25 Burst results for "Foursquare"

"foursquare" Discussed on AI in Business?

AI in Business?

05:10 min | 7 months ago

"foursquare" Discussed on AI in Business?

"That's another kind of big business use case for location data and then of course there's just the kind of intelligence around it like a lot of companies wanna know where people are going. Where's the foot traffic act. who's up. who's down. What are the hot neighborhoods. that sort of thing so all of that kind of falls onto the location of under the umbrella of location intelligence got it. Yeah it seems like it's quite open ended right. I mean when. I imagine. And i'd really love for you to flesh these ideas out because this is me as someone who's not in the location intelligence face fulltime quite. Obviously but i would imagine all right. Let's say i am mcdonald's. I operate a lot of locations. Well it sure would be nice to have some understanding of you know foot traffic uncertain streets or roads. Because maybe i would no. I would have a better calibrated. Understanding of what open close times i might want for different locations and how many people i should have on staff during what days. What time seasonality. Whatever if i had a predictive model or or some kind of previous report on what. That's what traffic like it. Seems like maybe that's one side of the coin is brick and mortar. What do i need for resources. Boots on the ground. The other side is who was wear. And can i get access to who those identities were in some way shape or form. So that i can then maybe promote something to them you know i. I sell some home improvement stuff. I want to target people at home depot. I sell some food related item. Maybe i target people that are on this very fancy road in newton street in new york city. That has all the fancy dancy restaurants whatever the case may be is this somewhat accurate here or their entire realms of location data that. Maybe i'm i'm sort of leaving out with those two little brief examples. Yeah i mean absolutely. There's a whole field of study now data science. So it's a big buzzword several years ago still a big buzzword there's a whole field study now called data science which is just how people move around the city where people go with. The pulse of the city is what the networks are like where to locate stores and all. Those problems are still. I mean i didn't episode on the local maximum podcast with my friend. Toss newes about urban data science and how they kind of figure out which places are going to be hot in which places are going to have the most foot traffic that you want so yes. This is something that that people are very interesting. So how do businesses do this back in the day. Max let's say we're rolling back time and it's two thousand five and i'm mcdonald's what am i doing to figure out times..

Max two thousand five newton street several years ago one side new york city mcdonald two little brief
"foursquare" Discussed on AI in Business?

AI in Business?

03:42 min | 7 months ago

"foursquare" Discussed on AI in Business?

"This is dan vigil emerged. Ai research listening to a and business. Podcast talked about a lot of types of data over the years on the show. We've talked about using payments data and banking or maybe computer vision data from satellites or from autonomous vehicles or iot data and manufacturing but what about the location data of individuals were all carrying this alternate sensor in our pocket. How is it that retailers or other companies might be able to predict peoples behavior. Maybe do better. Marketing campaigns understand had a better plan for capacity in terms of their staffing needs etc. How might that data be used well as it turns out. There's one company that does that awful well and that's four square. May remember them from back in their social media ish days back in the earlier kind of two thousand eleven twelve ish time horizon. We speak this week. With max sklar. Who spent nearly eight years. There's machine learning engineer at four square after being an adjunct instructor at new york university after getting his master's degree there. He is now in engineering and innovations labs advisor at four square and he speaks to us about the possibilities and potential of location data. We talk about retail. We talk about predictive and we talk a little bit about use cases accessible today and also where this data might be able to be handy for businesses in the future. I think that this is frankly. The tip of the iceberg foursquare doing some interesting things there. They're relatively unique in terms of the way that they're applying machine learning. But i think that this really is going to be in many regards. The future of how we predict consumer behavior and future of how marketing works in the brick and mortar slash digital world that were increasingly enmeshed in so without further ado atop rating to this episode. This is max sklar with foursquare. You're in the business. Podcast so max. Glad to be able to have gone here with us and i think folks will be familiar with the brand. You're with now foursquare from probably back in the day when they might have had the app on their phone and checking into different locations. I wanna talk to you a little bit about the importance of location data. How different businesses even used that will step out of how data are being used today and just talk about location data. Why and how is that valuable in business. Do you have a nice way to sum that up. Yeah well first of all dan. Thanks for having me on the show. Yeah i've been working on location data my entire career even like as an undergrad. My my my final project was location based project. This is before four scraping exist. So what's out to the question. A little bit like why is location. Data important to business businesses use location data for a whole variety of applications these days including one of the big ones that we do it for a score that i've been involved in is called attribution which is essentially determining whether ads are working or not in causing people to go to places that they wouldn't otherwise go to you know ads for particular sports or even tourism ads and things like that probably an even bigger one arguably is a ad targeting Which is taking a look at the places that people go and then companies might wanna target individuals. Who i don't know let's so for example. I moved recently right. I moved Last month in the previous couple of months. I visited certain places that Maybe i wouldn't have visited last couple of years like maybe i went to home depot a little bit more. I went to things like that. So maybe you might wanna target people who go to home depot and you might say okay. This is. this person is more likely to want my product..

Last month this week dan vigil two thousand eleven twelve foursquare today one company last couple of years max sklar one months nearly eight years new york four square home depot first previous couple university four
Jack Dorsey's Square has reportedly expressed interest in buying Jay-Z's music streaming platform, Tidal

MarketFoolery

05:17 min | 9 months ago

Jack Dorsey's Square has reportedly expressed interest in buying Jay-Z's music streaming platform, Tidal

"We're gonna talk financials. And i'm going to go broad in a minute but first i wanted to get your thoughts on this story involving square which are reports. The jack dorsey is interested in buying title. Which is a music music streaming service. I never heard of before today. Look jack dorsey has said in the past. He's interested in building on the square platform to offer other services. Music streaming doesn't strike me as an obvious natural fit. But what was your reaction when you saw this story. I mean my initial reaction is probably right on right on par with yours there. It doesn't seem like the doesn't seem like the first place. I would go if we're looking to build out this this square commerce ecosystem. I appreciate what he's saying what he's thinking about wanting to do longer term with with the business and with with the platform with with what square offers and i think a lot of this kind of around the cash maybe but yeah i mean it title is is. I've heard that before never subscribed to it just as a music streaming service. They it was built on the idea that high fidelity sound in artists owning the music would perhaps be a differentiator and maybe a time ago that was at least the high fidelity but not anymore. I mean you're seeing companies from amazon and spotify to apple all investing in that same level of level of delivery there so You know there's anything with title that makes me think. Oh wow that's some big differentiator that makes me wanna consider dropping my spotify subscription. Because they don't have even anywhere close to the catalog spotify as or apple for that matter. In when you look at the actual business i mean they. They don't have anywhere near the subscribers. Man i think that number around two thousand and sixteen title reported somewhere in the neighborhood of three million subscribers which is just a fraction just as a just a fraction of what you'd find on spotify and apple and really that is one of the biggest advantages with with that line of work and music streaming as the size of your customer base But i mean the economics of music streaming are still very difficult so to me this. This reminded me a lot of mean a little while back if you recall twitter in this matters because jack dorsey is also the ceo twitter and understand the two very different businesses but same leader Twitter invested soundcloud. And they were actually kicking around acquiring soundcloud at one point and they decided not to do that instead through their twitter ventures They made i think. Seventy million dollar investment in soundcloud which quickly evaporated two zero. They pretty much and they just wrote the whole thing off because it was just nothing you could really do with that and in regard to square. I mean you remember. They had the caviar side of business a little. While back in food delivery they decided to go ahead and sell that to door dash in order to focus more on investing in its core payments business and at the time that made a lot of sense and that actually is a pretty good investment foursquare given that. They bought caviar for just under fifty million dollars and sold at the door dash for just a little over four hundred million so so that worked at. I agreed selling caviar just made sense. It wasn't something that really lined up with the rest of squares business at the time and there were clearly companies out there. That are doing it better. This kind of seems the same thing to me. It just doesn't really line up with squares. Business companies out there. That are doing it way. Better die worse is a thing. You gotta be really careful. It's gonna be interesting to see if they proceed with this because there's a price at which it's worth. The risk square is a one hundred billion dollar company. They have access to all kinds of capital. I don't a particular price in mind but there is probably less than five hundred million probably a good place to start. I mean there's there's a price at which dorsey overpays and it spooks investors and there's a price at which is a reasonable amount of money and if it pays off great and if not well we write it down. Yeah i the biggest risk here is. It's not a financial one. I don't think i mean to me. I would imagine this has to be far far under five hundred million. I think if i recall correctly. Jay z bought title at some point for fifty six million dollars in five years. So i mean it would be very hard pressed to argue that they've been witnessing some just exponential growth that would just pump that valuation up to new heights today. Give an even even with everything we've seen in the market where it seems like the more. The more money company loses the higher. The market wants to bid up at stock price. I don't know that would necessarily be the same case with title at imagine. The the biggest risk is not a financial one squares. Got the balance sheet. Pretty much do whatever they want. They can certainly afford it to me. It's really more about taking your eye off the ball and making bad investments.

Jack Dorsey Spotify Twitter Apple Amazon Dorsey Jay Z
"foursquare" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:12 min | 10 months ago

"foursquare" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"You have four square. It's has this consumer heritage you've been using it from and <hes>. From an enterprise standpoint for several years and then you went ahead and launched an alexa skill and google assistant up <hes>. You said you didn't really get much traction from it now. Do you think you didn't get much traction from it because there's just a big discovery problem because consumers don't wanna use this because it was a <hes>. It's designed initially as a mobile solution. Most people are using alexa and google assistant or at least alexa. google systems. More split like in home as opposed to on the road. What did you attribute to that like. Not being an appropriate channel for you to be pushing out foursquare functionality. Good question you know. We built it because we we experiment with every platform. That's out there and a big part of the foursquare labs the rnd group is. I want us to build for every platform because it enables us to have an informed opinion about what is good or not good. What works what doesn't work with that right so even if we something nobody uses it i can still win for us. We built for that. We understand it. We did it. You know now we can speak intelligently about it going back to the voice skills like when we were building this in the end parse out the the actual command to fire up to four foursquare skill like. Hey hey hey alexa ask foursquare to tell me the best restaurants he's village. It's just not something that real people are gonna do and you know. Visually look at the data for what people use these voices for in their homes. It's like you know what's the weather today. What time is it. Set alarm for your mac and cheese that i'm cooking <hes>. In a place a music like it's not these complicated queries and so we tried it in an opinion about. And we kinda just shelved it right. Because i didn't think that was like the just wasn't wasn't worth throwing a lot of resources behind now if you'd would <hes>. The default solution. I'm one of these platforms where they could have said <hes>. Invoked the voice assistant of choice. And just ask the question without saying ask foursquare. Do you think that that would have made a big difference. I think it would have made some distant difference but also like you know planning where to go might not be the task you do in your living room in so it might be not the most appropriate thing to ask one of these things that sits on your like you know living room table in a when you talk about siri in having serious decibel on your phone or your airpods. Like you say he hit. Hey siri now. Just kind of cool. I think that as my theory goes off at more meaningful <hes>. But i think we got <hes>. We got some signals from apple early on that there was no intention to really like in its to to say. Hey i ask a question <hes>. About a map past that over to forswear in so you would still have that mouthful of a sentence like a siri as where to do this thing which is just it. Just doesn't roll off the tongue <unk>. Do that have you played with syria shortcuts at all a little a little bit but not not enough to fully comment on it. You have to install shortcuts though right as a user to to enable them at the very least so you could create a shortcut for four square and then basically publishing and then users could enable it or users can actually enable their own shortcuts for certain types of features at least two open apps we did. We played played with this. I mean probably a year ago it feels like forever. It'd be about the right team. we were. We were frustrated with the amount of hoops at the user to jump through to enable it. and it's like real arc de this early will do it but

foursquare google alexa siri syria samsung apple bixby alexa.
Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

The Voicebot Podcast

04:12 min | 10 months ago

Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

"You have four square. It's has this consumer heritage you've been using it from and From an enterprise standpoint for several years and then you went ahead and launched an alexa skill and google assistant up You said you didn't really get much traction from it now. Do you think you didn't get much traction from it because there's just a big discovery problem because consumers don't wanna use this because it was a It's designed initially as a mobile solution. Most people are using alexa and google assistant or at least alexa. google systems. More split like in home as opposed to on the road. What did you attribute to that like. Not being an appropriate channel for you to be pushing out foursquare functionality. Good question you know. We built it because we we experiment with every platform. That's out there and a big part of the foursquare labs the rnd group is. I want us to build for every platform because it enables us to have an informed opinion about what is good or not good. What works what doesn't work with that right so even if we something nobody uses it i can still win for us. We built for that. We understand it. We did it. You know now we can speak intelligently about it going back to the voice skills like when we were building this in the end parse out the the actual command to fire up to four foursquare skill like. Hey hey hey alexa ask foursquare to tell me the best restaurants he's village. It's just not something that real people are gonna do and you know. Visually look at the data for what people use these voices for in their homes. It's like you know what's the weather today. What time is it. Set alarm for your mac and cheese that i'm cooking In a place a music like it's not these complicated queries and so we tried it in an opinion about. And we kinda just shelved it right. Because i didn't think that was like the just wasn't wasn't worth throwing a lot of resources behind now if you'd would The default solution. I'm one of these platforms where they could have said Invoked the voice assistant of choice. And just ask the question without saying ask foursquare. Do you think that that would have made a big difference. I think it would have made some distant difference but also like you know planning where to go might not be the task you do in your living room in so it might be not the most appropriate thing to ask one of these things that sits on your like you know living room table in a when you talk about siri in having serious decibel on your phone or your airpods. Like you say he hit. Hey siri now. Just kind of cool. I think that as my theory goes off at more meaningful But i think we got We got some signals from apple early on that there was no intention to really like in its to to say. Hey i ask a question About a map past that over to forswear in so you would still have that mouthful of a sentence like a siri as where to do this thing which is just it. Just doesn't roll off the tongue Do that have you played with syria shortcuts at all a little a little bit but not not enough to fully comment on it. You have to install shortcuts though right as a user to to enable them at the very least so you could create a shortcut for four square and then basically publishing and then users could enable it or users can actually enable their own shortcuts for certain types of features at least two open apps we did. We played played with this. I mean probably a year ago it feels like forever. It'd be about the right team. we were. We were frustrated with the amount of hoops at the user to jump through to enable it. and it's like real arc de this early will do it but

Google Alexa Apple Syria
"foursquare" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

The Voicebot Podcast

04:54 min | 10 months ago

"foursquare" Discussed on The Voicebot Podcast

"Okay. Dennis crowley welcome to the voice. Podcast thanks for the beer. Yeah it's really good to see you again so we were just talking before we got on the bike in the video here that we met very briefly. I think we talked for about ten minutes after voice. Camp by beta works. Which i believe was june of twenty seventeen hundred times ago. Who has a lot of things happened since then and that was fun. I mean yeah. Companies like jovan came out of that. So there's a lot of listeners to my podcast very familiar with jovo and egg voice. I think was there as <hes>. They're doing really well in the in the custom assistant space rag culture so that was a really <hes>. Really good event. Very early on is reputed. We're starting to build custom assistance. And you're on stage. I don't remember exactly what your <hes>. Your comments and prognostications were. But i'm sure they came true. I think we were talking about <hes>. Voice skills at the time. I think i let alexa was opened to you. Know building your own voice skills. And i think we were. We force for likes learning with like. Should we make something there or not. Yeah and you'd never did correct. We did we made something for actually made something for google. Whatever google on google home google. Now whatever it's called sugarless assistant yet but we we. We launched them but we never really promoted it. I don't think. I even know it still works to be honest. We saw very williams at with that stuff as it's tough because you really have to say a mouthful just to get the thing to work like. Hey google assistant foursquare this. That's just not what normal people do. You know. That's really interesting <hes>. So actually why don't we. I think most of the people who are listening are probably familiar with foursquare. But why don't we talk a little bit about your journey with foursquare what that does how that lets you up to the assistant. We'll talk about that. And then obviously. We want to spend a lot of time on mars. Because i think that's a really interesting solution. But for the people who aren't up to speed on the foursquare journey you know what you're what you're quick summary about how you got to where you are because you know a tremendously important company in many ways <hes>. At least from my perspective <hes>. And you know really at the at the onset of the bubble revolution in particular. And now we're in voice and you're doing something else in the space so i think it's really interesting. How you're jumping these technology curves. Yeah i mean we've been doing foursquare for for twelve years now and so forth. What has been a lot of different things in those twelve years kind of typical startup journey of trying a little bit of everything until you really figure it out but started as a consumer app <hes>. Back in two thousand nine audience maybe fifty sixty million users which still wasn't enough <hes>. In terms of you know running a at canal a product radio ads in the product. And so that's really when we started to understand that the destiny of the company was becoming more of an enterprise providing tools and technology to develop partners providing data a building advertising marketing solutions in robust analytics around types of people have been to what types of places <hes>. You know really a lot of the things that he saw the consumer equitable to spin those into very valuable <hes>. Tools and technologies for for others to use and company has has been doing really well since we've really figured out how that business works really changed the company to better serve those opportunities. Yes it was really a social connectivity app. I would say in the beginning. And it's moved into that data location business. Yeah you're you're you're working with enterprises. I will say that i still use the foursquare out. Yes why there's tons of people still use the apps and i think that consumer dna still runs very strongly. The company which i think gives us <hes>. A unique perspective. When we're building had of these enterprise tools like normally think of enterprise stuff is like oh it's just software for companies but like we approach it as <hes>. As as you would if you were building it for for end users and i think that allows us to be more thoughtful like more clever with it more playful with it sometimes <hes>. And you know he was still a team here that works on the consumer apps. Like my my job now is run the the rnd team here which just makes weird stuff with the tools and technology in the most of that we are stuff is meant to be used by end users. Just people that are walking around was was phones or airpods. Whatever

foursquare Dennis crowley google urals Voice Bob Dot us. syracuse university dot alexa soccer Research analyst jovan developer williams product manager
interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

The Voicebot Podcast

04:54 min | 10 months ago

interview With Dennis Crowley Co-founder of Foursquare and Creator of Marsbot

"Okay. Dennis crowley welcome to the voice. Podcast thanks for the beer. Yeah it's really good to see you again so we were just talking before we got on the bike in the video here that we met very briefly. I think we talked for about ten minutes after voice. Camp by beta works. Which i believe was june of twenty seventeen hundred times ago. Who has a lot of things happened since then and that was fun. I mean yeah. Companies like jovan came out of that. So there's a lot of listeners to my podcast very familiar with jovo and egg voice. I think was there as They're doing really well in the in the custom assistant space rag culture so that was a really Really good event. Very early on is reputed. We're starting to build custom assistance. And you're on stage. I don't remember exactly what your Your comments and prognostications were. But i'm sure they came true. I think we were talking about Voice skills at the time. I think i let alexa was opened to you. Know building your own voice skills. And i think we were. We force for likes learning with like. Should we make something there or not. Yeah and you'd never did correct. We did we made something for actually made something for google. Whatever google on google home google. Now whatever it's called sugarless assistant yet but we we. We launched them but we never really promoted it. I don't think. I even know it still works to be honest. We saw very williams at with that stuff as it's tough because you really have to say a mouthful just to get the thing to work like. Hey google assistant foursquare this. That's just not what normal people do. You know. That's really interesting So actually why don't we. I think most of the people who are listening are probably familiar with foursquare. But why don't we talk a little bit about your journey with foursquare what that does how that lets you up to the assistant. We'll talk about that. And then obviously. We want to spend a lot of time on mars. Because i think that's a really interesting solution. But for the people who aren't up to speed on the foursquare journey you know what you're what you're quick summary about how you got to where you are because you know a tremendously important company in many ways At least from my perspective And you know really at the at the onset of the bubble revolution in particular. And now we're in voice and you're doing something else in the space so i think it's really interesting. How you're jumping these technology curves. Yeah i mean we've been doing foursquare for for twelve years now and so forth. What has been a lot of different things in those twelve years kind of typical startup journey of trying a little bit of everything until you really figure it out but started as a consumer app Back in two thousand nine audience maybe fifty sixty million users which still wasn't enough In terms of you know running a at canal a product radio ads in the product. And so that's really when we started to understand that the destiny of the company was becoming more of an enterprise providing tools and technology to develop partners providing data a building advertising marketing solutions in robust analytics around types of people have been to what types of places You know really a lot of the things that he saw the consumer equitable to spin those into very valuable Tools and technologies for for others to use and company has has been doing really well since we've really figured out how that business works really changed the company to better serve those opportunities. Yes it was really a social connectivity app. I would say in the beginning. And it's moved into that data location business. Yeah you're you're you're working with enterprises. I will say that i still use the foursquare out. Yes why there's tons of people still use the apps and i think that consumer dna still runs very strongly. The company which i think gives us A unique perspective. When we're building had of these enterprise tools like normally think of enterprise stuff is like oh it's just software for companies but like we approach it as As as you would if you were building it for for end users and i think that allows us to be more thoughtful like more clever with it more playful with it sometimes And you know he was still a team here that works on the consumer apps. Like my my job now is run the the rnd team here which just makes weird stuff with the tools and technology in the most of that we are stuff is meant to be used by end users. Just people that are walking around was was phones or airpods. Whatever

Google Dennis Crowley Jovan Alexa Williams
"foursquare" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

The Bitcoin Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"foursquare" Discussed on The Bitcoin Podcast

"Could you give us a quick intro about yourself and let us know what you're doing it for square. Hi John, Hi Jay, thank you for having me on I've worked at four Square Bell, basically since twenty eleven there was a little bit of time that I spent away but now I'm sort of on the. Innovation Labs team. LABS team. Not execture what our official name is, but basically we are a small group, three four or five people depending on how you count, who are just. Tasked with using four squares location technology to build cool consumer products and and put them out into the wild, and I love this team. Because we just build things quickly, we can just do very quick prototypes, and we don't have to worry about the Who we don't have to worry too much about the business case or the the short term money concerns, which I did have to worry about on some teams foursquare, which weren't bad teams, either but I love the idea of just being able to build. It's It's a lot of fun. Awesome some will the question we asked on. Every episode is is just what what is brought. You bring into the block chain crypto space, and what's your back story? You Genesis story with that. Yeah I mean I've I've been interested in this space for a long time I think. I think it just goes with my interest in emerging technology trying to figure out. Back, in the early part of the last decade, like two thousand ten's. I felt like I totally missed the the. The. Move to mobile in terms of consumer applications now like all right. You know what I don't WanNa miss things anymore in the future, so let me start to make sure that I'm always reading up on emerging technology and what's going on what people are building and what people are working on and then I cover that cover that in a local maximum cover that on my podcast as well. And also like my interest in sort of just. Human innovation and individual innovation. Maybe I'll put it that way like I feel like monopolies are They get us into trouble I. Don't want declare like all monopolies, evil or anything, but I feel like we have nowadays. Of course we have sort of our social media. Big Tech monopolies that are causing. Huge problems and it's sort of a one-size-fits-all and. I don't even WanNa. Get into those problems when I say this problems with facebook I, but everyone agrees that have problems with facebook, but people disagree on what the problems are. And then of course you know, there's problems with our money in our financial system. Don't forget the monopoly too so. I looked at bitcoin. May Be. I don't know the the the early part of the last decade I I wasn't like. I wasn't like the first one of the first people to look into it, but definitely people in in software in New York. We're talking about it. Thousand, thirteen, twenty fourteen, and it was really interesting kind of seeing all the crazy things were going on. We're of thinking. What is this stuff you know? Is it Is it really anonymous, is it? Can someone hack into it and those questions were people still ask those questions, but those questions were very. On certain back then like you know I now I have a pretty ironclad guarantee because I understand the technology and see the track record. You know people still ask. Why can't someone just take money from my? bitcoin account you can replace it obviously with a theory or any other i. can't someone who's minding takes something from my account and put in their account. You know people don't understand that well how the technology works and even once you understand. The technology works like I still think there could be a trick to it because if you think about it, you know even the theorem smart contracts. Sometimes, there's a trick to it and someone figures it out I. Mean Look at the the Dow. What. was that twenty seventeen where there was a a theorem smart contract and a really big, and then somebody figured out how to extract the money from there so. It's It's it's it's. Just to think about like what my thought processes were back in those days to what they are now. Sort of changed completely. I guess I'm so much more confident now in the space. It's so much more stable even though it's maybe looks much more unstable now to people from the outside. Yeah, that's That's pretty cool, so you've been watching it for quite a while so. It's now past the next having and against the. Time to look bitcoin again on i. get the sense that you're looking at bitcoin a little more than a theory him. Is there a reason for diverse? Well I don't I wouldn't say that I'm looking at Bitcoin more than the theory of the first crypto. episode I hadn't local maximum was episode five with Christian. LUNDQVIST WHO IS A. One of the smartest engineers in theory him, and we talked all about smart contracts, and I think that it's I think the only thing that I'm Kinda. Waiting for is some application that I can kind of. Understand, wrap my head around somewhere. I can't understand the applications. It's just I. Don't see examples of people using them in the you know in in more than kind of an academic setting or more than the trial setting, but I really do see people using bitcoin in terms of just trying to preserve wealth or just as an investment. You know a lot of people. Wouldn't have touched this stuff. Many years are asking you know well, you know, invest it in the. You know in in. Investing in gray scale trust on on the stock market and So I just see. More. I feel like. People need to get bitcoin first before they can go into theorem. That's maybe the order that I went in. And that's the order that most people went in. Because if you can't get how the main cryptocurrency works, then you're not gonna get a very far beyond that. Certainly I mean I'm I'm a big proponent saying that you're going to look at this stuff. I think reading the The ten page white paper, which is still one of the best pieces of on technical literature out there Even if you don't understand that, it's very clearly written, really does help. But. You mentioned something about ethereal more. Academic Sunbathing. Keep dive into that more. Well I just think maybe I just haven't seen it, but I haven't seen any applications that have blown me away. Just although I understand the idea behind the smart contract. I think there are going to be lots of applications that are widely used, but I just haven't looked into it recently. Generally. I mean yeah, so there. There's definitely. I guess like the the the response to that, I'll give for most of the theory in community is. Defy why aren't you? Defy. Big Big Word Right now. Yeah, it's a big word it's it's clogging up. Are The blockchain home so people are definitely using it. I can. I can see lake my back like I'm not. Multiple layers of of financial derivatives are..

facebook Innovation Labs foursquare LABS official bitcoin WanNa John New York Jay LUNDQVIST The ten
Foursquare with Max Sklar

The Bitcoin Podcast

07:53 min | 1 year ago

Foursquare with Max Sklar

"I've worked at four Square Bell, basically since twenty eleven there was a little bit of time that I spent away but now I'm sort of on the. Innovation Labs team. LABS team. Not execture what our official name is, but basically we are a small group, three four or five people depending on how you count, who are just. Tasked with using four squares location technology to build cool consumer products and and put them out into the wild, and I love this team. Because we just build things quickly, we can just do very quick prototypes, and we don't have to worry about the Who we don't have to worry too much about the business case or the the short term money concerns, which I did have to worry about on some teams foursquare, which weren't bad teams, either but I love the idea of just being able to build. It's It's a lot of fun. Awesome some will the question we asked on. Every episode is is just what what is brought. You bring into the block chain crypto space, and what's your back story? You Genesis story with that. Yeah I mean I've I've been interested in this space for a long time I think. I think it just goes with my interest in emerging technology trying to figure out. Back, in the early part of the last decade, like two thousand ten's. I felt like I totally missed the the. The. Move to mobile in terms of consumer applications now like all right. You know what I don't WanNa miss things anymore in the future, so let me start to make sure that I'm always reading up on emerging technology and what's going on what people are building and what people are working on and then I cover that cover that in a local maximum cover that on my podcast as well. And also like my interest in sort of just. Human innovation and individual innovation. Maybe I'll put it that way like I feel like monopolies are They get us into trouble I. Don't want declare like all monopolies, evil or anything, but I feel like we have nowadays. Of course we have sort of our social media. Big Tech monopolies that are causing. Huge problems and it's sort of a one-size-fits-all and. I don't even WanNa. Get into those problems when I say this problems with facebook I, but everyone agrees that have problems with facebook, but people disagree on what the problems are. And then of course you know, there's problems with our money in our financial system. Don't forget the monopoly too so. I looked at bitcoin. May Be. I don't know the the the early part of the last decade I I wasn't like. I wasn't like the first one of the first people to look into it, but definitely people in in software in New York. We're talking about it. Thousand, thirteen, twenty fourteen, and it was really interesting kind of seeing all the crazy things were going on. We're of thinking. What is this stuff you know? Is it Is it really anonymous, is it? Can someone hack into it and those questions were people still ask those questions, but those questions were very. On certain back then like you know I now I have a pretty ironclad guarantee because I understand the technology and see the track record. You know people still ask. Why can't someone just take money from my? bitcoin account you can replace it obviously with a theory or any other i. can't someone who's minding takes something from my account and put in their account. You know people don't understand that well how the technology works and even once you understand. The technology works like I still think there could be a trick to it because if you think about it, you know even the theorem smart contracts. Sometimes, there's a trick to it and someone figures it out I. Mean Look at the the Dow. What. was that twenty seventeen where there was a a theorem smart contract and a really big, and then somebody figured out how to extract the money from there so. It's It's it's it's. Just to think about like what my thought processes were back in those days to what they are now. Sort of changed completely. I guess I'm so much more confident now in the space. It's so much more stable even though it's maybe looks much more unstable now to people from the

Facebook Innovation Labs Labs Foursquare Wanna Official Bitcoin New York
"foursquare" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"foursquare" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Throughout the country foursquare said yesterday in a blog post foot traffic to quick service restaurants has risen over the past several weeks whether governments medical professionals and scientists want it want it or not people seem tired of the shut down an eager to get back to some semblance of normal life no surprise there no that was bound to happen we predicted it three well we are several weeks ago we predicted that it would happen in three to four weeks you start seeing that it actually started happening sooner and it's not just about cabin fever it's again being able to get out and about and do the things you want to do and looking at the policy in reviewing the policy in determining for yourself whether or not you believe it's reasonable you can have the debate whether or not you believe people should be out and about but frankly that's your choice if you don't want to get out if you want to stay at home shelter in place I saw something we talked about it last week this article that came out the surprising popularity of shelter in place well it's it's really only popular with people that data that would like to stay at home get government money that that believe nothing is wrong think about that because if you're not getting paid the same if you're not making the money that you made before if it and you're sitting in your home and you can't do anything about it well it's not popular with you if you're a small business owner any and all of that you have built to this point is going away in huge numbers every second of the day it's not popular with you you know we live in this room fantasy world it used to be really used to be about living in the books and movies right that kind of fantasy world now it's the social media thing yeah you go around you you see the videos at all the cute videos of people made all sheltering in place that's great wonderful correct but don't let that fool you that we can all be happy in shelter in place and that a society can go on and be healthy even with that in place for a long period of time because our greatest tool against fighting this or any other enemy is going to be the expansion of wealth we have to be productive as a nation in other news people with low levels of vitamin D. it may be more likely to die from the corona virus according to a preliminary study from Great Britain researchers at Queen Elizabeth hospital foundation trust and the university of East Anglia in England compared the average vitamin D. levels of twenty European countries with coal bed nineteen mortality rates and found significant relationships between vitamin D. levels and the number of deaths caused by the infection the study which has not been peer reviewed notes sun starved Nordic countries are among the most at risk we believe that we can advise vitamin D. supplements to protect against Gobert nineteen infection the researchers wrote the finding falls in line with previous researches suggest healthy vitamin D. levels can reduce the risk of respiratory infections in general well I mean you look at it and just by the way one of my recent blood tests showed it showed that this before extremely low vitamin D. levels right now comes from being a vampire for twenty three plus years the the whole event is being treated by the doctor now again it was back then and and are the first time I tested port but you look at these the situation in these regions what we see over the last few weeks as well when it came to sunlight and the behavior of the virus is it that the UV rays are are killing the virus and that those in those areas where they have greater sunlight people have greater levels of vitamin D. which you do uhhuh if you get more exposure to the sun right typically speaking it depends on the individual but for the most part the average person does if you spend more time in the sun your vitamin D. levels are higher so I wonder the the what the what the final bald what future studies will say I guess let's go to Mike in Seattle Mike welcome here and run a radio welcome to the show hi Mike thank you we has these experts rebuild the grandstands at husky stadium the years ago and they were the smartest people in the world and when they finish building these beautiful new grandstands they all fell down and these governors when you take away somebody's right to work your CNN anchor in the American people that you have never seen in the history of the United States and it's going to come back to haunt them because people relate to work that is you you're right of freedom and they're putting handcuffs on people in the end it's gonna they're gonna lose the election well I you know this is something that and and thank you Mike for the call we appreciate the comments the mayor of Chicago over the weekend and she was saying work we're gonna find you we will arrest you we will put you in jail you look at how this is different than generations ago that we're dealing with the Great Depression I'm just talking about the availability of work right and how maybe our parents if your if your parents were alive during that time or your grandparents were alive during that time they would seek out work anywhere they could get it they were always looking for work I know my grandparents were in West Texas they traveled throughout the Great Depression to find work and they were always able to find it according to my mom and it's different now because you have a this order that basically says which jobs people can work and can't the whole central employees or essential workers thank which again at the beginning for the first week or two when data was scarce and we didn't have enough time behind us what was different but now this continues its extended over and over again and yes it's about people wanting to get back to work I think a lot of people Guerrier are probably hearing something that was inevitable and that would be what you and I talked about I wouldn't want to be off for a period of time because I would be afraid that my job wouldn't be there to go back to yeah exactly I think we'll probably I think the number of people out there I think it's reasonable to believe that there are a number of people out there that are in the situation going well at my company doesn't just as we've said over and over again my company doesn't need me right now are they gonna need me when things return to normal and and that becomes very scary because it may not be the role within your specific company it may be the role within your industry that you work and where you have your experience and you say is that going to be a necessary role in in my industry am I gonna be able to am I going to be viable in the work force beyond this because they're going to they're going to be a number of things that change that change if not permanently certainly for a long time about the way businesses are conducted our our run it's I just think people with the number of people are looking at this right now hoping and praying that they'll have a job to go back to when they are ready to go back to work that's and they want that work but you have the government level different levels of government saying no you can't do that because your job isn't essential every job that contributes to our economy is the central the last color I don't know the relation between the collapse of husky stadium back in nineteen eighty seven when it was being repaired and there was a miscommunication between the workers and the contractor about the wires that were support cables and they mis communicated it they took off from support cables before they were supposed to when it collapsed I don't know what that has to do with corona virus yeah if you're talking about a putting your trust in government them saying Hey this is you know this is okay and good but there are other that was the contract yet well that was the private contract yeah there are great much greater comparisons I think and and yeah we always get back to us the media right now the activists and the media and and and how they either live through a mission and editing or they lie all you know all together just flat out lie and then the people on Capitol Hill lawmakers but I mean it's there is an agenda at work at every level I don't care if your county judge or a governor or right a lawmaker Melissa said when the media and politicians can't live you on a consistent basis and then shut down your life completely and then start moving the goal posts yeah right and do that I mean I know it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure that one out you and I've been complaining about how the inferred the last really to to release it's been two weeks since the antibody of reports started coming out we started in about a week ago it's like Eric is it just me or does it seems like all this week we've got all this new information yet this hasn't changed the policy at all that was based on faulty information back then right the hospital systems are not at risk in ninety five percent plus in this country and warrant that's what we were told were shut this all down yeah and now we're being told we just need to keep people from dying well for how long and I'm so glad that other people are now asking the same questions that we are well wait a minute then you have to shut down all of society toll and can continue this until until Jan till January to whenever we get a vaccine well it okay imagine this and we're not gonna do that what we're not gonna have a vaccine by the end of summer right now so we're not gonna have if we don't have a vaccine by the end of summer now we're talking about going back to school that we're talking about the cooler temperatures in the fall which could see a resurgence in the virus itself right you see that well now you could extend it out again that could go all the way into next spring I mean if you're using the same problems right and you can't yet that's impossible you would destroy a society and as we pointed out last week the U. N. pointed out that millions possibly worldwide could starve because of the response to corona virus in western countries right because of the effect on charities the effect on the supply chain of of of being able to bring food over there and in general government saying sorry we're not going to afford that anymore I mean we're we're we're not we're not going to support right when I can afford that we just we can't do it we've got to take care of our own over here and so the great the lost world wide from the result of our reaction of coronavirus could be mind boggling numbers over the number that died worldwide because a corona virus yeah right exactly something we set yeah the fourth from the very beginning we said that well I get it that this stuff isn't complicated as we always have the two idiots overnight can figure it out and be asking the right questions very early on then tell me why politicians can't do it well it and part of it is the ignorance of a society to the extent that they don't know how an economy works and they don't care whether it's the elitists who in Hollywood who have plenty of money to survive this by the way it doesn't matter how much money you have if the supply chain is broken if we're to believe Tyson foods in terms of the meat supply chain the food supply chain being broken if that starts and there is that downward spiral with that I don't care how much money you have your it's going to be more and more difficult your going to feel the pain just like everybody else does but the fact of the matter is is that you cannot do this for long you can't if you'd like to chat to the idiots eight six six ninety right I with.

foursquare
Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

How I Built This

07:19 min | 2 years ago

Tristan Walker's Winding Journey to Walker & Co.

"I got laid off in January of two thousand eight. I was applying to Stanford for business school. I applied there in the fall. All of that year and fast forward I started Stanford September of two thousand and eight crash happens a month later. Wow so you get to Stanford and from what I've read like you didn't really have a sense of what Silicon Valley was and what the tech world was any of that at all so so what what did you like. What was your impression? We got there so at Stanford I got there is two thousand and eight. I was twenty four years old and very quickly I knew as where I needed to be primarily because I saw the twenty four year olds not only making millions of dollars but fundamentally changed in the world and like how come I had no idea about this place. Seriously thought Silicon Valley was a place where semiconductors got made right. That's it that's it. This was before kind of you. Know facebook became what it did witter mujber all that stuff right in foursquare. I say wow I can participate in this and I started to have that kind of hotchkiss moment again right yeah. This is something new but I can you do while you are a student at Stanford you start to reach at a four square league. I mean what what what's the story like what what is foursquare at the time foursquare location based at at ten thousand users at the time. It was getting me explore. My the city is getting me to do things that I didn't WanNa. Do Give me the gym more like how is this thing actually inspiring me and changing my behavior I and I said wow like I. I want to figure this out found. The founders emails on the Internet is the classic story emailed Dennis Crowley the CEO founder eight times and the eighth time he might be back and never forget this. He said he said after all these ideas as I share with them you know what Karma I just may take you up on some of this period. Are you ever in New York question-mark Dan's my wife and I were watching lost binging on loss at the time I remember this very vividly in liver and it look like what should I do in five minutes later I said actually yes. I was planning on being in New York tomorrow. So I booked my flight. That night flew out the following morning. Show at the office and you're like I'm here and what happened. I was thirty six Cooper Square. We were on the fifth floor. They surprised to see you. I opened the door for Dennis was facing the back he turned around and he looked at me. Surprise as if like I wasn't actually going to come and here's this awkward moment like what does he do now and it so happened that there were like two empty desks there. He's like yeah go over there over there and throughout the day I mean he had a meeting yeah couple of meetings and then when he's done with came over he's like all right. So what do you want to do and I was like. I don't know and send him some ideas over email around kind of signing up retailers merchants that sort of thing anyone who's familiar with foursquare very small business focused. We wanted to get merchants on the platform orm to start engaging with their customer. I'll tell you what sign up thirty merchants by the end of the week and get a job and and he's like what do you want your title to be as like a business development because as we're business in it and I go to business school so it makes a lot of sense and how many people by the way how many people worked at four square there are two and a half Dennis Navene they were co founders and then Harry who is leading engineering but he wasn't quite fulltime but I guess US theoretically so he's he gives you challenge signed thirty businesses up by the end of the week and we'll see if we can do and what happened signed up three hundred four hundred. Oh Wow so you end up going to work four square after you after you graduated from Nope is actually in between my first and second year business school so I work fulltime foursquare during my second year school and four square gave me a gift you know because I was so early I felt as it was as much as my company is. Everybody is a family. They were doing something completely different. You know we had folks like facebook trying to come after us and that felt that was energy. I loved it and I felt like my work wasn't done so new. Dentists was kind enough to let me work on the West Coast to allow me to get a platform for people to know who I was after I graduated. He didn't ask me to come to New York. He's like you can stay on the company was growing yeah. There's a lot that I had to learn to write and through that process in not only kind of kind of growing the business. What does it look like to go from two employees one hundred fifty to raise tens of millions of dollars to build something uniquely authentic? It was an education that I wouldn't have gotten alone so you were there three and a half almost four years three years so you decide that's roads course and I'm going to do the next thing and it turns out that you either met or you knew Ben Horowitz the one of the partners of injuries in Orleans and he convinced you to become an entrepreneur residents there. How did that happen? How did you meet yes so when it's on the board of four squares they were the four squares largest investors? I known been not very intimately which is kind of as board member in new of the work that I did. I'm so when I told Dennis that I was leaving the company Dennis reach us on the board told them I was leaving and then Ben reach out to me a day or two later he said Tristan I get it right. I understand and you should not be an entrepreneur in residence reasons why and he said but if you're going to be an entrepreneur resonated with us and what were you going to do entrepreneur residence basically come up with ideas and and pitch ideas to them in theory they would fund those ideas so in as I think about the job is one of the craziest jobs in the world you get paid to think of ideas all day. He said comes to spend six nine months with us to figure this out and I was like I'm gonNA spend all nine months to figure this out residents. It's interesting because I've never met one who's enjoyed myself included but it spending a lotta a lot of time to think about things in an authentic way right you know the lesson I learned in Ben Taught me a lot. He's like tristen. You got to understand that you need to do the thing that you fundamentally believe that you are the best person in the world to do right. We have a unique proposition giving your story to solve that problem again. If you're doing something that's like inauthentic. This is hard enough right. You can't do

Foursquare Stanford New York Dennis Facebook Silicon Valley Ben Horowitz Dennis Crowley Cooper Square Entrepreneur In Residence Dennis Navene Hotchkiss Wanna United States Ceo Founder Witter West Coast DAN Harry Orleans
"foursquare" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I haven't talked to david but i would imagine that i know this from personal experience. It could be a company that you love and you let it go and then something doesn't something great doesn't happen to like you. Just carry that with you for a long time. I carried that with me for a long time with dodgeball if the money doesn't balance it out or the money helps balance it out or i mean i mean we. We didn't make david karp money off like you know it. No it's like you you know we were comfortable in new york after that but like i am not motivated aided by the briefcase full of money. I am motivated i like. I want to build things that people think are cool. I want to build stuff that people respect to build stuff that inspires other people to build better stuff off like it is like i'm forty three. It has taken me like i think i was only able to articulate that thing in the last like five or six years and i think the humbling experience of dodgeball and then kinda the the not i just like the the agonizing decision to keep the company or sell the company and then to ride the ride our company foursquare through ups and downs. Did we do the right thing. Did we not do the right thing and then to come out where we are today with like companies doing well we might i._p._o. This thing into years right like we're defining company. In new york. There is a laundry list. The people that have had that have spent time at force had amazing amazing careers but it's taken me a long time to get to the point where i can clearly articulate what is important to me me and what keeps me going and i think like my personal. Magic trick has been that. I've been able to turn my small role at foursquare sure well. My small role is foursquare labs and my big role is like johnny executive chair into specifically the three things that energize me you send you slipped in the i._p._o. Oh i did did i didn't i didn't i didn't get kicked considered guys in i._p._o. Candidate well what what makes an i._p._o. Can you tell me i don't normally there's like years of going. They're going to be oh okay. Uh what we started. <hes> i don't know did you read the we work s. This one came out this week..

foursquare david karp i._p._o new york executive johnny six years
"foursquare" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"I'm in new york and grislier in london. <hes> and were talking to people who we think are shifting culture. Yeah guests include taffy ed asner george the poet gio tolentino and esther perot so please do subscribe everybody. That's culture call wherever you get your podcasts all all right excellent bam backyard dennis crowley who's being observed by his comms person how we doing sarah. Sarah says excellent smiling. I wanna talk more about founding stories in the transition. I do <hes> wanna talk about where the company is at today. You're not running day today. We've we've established that us. Both foursquare foursquare got split up into two different apps once called swarm or you check in and you say i'm here i do that. I'm not exactly sure what i'm doing it still oh for the habit i do it yeah. That's a good product thank you it's kind of a journaling thing i think reminder yeah <hes> and then i use force where when i go to a new city city or even a new part of new york and i wanna go find some place to eat. It's a really really good recommendation good product. It's way better than yelp. If you're using yelp to figure out where to eat you've screwed up. You should be using. Thank you great compliment. I i've i've issued this compliment multiple times on twitter whenever i do get a lot of re tweets from the hardcore twitter for foursquare fans excellent i do think about it a lot because you are often telling me that the app often says hey you should turn on your your notifications or your your <hes> the location awareness full-time she do that. It will help you always allow. Yes and i never want to do it <hes> and partly because i think it makes my phone work less good than it should. You'll take issue with that and also i think i don't know you don't need to have that data. I'll give you the data when i want to give that data especially paranoid about that stuff but i am thinking now now in two thousand nineteen when it was a big discussion privacy scraping data and google facebook using to target me. There's a lot to talk about regulation how you think think foursquare fits into the conversation because on the one hand there's at least for me. There's an active trade right. I'm going to tell you something about where i am or. I'm going. You're gonna use that data to help fund the company and in return. You're going to give me information. That's a fair trade. I'm aware of what's going on. Yeah i would take that one. Step further right where it's like. We we want to provide value to the users. Don't it's not like you know in addition to a we. We have information <hes> or data about you. We can use that for advertising purposes. Who says like i. I wanna know what coffeeshops your phone went into so i can recommend you a similar one when you go to tokyo san francisco and it used to be the the the idea was as you were going to fund the business with advertising. I think probably still answering their advertising inside the app inside promoted tweets or stuff like that. It's your real businesses collecting all that data and then selling it to someone else who can use it right <hes> packaging in advertising segments that other folks can use targeting attribution yes that is that the main business sirat data. They're using for research purposes. Where does you create this corpus rank do we. I don't know we never used the word corpus the other guys guys do okay now. They also surface different surface. This is the facebook turn okay..

foursquare sarah new york facebook yelp twitter ed asner esther perot gio tolentino google london san francisco one hand
Google takes another run at social networking with Shoelace

Latest In Tech News

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Google takes another run at social networking with Shoelace

"Google apparently can't quit trying to make new social networks you see Google has a problem never made a successful social network but you have to give him some credit for never giving up after the shutdown of platforms like or cut Google buzz who you remember that in Google plus and the shuttering of messaging services like aloe and Google wave it appears that Google is testing out yet another social network this one called shoelace. Nope not even kidding you devout by Google's experimental area one twenty product development workshop shoelace is a hyper local social networking APP available on Android and I._O._S.. That aims to connect people based on shared interests in specific events in in person activities in short shoelace looks like a social network that encourages people to spend. Less time on their phones the more time doing something anything in real life mostly how long this lasts for I'll have to see their shoelace users are able to create loops like the Luke's shoelace kit which are essentially li-listening three events that can be shared with others the APP decide goal of possibly helping people make a new friend or two conversely. If you don't have any of your own events to suggest us can designate their interest in a variety of categories shoe late will use to recommend a number of hand-picked activities the things you might like so you won't have any excuse for saying. There's nothing fun to do ever again. Unless you live out in like crack nowhere in which case it's like can make an event with me hanging out in the back burner fire. I don't know in like you have your own self and you invite yourself and go. You have a fire all by yourself <hes>. I don't think it's designed for that. Obviously I'm being sarcastic. Only mainly seems seems to be targeting cities in suburban areas for the most part but will have to actually see what happens as I was reading the article out thinking like you mean the seems to be a little bit of a mash of between like swarm slash foursquare and the meet up in we have meetings and events and you can promote them around in your local area okay but you don't get any credits or points for checking in so that Kinda defeat gamification purpose gazette foursquare swarm built on so we'll find out the article goes on to say users will also be able to create profile so they can share some tidbits about themselves learn about others in their crews and make it easier to organize and plan for upcoming events okay right there to branding naming should not have been crews for the group's. It should have been soul maids. Get it get it. You've read his article. WE'RE GONNA lose it. According to shoelaces listing on Google play store the most recent update to the APP added the ability to share loops using a hyperlink something that would make it even easier to spread the word about upcoming events. Unfortunately shoelaces currently only available in one place New York City so if you're listening from there in your from New York City probably have good shot testing it out Google says its goal is to bring shoelace to cities across the U._S. U._S.. In future Google is even taking requests for suggestions on places. It should bring shoelace to next and even if you do live in or near N._Y._C. Access the shoelace is invite only for now and while it's fine as it is to poke Google for past Ilyas in social networking space amid growing concerns at time spent on platforms like twitter facebook Instagram Youtube for that matter you do have a social network. It's called a youtube is having a negative impact on our lives. It's kind of refreshing to see social network whose main purpose is to encourage the people to spend less time on set network and more time actually doing things Yelich four squares form of meet up and all the other sites do already we have plenty of options to choose from. Please just add another one to make an even if shoelace doesn't make it in the long run and don't be surprised to see many of its features <unk> ideas incorporated into Google maps or another Google service in the future so that's all I'm going to say about that and if I say anymore I'm going to start the kick flips. Tips are something we'll find

Google New York City Product Development Twitter Ilyas
Apple Fights Proposed Right to Repair Legislation With Warnings of Consumer Harm

This Week in Tech

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Apple Fights Proposed Right to Repair Legislation With Warnings of Consumer Harm

"Latest an apple lobbyists. Brennan iphone in meetings with California lawmakers and said the reason we don't want people fixing their phones they could hurt themselves. You could hurt yourself. Yeah. There's nothing like getting that screwdriver wedged into your fingernail. Lithium ion battery because the right to repair isn't about necessarily me opening up my phone. It's about me being able to go to a third party repair facility that has manuals that has parts both of which are withheld by apple and I can get a repair as a result of apples lobbying the Bill that was in front of the California assembly has been pulled. Yeah. I think that this is actually this is really, and it's really funny to think of an apple obvious like running around with an iphone open with like a finger finger finger what does that cut on their fingers? It is a finger cut. But that's not what I meant. But I think the more insidious argument is that a lot of these companies will say that it's a security issue that. Yeah. That like there's a cybersecurity risk in fixing your own your own 'electronic and that raw gonna get hacked. If you release bear part apple used that story in Nebraska, they told a lawmaker there the passing a right to repair Bill would turn the state into a mecca for. Bad actors, criminals and hackers. I don't think that this argument is gonna last any longer. I think in the last couple of hours while we've been talking actually Bernie Sanders just endorsed national right to repair law. Elizabeth Warren's done a to the FTC is taking up the issues. I think apple trying to scare these local lawmakers individual states is not going to keep working good. All right. Good. Can you can only flick so much?

Apple California Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren FTC Nebraska
"foursquare" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on This Week In Google

"They're collecting information from a lot of apps on a lot of phones they during southbound I don't know if you saw the Stacey they released a demo of this called, hyper trending, then that had bubbles where the most people were. I think it's just really interesting in all like, the the writer of the piece is right. This is both creepy for many people in cool for other actually was Dennis Crowley. Who said we're not sure we said, we're not sure if it's creepy. You're cool. That they threw it out at tech event. I in in I actually would draw the parallel with this in the NBC story that you have on scraping people's photos facial recognition. Parallel here about people. This actually makes clear what data is being collected in a way that is pretty visceral for people, and it does it in a way that still respects their anonymity, which I think is the best possible way to do something like this. But it mistakes it because you are not in fact anonymous in the actual data that foursquare cells people you are benefited by a unique advertising ID, which I wouldn't be too hard to demonize you. So. Yeah. And Crowley, who's founder foursquare said we want. We're not sure if it's a responsible thing or not to have a view like this in the phone yet. I don't know how people react to seeing a heat map in real time. Overall, the phones are I can imagine some people would say, oh, that's the coolest thing. And some people would be like that's the creepiest thing, and so they wanted to put it out there. But I think they don't what they're doing is misrepresenting it a little bit because these are. Just a nonimmigrant blobs these show numbers. But in fact, the data that they're selling is much more specific it shows also will in the not this version, but in the game they were talking about also showing replacing that unique ID with an avatar in fake Votto. And then showing the demographic data, I think so I get what you're saying. This sort of tracking is happening and people kind of soom happening. But they don't know what that really means. I think this gives them a nice window to start understanding what that means. And I think anyone who freaks out about this that that's totally fine. Then they're going to say, wait, how does foursquare? No this. And then they're going to suddenly realize when they look into it that foursquare has co companies like Uber, and I don't know if Google does Uber Twitter, they're all using four squares code to get your geo location information, and then and to mourn for me. Back in I presume. Yeah. And then they'll actually be like wait is second. Can I get out of this? And I think that'll start a really important conversation also lay switch I wish it would. But I don't think that this hyper trending thing does that. Because it's it's it's missed its understating what they're actually doing in twenty fourteen four square launch pilgrim, which you cannot see a piece of code that passively tracks where your phone goes using bluetooth wifi GPS GSM at an FIS this shop or the cough the park or the restaurant..

foursquare Dennis Crowley writer NBC Votto Google founder
"foursquare" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Technology never ceases to fail us talk about privacy. There's an article in wired this week by Paris Martineau. You may have forgotten four square. But it didn't forget you. Remember four square. I used for square. I really thought it was cool and then their follow up swarm where you would check into places, and you would get rewards if you if you were the person who checked into a place, the most you'd become the mayor of that place, and you get a little crown, and you know, they were all phony rewards, although I think briefly some restaurants and coffee shops offered you deals if you were the mayor mostly it was bragging rights. Foursquare even though you know, I doubt anybody's using it anymore. It's still around you can still download swarm and four square and use it. But it turns out little did. We know four square continues. To collect lots of information about you through a variety of programs, and techniques and cells that information all the time. In fact, it's a booming business. It's just not maybe quite as visible as it used to be. Foursquare knows who's where at almost all times and offers that information to companies like Snapchat. Is it is almost as big as Google when it comes to location, data only Facebook and Google rival foursquare in terms of location data precision. Foursquare? Uber uses at Twitter uses. It apple maps uses Airbnb uses it we chat Samsung phones, both by. And I imagine offer data back to foursquare to the point where no matter where you go four square knows. You're there. They don't identify you by name but by get this advertising. Ide- your unique advertising ID. It's part of tens of thousands of apps sites and interfaces. Even on their website foursquare says if it tells you where it's probably built on foursquare. Now, that's something. I'd like to know more about. This is a big issue. Now these data brokers who are collecting, you know, basically, we're all walking around with location trackers in our pockets at all times, and it's not just the cell company. That knows where you are. It's the apps on your smartphone. That know where you are. If you give them access to location information. And they're gladly passing along to other companies where it's aggregated used to sell ads. One of the reasons we're aware of this is because of this conference is going on in Austin right now south by south west foursquare rolled out a feature based on this database called hyper trending at south by southwest a map that you could put on your phone of the Austin area that shows the location. Of all the people with smartphones that foursquare contract, which is pretty much all of them in real time. Remember, the marauders map from Harry Potter? If you if you said, I solemnly swear. I'm not up to no good. And tapped it with your one the map would show the location of everybody inside the Hogwarts premises. This is like that. And yeah, you didn't get four square. Exactly give them permission. But you gave permission to subsidiary apps to the phone itself. And they're aggregating all that data. People's locations aren't shown individually, but in clusters foursquare score says that's to protect user privacy. Oh boy. Isn't that cool? Eight hundred eighty eight ask Leo now that I'd like to hear somebody talk about the problem is politicians aren't going to talk about it. 'cause it's scary. And it's complicated. And it's not immediately clear what you do about it. But I wanna hear more politicians talk about how they're going to protect our privacy and our data. That's what I'd like to hear not how they're going to break up the most successful custody cut companies in the history of of the world. But how they're going to protect us from them. Mark in effingham, Illinois, Leo LaPorte. The tech guy. Mark. Hey, leo. How're you bad? I've been good. How are you? First time caller, look. A question about some drives flash drives. I used to normally use thirty thirty two gig. I showed turns storage and for transfer that and then I moved up to the sixty four and once one was so with the data and got it to the other end, I would format it and it would. We're back down to thirty two gig. And and no matter what I did. I couldn't get could get I could not get it back up to sixty four. Yeah. Is there something on? And I've tried to fat thirty two. The fact I've tried every now it's not that. It's probably a failing drive or and this is also a possibility. Remember, I was talking about those counterfeits. It may never have had sixty four. We've seen this happen before. By the way, the largest thumb drives coming out now will be a terabyte. And I think two terabytes just around the corner. These are massive thumb drives part of the problem with the memory. That's used the flash memory. That's using these dries is some part of it dies every time you right to it. It starts to wear it out. And it could be that in this case that drive just decided to Mark off thirty two gigabytes because it was unreliable. I would trust that. It also could be that it never was sixty four gig. There's a guy named bunny Wong? He's got a great story. I knew bunny because he way back when we visit MIT he was a a great hacker. And he created a company he hacked the Xbox One of the first guys to do that. He had he had a company that made a little you may remember it. A little clock kind of in a beanbag that talks to you. And all that was a really cool little product and the chubby. Remember, remember, the chubby? Well, the chubby among other things had a little micro ST Carter an SSD card in it from memory. And bunny was manufacturing these and ordering the SSD cards who's buying them from China, and he noticed something odd about batches of these cards that many of them had much smaller capacity, then they were advertised as and some didn't work at all. They were just pieces of plastic that never worked. It was puzzled and he investigated what he found out was. And I bet this still goes on the Chinese companies that were manufacturing. These drives were let's say manufacturing drives for big companies like sandisk during the day. But then when all employees clocked out they'd offer money to stick around and continue to manufacturer. Very low quality or phony or counterfeit sandisk drives with the same labels, but defective parts cheap parts and send those out and bunny was getting those defective and working and counterfeit drives. Even though the labels were real because they had leftover. The drives themselves were defective and that practice still happens. They're made in the same factories, but with worst components or defective components sometimes mislabeled as sixty four gig when they're only thirty two gig. And it's really hard to know, especially because at Amazon does nothing about counterfeits, as we mentioned that you're getting a legitimate part that really lives up to its promise. So it's possible. If it really was sixty four when you started that in in the Houston and formatting it went down to three two parts of it died. It's possible never had sixty four. And I've seen that happen. Many times too. It's just kind of the world we live in. I'm sorry to say eighty eight eighty eight ask Lee remember that chubby chubby somewhere in.

Foursquare Leo LaPorte Paris Martineau sandisk Austin Twitter Google Mark bunny Wong Samsung apple Harry Potter Facebook Illinois Amazon Snapchat effingham
"foursquare" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Unless like. Check donation. Doublet at me because I got to listen to. I'll probably get a box of one day. Okay. Do it anyway. But you know, I thought this is very interesting. I know you're talking to you about this. But I don't know square. It's a it's an object. That is. I knew I shouldn't even ask a question on air. That's right. Okay. I will answer. It is that is a few. Don't know what it is square is. I'm sure you've seen when you're out shopping small business anything even corporations use it. But it's that little piece of. I lost the word anyway. You can it into an iphone ipad or anything else in the now, they have even that big looking for if you wanna use it. But what it does? It's like here commerce thing for small businesses and businesses to swipe. Address a places. It's now you foursquare. That's not living off. But no, it's really cool. Because I mean, it's gotten really big and actually Starbucks is the one that put them on the map when I first started. So I mean, obviously, we're backed with a big retail company. Yeah. Not retail. Right. But turns out they just came out with a story and how what their title was square successor. In two words, small businesses. You got a lot of success stories right there. Yeah. Yeah. So it's the articles really neat. But what it's about is. They basically said, you know, the thing is this we do work with larger companies, but we've noticed a small businesses are where we focus on one focus on because they are the background America. And so they're really catering to, you know, the small business area and everything else. It's really funny because a lot of people, you know, like, they kind of I guess you consider Macau I pay pal. Quickbooks and some other things, but they really they're really focused on this really cool. So it got me thinking a lot of people like, you don't know. Square is. And a lot of apps and everything else because this is I think ultimately battles with the questions that we have come in. Where people are like, you know, this for twenty years, I need updates and stuff, and I don't know what to do or don't know what to use square. But I think that's one of the big things. Now, there's a lot of people face is. You know, no one went to jump go. Okay. Should I use this? New long-term doing kind of old school style. What does a great actually say? Thank you. Because here's the thing. Oh, what a safe and. No, I'm serious because I mean, I sometimes the old school stuff because I know some of my friends who aren't using this, and I'm like because word of mouth still is like the number one triumphs everything I liked it. See, you know. I mean, it really does. So you can say is word of mouth and a great marketing anguish, like, I always say T shirts T shirts. Exactly. I mean, everybody. Wherever you pick up a paean, especially if it's a good writing, right? You're gonna look. It happens every day. That's what. That's why so many. Well. Best apps for small business. So I came across this. It's actually on nerdwallet dot com. Good or not squares. Lorde? There's some actually I don't recognize. But maybe I should get Metron. I'll update next week. I'm, but there are few for views, which Skype is one of them, which Skype is become. I mean, even Skype my grandmother, and she's figured out how to use this. I mean family, but you get what I'm saying. But the fact is that you can read it and use it. Yeah. What you're saying? Yeah. I mean, sometimes jump and shit. It's okay. And my grandmother can use it. It's a good thing. Also when you think about to your business. The first time. No, she answered the phone. Call out of sitting there on Skype and told me to hold on. That's my grandmother. Yeah. So that that's a very good one two years. And then of course, they got smothers on here. But dropbox I can vouch for dropbox dropbox is amazing because let me tell you when you have think about a USB if you we used to depend upon that like in college those were big. So you put something on there and take it somewhere else. What happens when you misplace that USB that has all your stuff on? And you can't take it for one of the this doesn't work with this drop off something in their foul. Senator somebody have shared folder. We're anybody can look at it shared across your office instead of having to go here put it in here. I mean, so it's beautiful. Kinda sorta more more information or write emails always there. Whatever device, right? We just can't remember this is a side note technologies like dropbox, you gotta realize it does go over a server so don't put like really important stuff. It can be right, right. If you do old school like me, let USB is in my pocket. And I don't lose it. Run. People talk about this. Now, what's the argument? I don't know what I'm saying. If they do they're going to be hurt. Let's see squares on here. And then you've got Evernote which Evernote too great. Yeah. Use it before. Well, actually, think your notes across different like your macbook or your iphone or other even at PC thinks it's kind of nice and instead of handwriting losing it anything else. So. But there's there's a lot on here. I'm I'm gonna actually try out a few of these sweet. And I'll get back to you on that. But just, you know, sometimes don't be afraid to you something that's new retry something, especially dropbox, Skype and Evernote are pretty good ones. I can now score. Thinking about this is for this is for each and business. Yeah. Technology to enhance enhance your business atmosphere. Both really I mean, I use dropbox even put like whenever I want to transfer over to instead of putting on CD after CD. Pretty good too. Right. I mean, it's not like it's not. Limited pretty big foul. You can use. Yeah. More interesting. Yeah. Don't be afraid. Right. Yeah. Target was like me. If my mom. But you know, what I will say this. There are a lot of apps out there. And sometimes it's overwhelming because I'm even looking. Right. You know, pick a few and Trump, but.

Skype Square Starbucks foursquare Metron America Quickbooks Lorde Senator Trump one two years twenty years one day
"foursquare" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Pending on the service choose not to and then we'd never collect any location data. Last weekend. I'm completely lost. I I have no idea what I wanna do. But I know that I want to I want to explore would would I be best with for for Conde nast traveler for Tripadvisor finding out more about my area through you. You always have the foursquare city, God art classic nine year old up but increase, I think you are this stuff's much more interesting. Absolutely. So the businesses ninety nine percent about helping other brands reach their audiences at scale. You're absolutely right, Jim. And so, you know, whether we're helping traveler or Hilton honors app users or were helping trip now be more contemptuous aware in the travel industry in the weather industry. You know in the dating industry with Tinder, we're helping all these other apps be more picture where people think maybe I don't use foursquare any more. They might think. But if you if you tag, a tweet on Twitter, if you get a GO filter on Snapchat. Participate in tender places. These are all services that we are helping create it feels like Toyota me, I don't know what I'm TULIO. But they sure get it done for me. And that's what you doing it. You just have must have reams you probably the most eight of any company in terms of location based I think other than Google and Facebook, we this wetland we are the platform that everyone who's not Google or Facebook want to us because we understand the whole world's places, and we understand different floors of buildings where you go in malls. It's very hard technology. And so really only Google Facebook and foursquare have this precision globally. Right. Well, I sure hope one day to our our viewers can have shares. It is a private company everything, right? Thank you Jeff cliff seat. You'll foursquare every time we see it's really kind of exciting. But you guys are up to me back. Yes. Stay with them. In the world. Apple would probably be in their fine next week. I think you'll let the seller skit data little bit more. And then you buy along with them if you do not own any apple it was a fine quarter. Let's not over think this. They are doing exactly what one from a company. I like say this always market someone at pump side find just for you right here. Mid money. I'm Jim Cramer. And I'll see you.

foursquare Facebook Google Jim Cramer Apple Conde nast Twitter Hilton Toyota Tripadvisor Tinder Jeff cliff ninety nine percent nine year one day
"foursquare" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

"Now that now has not that the exist but just kind of as you say they had just kinda shikata did but i'm with one hundred percent i kind of forgot four square was around as well launched it and god knows into a thing that they were going to do and so it receded into sort of they just do their thing and so this was kind of pleasantly surprised say look a new a new thing so that's what i was trying to say it wasn't trying to say that i forgot the existed because that's not true and yes i chuckle gives jesse uses it quite a bit i'm going to say them apparently this was well timed if people were beginning to forget about the business options from foursquare you know with the split off of the swarm app from the main foursquare app you know i don't actually use the foursquare app as much as i usually i'll or something like that so i guess it makes sense but i mean they have a lot of data on the back end i mean they now that is true they do yeah so and it's used by a lot of companies you wouldn't think so snapchat newburgh for example user data which i didn't know which is interesting so you so so i'm gonna i'm gonna i'm gonna go up on a little tangent from this per second okay because google said that one of their core areas was places and of course they had foursquare says they places api and i don't think that they mean the word places like a lot of geographers mean the workplaces do you i don't know what how do you think they mean.

foursquare google jesse one hundred percent
"foursquare" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

A VerySpatial Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on A VerySpatial Podcast

"The virtual earth or whatever it is currently called api something there are other api's and of course that doesn't even touch on any of the open source options that are out there so you know this is going to be i think we're gonna see a lot of people moving to a lot of the the open source options especially those people who you know are willing to spend a little bit of time in effort setting up their own back end server we'll see how it goes yeah so next up some more api news and i saw this in the few people were tweeting it and this happened actually back in april so again we're catching up some stuff from last month as well foursquare which i hadn't really thought about in a long time and that's kind of why want to talk about it they actually launched a places api back around mid april and it was focused especially for a small to medium size businesses so it's called the places api for startups and those who want to look to add some location to their platform so searching sharing you know business things that you might want to have done for location based services is now you another option so i guess that's basically it you have another option you can use the four so foursquare still around still doing stuff and here to reference our previous right now unlimited daily api calls the weird part here is that sue apparently forgot four square exists except for she fact she makes fun of me checking into foursquare.

foursquare
"foursquare" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Inside the Hive with Nick Bilton

"I think people get energy from doing different things and some people like get it pumped some people might get a from my consuming media or creating media reading books like watching movies and things like i i get energy from creating things and i think i'm still trying to figure the solid myself but i think it's about like building things that bring people together and bring in a building things that people get enjoyment out of like users and communities and stuff and in the absence of doing that type of creation a get really like like itchy just it's it's it's like really really dissatisfied and really restless and it's like it's it's it took me a while to kind of selfdiagnosis like i think of goods just depress during that time in on i remember heaven my buddies come over and they they could tell i wasn't myself 'cause i wasn't working on a project and being like don't worry someday you'll find something that you want to work on again like we we know you will turn it you know give me a peptalk mark and that was you know that's like three months before that foursquare journey started so okay so let's let's move ordered to foursquare i i remember i actually was in new york at the time and we we had become friends and there was a coffee shop over by an why you and i would see you and your cofounder nhavene in the cobb shop i think i was writing a book the time i forget what other has does or does looking a porn job i don't know but but i remember sitting next to you guys in the it was as you to is this the two of you building this thing and.

new york foursquare three months
Washington state passes net neutrality law

Daily Tech Headlines

02:03 min | 3 years ago

Washington state passes net neutrality law

"And then an and then he's the daily take headlines more tuesday march six 2018 i'm sarah lane washington state has passed a net neutrality law requiring internet providers to treat all lawful content the same governor jay inslee signed a bill enacting statewide net neutrality protections despite the federal trade communications decision in december to repeal similar regulations governing isps nationwide inslee told geek wire quote the state of washington retains its rate have consumerprotection lots this is at its heart a consumer protection law and we're providing a mechanism to protect consumers from illicit behaviour in the marketplace on that note several tech companies including at sea kickstarter automatic and foursquare together as the coalition for internet openness fell to petition monday with the court of appeals for the dc circuit against the fcc decision to end net neutrality this follows similar actions by other tech lobbying groups such as the internet association which represents amazon google and facebook which back in january joined in exist in lawsuit against the fcc google is grown browser has switched from microsoft c plus plus compiler to the klang compiler on windows to google is now using the same compiler for windows mac os lennox and android and appears to be the first major software project to use cling on windows chrome was first successfullybuilt with cling on windows back in 2015 then it got tested in the canary development channel than the development and beta channels and with chrome 64 the stable browser channel was ready to make the switch netflixing announced its updating its parental controls to better protect young viewers and is adding clear immaturity level rating labels to its contact net flexes updating its existing pin feature to let parents restrict individual movies and shows and series once live over the coming months the update will apply to both the web and iowa's devices movie past ceo mitch low said at the entertainment finansforum in los angeles that the company watches how its users' drive from home to him.

Los Angeles CEO Klang Microsoft Amazon FCC Foursquare Jay Inslee Mitch Low Iowa Facebook Google Kickstarter Washington
"foursquare" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

03:29 min | 4 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"So we just had a lot of fun with it towards thousand six of two thousand seven hundred thinking, I was still very young. I just turned twenty four I moved to the city when I was twenty one. So I just turned twenty four I'm thinking, you know, these guys did it. They started the company, and maybe now's my chance to just like go get out there and see. What else I can join or or what else I can put on the world. Now's the time to take risks being twenty four you know at the time. I would look at C companies in New York like delicious coming up dishes was built by one man saying thinking like that's really great. He just doubled into a pretty good idea. He worked his face off people really wanted. I wanna be a part of something like that. Right. And that was around the time and things like flicker was coming around for sure becoming big. So I think to me it was less about like Apple's coming in or Sony losing anything because it was still pretty dominant, right? But more just like, what do I want? I want to I want to go do something take risks probably gonna fail, but let me just go after ROY. So that's what I did seven, and, you know, seven actually ended up in a shared co working environment. We were almost like we were right? That's why I wanted to bring it back there. When co working was just I don't even think we're calling it that back then in in seven, and it was on twelfth and Broadway sitting with a whole bunch of other teams also work in the mobile space, and I joined up with these two of the guys that we're working on a startup Paul socialite and socialite back. Then again, this is before I phone, right? So things are still very hard before you could even program for iphone or even was around. And what we were trying to do is saying, hey, listen, what I did before was just bring music to phones. But if the phone is always in your pocket shouldn't just like buzz in your pocket and be like that museum even want to check out his around the corner. So that was basically it. The phone can entertain us. Can't tell us where we should be going. Sure. And so with the guys at socialite, we spent two years as tonic figure that out built a whole bunch of things slender was so funny because racer money one of the guys pretty much mostly funded it mostly self funded it, and I didn't I didn't have insurance for about two and a half years. It was a whole mess. I'm looking back on that time. Like, I thought I never got sick. I dipped into my savings. Yeah. All funded. We didn't have any BC's. We'd have any Angels' at the time. Friends and family, I guess helped us through that I talk classic Cooper union ochre can make a little bit of money. I consulted a little bit make a little bit of money. Basically. I just put everything into all my savings everything because I really knew there was something there for people to figure that out maybe end up somewhere. Good. If we don't figure it out. I mean, we've got a lot of friends we could go get a job. I think that's what I was thinking about it took a long time though around the same time they met with Dan and Michael to work on socialite. I met up with another cycle. Dennis. Who'd also been wanting to work in that space as well. And we both ended up in the same co working space that's based on the street, and we start talking about other ideas and about a year and a half into we had, you know, iphone iphone had been out for a long time. People could not program for it was was this out, the we're thinking, let's just this reset would we want to hear like, but just put some of the ideas that we've been working on independently together and see where that goes it's been about six months doing that and kind of pieces of that turned into foursquare. Okay. And so we put that out in the world in two thousand nine ROY. And even then I remember just like programming into the last minute, and we decided to launch it as by south west. And and literally was just like coating away until four am on Friday morning..

foursquare Apple New York BC Broadway Sony Cooper Dennis Paul Dan Michael six months two years
"foursquare" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

03:58 min | 4 years ago

"foursquare" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Why he thinks technology companies are like people without further ado, let's get into. And we're in the heart of Manhattan, we're all the hustlers hustle. I mean here were my own boy, navene Salvador, I that I pronounced that. Right. That is correct. For those that don't know expert today. Previously foursquare tell us a little bit about four square expo actually, you know, wants to give you we'll get we'll allow you to give your own introduction which give it give us a little quick thirty. Second introduction. Sounds good. Well, here's what I've been doing for the last ten years. I helped start a company called four square about six years ago now seven years ago, which is in the local place recommendations and discovery space, and since then I've been actually working on a new lab for new ideas called expo with one of my friends Garrett camp who started a company called Uber and together for less two and a half years. We'll we've been trying to do is just try to figure out. What's next like, what are the cool? It is out there. How can we kind of get out there and challenge ourselves put new ideas in the world, hopefully, get people using them ROY and just on with it? And so that's that's what I'm up to. Offices. You guys doing the same offices? I still was still downtown with still and so lucky to find such a great space, and all of our small ideas in small teams that we build and anyone that knew that we hire starts out of that space before they moved other other around the city, right? Right. Right. Right. So yeah. So so for purposes of art of the hustle, man. We like to really kinda dig it gets us some nuggets if you will of of information to bits of information that may be listeners may have not known about you. And maybe some people are listening to this and getting introduced to you for the first time. So you are an actual a family that immigrated to the United States from India. So you were born in India, and I feel like I feel like I know too much. Finish it. Yeah. I was born in India and twenty five years ago this April nineteen ninety one April my family, my parents my sister, and I will note here to the US I was born in south East India in a big city in the southeast called address Chennai, it has two names for complicated reasons. And and yeah, and we'd be we actually moved to Connecticut of all places because we knew some family there and kind of uprooted everything and started over. Well, did you feel like you took certain trades of facets of you growing up the built that or ignited that the spirit of entrepreneurship in yourself? Did you get that from your father from your uncle into the states? Definitely I would say I would say, I definitely got a good balance, my mom, and my my dad, I think most of it. I think actually came from my dad list, so the eventual entrepreneurship and wanted to kind of go out on my own stuff out. But my dad was he's kind of like a jack-of-all-trades engineer. Okay. Man can just take anything apart and put it back together. Well, and so he he went to school to study mechanical engineering, and then started working on ships. I've known them to fix cars up. I've known to like, you know, really get into fixing computers and programming and doing all this stuff. Well, so I think that's really where it comes from like this passion to tinker take it apart ask why things are the way they are. Maybe put it back together fix things around the house. Make you better make it better. That's just watching him. 'cause probably where that came from wherever you go to college. So I kind of I guess after I moved to the US was when I really got into internet and slowly started learning like I remember getting all these free CD's from like prodigy and CompuServe and stuff, right? Remember, like twenty hours a free internet. Let me get on what that's about as slowly I use that to get into things BBS's and start hacking away, and like trying to reverse and you're like how does the PBS is a bulletin board system..

United States India navene Salvador Manhattan foursquare Connecticut CompuServe Garrett East India PBS engineer twenty five years twenty hours seven years six years ten years