9 Burst results for "Fourie"

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

"And we're back. It's what's involved. We're wrapping it up. My special guest is professor Johan fury. Talking about the book how long worked economic freedom. It's well worth a read, particularly if you want to get a bit of a grasp on the history of economics in our country and how the rest of the world impacts us. As we wrap up though, Johan, I'm going to ask you, going to where do we stand now in terms of, you know, we hear about this thing called the second era of globalization. We hear about the fourth industrial revolution. Somebody was talking to me the other day about the 5th industrial revolution. Where are we now from your perspective? Yeah, I've stopped granting also the industrial revolution. So I'm also not entirely sure what people mean when they say the force or the first industrial revolution. I think for I'm quite an optimist. I should kind of quantify whatever I say by that. But I think what I'm saying is that there is a movement away from what was known as the great moderation. So period say two or three decades with technology didn't really have the impact on economic growth, right? So economic growth is just creating more value basically. So more production, high incomes, these kinds of things. And that's really what we want. If we want to go the major issues that poverty and unemployment then really growth is essential. And for a long time, actually, globally, we've seen technological innovation. We've got the Internet, we've got Nobel phones, but those things are not always translated into the classic economic growth that allows us to see the kind of higher living standards, but my sense is that a lot of those things that have happened are now being translated into the kinds of technologies, various kinds of things like FinTech or BioTech that would actually see as it is a vaccine is a great example. So we've already had this technology about for a decade. And yet it's now really only the way we see its application and potentially not only to see the coronavirus, but also to malaria and then HIV aids, which would obviously have remained implications for the continent. So I think we now entering a period where we hope to see again the ingenuity that I've mentioned before the innovation really translate into high growth. Of course, you know, that requires certainly a government that allows those things to happen. So one of the lessons from histories that whenever there's innovation, innovation disrupts. And there's a stay at a school and those with power typically want to prevent that disruption or innovation because it threatens their position in society. And these are typically elite, the political elite and really what we want is a society where that can not happen. And if it does happen, unfortunately, what we'll see is that the innovators will leave and so we really if we want to see growth, we want to see the kinds of economic processes that allow us to tackle the issues of our time, then we have to benefit from those kind of innovations. And the nice thing is, I think, is that there's many countries in Africa where we see a lot of that innovation now being applied in a new and innovative areas that are applicable to the continent per se. So the way that we exchanging money on phones is very different to other places in the world. And so again, I'm quite excited about about those kinds of innovations, actually having an effect on people's lives. Absolutely. I'm an eternal optimist, you know. I do firmly believe and I was actually chatting to a gentleman the other day also wrote a book called the a and C's last decade. The gentleman by the name of Ralph Mackay. And he was also talking about in terms of growth in what we need and government, et cetera, et cetera. But he's also very positive and he believes that there is this upswell of people being more innovative. Being more creative being more disruptive and putting their hands up and saying, hang on. This is not working. Before I let you go, though, Johan, can I ask you to do and you did write a bit about it in the book to do something that scholars shouldn't do. And that is ask you to look into your crystal ball and tell me tell me what you see and what you would hope or what you see the future would be for South Africa and indeed Africa. David, I think the partly the reason I wrote the book was that I realized that students are incredibly pessimistic future. And there's a reason for that. It's a valid reason. I think, is that they they've only experienced South Africa in the last decade. So they basically don't remember the World Cup. So that's still, and they were 8 years old. So then that's ancient history. So the South African that they know is the South Africa of the 2010s. And that's an accelerator with negative economic growth. And just basically more generally. And so it's understandable that they don't see a place for themselves in the future or they feel like if they want to have a better living standard than the appearance and they have to move elsewhere. But there's obviously a generation if we go back just a little bit earlier, which felt exactly the same, right? The generation of the early 90s, where you've had the period of negative economic growth, this South Africa to some extent were on the brink of a potential Civil War, education was terrible. There were these massive cleavages in society. But within ten to 15 year period, we had a growth rate of 5%. We had a budget surplus. We had brought down our government date from very high levels to lower than city, 30% to GDP. We had built an electric car in 2007 the jewel was at the Paris motor show and it was thought to be this is South Africa's making this breakthrough in, of course, just basically went this level was founded. And so, you know, if we just take that lesson and apply to do that, then what I would say is that there's not it's not necessarily that things will be better, but they can be better. And if we implement the right policies, if we I guess also in some sense, take risks. That's exactly what happened back then as they were entrepreneurs who founded things amidst these terrible times which actually ultimately rewarded them very handsomely so we can be optimistic of the future. It's not that it's almost by education going to be a terrible decade ahead of us. I'm not so I'm not saying that things will necessarily be better, but I think we can be optimistic of the future. I would agree with you. And I think it's things like that yourself, your outlook on our country and the African continent. The book, which is, as you said, now, hopefully going to game a global audience. But also, you know, this show, for example, I like to share stories of hope. I like to share stories of passion and I like to share African stories. And this is a great way of doing it. The book is our long walk to economic freedom, lessons from a 100,000 years of human history. Johan available in all good bookstores is available online.

Johan fury Johan South Africa Ralph Mackay malaria Africa HIV aids World Cup David Paris
"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

"The valid critique is of a clip by title. So it's in, of course, not Einstein, who himself created a scumbag was indirectly responsible for it. It's a fascinating story. I won't tell the entire story because I don't think we've got time. But basically there's the South African student postdoc really who's spends just before the first one or sometime in Dresden in Germany and is basically asked, and I suspect it's because you can speak English to host this American physicist from the University of Chicago, Robert Mulligan and they walk the streets of Dresden and talk about their research and actually Robert is there basically present the paper that this misses the ideas of Einstein and this postdoc the South African postdoc listens to this story and he just doesn't agree with him. He says, well, you know, in my experiments, I think I found a way to explain what you have found and it's not because Einstein is wrong. It's because you haven't thought about this specific thing. And this role in Milligan is quite a famous professor really. And so he doesn't like this idea that this postdoc is telling him that he's research is wrong. But he presents his birthday goes back to Chicago and then he realizes actually will this first year something that there was some issues of paper and it ultimately went to Nobel Prize for it without citing this postdoc incidentally. But he does reward him return the favor by actually getting him a job in the U.S. just before the outbreak of the First World War. And as both stocks and Amy's engine funded bail, so he becomes he starts working in the telegraph telephone industry basically designs lightbulbs for the First World War and writes a textbook. And then he writes this paper, which Jan Smith picks up and reads and realizes about what South Africa's industrial future could be like. And then Jan smith's presumably phones him up and invites him back to South Africa. And so he becomes his appointment in government and basically is a point to the established scone. And so that's really how our Einstein was responsible for. And of course, this is not only a school that establishes it's also escort that it creates and the host of different government institutions that is responsible really for the industrialization of South Africa. It's a fantastic story. Then also we move on in subsequent chapters we talk about apartheid in the economies of apartheid or the economics of the party. One of the things that people point out a lot these days is back in the good old days, you know, it comes to work and arms course still worked and everything. What sort of impact did politics and apartheid have on our economics? Yeah, I show that's a big question. I mean, there are two chapters dedicated to that period. To the period, so the one is on the industrialization. And the other one basically tries to understand where the. Money comes from for government to allow them to do a lot of these things. And the main answer there is that it was the relatively low wages of the prospective black mine workers that allowed these high mining profits which pay also for Texas to the government. So it's an interesting it's an interesting period. I think we tend to think of positivity. If you just look at the economic growth rate, I think a lot of commentators typically would say, well, the country had four or 5 or 6% growth rate for the decade or two, one should keep in mind that this is the period of the golden capitalism period where the entire world, at least the western world is experiencing massive growth, both World War reconstruction and then of course South African resources are in high demand. And so again, with low wages, very high profitability of the mines, and of course, also gamma investment in the infrastructure that we typically associate with building a manufacturing industry. You do see the kind of relatively high where, of course, we don't know what the counterfactual. So that's partly I think that the big thing that economic historians think about is we can say yes, these were high growth rates, but counterfactual, where labor was could be represented, for example, or where they weren't these discriminatory and repressive labor laws like the calabar or other kinds of barriers against movement of people. It's entirely plausible that the growth rates could have been even higher and that the spatial distribution of the Africa would have been very different. And certainly, the cities would have looked very differently. And we just don't know. We don't know what that is today. So it's very difficult to make a kind of normal claim to say, you know, this was good or it was bad. What economic historians can pretty much do is to say, this is what happens. But we so it's a positive approach, but not enormous difficult. We can not judge whether that was good or bad. And unfortunately, I think that's often what people want to hear is whether the value statement. And that's just very difficult because there's only one observation. We only have one east street. We don't have multiple, like a natural scientist, but we have a laboratory and many different experiments. We don't have that. So. In a natural, I think there's a lot of lessons to be learned, but ultimately I would say that there were a lot of government involvement in the economy and particularly when there are rules and regulations that prevent the market from that inhibit kind of market processes that usually doesn't foster the kind of growth that one would see if those persons are or if those rules and regulations are absent. Yeah, I think that's based on good. All right, we are telling to Johan free about his book our long walked economic freedom. This is what's involved will be back in just a bit. And we're going to wrap it up with professor Johan free..

Einstein Jan smith Dresden Robert Mulligan South Africa Milligan University of Chicago Nobel Prize Germany Robert Amy Chicago U.S. calabar Texas Africa Johan Johan free
"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

"Very specifically on services and exporting services. I think that the view of Africa typically is one where we think we tend to think of African history the first thing is slavery and in the second thing is colonialism. And of course, those were major events and these chapters actually dedicated I think two chapters on slavery and chapter on colonialism. And but I don't think that should define the continent. Certainly, as affected, it's economic trajectory. But the point of the book really is to say that if we want to, if we want to kind of think about the lessons from economic history, and what the most telling ones are, then is that those that have been successful, whether that's people or countries or regions or whatever, it's really about ingenuity and innovation and productivity growth. You get rich, not by stealing, but by innovating. And there's some examples of that happening in Africa too. So I would be cautious to say that those slave traders became rich because they were trading in slaves, yes, perhaps some of some of them in a certain time period, but certainly the industrial revolution, England is not the consequence. They're not rich because of an empire or because of slavery. In fact, the industrial revolution happens almost exactly at the time when slavery ends. And slavery has been an institution that has persisted across the world globally throughout human history. So if celebrities indeed, the reason for prosperity, then that should have we should have had an industrial revolution much earlier. This is, of course, not a dismiss. The incredible tragedies that came with slavery, but I don't think one should think and certainly, I think the economic history profession in general agrees that slavery is not necessary for economic growth. There are other kinds of ways innovation again I want to stress is the way to really prosper. And so you can again just also do some kind of back of the envelope calculation, the world is about 8 times larger in population size than it was when slavery ended. But it's 18 times more affluent on average globally, right? So the average person is 18 times more affluent than the average person 1800. And so we've just become so much more affluent than we've ever been. And that's not through exploitation, but again, through the innovation, the new tools, the technologies that allow us to do more with less. And really, the way I try to do it in the book I guess is to say, if you think about it as a kind of game of monopoly, we tend to think that this is the way the world works is that, you know, this everyone gets an equal amount of money and then there's ultimately one when it ends up with everything and everyone else loses. And so it's kind of a zero sum game whereas I think a much better would be like it is simplest of good time where listeners know what's in this opportunity, but it's a game where everyone starts with a village in a town and ultimately the winner is ten points, but by the end of the game, everyone has got a thriving civilization because you train. And you produce resources and so I think that's the way to think about the world. Rather than a game where for a certain individuals to be better off others must be worse. I have to tell you I smiled when I got to the dead pit about the cities of Qatar and I thought the reason I'm smiling is that every single geek out there is going to know exactly what you're talking about. And those of you who don't know, it's a fantastic game. Man, you can have literally hours and hours and hours of fun. So no, that was that was something. And I loved that analogy. You know, it's about, you know, and there's something that's been coming to the full more and more often is this whole concept of together we rise. And I think in terms of South Africa and Africa, we're getting there. We're getting there. But when we come back, I'd like to share a little bit more about some of the chapters as we get to towards the end of the book because you've got one name. And it's all about South Africa's industrialization, but the chapters entitled how did Einstein help create iscom? I want to get into that when we come back. This is what's involved. My special guest professor Johan fury author of our long walk to economic freedom will be back in just a bit. And we're back here is what's involved my special guest is professor Johan fury, talking about his book how long walk to economic freedom. As I said earlier, and it's one of those things. I love recommending books and talking about books that I get value from because I consider myself somewhat of an everyman. But in terms of economics, just help you understand a little bit more and the way this book has been put together in written is brilliant. And Johan you said initially when you did this when you wrote the book, it wasn't intended for general public consumption. And yet, you know, when I think of you in terms of being a lecturer and, you know, the history of economics and economic history, et cetera, et cetera. I automatically default to it's going to be dry and dusty and you're going to want to take needles in your eyes. And this book is not like that. It's not this dry dusty time or treaties. Did you set out to do that? Yeah, I guess, I mean, I guess it's almost forced on you if you're a lecturer, because you have to get the attention of students. And now I have to compete not only with, I guess, coffee outside, but students can. Listen to podcasts and they can download websites and visit websites on their phone. And so you have to have to graduate attention. And so the way to do that is to tell interesting stories. And so it's a combination, of course, it's not just stories. Because otherwise, you know, stories must have some kind of meaning, I guess, attached to them if you want to, if you want to learn something new, and so it's combining that, I guess the interesting little tidbits with a more profound message. And that's really how I tried to do it also in each of these chapters. I also try and keep the checklist pretty short. So I think they're 2000 to two and a half thousand words so that otherwise you're just going to lose interest and they are just other more interesting things. So maybe it is a also considered slightly superficial obviously that is not a lot of death in these chapters. There's a lot more to say, there's not a much larger literature behind this. And I guess that's why it's an undergraduate course, if you were to specialize in what you would go deeper. But that's why I think it is such an accessible book because you don't need any background in it. And you can read these stories. And you can either just see them as stories, so if you read between the lines, you might the more profound message in them. Well, it certainly has brought a couple of things into a little bit more clarity for me. But you've got to tell me, please, how Einstein helped to create a school..

Johan fury Africa South Africa England Qatar Einstein Johan
"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

"There's a chapter, for example, on the Mali Empire and mansa Musa and the incredible wealth that he had amassed during his during his life. And he stole the only person only individual to do single Annie influence the price of gold. So. I think the fascinating history is, of course, also a history that perhaps have been underemphasized because it is only followed after, say, you know, the 13th, 12th centuries ago, this early medieval period in Europe is kind of a dark period. It's really only after that that you see the emergence of the scientific revolution and then after that, the industrial revolution. Whereas in Africa, during this time, it was a period of serving West Africa North Africa period of education of new discovery of innovation and I think that's an important issue to tell. And I think the final thing is even more recently, our view of Africa certainly has been I think clouded by the events of say the 1980s and 1990s, when certainly African economic growth was peltry or even negative in many cases and they were terrible events from famines to the genus side that happened across the continent. But if you go back only four or 5 that gets earlier, so take the 1950s, then the average urban wage for an unskilled library in Africa was higher than it was in Asia. And South African comparative development actually, if you look back to the 1950s, which is not that long ago, the future actually for efficacy very bright, compared to, for example, Asia. Of course, we know what happened since. But the point is that this idea that Africa has always been poor and we have to think about why that is, that's just historically inaccurate. And more recent evidence where we collect wages. We've got a whole host of different innovative techniques that we use to try and understand different living standards at different times in history, expose that those contradictions actually almost in, I guess the popular the mindset of that most of us obviously have. And so I think that's really what the book also tries to highlight is that perhaps we don't actually know our early street as well. And if we do know it, then I've changed the way we think about our continent and perhaps even our own identity. Wonderful stuff, my special guest is professor Johan fury. We're talking about his book a long walk to economic freedom. This is what's involved. We'll be back in just a bit. And we're back with my special guest. It's Johan fury. Our long walk to economic freedom lessons from a 100,000 years of human history. Johanna wonder if we could dive into some of these chapters that you did because you've come up with such fascinating for them. I mean, and I want you to help me out here and just give people a taste of what's in the book. What do Charlemagne and king's reality have in common? Because of the top of my head, I would have said absolutely nothing. But that's not true. Talk to me about that. Yeah, I guess, you know, most of us wouldn't think that there is any link between them or correlation. But actually, two gentlemen share quite quite a lot. The focus of that chapter is actually on feudalism. And so it's really going to feudal institutions that was present in Charlemagne's time around the 800 or so. And it's so present in many parts of South Africa today in the former and the former homeland with traditional leaders and the traditional leaders you have very similar kinds of institutions. And the point is we need to expose that and to show that what we could expect in terms of economic growth in those places would be very similar to what we could expect of economic growth in Charlemagne's time, which was really low. And there's reasons for that. Those institutions create certain incentives and those symptoms are not always conducive to improvements in productivity. And it's going to focus, I guess, again, the chapter is being blamed against a bit for clickbait titles. I didn't think of them as kick by titles, but do some extent that's an accurate description. But you know, it's not only focusing on the homelands, for example, a few of the institutions. We have even institutions that are similar to guilds and so these are something like the psycho, for example, the accounting profession is to very much extent share very similar characteristics than the guilds of medieval Europe. You can protect a certain profession to not allow competition and so I think it's useful to sometimes have those comparisons because we think we've moved into a new era of free markets, but actually many of those those older institutions tend to persist even into the prison. Which I found fascinating because I must be honest, you know, before getting into this book, my grasp of economics and macroeconomics slim to none to say the least. I've spouted out to people before, you know, well, Africans that I've kept in general would have been a whole lot better of, but remember how the rest of the world got riches by taking Africans and making them into slaves that had been a favorite topic of mine. And then also, you know, in terms of people coming into Africa and South Africa and pillaging it. And then I generally end up one of those rents with my feeling that Africa and South Africa is destined to become an economic powerhouse in the world. So, do your ideas that you put into the book fit anywhere within my very, very flimsy framework? Well, I certainly show you a view that we can be hopeful of the continent's future. And there's a chapter towards the end. I think the second or third last chapter is exactly why that could be the focus there is.

Johan fury Africa mansa Musa Asia Mali famines West Africa North Africa Annie Europe Johanna Charlemagne South Africa king
"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

Watts Involved

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Watts Involved

"And once again it is what's involved as always good to have you along with us. Now, you know, I like finding and chatting to interesting people and people who have experience and you do wonderful things. And I get a lot of books that come across my desk. And one of them that I got is a book entitled a long walk to economic freedom. Lessons from a 100,000 years of human history. And the first thing I saw was economic and I thought economics and I was absolutely terrified. And I thought, all right, but hang on. Let's have a look and see if it's something I can understand. And then I went one better and I decided I'd love to speak to the author. So we say welcome to you professor Johann ferri. It's great to be here. Thanks, David. Okay, so we're going to get into the book in just a little bit. But give me a bit of Johan's background. Where did you start? How did you get into what, you know, where did you get to and what made you want to write a book? Well, I guess a bit about me is that I stated that a undergrad did economics and then Postgres as well. And then was appointed as a lecturer basically immediately after as an specialist in the international trade. And then through weird serendipitous conference happened to bump into an economic historian and basically the rest is history. I fell in love with the field, did my PhD at Utrecht university in the Netherlands and since basically about a decade ago I've been teaching economic history that emotion in the economics department. And ultimately, the book is the culmination of a course that I've been teaching since then so I've had a lot of time to think about it, but ultimately when lockdown came, it was about, I guess just sitting sitting down and writing it up. Obviously, classes had to move online. And so we couldn't have the same action as before. And I just thought the students needed a bit more content than what they could get on an online lecture. So ultimately it was never really the purpose to write a book for a public audience, but after a couple of chapters were circulated the students came back and said, well, you know, I think the family and friends would enjoy this as well. And so then the idea was born to actually make this more widely accessible. Which I got to admit, it is, because, you know, when I was in school that the whole concept of economics and business economics gave the laugh out of me. And then along comes this book and I thought, hold on. So essentially what you've done is you've taken if I can be so bold you've taken economics out of the classroom, you've made it accessible, and you've made it entertaining. At least that's been my take on it. Is that the kind of feedback you've gotten so far? Yeah, I think so. I think it's also when people think about economics and certainly the economics that you encounter in your first second and third year, you know, it's very model based. It's quite mathematical and what I've tried to do is to show that there's a different side of human side to it. I guess by incorporating history. And so we all love to tell stories, we humans, we love to learn by listening to stories. And so the purpose is really to show that a lot of the historical stories that the stories that we kind of familiar with and often associate with say political events, history is fog with revolutions and wars, and these kind of things. Or even social, cultural, often underpinned by economic events or economic and effectors. And so and that's really the purpose of the book is to show that economics actually have this huge important expenditure power. In a lot of the things that we observe around us today. So it's not just, of course, those models are important. We want to predict what's going to happen in the future. We want to think a lot about economic policy and model modeling these kinds of different macroeconomic relationships, for example, important. But I think if we really also want to understand how valuable economics is to our broader understanding of the world, then this is what this book tries to highlight. And it does, but there's some fascinating bits in it. I mean, right off the bat, okay? Chapter one, you ask the question there. And that's actually what got my attention initially. Who are the architects of Wakanda? Now, everybody knows the Marvel Universe and the Black Panther, et cetera, et cetera. Talk to me about that. Why that particular title? Yeah, I think the first chapter really just sets up the field almost of economic history. And whenever I get an invitation to contribute to say collected volume, it's the right to chapter on Africa. And then typically that chapter is towards the end of the book, it's typically actually the last chapter in the book. And so Africa kind of is always left to the periphery and discussions on global economic history. And actually that certainly not that shouldn't be the case. And so the point really here is to show that if you bring Africa in from the outside and you can stop with Africa at the center of the discussion, there is so much that one can learn from our history. And of course, it's not only a reason these streets, it's a really deep stream. So the first the chapter after that is about the out of Africa migration. And so that's really the purpose, I guess of the book and I'm fortunate that it's now the book is now been the international rights have been purchased. And so it will hopefully get a global audience. And the purpose really was to show that African economic issues at the center and Africa is at the center of our understanding of economics and development more broadly. But now how do you come to that specific conclusion? You mean the Wakanda? Well, not only do we, but we are at the center because for so long, we've been marginalized. The dark continent. The shame those poor people in Africa kind of things. Now you're saying but hang on, you know, this is where everything starts. Talk to me about that. Yeah, you know, that's in. And to some extent it's understandable, right? So there's obviously a much longer written history, many other parts of the world, Europe, for example. And so, of course, it's also England and Europe that experience in industrial revolution first. And so there's a lot of firsts that do not happen in Africa. But there's also a lot of things that do happen in Africa. And I guess the focus of global economic history courses of overemphasize those events and and the emphasized a lot of the things that did happen in Africa. And we can go back millennia and so there's a couple of chapters on this. They, for example, a chapter on the bump to migration, which is a huge event in world history, not only of implications for Africa, but global implications..

Johann ferri Africa Utrecht university Postgres Johan the Netherlands David Europe England
"fourie" Discussed on The Woody Show

The Woody Show

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on The Woody Show

"Talked three loving the three on the show. Come on car for this guy. Friday turn off the woody show ninety eight seven people checking in skip through some of these check ins off attacks two to ninety seven. We've got jason checking in good morning. Sheila be listening from guarding grove. Orange county hashtag. What he show hashtag friday. Turn up this weekend. We got checking marceca. What's get shot up to. The king of creeps j. scotty and the turn-up his mercy work in huntington park hashtag friday turn up and this one nelson from pong tanna just got my citizenship party time. Congratulations nelson yeah. We got some other people listening to ninety eight seven long distance on the radio app greg. Gory el checking in devon into moines fourie in massachusetts jephson. Detroit seen ache in south. Carolina allison's in san francisco. John hamburg new york wig. Melissa atlanta pack. Thanks very much. Thank you everybody who checked in today long distance on social media or on the tech nine eight seven one. More time for dj. Scotty week after week. Killing for us. Here on the woody show. I'll tell you that on monday. Checking on the drunk dial voicemails so leaves messages weekend at nine. Zero nine drunk. Vm if you find yourself and your status to be that of somebody who should be leaving a message or something called the drug dial voicemail jewish nine nine drunk. The that's all i got rabi medicine bass anything else to add. You got it all well whether you realize it or not be morning music. Marathon has already begun already into the two hours of commercial free ninety eight seven music. Hudson is coming up next. Employ your listening pleasure here on ninety eight seventh. Thanks so much in the way some of your valuable time today. You know we love appreciate you for that. The rest of the guys could suck it and we'll catch back here on monday. Have gray weekend. Smd wm great. Friday you mother..

marceca pong tanna jephson John hamburg nelson Melissa atlanta huntington park Sheila scotty Orange county jason moines devon allison greg Scotty Detroit massachusetts Carolina san francisco
"fourie" Discussed on Wrestling With FanBoy Mark Jabroni's Ring Rust

Wrestling With FanBoy Mark Jabroni's Ring Rust

10:25 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Wrestling With FanBoy Mark Jabroni's Ring Rust

"Sir. The title track from their album. Banned girls money really for no particular reason. I don't think just relate to song. I heard it recently on my no pod and said you know i haven't played that unrest. Phoebe really good song and there it is. You are listening to wrestling. Fan bore mercury. Rone's ring rust on paramedic and seller podcast sharing media like i tunes. Iheart radio stitcher sir. Another one in there two. I think there's another one in there. S what she said so. We got a show to paper review when it showed a preview. So let's get down to it. Nwa win our shadows fall from this past weekend. And fight tv. The end oden and pyro versus sam ruto and romero versus mouche rocket. I hope and slice bogey verses beceerra six and michael wolff four fifty in a was the number one contender patron think now just a just girl fashion aaa rules match. So that meant basically. If if someone isn't in ring someone else can come into the ring and take their place without tagging something that deluce brothers apparently are getting or were they still are getting in a bit of trouble in elite wrestling for doing 'cause like why are you doing that. Not what we do here. We do regular tag teams here. Bastia and mecca are in control early and go for a pin but it's broken up by slice boogie rocket tags in and hit some ten offense with his tag partner. The end break up a pin attempt and take over control olsen and perro nail hell on earth a modified doomsday device. Their attempt is broken up by vce and mecca but are lifted any reverse fireman's carry by the end and launched into the term buckles. Sam rudo hits a five to the outside from the top rope and while his partner sell renault tim's the same. He caught up by murphy. Wrote who then hits a suicide dive to the outside. Minero is up now but is cut off by odin. He attempts a choke slammed to no avail and his power bound to the outside by odin. Who is now met by marshy rocket and two two big men trade blows before rocket gains the upper hand and nails odin with a cutter. His pin attempt is broken up by bastia who hits rocket with a muscle. Buster mecca wolf takes to the skies to immediately land four fifty slash on rockets who successfully covers for a one-two-three. So a nice solid triple a. Rules tag match is still considered tag michio. If they don't have the tag. I guess they do tag if you know. Someone's in they want to get the data they do tag. They don't swap out they could. Maybe i don't know. I mean if the rule is if there's one in the ring someone else can get in the ring and take their place wouldn't be much of an extension to say that you know you don't need to tag just as long as there's only two people in the ring legally then you don't need to tag. You can just go walk over here. Partners in an gestures for them to come in they come into the ring. You sit buttering. I don't know. Maybe i'm over thinking if maybe they're under thinking it. Non title grudge match. There must be a winner. Nwa champion the pope versus tyrus. Boy francis sure is getting into the fighting spirit. Oh wrong with the pope pretty much entirely opposite the wrong. The pope anyway poke his tires with a flurry of strikes from jump after the big man attempted to blow his nose in his charity. T shirt to former brodus clay flees to a breather but met with more strikes once he returns to the ring to to begin teeing off now in center of the ring with the champion knocking tyrus to his knees. The former allies virk lands a dropkick and attempts to pin but the former focus kicks out quickly. The angelo deniro goes for a cross body. Bunce's off tires who then lens a running cross body onto champion but it is a rough for the pin tires now in control lending multiple strikes on pope the bigger man stands on his opponents back for a four count. Pope attempts a sunset flip pin combo. But tyrus just sits on him for the pin attempt to champion escapes the to then gets back into the corner by the former brodus clay and hits his opponent with numerous body shots boop again tries to get momentum back and hits the ropes but is immediately met with a flattening strike tyrus no stands on his opponents prone hand for a referee's war can't for housing him with a fisherman suplex the former funke sores once again stands on diangelo deniro's back fourie referees. Four count breaks up then resumes by pressing his knees against popes midsection. The former brodus clay goes for two elbow drops but the champion rolls out of the way both times before landing. Numerous strikes tyrus planting a big man with a ddt. The former. Elijah burke goes to the top rope losing his balance briefly but lands a massive elevator up before pulling e has down and going for a corner. Strike which tires dodges before landing a hung and death grip slam fruit. Probably would say dan that. But the champion kicks to commentary. Noses the first time anyone has kicked out of that maneuver and what a maneuver tires goes to the middle. Rope to landy slam but gets an ease up then lands his corner knee. Strike austin idol. Tires manager hands his man something that he puts into his wrist. Dangelo deniro whips the former brodus clay round and his mit with a strike straighten teeth. And that's good for the one two three so there wasn't a title but i guess this will lead to a title match somewhere down the road. I should imagine somewhere down a very short road. I mean i can't imagine tyrus wouldn't be calling for a title shot now after beating. Champion short a non title match but he beat him and short was underhanded but you know if he did it over handed the might have been gone through the roof. So maybe if tire doesn't get what he wants he better be thrown and have somebody call mama. What's it john concern. What's what's proof. Seem i show consider making the donation. Adriaan dot com slash sounds. Lack of groping and pieces took the fall. You don't stop delivery ball. And max space off.

Sam rudo sam ruto diangelo deniro Pope two people romero Elijah burke pyro Minero Bastia tyrus oden first time michael wolff Dangelo deniro Four count three two big men mouche Bunce
"fourie" Discussed on Things Above

Things Above

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"fourie" Discussed on Things Above

"Pastor a leader in a church. People who opt for leadership should be using their power for authors their power with others rather than their power over. And this is why. I think the true spiritual gift of past reviews is to maximize or to develop the giftedness of other people who are Let's say to whom have been given opportunity to mr as we do and so. I feel like i wanted to do that was i. Do that was lemon. I want to use my gifts to help. Women become what god has called them to be. And and jim there's fighting about this allah churches today the piper world us against women preach year teaching right and in all. I'm i'm willing to fight this automobile and to i don't wanna get it point by point. Refutations presented lead anything. But i wanted to tell the story of women like students. I have right now. Suzie fourie out in lake tall. And she's a wonderful student at a wonderful person and she needs opportunities to sir because of her giftedness. I wanna do what i can to help. People like that Yeah it's wonderful. Isn't it at our church One of the in our preaching rotation jennifer herndon is her name and she's fantastic preacher and she's diagonal minister but she's so good in the pulpit and at the height of the summer issues with race and stuff. I remember both jeff and i were like. Wow what are we say on this. Well it was actually her sunday kind of at the peak of that and she gave the best sermon. That was the most christ centered sermon on on the issues of race and things and it was. Just i and i remember. I said to her note. We couldn't have done that like you. Only you are gifted to a pulled out that sermon. Because of who she was. And i'm with you on that. Well okay so the last aspect of tove over approach is nurturing christ's likeness which of course is in my field of christian spiritual formation and you use the term christo formity which i have already used got a mostly used it. I did quote you Intellectual yesterday to masters glass. But i mean that to me is so important and i remember reading eugene. Peterson's working the angles which you reference way back in the day. And he was just he was. Just you know getting right after seeing pastors you guys. You're not shopkeepers. You're not business leaders. You are spiritual directors in a congregation. Your job is to pray and read the scriptures. And and i remember that was so revolutionary. But you you cite the nineteen eighties and nineties. When this sort of craze emerged of flipping the pastor to a to a leader in with a business model. How how did that happen. Exactly i mean what how. The church become a a business. Yeah producing a product as opposed to making people like christ. Well let's let's I don't. I don't know exactly all the steps eugene peterson spent taught him his life griping about this and i always liked his griping. I just saw needs to. He's right. I don't know what's going on. Who he has in mind is he never named names. But i think that your abc's attendance building cash is at the heart and.

jennifer herndon eugene peterson jeff Peterson yesterday both nineteen eighties nineties sunday today christian abc Suzie fourie One allah christo christ
"fourie" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:46 min | 2 years ago

"fourie" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Two million votes And it's not really that big of a threat. And i think you know this is where a lot of people kind of get me where they're like. Oh yeah well you know they're not gonna win. They've only got two million votes one million votes. Whatever and there's there are a lot of people generally who who are so sick of the two party system that they just say well libertarians. Not gonna win. I'm just not going to waste my time. And so they things. It's not that the necessarily not gonna win is that they have to get campaign managers in there. That understand what they're doing. I'm not gonna talk about any particular campaign but there's absolutely no question or no doubt that were not assembling well-qualified educated campaign teens that know how to run a proper campaign in the process of creating this film. We've assembled from the vessel in the will. And i say that's not just patting ourselves on back. We went out and we've got some of the best mathematicians in the country who factually understand numbers. We put them together. We pre interview to. We made sure our beliefs were reality that our opinions were fact in doing so and discussing this and discussing campaigns in sitting down with a couple of best campaign managers that existed the reality simple so so we're led to believe that. Our current system is horrendous for third party success. Mathematically that's not actually accurate mathematically weren't a significant good position if campaign properly. I'll try and go into a less fourie portion of explained this at length. I'll try and do it as short as possible. But let's say we have a campaign team we say you know what let's take a bus and we'll go all around the country and we'll find all around the country we'll talk everywhere for like thirteen seconds and somehow talking for thirteen seconds and every state to be a big deal. We'll go all the way to alaska even convince alaskan voters vote. Well here's the problem. What do the reds and blues do very well right now and that's not spend money and time where they can't win right they're not gonna you know. There's not a republican presidential candidate. Who's running order california state. I'm about to win california. They're not going to spend that time. Never through can fight in the states where they potentially can win. You know where they've got to motivate independent voters in motivate just enough of their voters ship to actually show up not going over. Send over some time in states where they have tents landslide right there. You go game theory. As i happen to have that on my desk. Such if let's say a third party campaign once again we're not gonna talk about specifically was to spend their limited resources and a handful of states with a large independent registered voter base which as reminder everybody independent registered voters are the largest number in the united states if you go to the states with a large independent pets with a reasonable balanced republican democrat standpoint. And if you're also marketing and campaigning to both of those parties and spend your limited resources there with a good candidate that speaks to. The audience has a platform is very reasonable that you can take ten to fifteen percent of each party gets them to vote for you. It's very reasonable that you can motivate twenty four to twenty six percent of your typical independent base of that voter shift in that state and guess what those numbers lead to you winning a majority in that state because you're a third candidate out of that because it's no longer about a fifty fifty percents standpoint matter of fact from latour votes standpoint. It's no longer about two hundred seventy into her eighty electoral votes because there's multiple significant candidates. That's why it behooves the libertarian party for a green party candidate be strong and vice versa. Because suddenly it's even less numbers of electoral votes. You knew and because of that if a party put an emphasis on twelve to fifteen significant states where they put their time and their money in and they had a candid worth listening to that truly believes in their platform anchoring market themselves to the other parties that can show up and set up a an actual an actual rally for democrats say democrats. I want you to come here. I want to ask me a question. I wanna give you answers insane for republicans. I wanna be your voice to. I'm not just will libertarian-leaning green party voice trying to be everyone's president. Yes what you're gonna win a few states if you start winning if you what happens you are relevance in a good game with a handful dollars more. Say luke change raise last year. Plenty cohesive battle and the states where they have a large number of independent voters. Reality is you have a legitimate shot and this is interesting too because you know you mentioned you need good campaign teams and you know there's this there's this thing within the libertarian party that everybody has to be a libertarian. That you work with. And i've talked to some people who they've worked on democrat and republican campaigns. You're talking yeah. And it's it's it's these are people who have one major elections. They have that experience. They know how to organize it and they're not necessarily as tied to a party. As most of the candidates themselves are the maturity of campaign majors in this world. Aren't there pneumatic hired guns. Their job isn't to be mcrae ronald republican. Their job is to be employed just like politicians judges to be employed. So because of that. We'll who's ever kinda check in. Here's a shocking thing. It's not that expensive to hire campaign manager in a qualified campaign manager. Yes the top three or four. Our guys who are making or women were making millions of dollars a year but guess what the next year are. People that are making fifty to seventy five to eighty thousand dollars campaign cycle. And when you have three million dollars you can afford a seventy five thousand dollars campaign major. That's excellent at what they do. And now you have a reasonable shot because you have to understand the game hiring people and asking volunteers to do who are qualified and haven't fought these battles that don't get it right. I absolutely agree with you on that And it's it's yeah it's it's difficult It's man who so many tangents. I could go on to well here. Let's do this. Because i want to. I want to talk about your film history a little bit and because i looked up your imdb link. You sent me that and and you've got a lot of work under your belt. I was actually pretty impressed. You've been doing this for a while. used to be in the film industry a little bit. But you know. Mostly i would do little things or we're going a couple of independent films. My imdb credits to come out to be a great dad. In fifteen seconds bike ride. Go fish walk in the park. Phone call milkshake play. Catch picnic. fly a kite. Tell jokes laugh. Doc read a story. Tell a story bumper car swing set bowling pillow fight cut loose. Stay tight.

libertarian party for a green california reds latour alaska mcrae ronald green party libertarian party united states luke Doc bowling