things so anyway. Got that guy off there or gal. What sexy was i didn't ask Got it off there in any way. Put put those thoughts to rest but thought thought it was interesting because you had one crawling on you. At one point there we've had quite a few. I saw one yesterday So yeah i mean they were out there landscape and obviously we're mammals and we're hanging out On the ground because that's what you do when he turkey on like we mentioned and so let's see so now a rolling onto day three so day three. We are back in the blind. We decided to leave the tarp up. we left the tarp up. Keep it dry spot. 'cause it we knew it was going down. There was so nice so nice to do that. And yeah just just to come in and nabi sitting on. Soggy mud makes a day. Oh yeah it was good so when you spend fourteen hours you see how we spent fourteen hours in the blind..

fourteen hours yesterday over six washes day three one point dozen gigabytes one day
The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

02:49 min | 1 year ago

The New Normal with Dr. Jennifer Ashton

"Today we have the real privilege of being joined by practicing doctor for the last twenty years and the chief medical correspondent for abc news. Dr jennifer ashton. Dr ashton received her medical degree from columbia university's college of physicians and surgeons in two thousand and six. She became the first female medical contributor to the fox news channel and from two thousand nine to two thousand and eleven. She was the medical correspondent for cbs news network and since two thousand twelve. She's also been the senior medical contributor for good morning america and world news tonight. Abc news in october twenty seventeen. Abc announced dr ashton as chief medical correspondent and health editor during the pandemic. She's played a truly critical role in keeping americans informed. She's appeared on the abc network sometimes up to fourteen hours a day in order to bring viewers important medical information and she's widely considered one of the most trusted health personalities on television today. She's also the best selling author of six books including the self care solution and her recently published book the new normal a roadmap to resilience in the pandemic era. It's a real privilege for us. To have dr ashton on the show to talk about the coronavirus pandemic and what we can do to support our own physical and mental health during it. So dr ashton. Thanks so much for joining us today. How are you doing. thanks for having me you guys. It's really an honor and a pleasure to be with you. And i'm doing well awesome. Glad to hear that. That's great so. I want to play off the title of your book. The new normal. I'm in california forces here to without a lot of ups and downs estate. The definitely there's a sense with more and more people getting vaccinated people kind of stabilizing. There's this longing yearning to get back to the old normal and even kind of prickliness said any sort of restriction on a return to that former sort of equilibrium that people were used to and yet you're talking about the new normal that we just have to face. So why do we have to face and deal with a new normal. It is kinda wanna ask the naive question. Why can't we just go back to the hold normal. What's pushing us ended as a new normal. Well as you guys know. I'm a medical doctor. Not a psychologist but in medical school we do have to learn some psychiatry and some mental health and mental illness Unfortunately we learn enough but in speaking to a lot of mental health professionals. First of all your question is a really important one. Because we're not just seeing that people want to go back in time almost magically in the setting of a pandemic. We tend to want to do that in

Dr Ashton Dr Jennifer Ashton Columbia University's College Cbs News Network Abc Network Fox News Channel Abc News ABC America California
"fourteen hours" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

GamesMyMomFound

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on GamesMyMomFound

"I remembered loving this game. But i remember. I didn't finish it. And what i know what happened is that i put it down to play something else for a little bit and then i came back to it and could not remember what i had been doing and couldn't figure out where to go next and now i know why because i stopped on the board mansion level and that is one of the most. It's the water temple. i'm legacy ordering defiance. it's worse you know. I don't know if it's worse than the water temple like for sheer navigation purposes. But we'll get into it. But like i got i was okay so i probably played this game for about fourteen hours to finish it and three to four of that. Playtime was on that one level and every time that i got stuck on this game and i got stuck. A fair amount was purely because of weird camera angles. Right couldn't actually see what i was supposed to be doing next or where i was supposed to go next. And that's definitely something we'll get into but the thing about that is that that's kind of just a product of the time which i think is why it didn't bother me in two thousand and three but it bothers me in two thousand twenty one just because like we're still talking about a time when you usually didn't have full camera control on video games like there's a reason why because he you know obviously this is super aping. Devil may cry. Which i think came out like a year before i mean straight up with the the air juggles and the launchers and all of that stuff but also if you remember like devil may cry. One was fixed camera angles. Like a resident evil game thing with owning musha. And i kinda wish that this had fixed camera angles to because i think that would've fixed a lot of my issues with it would have been better at times because the camera is the biggest enemy in this game..

two thousand three one level about fourteen hours one four One twenty one a year
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Guerrilla Podcast Syndicate

"How legitimate desalvo bump oil designees loose under by the dam would have been a whole sharpest bites. will be a defy in the in mind hopes Indexing amazon Personal whether you're going at it woulda political stock. Become personal up at the llano. You personally studied the time and better. Individuals going go on now and some are aspiring on initiative not by going with the issue go of nausea picnic on minimum. Bank is an incident now. Golly say sang player or coach during the game upon unbeknown jarido or panel are got may agree below bill star. Note that he you guy nigga Name guy the in fourteen hours a forty eight minutes in forty for convenience of busted but what ought not guide. It's just a separate weakness but mindy any Staying civility this impacts on league. Ed benkin china. Oh golly that's but other male victim Repeating something william mafia coaches flavors they spent says salary spilled out but developed by. Golly as guides is superior. I don't see the and then update expanded. They pension is by timothy b. m. muha finish time being.

Ed benkin amazon china forty fourteen hours a forty eight minutes golly timothy b. Golly llano jarido
Jaslin Kaur, Candidate for New York City Council District 23

The Electorette Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Jaslin Kaur, Candidate for New York City Council District 23

"Skinner. This is the electorate on this episode. Have a conversation with just lean core candidate for new york city council district. Twenty-three does lean has lived in this community for her entire life and she's really passionate about fighting for the working people. There we start our conversation off with just leeann explaining what drives her leadership and why she was inspired to run for office in the first place. So here is just linkohr. So you're running for city council district. Twenty-three in queens. Was there a particular issue in your community that pushed you to run something that made you angry. Something that you're passionate about. What pushed you into this race. Yeah for me. I never saw myself as someone who wanted to run for office. But i think i was really just tired of having a kind of government. That doesn't actually respond to the working people so for me. I am the daughter of a taxi driver. My dad has been a taxi driver for nearly thirty years. Now but we have been dealing with a taxi medallion debt crisis for about seven years at this point. And so i look back at points in my life like back. In two thousand fourteen where the markets were being inflated artificially by medallion brokers who really preying on a majority of immigrant working class people who thought that a taxi medallion would be a really worthwhile. Investment was worth a mill- a million dollars back in the ninety s and into the early two thousands so in that market we came under almost hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of debt almost overnight and it is devastating for so many families that are close to us our neighbors our family friends and when you look at the state of our city these are the kinds of workers who generate worth of revenue. I city but don't have pension don't have a retirement fund and get people like my father who are sixty two years old and still working these fourteen hour shifts in the middle of a pandemic. So i see myself as somebody who really wants to champion the rights of many of our gig economy workers who have just been categorically left out of political process. How does this

City Council District Leeann Skinner New York City Queens
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Pop-Punk & Pizza

Pop-Punk & Pizza

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Pop-Punk & Pizza

"And and he does magic at a. It was a little bit He was he's he's he's tunnel. The m the full the proper mix master in does that is back to us. We kinda review them You make them will moments assign white and we just an amazing job. He's taken on a a whole signed up levels. Because you know there's only so much could have done. I'm kind of learning jehovah's like this is good. It is good for today's the on you. It could be some And he's helped us along and yeah he's good so so when you were at so when you were at uni and you. You're you're learning. You're learning specifically music. Production right yet. So some production of like technology and things like that so like live signed things Did you have a studio at your disposal. Then or were you okay. Yeah so we went up on university at this really cold studio knows. Yeah i mean. I was in the a thing at one. Point during production album is in there for a full week. Fourteen hours each day my towards of over a few weeks. I was going to just all the time because it was really fun environments being. You'll this writing. Paul studio arranging. Get again so i was kind of maximizing my time in that and yeah just experiment in because that was what it started as it was. You know we want. We never to be a lot of people might see it and go all that just trying to be famous so we'd never really entered it in that mindset. We will kinda like all this cheering knock now. Hi this equipment alexa. Just make stuff in as it's gone on which is kind of taken over all of the roles. The we manage it yourselves. I'm doin' and it's gonna building slowly but surely building up really. We've got some awesome people Mostly based around our instagram. You've got really nice community of equal love. The music loves the style. Every fucking nine people is just really cool to just be expected. Hell yeah man yeah. That's that's always. That's always the nicest part you know is when someone takes the time to appreciate your work or and go out of their way to say. Hey i really like this song. Are i really like this. Ep or whatever. It is specifically that they're commenting to you about But when when you were learning like music production stuff and you're in the the.

Fourteen hours today instagram nine people studio a few weeks Paul each day
"fourteen hours" Discussed on DV Radio

DV Radio

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on DV Radio

"The only thing they're usa for to some degree is social media. And even then. I'm just like i don't fucked light companies. Maybe like us devi radio navy. They matter i don't know other than that. Yeah no. I'll be only matter for branding. That's all exactly and i mean i'm not trying to brand myself because somebody's already making money somewhere. It's called the government fucking. I wish i was at goddamn whatever foul. She is making twice as much as the god. Damn president sitting there flagging killing people's ears full of nothingness and contradictions like anyway. That's that's his political. As i'm getting and i swear to god there's any politics and the news. I'm shutting the shutdown. Kill it now. I will pull the fucking. Don't test blame the messenger so chris. How was your week. Why didn't follow up any stairs. Let's good good. I'm glad to hear what the wind blew. mo say. I'm glad to hear that. Because i heard the wind was bad there this this week. It is going to be this week too so now. But you know what's going on with me. But i'll give i'll give the others A brief overview so i am switching careers Trion and hope trying anyway. I'll kind of forced to So i will be switching careers. It's just. I'm trying to specific company that i It'll be a big change But in the end. I think it'll work out if if i am lucky. Enough to land this position Pretty hectic and and crazy and exciting and scary and everything else week for me Next week will be more of the same. All you put up with in twenty twenty one alone. Yes i mean. I got ahead to you and you got going on at home. The street you got going on your job and all the other show you got going on on top of that with all your other stuff projects and a lot like now you guys see how i feel and i just think you're all day go out in public but i've got it me because i get to sit here all day and sleep. That's that's some people. Perceived forgot about that not been asked that in a while so good. Yeah he doesn't sleep. I know right. It's like that's the opposite of what you do. I actually think a message. Chris one morning like five or six years. I'm headed out the door to work during. I'll catch in a minute. Actually at that time. I probably would have been coming home. I've been working overnights. Well this was a while ago. Before so as i say i've been on vacation and i think my messengers gone off at three thirty every morning. This week i don't think it's been every morning i mean just about. I know six is complaining. 'cause he's sleeping so seven yeah. He was complaining when we last a. Why isn't he here. he was like man. I slept and slept until now but over going to sleep around thirty nine. I'm like that's good. But yeah i know is bothering him. But i'm like it's probably because they did the injection and his knee and god that his age and health problems on top of all that with every goes on day to day basis. I'm like dude. You're gonna go to sleep early. Trust me then. i mean like before. He got the injection. I know he wasn't sleeping because he like wake up screaming. Not even remember league still has nights where he wakes up screaming but that's because his his other knee is going to again. Age is playing a big factor in it and to wear steel. You guys have a bra bra of the operations own you guys. It's just exhausting on him. And i'm not saying that. He's getting restful sleep but he's gonna sleep a lot more than he did two years ago. Yeah it's definitely not restful tell you that i'm very take difficult. I feel his pain. People ask relationship. Well i here the horst burgis. Well not only that you're najan. Could you imagine if i was with a woman and she had a newborn like within the next nine months the amount of sleep that girl would get would be non flooding existence. Between me and the baby. She would get no rest whatsoever like at all. I hear someone. yeah no. I mean the be a nurse. Fourteen hours a year. I am not paying the hundred of thousands of dollars for years to come sit twenty four hours a day or a babysitter for that matter fucked. That noise like no people. Thickener are cheap. No it's not even with no medicaid. It's not anyway i mean. Stop talking on her. Goddamn ideas you are. I remember like last year one of those friends. She was like we could always get a nurse. And i was like you're gonna pay for it because i know about moving in together shit when she moved back up here and i was like. Are you gonna pay for a nurse. Because i sure as fuck him not because the. Va only supplies. A fourteen hour nurse per year. She was like what does that mean. I said fourteen hours altogether per year. She went what i want. Yeah said really she said. That's that's yeah. There's there's fifty two weeks in the year fair sixty five days. You got a total of fourteen hours. So that's how many hours a day really.

fifty two weeks fourteen hours last year Chris Next week This week five six years sixty five days two years ago fourteen hour three thirty twice chris twenty four hours a day six seven around thirty nine this week Fourteen hours a year
Patrick's Hot Take on Clubhouse

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Patrick's Hot Take on Clubhouse

"Everybody it's another episode of after hours and today. Oh boy we're going to talk about the most fomo inducing social media app out there drum. Roll me second drummer. Drummoyne desk here. It's called clubhouse okay so you might remember a couple of weeks ago. We had A listener mail. Message from brent mcginnis and i was talking to brat around that time and we stayed in touch. He wrote me a note and he said hey. Do you have any advice for clubhouse. You know i'm going to start getting involved clubhouse and my my answer was i don't know because clubhouses causing me a bunch of foam stress i don't think about clubhouse and so i decided to talk about club does this week because it. I just said it like a canadian. Their club hosts. I meant clubhouse. Because everybody's talking about clubhouse. I feel like every conversation i have has a clubhouse element and everybody kind of criticize out clubhouses the worst but yet they're all on it and so i just think it's interesting to unpack that. What the heck is going on with clubhouse and so i have five conham went through for five hot takes on clubhouse that i wanna share with you today okay. Hot take number one this. I don't think it's that hard to take. But tell you think i think clubhouse is interesting and i'm gonna tell you why i have spent a little time on there and people have cool conversations. That are outside of the norm. So i think the very obvious use case clubhouse it's a place to congregate a following so for example we can have a really cool foam sapiens event. Where a bunch of us get together and we start talking about the show and the things that we like from the show. It'd be great chance for me to meet some you listeners. And maybe we'll even do that in fact if you're interested doing that and you're a member of clubhouse I would love to hear more about that. You can actually follow me on clubhouse at petro mcguinness so check me out patrick mcguinness and i just like like the fact that you get groups of people together and there are some really interesting people. Obviously the musk's of the world now those types come on. That's great too. But i i was on a A bunch of conversations about dating or about social life for about politics and people. I never heard of were getting up and talking pretty honestly and sometimes saying some crazy things. I was like ward. You said that. While but i just think it's a great way to learn about topics that you may not have exposure to and frankly i was looking to a conversation about race and that's a conversation that i really wanted to hear and i don't have all the time with with certain people in so hearing about Concepts of racial equity and and in from people who are living Living lives are affected by racism for me was super education. I valued being able to hear that. So i think there's a lot of value for people when they listen on clubhouse but let's move onto number two hot tag number two. It is super super time. Consuming i mean you get on clubhouse and then you like fourteen hours later when you get off because your phone is dying. You're like oh my god like what time go i. I wonder if people maybe just put it on in the background while they're doing other things but who is just. It just sucks up a lot of time. And i have a good friend who's been doing a benz on there and she was telling me her experiences like yeah. I love doing it. But frankly i you know i i. It's like start things. Go for three hours. So you start at nine o'clock and suddenly midnight and you're sorta like gosh. What are the time go and so it does require a ton of time and that's an interesting thing because obviously during a pandemic people have time to spare and so it's just a great way to kill time but what's going to happen when people are busy again. Are they gonna wanna be clubhouse. That is a mystery. We don't know what's going to happen. But i do think that the time sort of element. It's going to have to change because people cannot devote three hours for conversation Every week or every night or however frequently you're on it. And i think maybe after the pandemic will see that those conversations will get a little shorter. That's what i would predict but we will see when that happens.

Drummoyne Brent Mcginnis Petro Mcguinness Patrick Mcguinness Ward
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

Go West, Young Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Go West, Young Podcast

"My julie's tended become runner for a while. But that's gonna work out. I'm really really got into mountain. Biking i mean i do love these really long durrance Adventure activities. So you all go out you know. Ride my bike for fourteen hours. Or i did a big league up in client in rocky mountain national park with alex handled this last year where we climbed like you know twelve. We climb basically all the major climbing formations in the park and it took us thirty six hours. And it's just like a good sort of Endurance adventure in. So i'm always looking for that and it doesn't necessarily have to be exclusively about climbing although when i do it in that climbing round It tends to you You i feel like. I'm doing the thing that i'm sort of the best ad. So that's cool back to advocacy's we wrap up here You've got the by ministration. Just getting started. I see i see joe. They're over your shoulder in the shot there. That's got the. I got the celebration tax from the administration which those so what do you hope that president biden accomplishes for for climbers and everyone who enjoys the of course sunny on. There's a lot that's big question. But he's he's getting he's getting a good start on it. I will say that I mean i don't know. I think people who care about the environment. See this this period of time where you you know biden is very pro environments in his in the white house right now and we and and also. It seems like the environmentalists. Are you know the the party. That seems to Like to create policy for environmentalism is You know in power in the house and the senate as well. So we're like this is..

fourteen hours thirty six hours twelve last year president rocky mountain national park julie biden alex
"fourteen hours" Discussed on  Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Slick Talk: The Hospitality Podcast

"Margins. You're making the overall loyalty. You're getting from your customers. Your gas These are send things in the sense of a team in my opinion. Yeah i i agree the brian. It's there's no grit. there's no authenticity. There's no sweat equity and your set up for failure as a result of that because the team just isn't going to receive you especially if you're not equipped with the emotional intelligence to handle because they don't they really don't so that's one reason i've seen people leave the industry quickly as a result of that I also think that young people the they young people. And i'll see us right doesn't say you don't say young people. I just turned twenty six but does not mean. I'm old okay. I'm still your. You're young and i will say us as a young person's community. Jeff even millennials. Right it's not. It's not cool necessarily to be working for fourteen hours a day on weekends when your girlfriend is trying to celebrate her best friend's birthday she wants you to join her or vice versa. Lay that's not ideal for some but there's so many sacrifices and a lot of people are saying at what cost is being in the hotel industry specifically in operations. And i think there.

Jeff brian twenty six one reason fourteen hours a day
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

Diary of a Nation

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

"Desolate ten mixture of those also. It's like the same thing as sunscreen far as the news. Was there much shipping traffic along your route on. There are definitely a lot. But i like what i'm sorry. I don't see a whole lot I swim in then all of a sudden like oh hi at the boat that you don't see a whole lot when you're swimming but you really have to trust your boat captain and your crew in order for them to keep you safe and depict the best group real but the boat. Traffic is there. I am a frog like swimmer. Which i imagine isn't the most efficient way to cross the english channel. What strokes did you swim I did freestyle and something that you have to beware before you swam you have to like Tell the captain what stroke you're gonna be doing. What were the weather conditions like during the swim for the most part they were pretty nice as far as it got a little wave in some parts. I can like you wanna gets crazier whether y like as far as the waves so i was pretty happy. The water temperature was around like sixty three ish and then the air temperature was around. Fifty eight are you just mentally strong. You're not panicked at all. I definitely panicked. But it's just. I have to rely on my training and no like the work i put in and it's like by the time i got to actually starting swimming english channel. I was just so happy to be there. 'cause i trained for over two years for that specific swim and yet a lot of people. Describe me probably stubborn. Though so you finish the solo swim just before midnight in fourteen hours ten minutes and that distance short ashore point to point is twenty one. But it took you thirty three miles to get across and i looked at a map of your actual route which is a bell curve like you said earlier. It was the change in the tide that.

thirty three miles Fifty eight over two years fourteen hours ten minutes sixty three twenty one before midnight english ten
Tips For Staying Sane

Mentally Yours

05:16 min | 1 year ago

Tips For Staying Sane

"Welcome erica stevens mentally yours. Thanks very much for joining us so we has just about your book even together. The guinness guy tucson sannoussi Why did you want to create this. I had. I've always wanted to write a book about my experiences with psychosis but i kind of felt that it would have more to offer offers a book if i listed the help of a co author. He was a professional in mental health. An augment stephen a conference on and it was about schools. New routes tibet to catholic schizophrenia. anti newell basket sphere. Its area of expertise. Less ask him. let's ask him and he was for. And so we started writing this book together But just felt the kind of just mike spirit. Just the expert by experience will lived experience on and maybe wouldn't hold water. I thought that it would be much better. Talbot's that too. What about east stephen so obvious similar oversee from a professional perspective. So as okay said. I have kind of specialized in researching schizophrenia for twenty five years and look after any large number of patients with illness and other and had wanted to write a book that would be accessible to them and to a wider audience. But also one. That wouldn't be too dry rocket dynamic and around about the time. I'm i'm erica. I also told by various agents event. If i wanted to write a book like this. I definitely need to get Lots of people stories in it so lots of people with lived experience contributing Beating erica was a very happy coincidence and from there took us a while to get going but i think we broke during two eighteen and then finished off in nineteen before publishing of this year. And who would you say that. It's forty anyone with schizophrenia. And anyone is interested in like working schizophrenia. Or care and put some moments schizophrenia. Like a friend or a loved one. Yeah i think. I anyone who's got Or any other type of psychotic illness. This a few different types of psychotic illness Bipolar disorder for example People often have psychotic symptoms of that and other conditions. That are less common so anyone kinds of problems. Anyone looking off to them girlfriend. Mother father sister brother hawks would also. Perhaps anyone is our cassette. Just interested in knowing a bit more about psychosis genuine schizophrenia in particular so one of the psychiatry senior trainees kindly read the book. drafts and coming to the drafts to improve the readability. Apparently who has no connection health connection was he apparently likes reading the extent. For at least it's it's worked. It's an interesting one for me. Because i was now hundred solder and i had psychosis so it would have been lucky to have a ham but like the i think when i i have my my first bit of mania because the thing is it happens and then you get back to normal source of reading. I what's happened to. Why as happened what to do next radius. That's almost as bad as well as just happened in a way. That kind of Mystery around it. Will this fair around it. You're right to tell us a bit about your experiences again our. We've always had you on the poco before that was a while ago. now so you're right to tell we re to go right to tell listeners about your experiences psychosis first episode. Was rhinos on about twenty two Fourteen hours say it's been about two decades of living with psychosis Something i can manage quite well with medication and different therapies But it can be quite terrifying when you have a psychotic episode and there's definitely more at the start of the illness later on and i think the police spying on me. I think i've committed really henious cry and all much like a burglary or you know so of a monkey or something really say area slight blowing up canary war types areas And i just really believe. It's true. And i might start to think the The songs i hear on the radio have been written especially for me to kind of condemn more behavior or the tv might be talking to me in subliminal messages and is terrifying united states ironic to me how much fear or inspire notice when they hear a half psychosis when the reality is you know. I'm just terrified myself. Really in a housebound when it's happening.

Schizophrenia Erica Stevens Mike Spirit East Stephen Erica Psychotic Illness Bipolar Diso Psychosis Tucson Talbot Tibet Stephen Okay Hawks United States
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"He knew he had to get out of there. I don't know what's up. I don't care if here's my shift can try that at work happening. I got the lead by by punching note. Either fees billy. It says that you were here for fourteen hours. Yes yes. I meeting potato chips. I worked hard day after he was safe. He was informed that many of the museum staff members had felt a presence a similar presence that to the director of the museum that claim that he once saw a white floating spirit at late at night upon further digging. It was discovered that years prior to win. The museum was a theater. A large speaker fell off the wall and kill the boy. Oh shit speaker. Just fell and flatten this boy to nothing. So it's unbelievable. Has the boy was killed in that. He's the same. One that haunts museum could be. How big's the speaker. And how was that boy. I don't know it's probably pretty probably pretty big speak. So what do you think. I think he was aliens and i think they crashed here. I've i've looked there's more i think the russia's special needs program stole the best one. Yeah that was pretty fucked.

fourteen hours One russia
Review: 13 Sentinels

DLC

05:29 min | 2 years ago

Review: 13 Sentinels

"Really curious to hear your take on thirteen. Sentinels a game again. That kind of creeped up on me out of nowhere and saw a lot of people who i tend to kind of align my taste with talking about how great it was in it is vanilla. Wear game i've played. I guess all their games of years and they're known for just this very beautiful hand-drawn style and it comes through wonderfully in thirteen sentinels but a backup explained the game. It's really interesting in. do you know much like. Have you paid much attention to it. Yet what the narrative is what's going to dislike a pop culture mash up the storyline with the time. Travel and stuff right there. Yes quite a bit. That's what kind of like piqued. My interest being with people like this game is really well written as someone who likes riding lakes games. I tend to try to pay attention well and seeing also that smell aware. I was really interested but The actual construction of the game is really interesting. It's almost two pieces one of which is for better or worse almost like a graphic adventure that you play non linearity that you kinda play different segments between the thirteen different characters that thirteen sentinels the sentinels are there giant robots that but there are thirteen people get into them sue kind of play small sets that all we've together to a bigger story in the game play is very much a graphic adventure. You walk around two d. screens talking to each other. It's fully voiced and have to say trying to be like an alpha like animated fan. I said it to japanese initially and was enjoying it. Okay but then actually switch it over in the english word sackings actually fantastic really up to my enjoyment of the game. It's awfully voiced so it is this again. I just really call it a graphic adventure you walk round and you just choose kind of like questions to ask. There's an interesting mechanical. You just press a button and your thought cloud comes up which is just different topics that your character has heard about or kind of like buzzwords you can choose and one thing i enjoy. That silly is your character like this robot. Boy says the buzzword. I liked it so it'll be like ufo like that that but it is very much a graphic adventure but then the other part of it is extensively a tower defense game. I want to say it's very interesting. And this part of the game is almost polarizing in how not pretty it is. It's almost like wire frames like it looks almost like imaginative cyberspace but a what that allows them to do is create a huge sense of scale. Basically you are piloting. Different robots in the city of tokyo. I believe mostly it's the whole city entered finding one part but it's very simplistic graphics As most looks like wire frames. And then if you like played on certain units you can see illustration of what they're supposed to be like which will be giant fantastic mexican most part but what that allows them to do is do things were like like two hundred little enemies are coming at you and you could shoot them all with a giant giant like rail gun that will kill of them at once so the simplicity actually allows them to create this like cool game of scale and is like it's turn based in a way it's for unique. I'm scrubbing poorly. But it's definitely nothing. I expected because i thought maybe it would be like jr g like mechanically but up. It is just fascinating as you can play them. The two parts separately out of sequence. I believe i. i'm b. But i believe you eventually do need to get to certain parts in the tower defense portion to unlock other parts vice versa. But i it is wholly unique in the sense. I've never played a game kind of constructed like this. But also at its core there's a really well acted compelling story that if you are fan of sci-fi wouldn't even go as far as saying anime which can to some people seem as a pejorative like yes. It has very anime style to it but it is a pretty unique and compelling story a that involves like time travel almost like meta narratives about pop culture. John ryan Anymore to spoil it. But it's really intriguing that it is thirteen different characters. There is an element of time travel in just characters not appearing to who they need to be in a time where. I play a lot of video games as i'm sure everyone does. I tend to be a little bit of like a tourist gamer. And i want to see like the new cool thing that's out but sometimes it takes a lot for a game to hook me but this actually like immediately got it's like mystery hooks in seems like a really well written welcome post story. That has well. I've just seen people say like oh stick with it. The reveals are really worth it. So yeah that's my. Because i'm so glad to hear you say that last part because that was biggest worry honestly. The only reason i picked it up yet is because i was worried that it was going to take fourteen hours to get to the good stuff. You know a lot of those. I mean not to be overly generalizing but a lot of those vanilla games are kinda like that. Where like you'd have to play for like thirty five hours and it's good it's like i ain't got that time

Travel Tokyo John Ryan
"fourteen hours" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"fourteen hours" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"I might trout there that that you probably haven't thought about is when i work with entrepreneurs again they're trying to a lot of times hustle and grind their way to trying to work their way through the trying to spend fourteen hours a day and what happens is people get burnt out especially if they're traveling especially if they've during the digital nomad thing they're trying to build a life in there. You know. i see this a lot. It's like you could. You could work your way into the ground if you just try to hustle to grow business but what you really can be doing was going to accelerate. You is to to be lazy. I learned this from some of my studio. Everybody's cheering right about that. I can get down with that. And what i mean. Is that when you invest in creating more time for yourself when you create systems for your business or when you Stop doing things that aren't important or when you learn how to delegate or properly hire all of these things so so my good. Ceo friends you know. They managed one hundred five hundred people in their companies. They're actually sitting down for focus worker. Just a couple of hours a day and they're leaving time for fortuitous conversations or to to have a difficult decision or something like that. And i remember i remember reading about obama. When he was in office he been make any decisions he would just. He had this system where he the same same their workout time. He'd wear the same thing black suit everyday or whatever it was and so. His first decision of the day was of national or international importance..

fourteen hours a day one hundred five hundred peopl first decision obama couple of hours a day Ceo
Treacherous travel expected in much of eastern US

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:18 min | 2 years ago

Treacherous travel expected in much of eastern US

"Begin with millions of americans now digging out from one storm as a new system. Take shape in the south and takes aim at one of the busiest travel days of the year. A state of emergency to open twenty twenty one as heavy snow and ice pushed north from texas through the heartland then all the way into the northern new england area a foot of snow paralyzing interstate traffic in texas. Some drivers stuck up to fourteen hours tonight. Attention moving to the southeast where a rainmaker has already triggered. Flash flood watches from tallahassee to columbia south carolina that storm pushing north along. The i ninety five corridor with snow inland and a wintry mix sure to make for treacherous driving the forecast in a moment but we begin tonight with abc. Stephanie ramos right here in new york city tonight. Dangerous winter weather slamming parts of the country with millions heading home from the holidays. A major storm system sweeping from the south into the northeast bringing heavy snow ice and rain parts of west texas digging out from more than a foot of snow. This is miles and miles. Hundreds of drivers stuck in traffic for up to fourteen hours due to the treacherous conditions. One woman with diabetes trying to avoid a medical emergency by rationing her medication in the car. I'm trying to take my medications right now. Because i don't really of drop zillow. In oklahoma snow and ice knocking out power to thousands icy road conditions stranding cars semis sliding off the highways this eighteen wheeler toppling onto its side ramming a guardrail to reported tornadoes. Touching down in georgia. This mobile home flipped over by high winds injuring. One person despite cdc warnings not to travel due to covid more than fifteen million people flying across the country for the winter holidays rain snow could impact travel over the next twenty four hours with tomorrow expected to be the busiest day for air travel since the start of the pandemic. The travel headaches aren't over here in the northeast. Black ice is a concern tonight. Temperatures are expected to drop below freezing and a new storm set. Impact much of the east coast tomorrow giving travelers very little time to prepare

Stephanie Ramos Texas Tallahassee New England South Carolina West Texas Columbia ABC New York City Zillow Diabetes Oklahoma CDC Georgia Headaches East Coast
Managing your time effectively

The Tropical MBA Podcast

05:05 min | 2 years ago

Managing your time effectively

"Let's talk about time then. In the next thing i was thinking about what are some effective time hygiene or time habits that we can about to institute in the new year. And you know there's just so much of this thinking in the entrepreneurial world that the idea is to just go out there and to work all the time to sort of sacrifice other areas of your life. I caught myself seaney. Lan must describe how he puts ninety hours a week into his business. And i have a hard time relating to how that's possible and the reality is it's i almost feel like a little bit ashamed to it in the light of how this kind of hustle culture is so glorified but i spent more time. You know working on businesses. When i had a job and i sat in a desk from eight. Am in the morning until seven pm at night. Then i do for the businesses that we've run together and part of that is having good time hygiene and focusing on the things that count tell you what my trick is. Dan and it has been the last three. Years is just have a kid because that will clean up your act immediately. It's kind of a joke but it's kind of serious which is like there's a limit now on my time. That was never there before so when people had said to me in the past like oh man. I got so much more disciplined with my time. When i had a kid. I can totally relate to that so i guess what i would try and tell myself before is like how could i engineer that into my day like pre kid because actually used to pull it on must end like you used to make fun of me for it. You'll be like oh. This diesel just like sits down for like twelve hours and the reason i did that is because i kind of enjoyed it and one hand but on the other because i was like super inefficient and the way that was approaching some of these problems so it worked out because they didn't have anything better to do and certainly that's a okay position to be in. If you want to sit there for twelve hours you can do it. If you don't have much else going on which i didn't but now i can't afford to do that so i just have to be a little bit more deliberate about the way that i spend my time. It's weird because like besides being braggadocious on youtube about it. No one's keeping track of this stuff anymore and no one cares right and so it doesn't matter whether it takes fourteen hours a day or four. It's really a matter of practicing the fundamentals simply asking yourself. Are you being efficient with your time if your being efficient with twelve hours a day and what you want to do is grow the biggest company in the world and become the richest person in the world. Then more power to you. Know that's really cool a couple of things. I mean for me. My time hygiene habit in two thousand and twenty one is calendar in a lot more and the strategy essentially is time boxing and time. Boxing is an approach. That leverages parkinson's law which suggests that task expands to the amount of time that you a lot to it and this is particularly true in knowledge. Work and men. You've been through this a million times. Essentially you finished the task by the deadline. Yeah and especially in knowledge based businesses where there are these moving grey lines as to what constitutes being finished. I think time. Boxing is a really excellent approach. The so typically in my calendar has been only for meetings meetings blank space and in two thousand and twenty one. I'm going to get more serious about time. Boxing and putting in projects deliverables deadlines and areas of focus in the calendar. You know one of the small examples started happening in our businesses one of our team members. Alison i would set aside an hour to work together on our sales literature every week and it was simply a matter of like. That's a time hygiene thing. This is a very important thing it tends to get put off and we think it's important so how about we just work on an hour week together and keep each other motivated. This is something. I really wanna explore in two thousand and twenty one interesting. I mean that is a real example. And that's something that we've talked about behind. The curtain with our businesses like ourselves pages needed to be updated. And i like the conversation that we had is like. This is an ongoing project. And so you know with these habits. Die ideas like identifying what's valuable and then making it a habit one of the thing. I'll add to hygiene dan and this is something that i implemented in twenty twenty as it relates. A time is a bedtime. I to stay up really late and i know. Sometimes you're up late to text. You still be up but it is rare. These days dan that i stay up twelve thirty. The reason for that is because i get up later and then i can't be productive during the day as much as i'd like to be. I don't know. I guess this is being part of an adult or something. I don't know. I've always kind of you know moon lighter on the night owl. The best stuff happens at night really. It doesn't for me the best things that happened at night or like more interesting so i cut myself off. And this is one of the habits that i implemented for twenty twenty. I'm looking forward to in twenty twenty one as

Seaney Boxing LAN DAN Parkinson Youtube Alison
Your Career Future in an AI Digital Tech World  Somi Arian  Career Fear - burst 11

A New Direction

05:09 min | 2 years ago

Your Career Future in an AI Digital Tech World Somi Arian Career Fear - burst 11

"How do we. How do we reach those people to get them to understand whether you're the deniers or whether you're the the as yukon the career fair people what do we what do we need to do to bring them in. And maybe maybe we need to understand. Help them understand why they feel that way and what we can do to help them change their change their thought process. Okay so Step one stop watching netflix. I i was not ready for that. So i was not why. Why do we need to stop watching that flexible. That's great because they are wasting their time. You know it's like the world is going into direction where there's going to be ten percent of people doing all the work ninety ninety percent of people not having much to do the way that are going if it continues the way that is going because the age of middle classes is over. Yeah people are Madrid people in the west. I feel like they have especially you know. Our generation millennials Dave not seen difficulty if not seen adversity yet. This is like this generation After world war two the baby boomers agassi. They created the The middle class. Has you know everything was going upwards in everything was going better. You could get a job after five years. You could knew that you'd be able to have enough money for deposit of a house and then you would be able to get mortgage you know how to family. That's not going to be the case for our generation because the nature of technology is deflationary. Because i as technology moving forward more and more people are job because we're not going to need that many people who don't have unique amazing skills so what we need the cut this book although yes it tells you how to Have a better career in the future. But the truth is the steps. The things that i talk about in the book they are not for everybody. This is not the kind of thing you know. It's not a book that's like you know emmanuel for how to get the job like how to write a better seavy. It's not that kind of thing you know. You need to come a unique worker unique person. You need to develop maltese skills. You need to be multi skilled and you need to be highly highly skilled in your soft skills or you know what i call human skills just emotional intelligence contextual creativity. Mindfulness and critical thinking. And those things take time to develop. So if you are you know have twenty four hours. Eight hours of sleep. You need that right. I used to sacrifice sleep. And i realized you know from reading a lot in it and thinking a lot about where i'm going to go and i was like what i'm doing is not sustainable. I need to get enough sleep. Okay so if i'm gonna get enough sleep. Then i have sixteen hours to work right and out of those sixteen hours I definitely need to give an hour for exercise. Okay i can listen to an audio book while i'm on treadmill and i'm doing my workout. I need maybe a bad of fourteen minnesota. So for general kind of things like say a meditation and things like that twenty minutes to shower so it about fourteen hours who work fourteen hours to work right so what. I'm suggesting in the book. If you are going to be in that top ten percents. This book is written for people who want to be in the top ten. Set if you're going to be the top temps then you need to work for fourteen hours. I'm not talking about work as in. Sit down and like you know just like not. Talking argument repetitive things. When i say works. Let's say out of that. Fourteen hours four to six hours of paraguay should be dedicated to research and development. Learning new skills when i say working over. I'm sitting here practicing linear algebra. I'm working as part of work. I think about newtonian and i aside. You know like dot. Org beh- using so many. I think so. Many people. And i know that there is a group of people who would say oh. Well this is millennials. Origen zad or even some Late xers but people are going so many work. I wanna work that hard i want. That's already than i'm sorry. The way things are going. I know you want to tell you what you want to hear or do you want me to tell you the truth. The truth is that

Somi Arian AI New Work Order Carrers And Technology
Best tech gift for under $70

Talking Tech

01:24 min | 2 years ago

Best tech gift for under $70

"Yesterday we talked gifts under fifty dollars. Today we're going all the way up to seventy bucks. And what i think everybody in twenty twenty once lighting to make themselves look better on zoom call will the folks that loomed cube have what it calls the video conference for remote workers. It's a little. Led lights that snaps in the back of your laptop to illuminate you during your calls and does a pretty nice job in a lot of people were buying ring lights for this purpose earlier in the year but frankly i never found one that look decent this one. Does it has a diffuser to soften the light and a toggle switch to with just the intensity of the light now. let's face it. Many people are in the dark. They're sitting in front of a window. The looked like a silhouette they need. Lighting lighting really helps now. This light has a rechargeable battery that answers to usb c which i love because while it's attached to the back of my laptop the charging cable is dangling from it and i can plug it into my laptop to recharge now. The company says the battery itself can go for fourteen hours. Loom cube is a company based in san diego. I encountered a few years ago with its first product. A little cube lights that fit atop cameras and provided some well-needed illumination. However it's the zoom light. It's clearly the product that will put it on the map.

Loom Cube San Diego
Dallas Fuel in Buying Spree

High Noon Podcast: The Overwatch esports Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

Dallas Fuel in Buying Spree

"Fearless has joined. The dallas fuel from shanghai has joined the dallas fuel from paris repel has joined the dells fuel from free agency. Dallas fuel of seinfield. From harris. And jack say has joined the dallas fuel from houston okay. I'm not gonna do whatever he thinks. I'm going to do and flip out man. But what i am going to do is laugh at astro here. Okay they're obviously building a phenomenal team. Right like this is a great roster you should already be thinking about. Are they favorites to win this thing next year the talent is certainly there so i'm super excited to watch and blow it up to watch him joking and threw it up because that's tip that's more often than not what happens with super teams right and we're iraqi territory and a super team that is specifically playing under the dallas fuel. Banner which we've seen happen right. And i do also want to continue to to make fun of hasro for this because it's hysterical to me him tweeting about how much effort he's putting into build this roster for twenty twenty one aired. He now that it's done and they put out a tweet saying they're done so that that should be the end of the. You didn't build anything you try. He's got his out. You think you're sitting fearless downside trial you think. You're buying a half of the parents to turtle the good half of the turtle and trying them out. stop it. this is the lazy. I don't know what i'm doing. So i'm throwing money at solution and you're like you just ran three marathons back to back in. You need to sleep for two weeks. It's hysterical get over. It manley utah. You're you committed in a different way. Okay yeah fans don't care. I'm gonna continue to throw stones at you because you're my rival and you went the yankees route right like. Oh there's no salary cap so we don't have to be opposite. We need money we opposite. It's just stop pretending like you you you were in the salt mine slaving away for fourteen hours a day over the over the course of this offseason far you bought it. You're trying to buy a championship mad about it. But i don't respect either right like i'd rather know unless if it's eight listen if you wanted to do it. I'm not gonna sit there and complain going to be like oh look at. The amazing is yes. Enter general manager is a genius because like take a step back calmed re. Don't don't try to pull the wool over people's eyes right. You're committed to winning your committee. Your fan base. That's enough for your fans. So that's that's the end of it. You have to try to sell me. That you're you're doing some herculean task or haley effort. Like get like let it go. You need to stop that angle. 'cause i swear just looks like a complete fool to me when he tweets like that. Yeah this and this is i. Don't know what a general manager does. Maybe he really did have to go to go to battle in a different way right like me. Did after like contract negotiations outs in like it could have. Maybe it was. Yeah but like. When you're taking that route it looks lazy so like don't try to fight the optics of it. Just ignore the optics of it. I don't know it's gonna bad look for has show or whatever because he cares what i think but i know i'm not the only one that kinda felt this way a bright And yeah it's just funny me. Congratulations on attempting to just purchase and overwatch league championship. Right stop patting yourself on the back

Dallas Hasro Shanghai Harris Paris Houston Jack Manley Yankees Utah Haley
Behind the Book: Nine Lives Over the North Atlantic with Kerry McCauley

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

05:10 min | 2 years ago

Behind the Book: Nine Lives Over the North Atlantic with Kerry McCauley

"You must be somebody who really really loves adrenaline jockey that's for. Sure. Yeah, I sure do got to keep the heart going. So you talk about in this book single engine over the Ocean. Boy Really. Sure. Sure. They gotta they gotta get. There's someplace and you gotta find somebody stupid enough to do it so. that. It takes a lot of skill to do that, and so a lot of times people ask though. I know we talk about faring airplanes, 'cause people, purchase planes. There's a lot of reasons to do it I. I'm in a building here where we have a ferry company downstairs. I always think of putting a small plane in a container and shipping it would probably be the best way. So so why would you ferry a plane over the water when you could ship it in a container? Well in a word money I mean it's expensive to take him apart. Shipping is not that expensive expensive to put it back together. But you know last time to play I've heard lots of stories of people doing that and they get there and there's a couple of vital parts missing from the plane and. Becomes a problem. So then they would go toward someone like you that can actually has first of all the knowledge. To fly an airplane, the water and also has more than that has the guts to do. I I'd have to say when you're preparing for this, there's got to be two things involved. I would think there's a psychological aspect and there's also the the whole part of preparing from paperwork and more of a knowledge aspects. So it's talk first about the the knowledge you know what type of things do you need to not do this type of a trip? Well number one you've got to figure out, can the play make the trip? You know what route are you gonNA take you get find fuel stops you need any overflight permits arguments, put ferry tanks in the plane that's kind of the big one. On a few need to make some really long legs over the ocean, most planes can't do it on their standard fuel. So you've got to put very tanks of the plane. So ferry tanks. What are those? Are they metal or a rubber? I freeze the metal ones. They do make rubber ferry tanks at collapses there being used, but the metal ones are more reliable. You take the seats out of the back the out of the back of the plane and put them in the tail basically in. Put the ferry tanks as far forward as you can for CG and. There you go. Extra. When you're when you do that, that's going to be a bit of a cost to the person right to that's part of the cost of doing the first flight. Yeah Yeah. But usually if you've got very tanks in their lifetimes, you can make up the cost or that by skipping stops especially these days a lot of times landing permits and especially foreign countries get to be really expensive. But when you have fourteen hours a range you can. Literally make half the stops that you normally would end if you didn't tanks. So it's Kinda Nice. So each of those stops assuming there are some costs involved in and that type of thing as far as like land permits I'll a definite landing permits these days in foreign countries are getting to be really ridiculous plus these days. Almost every foreign airport requires you to have a handler. Which is adding extra costs me back when I first started three years ago we did everything ourselves you shop at a foreign airport that you'd never been to that. You don't speak the language you just have to dive in fine landing fees get fuel weather food if you got time and do it yourself now they make you hire handler which is nice but expensive. So. Do you really need the handler? No Dan was really bothered me most of the time they're not. They're not very helpful first of all, and it's just the money's right off. You know right off the top every time you spend on your on the road is coming right out of your pocket. So it's It's going to shell out a few hundred dollars or more on a stop just had some guy walk alongside you. Yeah. How did you learn to do all this? I started back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety for flying for a company called Orient Air out of Saint Paul Minnesota. and. My friend's father owned the company. We were army recruits together in the National Guard. and. They needed a pilot ninety job actually was a actually spent a few years trying to get this enough hours to get this job. And got. Hired. Off on the road I went. So yeah. It's some mentors that could help you out Is that something that you would suggest if someone was thinking again, getting into this get was somebody I. Oh, definitely there's so many things that you don't think about when you're getting ready to make especially along ocean crossing. The the weather considerations are. Paramount I. Mean you run unexpected headwinds? Don't leave yourself enough reserve. You might come up short nets usually considered inconvenient

Orient Air DAN Saint Paul National Guard Minnesota Paramount
A Conversation About Intermittent Fasting

20 Minute Fitness

05:33 min | 2 years ago

A Conversation About Intermittent Fasting

"I welcome to the show. It's great to have you on here today Amazon, pleasure to be here. Thanks for having me yeah. I'm really excited to chat about fasting today because it is something that I have personal interest in, and it's not something that we actually covered on the podcast for a long time before we dive deeper into fasting what it's all about maybe can tell our listeners what fasting is all about? Yes show. So I everyone filming them of festive and maybe I'll just start off about myself how we got into this. So growing up I was always passionate about sports unhealthy lifestyle in. My teenage years I was getting into Ganic Foods, and will my friends actually would make fun of me because it wasn't at the time like ten years ago during my late teens though I had a car accident and I just located shoulder, I had rations to fix it login that time I was bedridden. So the whole process lasted about a year and a half unnaturally I was experimenting with different diets to maintain my my way because I couldn't exercise on a what I came to the conclusion that time that by it's really harmful. So I noticed that most diets that was restrictive and I couldn't see myself. Not being able to eat certain foods on a long-term basis like that just was not for me, and so eventually stumbled onto fasten myself without even knowing it actually what I was really doing I was easing in the afternoon visits. First thing in the mornings what I usually did an a notice that has a lot more energy and a felt mentally stronger, which really helped me get through the healing process with my shoulder and the funny thing action during that time Martin I'm it's the bastion who was my co phone comes from a background where his parents have been fascinated posts for over twenty five years so. They run the fussing hotel in Germany and they've helped orders a fasting hotel fessing leg for a long-term Fassulo. That's where people they come to the hotel and they get guidance from the best parents through the week of detoxing there buddy. That's where the body just goes without foods and just has lot of water tea and broth in the evening, just the chance to not focus on the gestion but on heating its body in repairing itself. So this is like getting a big thing he in. Germany we see that with the parents I don't know how it is over there and the US actually. I've I've seen a documentary on Netflix of lace, and so I'm sure you guys will have something that as well. But it's it's very interesting thing we can go into gamma I wouldn't be surprised if we have something like a while fasting retreat I guess it would call. It's a bit like well, a reset ride like you WanNa make a change and this could be like your starting point of doing so you have a show so. Passing special long-term fast brings a lot of benefits because it's important that you you actually give yourself time to relax. So we don't recommend to actually work. do any of a kind of things that stress you out but just that you take the time for yourself, I mean we live in a really fast fast life nowadays. Just for actually we setting your body, but also forgetting back to like what the connection between body mind soul, right Before we go actually point into that. You still have already told us what fasting is. Carried Away with that. So fast is that guides people twelve a healthy lifestyle through intimate infesting. So we offer a holistic approach to health combined with fasting so that people can reach the individual health goals sustainably inflexibly. So basically fantastic, we are working with nutritionists medical professionals so that we provide the solutions that people can trust and reach personal goals and adapted to the needs. is all about also sorts of what? Types of goals do people typically have when they come to you is weight loss is it health? What are those? It's actually very different several goals like obviously everyone is is is different and has different needs, and that's why we we have. So strongly, therefore we are trying to pursue to hustle is everything to us because some people want to lose weight. Yes. True. Some people want to focus more on. On a healthy healthy lifestyle and get more education going there some people actually just wants to have a better focus on my energy will fessing can can lead to as well. So they're just very very different goals while while will you come to? So it's like a very wide range of of goals in these. It's so important to US allies it to to them right and what would be like a good example. Maybe something that that he may be more often than not live. Let's say somebody in in weight loss, but maybe they have something some different routine like what what type of recommendations do you get them then? So there it's actually that we we tried to figure out where the US is at the at the current stage in where he wants to go to what is goals, and if he's a beginning then obviously which. Lead him into fasting with not like him abrupt end and. Has Way but tried to guide him into that because at the end of the day, it's about mindfulness. So it. Is, obviously, recommended, and guided different than a more experienced faster. So for example, if we would say someone wants to lose weight I'm we would send him if he's beginning to do fourteen ten, that means he's got to fasting window fourteen hours in eating window of ten hours. But if he would be more experienced than we would go for hours of fasting ten hours of eating but also recommend certain healthy habits what he can. Actually track and where we will guiding with with fastest

United States Germany Amazon Ganic Foods Netflix Martin Fassulo
The Problem with Intermittent Fasting

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

04:25 min | 2 years ago

The Problem with Intermittent Fasting

"Hello and welcome to the nutrition diva podcast. I'm your host. Monica. Reina. The nutrition world was rocked last week by the publication of a new study which concluded that intermittent fasting is not very effective for weight loss. What's worse? The results suggested that it may exacerbate the loss of lean muscle tissue. Intermittent. Fasting has been a topic of intense public fascination for several years now. I. Give Workshops and lectures and interviews on a wide variety of nutrition topics to a lot of different kinds of audiences, physicians, nutrition, and fitness professionals, senior citizens, college students, parents, and the popular media, and no matter what I'm talking about or who I'm talking to the minute we opened up the floor or the phone lines. We inevitably get questions about intermittent fasting. Is it effective? Is it safe? What does the research say? So it was not surprising that this study caused such a splash despite the breathless headlines though. This latest study didn't actually change what we already knew about intermittent fasting and weight loss and the new finding on muscle loss confirmed a suspicion or concern that many had already raised the allure of. Fasting is totally understandable. The premises that we don't actually have to change what we eat or even how much we eat. We can lose weight simply by changing when we eat it. There are a few different ways that intermittent fasting can be practiced. One of the most popular protocols and the one that was used in this latest study is a restricted eating window instead of spreading your daily meals over the course of twelve or fourteen hours you shorten that eating window to eight or ten hours, for example, instead of eating your breakfast at seven in the morning, your lunch at midday, and then dinner at seven. In the evening you might eat all of your meals between the hours of noon and a PM each day. Now when they tried this in rats, it worked like gangbusters researchers gave the rats a high fat diet, and then they let them eat as much as they wanted not surprisingly this led the rats to gain weight. But when they gave him the same diet and let them eat as much as they want. But only for eight hours a day, they didn't gain weight. In fact, the rats that started out overweight actually lost weight. It seems like the extended fasting period did something to the rats metabolism or maybe their hormones that caused them to either burn more calories or store less fat and if the same were true for humans. That would mean that as long as we kept our mouths shut for twelve to sixteen hours a day, we get all the pizza cheeseburgers, French fries and ice cream we wanted and not gain weight I mean signed me up unfortunately as is so often the case it didn't seem to work quite as well in humans simply restricting your food intake to a shorter window did not seem to change the rate at which humans burn calories or store fat. It did sometimes lead to modest weight loss but this was due to the fact that people following the schedule simply ended up eating fewer calories. No metabolic magic there. In my experience, the benefits of a restricted eating window are purely behavioral. When you limit the number of hours a day that you eat, you often end up eating less which leads to weight loss, and if this turns out to be an easier or more comfortable way for you to limit your food intake than this could be a very successful long term strategy for weight management. I've certainly heard that from many people that I work with. But if you don't eat less, you probably won't lose weight. Now there is just one possible exception. To the extent that there is any metabolic magic in our meal timing, it seems to hinge on eating our calories earlier in the day. So instead of eating between noon and eight PM, you might eat from eight am to four PM and then fast all the way until the next morning this is significantly less popular for obvious reasons, and that's why the authors of this latest study made their eating window from noon to eight pm

Reina Monica
Faking IAB-compliant downloads

podnews

03:06 min | 2 years ago

Faking IAB-compliant downloads

"Can Be compliant download numbers. The faked Antony Guo thinks. So indeed he's built contraption for about two hundred and ten dollars. Theoretically. Fake thirty thousand downloads a month. If you're really determined and quite technical, he's documented how he did it and how podcast hosts can detect. We've linked to its today from show notes and Dr Newsletter. It's a national podcast day September thirtieth, but it's already September thirtieth in some parts of the world. So bunch of live presentations happening right now, you can watch for free at international PODCAST Day Dot Com Hindenburg is planning a set of free workshops and a forty percent discount for Hindenburg products that's on now and tomorrow the match talk podcast network and founder Jason Bryant will be hosting a fourteen hour. Wa. livestream interviewing and showcasing wrestling podcasters from around the US. College High School in Olympic style of wrestling the drama that is sports entertainment were told a livestream starts at nine. AM central time. Love the podcast you're listening to Daniel J Lewis has added a new feature to my podcast reviews cold, love the podcast and it'll help your listeners give reviews for your podcast linking to the right platform for their device. If you'd like to see an example, thank go to love the podcasts dot com slash news because you. Apple spending money on podcast advertising McClellan I has published list of US podcast advertisers who increase spend the most in August. Apple spent three hundred eleven thousand dollars on advertising according to the company all for that Apple News plus products. The twenty two thousand discover pods awards are open nominations the fourth annual awards fan nominated fan voted without a paywall. We've only got two weeks to nominate your favorites though Pushkin Industries has a nice new website that like you to know another podcast APP in India Kuku FM has a number of podcasts as well as live radio and music and congratulations to the podcast global summit who set a Guinness World Record in August for the largest attendance for virtual podcasting conference. In one week, we're told Guinness, wanted at least five thousand attendees to set the record and they achieved five, thousand and three. Well. And pocano Kaczynski's it's fine to hit from millionaires financial whiz kids about what to do with money. But better the hear from real experience small change money stories from the neighborhood highlights smarts practical and collaborative money skills develops by people living with lower an unstable incomes new from NPR news in Minnesota. Horror Narration podcast creepy is launching their thirty one days of horror series beginning on October. The first series will new chilling tale each day of the month culminating in a special episode on Halloween against more than a million downloads a month we're told,

Antony Guo Apple United States Pocano Kaczynski Guinness NPR College High School Daniel J Lewis Founder Dr Newsletter Jason Bryant Pushkin Industries India Kuku Fm WA. Minnesota
Conversation with Stephanie March & Rebecca Perkins of SheSpoke Makeup

Full Coverage

04:46 min | 2 years ago

Conversation with Stephanie March & Rebecca Perkins of SheSpoke Makeup

"Stephanie I'm Rebecca. Thank you so much for joining us. This is possibly the highlight of my whole, my whole lockdown. It's very hard to say that is a compliment was so excited, we are delighted to be a part of. No I'm so excited to which you. It's so fun to talk to people in different parts of the industry. That's. My favorite thing about this podcast, we get to all different kinds of people and you have such an individual take on where you've come into beauty. So for the listeners at home, can you explain to us how you two met? We met on the set of law and order svu Rebecca was head of makeup departments camera what seasonal was backup, but you remember. It was it was the. Eater nine. and not yet was during a triumphant return yet for Good Alex and Rebecca I. Just you know it's really important that you have a good relationship with everybody on the set but particularly people who are very you know literally picking food out of your teeth of are going wrong you haven't noticed. People who are on your person and so not only did we get along but we became really good friends and then, and then we started this business together and so that must've been crash becker. Boeing, seven years ago seven years ago when we when we started noodling it over yeah. was years ago when we started noodling and then that's right when we. opened the door and you know when you're on set your onset with people for like fourteen hours a day five days a week. So you really get to know people when they're tired when they're cold and. And you know. We near makeup artist, you're literally up in people's faces. So so you know. I think it's so important when you're going to business to have a partner and to already go into that knowing that like you know, we don't get tired of each other and we could really trust each other to to tell the truth about an idea. So that was sort of. That was that was the first good decision and then we realized. I left the show at the end of season twelve. And A. Lot of the experience of having a makeup artist wasn't something that only people who were on a set should have. And so we started doing. This makeup services tennis. But then we also started offering as a service, the ability to make makeup, and it's just it's been really fun approaching makeup as a career from so many different angles like from the production and onset angle, and then from opening a business in a service capacity and then developing products. So it's been a really. Wild ride tells on how you came to start the store for people that don't know you guys have a store in Soho in New York where you can come in and get your makeup done and craft your own products. Right. You can make your own lipsticks, which is terribly exciting all the obviously not right now but. So tell us where the idea for that I came from. Obviously, you mentioned the idea of everyone wanting a makeup artist. How did that go from a casual chat to something that is real exists you know somebody told me I think it was originally Christopher Reeve and I can't remember the three questions but it's what you ask yourself when you're deciding. Whether or not to take on a role in one of the main things is, can I bear? Can I stand to watch somebody else do this if I've been offered the job and don't take it and Rebecca had talked about doing make up a dry bar but for faces for a couple of years and she was Becky, you must have been. How was Arthur to? To okay. So so that Arthur is Rebecca's first child will boy Arthur. She said look who's doing makeup in the Hamptons actually it was worshipped as I really want to go ahead with this. Are you are you in and I thought I cannot bear to watch somebody else do this with her and not be a part of it. So that's kind it was kind of. Do we go forward or not yes or no shoes right now kind of thing and we went for it no matter what has come our way I've not regretted it since it's been an amazing experience in it's so liberating especially as an actor when you're constantly trying to get somebody else to give you a job to be in charge of your own own destiny for a little while it was so free. nuts that's where it all began. We've found this great spot and so. we'll tell you more about the story in the trajectory about that. But it we found this great spot and and it just it just happened I. Mean there's a lot more work behind it than that but that's just said yes.

Rebecca I. Arthur Christopher Reeve Stephanie Boeing Partner Alex Soho New York
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 2 years ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran