35 Burst results for "Four Hundred Years"

Travel to Kerala, India

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:16 min | 2 weeks ago

Travel to Kerala, India

"I'd like to welcome to the show Mary. ELLEN WARD FROM BREATHE DREAM GO DOT COM, and India for beginners. Dot Com and mary-ellen has come to talk to us about Carola India burial, and welcome to the show. Thank you very much for having me and and we were just discussing the fact that we've known each other since probably about two thousand and ten. It took us a while to try and figure that out as we're in that kind of it's been. So long sort of things, but it's great to talk to you in I. Think a number of people suggested when I said I wanted to do Carola Oh have you talked to Mary Ellen and I thought Oh you're so right because what's your connection with Caroline? Connection is mostly with India in general and Carola. We're talking about today, but I've been travelling to India since two thousand and five and my blog specializes in focusing on India, not specifically in Carola. But careless just one of the many states that I've been to many times and it is actually one of my favorite. Rank them. I think it would definitely be in the top three. So. Blogging about India for fifteen years and then only recently started doing tours, which is that second you're we mentioned India for beginners, Dot Com. But why should someone go to Carolina Carolina is often considered the ideal landing place for a first time visitor to India, and there's a number of reasons for that and one of them is just that it's a more gentle laid back. Type of place it's it's in the south of India. So if you look at the map of India, which is the down in the south is the tropical part where all the beautiful white sand palm-lined beaches are, and that's Carola. So it's a tropical state with gorgeous beaches. It has a very unique rich culture. It has quite a varied landscape it has more than just beaches. A mountain range called the Western guts, which is considered one of the top biodiversity hotspots on the planet, and it's got a very unique feature called the backwaters, which is nine hundred kilometer network of canals. Through very traditional cultural farming area. So you can really feel like you're going back in time. Just so many good reasons to visit. Carol, it's a really beautiful state clump and where would you start us with? With Carola, well, I gave us a lot of thought because it's quite a big state. It's very long narrow state. And if we're GONNA talk in the timeframe of two weeks, which is what a lot of people sort of plan for than my ideal tinder starts in Cochin also known as Fort Cocchi it's Kinda got two names, which is if you look at the Carolinas along narrow states halfway from top to bottom. So unfortunately with the site to newry were not addressing north? Carolina which is less touristy and also very beautiful but we have to honor the timeframe. So we're going to start in coaching and coach in. Small historical area that's within a great big city. There's a big modern cindy around it. Call Ear Knock Elam but coach is this one little area at the tip of concealed that jumps into the harbor. There's a natural harbour there and it's very historical area going back hundreds and hundreds of years. It's been a spice trading port for hundreds of years. I don't even know how hard AC but from about the sixteenth century until the independence of. India in nineteen, forty seven. So we're talking for over four hundred years. It was occupied variously by colonial powers most specifically the Portuguese and the Dutch both left a big imprint on the area. So coaching is a its historical has a lot of colonial architecture, and it's a tourist area in the sense that it's set up for tourism. There's a lot of cafes restaurants. There is beautiful tree lined streets you can walk it's very walkable. It's very safe. And it's a small area. So we're only talking about few kilometers square. So it's easily walkable. So this is kind of an ideal place to get your feet wet and really enjoy the ambiance of the place

India Carola India Carola Carola Oh Mary Ellen Ellen Ward Carolinas Carolina Carolina Cochin Fort Cocchi Newry Carol Elam Caroline
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
Activists uphold John Lewis' legacy to fight for voting rights

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:48 min | Last month

Activists uphold John Lewis' legacy to fight for voting rights

"Imagery of these past few days comes close close to the honor John. Lewis deserved in life as was said over this past weekend this time they saluted the man who was almost killed at the hands of police this time, his final crossing of the bridge that may soon bear his name. was on rose pedals John Lewis witnessed his share of history during his time here on earth, and now in death he becomes the first ever black elected official to lie in state at the US Capitol. We welcome to the broadcast tonight. Nicole Hannah Jones, correspondent for the New York Times focusing on racial injustice this year she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for her work on the time. Sixteen, thousand nine hundred project, which analyzes how slavery has affected our country among her many other honor. She's also a past recipient of the MacArthur Genius Grant. Thank you so much for spending some time with us. All of us who were lucky enough to spend any time with John Lewis are left just with our memories, but I'd like for you to talk about his personal legacy in your life for you. As, thank you so much for having me on to talk about one of the greatest Americans that this country has produced John Lewis was just a few years older than my own father. like my father was born into the segregated south into a family of sharecroppers so I very personally understand how he change the country that my father, and that he. He was born into. That would allow someone like me. an opportunity to work at a place like the New York Times and to do the Piper journalism that I do I just would not be here without him. and you know all of the other civil rights activists in everyday Americans who I consider to be really this nation's true founding fathers. How do you keep the legacy alive of such a towering and unique American? During a time in our lives, where everything we see around us is kind of his antithesis sadly. Yes, I mean the amazing thing about. Congressman John Lewis is that he was not one who felt that he needed to dictate our control the movement that was coming. He was a supporter of black lives. Matter. We spoke about it when I interviewed him about freedom, summer one of the last things he did before he died was to go see the black lives manner banner that was painted in DC so i. think what he much more than myself was. Optimistic he believed that. We would need to keep fighting these BABS, but they will worthy and that we would have victories and I think he has passed that legacy onto us, and it is our charge. You know we know that as As John Lewis died, there was a bill in Congress right now to restore the provision of the Voting Rights Act. That was good by the Supreme Court and that is his legacy. If we want to honor him, then the way to honor him is to continue his work, and that is one way to do that. I. Hope. My, sarcasm. Comes through over zoom or whatever it is, we're calling this technology because it is meant to be the dripping kind of sarcasm, you guys at the sixteen nineteen project must be working on some very scary stuff because it seems to trigger a lot of officeholders. Yeah. It's been an interesting time. The Sixteen nineteen project published almost a year ago. Next month it'll be a year and yet it seems like the people in the highest offices of this land have a bit of an obsession with the project and it's been. It's been interesting I hope though that this conversation will drive people in this country to do some reflection on why we hold so dearly to these founding myths, and why we still four hundred years after the first Africans were brought to this land. To be enslaved cannot deal with our history and our past. Thank you for not minding a little well. Sarcasm and thank you mostly for talking about the life and legacy of the giant, we just lost John Lewis and I'm reminded people will line up tomorrow morning at eight am. The line will stretch tomorrow evening until ten pm just to pay their respects Nicole Hannah Jones. It's been a great pleasure having you on. Thank you so very

Congressman John Lewis Nicole Hannah Jones New York Times Pulitzer Prize United States Macarthur Supreme Court Congress
Han Dynasty

Bedtime History: Inspirational Stories for Kids

04:50 min | 3 months ago

Han Dynasty

"Welcome to bedtime history. Have you heard of a country called China one point four billion people in China more people than any other country in the world around nineteen percent of the world has Chinese, which means around one in five people. The Chinese have very interesting history which goes back thousands of years there civilizations were vast and powerful and the invented many useful things tonight. We're going to learn about the Han dynasty which ruled China for over four hundred, years. China located in the East which is across the Pacific Ocean, from the United States than below Russia and above India. Like many civilizations changed over the years as emperors replaced other emperors. An emperor is the same thing as king in China. Gals who was the first emperor of the Han Dynasty in two hundred BC? He formed the new capital of CIANCI along the way river. His first move was to replace smaller kings over the different regions with his own relatives, which he I thought was a good idea, but these relatives ended up being just as difficult, often trying to take over his role as emperor. With gals Zoos Emperor Confucianism, became the main philosophy in China, it started with a man named Confucius. Who wrote about how people should treat each other and behave? He wrote the people should be honest and trustworthy. They should be loyal to their leaders. Parents and parents should love their children and children should love their parents. A follower named Fu Shang had saved the books of Confucius and under Emperor Gal Zoo universities were established Oliver China to share his teachings. Before. Long thirty thousand students were studying Confucianism. For many years, the Chinese people worship their ancestors. The emperor worshipped his ancestors to and he and most families made ritual sacrifices to them and to other spirits. Taoism was another religion practice during the Han Dynasty, and during this time Buddhism was also introduced to China. For every civilization trade is an important way for people to get things they need. In one, thirty, eight BC, a man named John Chen was sent by the emperor to explore the West. On the way most of his party was captured, but junction continued on until reaching Afghanistan. There he discovered goods. The Chinese would find useful like horses and Golden Silver and could be traded for junction, hurried back to the emperor and told him about the trade route soon. Many Chinese were moving along this trade route, connecting the east and the West. Some of the main goods China traded to the countries in the West where t perfumes, precious stones and silk. For this reason, it became known as the Silk Road and was used for hundreds of years afterward for trade between the east and the West. The, people of the Han Dynasty were also known for their beautiful artwork. We know this. Because many of the tombs were decorated with paintings and pottery and carved stones for example, the Tomb of the Wu family had three thousand figures carved from silver bronze jade. The, Han Dynasty also known for its invention of paper. The Chinese people took items like bamboo rags, fish, nuts and tree bark impounded them down, and then mix them with water next they spread it out flat and let it dry. This new invention quickly spread the empire. Another important invention was writing during the Han Dynasty. Someone wrote the first Chinese Dictionary and historians began recording the history of the Chinese people. Which is why we know so much about them today. Like all great dynasties, gals, uis ended when someone more cunning and powerful took over. Wing became the next temper and broke with many of the old dynasties traditions and called his new dynasty. The first thing he did was took the farms for many of the wealthy families, and gave them back to the peasants, the poor people. This angered many of the smaller kings, and before long a new emperor lay shoe controlled the Han Dynasty. At this time, the dynasty was mostly controlled by young teenage boys who are power hungry and always trying to get the best of each other, which only lead to more trouble in the palace. Before long the next person wanting to be emperor raised an army, and conquered the palace, leading to the end of the Han Dynasty. But incredibly at four hundred years, this dynasty was the longest lasting of all dynasties in the history of China, and also set the standard for future dynasties which sought to emulate its success today. China's one of the largest countries and seeing much growth and has its history to thank for it.

Han Dynasty China Emperor Gal Zoo Oliver China Pacific Ocean Cianci Afghanistan United States Fu Shang BC India John Chen Russia WU T Wing
San Antonio Spurs' Popovich 'embarrassed as a white person' after Floyd's death

KRLD Sunday Morning News

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

San Antonio Spurs' Popovich 'embarrassed as a white person' after Floyd's death

"San Antonio spurs coach Gregg Popovich out with an emotional statement on the death of George Floyd saying the country is in trouble and that he is quote embarrassed as a white person and quote to know that a black man can still be lynched pop up it says it's time for white people to step up and do their part to end racism black people have been shouldering this burden for four hundred years the only reason this nation has made the progress and as is because the persistence and patience and effort of the black people

Gregg Popovich George Floyd San Antonio
Spurs' Popovich 'embarrassed as a white person' after Floyd's death

KYW 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Spurs' Popovich 'embarrassed as a white person' after Floyd's death

"San Antonio spurs coach Gregg Popovich has released a video saying Floyd's death has embarrassed him as a white person black people have been shouldering this burden for four hundred years the only reason this nation has made the progress and as is because the persistence and patience and effort of the black people he says the killing should be a wake up call for the country and shows that a black man can still be lynched in America

Gregg Popovich Floyd America San Antonio
A Banana Republic: Pelosi unloads on Trump over tear-gassing of protesters outside White House

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 3 months ago

A Banana Republic: Pelosi unloads on Trump over tear-gassing of protesters outside White House

"It's been a week and a day since four Minneapolis police officers were implicated in the death of George Floyd setting off protests around the world they have ranged from somber and reverent to violent and explosive last night as a seven PM curfew neared in Washington DC the National Guard and park police officers fired tear gas and set off a flash bang explosives to push out a peaceful crowd of demonstrators that had assembled in a park across from the White House this after president trump delivered remarks where he threatened to deploy the U. S. military if states and local governments are not able to put an end to any violence immediately given the gravity of the moment we've asked one of the leaders of a co equal branch of government the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi and she's with us now madam speaker thank you for joining us I'm sorry for the circumstances but thank you for coming nice marked in fortunate circumstances most unfortunate just when we thought we had seen it all of this president last night he crossed another threshold of undermining our democracy that the federal forces would be used to disperse a crowd be using Billy clubs and tear gas tank system the status of banana Republic to make way for the president to come out and to threaten and all along the point of the U. S. military I was gonna ask you about that because they're they're the fact is there has been violence in cities across the country do you feel that the president's threats to call out the military are warranted and if if not is there anything Congress can or should do I don't think the president calling out the military are warranted I think that there are by and large have been a peaceful demonstrations in large numbers across the country there have been some violence and there's no place for that in any of our expressions of concern that Americans people want to make and violence must be addressed but there is no reason for the U. S. military could be called out for this let's talk about the the role of Congress right now does Congress have any role in this if you find this unacceptable other members disagree that it's unacceptable is there any role in addressing it well there has to be and and I'm very proud of the work that our congressional black caucus has done over time this is a terrible thing that has happened but it's not the first time it's happened it's been a pattern so they're making determinations about what legislation will use to go forward whether that's a comprehensive bill or it's a series of bills but that will all be taking place in the very near future can you identify at the current moment though a perk priority for something that would work for example changing immunity laws for police or perhaps limiting funding or condition funding for federal departments and an effort to make some reforms can you identify any concrete change you are willing to embrace and push for at the moment of the immunity laws are very important and that would be a priority along with holding funding yes but there are things that are very common and people understand very clearly like racial profiling that has to stop on the use of force and in the manner in which it was use whatever form you want their different descriptions of it that our colleagues are revealing as to what will be the most effective and universal but let me just say that this is a four hundred year old which challenge more than that four hundred and one year old challenge before we let you go I can't help but remember that your brother Thomas your beloved brother whom unit lost not long ago it was mayor of Baltimore during in nineteen sixty eight rights is there something that you feel you learned from his experience that is guiding your feelings and thoughts now in terms of my brother Tommy and what happened at that time my brother was a big civil rights leader and one of the things that just discouraged him from continuing in politics with the disrespect that was shown by many and the community there too that are to cardinal who was a civil rights advocate and so to see at that time something that was new in our lives that we would see a church would disrespect the archbishop it was a really an awakening as to how deep some of this racism goes that's a speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi madam speaker thank you so much for speaking with us today thank you

George Floyd Minneapolis
Protesters Dispersed With Tear Gas So Trump Could Pose at Church in Washington DC

Red Eye Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Protesters Dispersed With Tear Gas So Trump Could Pose at Church in Washington DC

"After speaking at the White House rose garden Monday president trump walked two blocks to St John's Episcopal Church for photo opportunity that's why cleared by authorities who used tear gas to move peaceful protesters bishop of the episcopal diocese of Washington Marion Edgar body was critical of trump's visit to that damage chart did not play when he came to Saint John nor did he acknowledge the agony of our country right now and in particular that of the people of color in our nation who wonder if anyone ever anyone in in in public power will ever acknowledge their sacred words and you will rightfully demanding an end to four hundred years of systemic

White House Donald Trump President Trump St John's Episcopal Church Washington Marion Edgar
Rana el Kaliouby  AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

The Tim Ferriss Show

13:33 min | 5 months ago

Rana el Kaliouby AI, Emotional Intelligence, and the Journey of Finding Oneself (

"And I'll keep this short going to jump straight to the guest. My guest today is a pioneer in emotion. Ai will define what that means. Ron L. CALL UB PhD. Who's also co founder and CEO of Affect Tiba and author of the new book girl coded subtitle a scientists quest reclaim our humanity by bringing emotional intelligence technology. A passionate advocate for humanizing technology ethics and diversity. Ron has been recognized on fortunes forty under forty list and as one of Forbes top fifty women in Tech Ron is a world economic forum young global leader and Co hosted a PBS Nova series called wonders. And she's also appeared on and appears in the youtube original series the age of a hosted by Robert Downey Junior Rahall PhD from the University of Cambridge. And a post. Doc It's doctorate from. It can find her on Lincoln Kelly. Ub TWITTER AT K. L. O. U. B. Y. by the way instagram at Rana Website Ron L. DOT COM Rana. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited I'm excited to have you on and if so much to cover and I thought I would begin with a question that will hopefully open up a whole different doors. A whole different set of doors. I think is the proper English expression that could potentially walk through. And it's related to a book. This is affective computing crime if. I'm getting any of the pronunciation wrong by. Rosalind Picard A. R. D. How did this book come into your life so I am concerned? I grew up in Cairo and around the Middle East. But at the time this is like nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight. I had just graduated from computer science from the American University in Cairo and my career plan at the time was to become faculty like wanted to teach and so. I knew teach had to do my master's in it was all very calculated and so I was looking for a thesis topic and my fiance at the time went on Amazon and he said Oh. You know there's this really interesting book by this. Mit professor called. Rosalind Picard Called Affect of computing and. We ordered it through Amazon. It took about three months to shift to Cairo. It got held and customs for reasons. I don't really understand but eventually I got hold of the book and I read it and I you know. I think it's safe to say that it changed my life because so so the thesis in the book is that computers need to understand human emotions just the way people do and I read the book and I was fascinated by this idea and it you know I made that my research topic and it became my obsession and it just really changed the trajectory of my life. What besides the thesis in the book had such an impact on your was it just that that world view that perspective or was there more to the book or more to the author. Yeah a great question. Soon let's talk about the author. I so rise is one of the few and I mean this was true back then. It's still true today. She's one of the few kind of female you know. Computer Science Machine Learning engineers professors in the space. And you know I kind of learned about her over the years I've eventually actually. She ended up being my co-founder many years later. But there's a story around that but but essentially I was just fascinated by her and she you know she's a mom she's three boys. I just thought she was like a Rockstar. So that was kind of one part of it but just the way she wrote the book and how she you know. I'm very expressive as a human being and I just really like. I think emotions really matter and are in the way we communicate. Non Verbally is very important and it struck me that when we think of technology that piece of how we communicate is completely missing and I was like. Oh yeah like it seems so obvious so I just got fascinated by the thesis. I got fascinated by the implications. Like what happens when technology becomes kind of clued into how we that's going to open up a whole new world of possibilities and I was intrigued by that. So let's travel back to that point in time you were with your then fiance and this book is ordered at the time. You're planning on becoming a teacher professor. Why were you on that track? To begin with I mean was it. Take us back to Egypt at that time were there. Many women striving to be faculty members in similar departments. I'm assuming computer science or or perhaps it was a different department. Maybe could tell us more. Yes so I went to the American University in Cairo and I study computer. Sciences an Undergrad. At the time most of the faculty were were guys except for one female faculty Dr Hulda Husni which became my role model and my mentor. And I just wanted to be like like she was awesome. She was you know. Very smart. Very approachable very fashionable. And I was like Ooh I like that and and I just wanted to be like her and so devised a plan also geek. I'm a geek and I'm proud of it so I I kind of devised a plan. I was like okay. I'll graduate top of my class which I did and then I was like okay. I'll go get a masters and PhD abroad. Because that's what you do and then come back and I'll join joined the faculty and so at the time because I was getting married to my fiance and he had a company based in Cairo coming to the. Us was not an option because it was way too far so he was like a let you go study in the UK. Because it's close enough so I applied to Cambridge and got in. That was kind of the impetus for going abroad and doing this. Like focusing on this research. So when did you then end up going to the? Us was that a difficult conversation with your family or your then-fiancee walk us through how that happened because it doesn't sound like that would have been just a hop skip and a jump to second conversation so walk us through that experience. Yes okay so then. I moved to Cambridge Right Cambridge University in the UK not not Cambridge Massachusetts and I will Cambridge Cambridge original Cambridge And we got married so basically I got married and got the scholarship to go study at Cambridge and my house. So He's now my husband right. Well he's my ex now but at the time he was my husband he was very supportive. He was like you gotta go. This is your dream. I'll support you will have a long distance relationship now. My family. My parents and his parents were horrified. They were like what you can't do that so so I do like to give him credit for for for making this happen and being supportive so I ended up in Cambridge and he was in Cairo and we did that for five years and towards the end of my PhD Ros Picard was visiting Cambridge UK. To give a talk there. And I ended up meeting her in person and we totally hit it off and she said why. Don't you come work with me at MIT as a post doc and I was like Oh my God. This is like a dream come true. I've been following you like forever and this is why you know like I told her my story. And then I caveat it I said that just you know I've I've been married for the last five years and have had a long distance relationship so I have to go back to Cairo otherwise and I actually really said that. I said otherwise in Islam because I'm Muslim my husband can marry up to four women and if I don't show up eventually he'll just like Mary more women so I said half jokingly right so she was like that's fine just like commute from Cairo and I commuted from Cairo Boston for a good a good three or four hundred years going back and forth between MIT and Cairo. How often did you go back and forth. Or how often did he go back to Cairo? Maybe is a better. What else get so. Initially I would spend a couple of months in Cairo and then go spend like a few weeks and Boston and then I would move with my kids to Boston over the summer so summer break we just all go there and so initially. That was okay. So this was between two thousand and six to two thousand and nine was okay Things began to kind of really follow parts when I decided to start the company so we started to get a lot of interest in technology and displaying. It they really encourage you to spin outright. So in two thousand nine united started affect. Eva and I was literally spending two weeks in Cairo in Boston. Two weeks or two weeks in Boston. It was insane and that was when like just goes out of balance everything was out of bounds unless tough it was tough and and and you know. I'm divorced now. Imagine how that didn't go very well. It was just it was I think. In retrospect it was not a very healthy lifestyle. And I I. I wouldn't want to be in that place again. I wouldn't want others to be in that. I talked publicly about that time yet. Let's let's hop around chronologically a little bit. We're GONNA come back of course to starting the company and that decision but for people who don't have any real firsthand exposure to the Middle East much less. Egypt for instance What was it like growing up in in Egypt and based on at least some of my reading you for instance wore a hit job for quite some time. We're not talking short period of time. Maybe you could also speak to that. Yeah yeah and it sounds like you've spent some time in the you've you've you've been to Jordan. It's time in Jordan of spent some time in a few places in the Middle East but not in Egypt never met each and when I was we chatted a little bit before start recording only have a few words here and there in Arabic but it's Levin Arabic right. It's it's what what you'd run across in Jordan or or the Lebanon and I remember though having many people recommend that I not study the sort of standard Arabic textbook Arabic but that I study Egyptian Arabic because all of the as they put all the entertainment and movies that I might WanNa consume would-be an Egyptian Arabic. Needless to say I didn't get that far but I haven't spent any time in Egypt. Well your Arabic spreading goods and you're right about Egyptian accent. That's kind of the most common but but I think the key thing is like there's no one Middle East. There's no one form. I grew up in a family. That's kind of an interesting way quite conservative but also quite liberal so my parents were very pro education. They scientist the They put all their money towards our schooling and they made a point during the summers that we travel abroad and experienced kind other cultures. And I think that's why like I was so comfortable moving from one country to another and ending up in the United States. Your parents do certain interject. But what is your parents do professionally okay. So my parents met. So my dad taught computer programming in the seventies and my mom was probably the first female programmer in the Middle East. He attended his class and he hit on her and they ended up getting married so so I guess I should give them a little bit of credit for ending up. Being a computer signed sub. Sure they had something to do with that. That's so so they both. My mom was a computer programmer at the Bank of National Bank of Kuwait. So we were in Kuwait for a while and my dad is. He's always worked in technology and culturally. What was it like where you grew up Or or within the family. You said that they were for instance on one hand very lesser with the right a cosmopolitan. Perhaps in their perspective and Dr Related to education and and what what were the other ingredients in the household there was there's definitely like clear gender role so even though my mom worked her entire life. it was always. She was not allowed to ever talk about her job post. You know she would leave work at three. Pm Be home like whatever for pm when we got back from school and that was it. She was never allowed to take a conference call at home. The evening never allowed to travel for work and I didn't realize that until I was an adult like I just assumed this was the way it was but it did hamper her career progression and it was this implicit understanding. That's does your. Oh this is my role and we all stick in our lane so that was interesting We were for example. I have two younger sisters.

Cairo Middle East Egypt United States Cambridge Ros Picard Boston University Of Cambridge Cambridge Right Cambridge Univ American University Professor Ron L. UK Youtube Jordan Robert Downey Cambridge Cambridge Rosalind Picard A. R. D. Lincoln Kelly
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:20 min | 5 months ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

"And so going back to think twice you were talking about about more about the writing. Yeah and it's something that I didn't know enough about until I was invited onto your program. But what are the things that interest me about? Shakespeare is the fact that you know. He wrote thirty six so plays that we know of and almost none of them may be. The tempest may be midsummer. Night's dream are his original story but for the most part Shakespeare was not interested in creating a new story. He looked around at the stories others had told whether they were Italian. Novellas or English plays or history's any thought I understand what's slightly off for not really fulfilled in this version older version and he did what architects call a gut renovation. He kept the frame and he just cleared out the inside and made it is. Oh so when Dylan writes. Don't think twice. He knows Paul Clayton Song. Who's going to buy you ribbons? When I'm gone? He worked with Klay knew who sadly killed himself in in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. Eight toward together collaborated a little bit and I'm sure that there is kind of cross pollination if you will between Clayton Song. And and don't think twice and dillon with a little techy from what. I've learned about that you know he said I steal the word a or the word so whether we're done you know Ed is a good question. Although he was a little defensive even steal those words but he is reaching into a tradition a tradition that goes further back than Clayton to. What I learned was an African American Song that circulated in Virginia. Who's GonNa Bring you chickens? So what we're talking about. Our traditions and Shakespeare comes out of traditions. Really in very similar ways. To how Dylan does and plagiarism is. A useless category the only useful category. Can you take something old and make it speak to the moment? In a way that makes people feel connected to that song ways. Nobody has ever felt connected to it in dealing did that for me. I think I'm right in saying and correct me. If I'm not the Sean Wilentz I think wrote a book called Bob Dylan and America. And he I believe explored this notion and said you know what it's Alchemy. What he's doing is he's taking base matters and is creating something new out of it that shines and I thought that was really damage. It is in trouble. Lens is A friend and a very smart guy and I think he wrote brilliantly about about Dylan. Christopher ricks did as well They're just a people recognize. That is work rises to the level of seriousness. And it is how chemical it is a transformation but for me. It's really the lack of thoughtfulness beyond the magic of the transformation and the thoughtfulness I suppose has to do with. I see what's not there. That's a hard thing to to grasp and Shakespeare was really good at it. Didn't create the story of Hamlet. He didn't create the story King. Lear those were all plays bouncing around in the stage. You probably acted in a spear holder when he was young. He's onstage they could. God I can write this great Soliloquy at this point or I could tweak it in this way. And maybe it's not occurring Bob Dylan in a cerebral way. But it's occurring to him in a way that lets them know. Yeah I. I know the folk he sang exists but that song is dead on arrival. Something has to be done to reanimated and I suppose it's as much Raising the data's alchemy. And where do you think Dylan? Shakespeare intersect particularly? I think oddly even though four hundred years or so separates their birth. They both products of a similar education system. You know it's it's remarkable if you listened to to Dylan's account of education in his Nobel lecture in two thousand Seventeen. He talks a lot of doubt grammar. School you know. He learned things in Grammar School. The devices techniques secret mysteries whatever. He's talking about. He talks about gullivers travel. Dickins Don Quixote all these stories and of course we know he had a great teacher in school. Who taught him the poetry John Donovan? The poetry plays of Shakespeare so shakespeare learn what he learned in Grammar School. I mean this is a Western tradition that span than in now and both of them sat there probably frustrated probably demise racing as they were exposed to this stuff and taking it all in and a decade later or or ten years later figuring out how to turn this into into gold if you will and I mean that both literally and figuratively because you have to make money as an artist or like pulled claim you can end up desperate and suicidal and both of them figured out how to do that. And if you think you know as a thought experiment Dylan or Shakespeare Been Born twenty years earlier or twenty years later whatever genius they had could not have been fully rely so yes. They were both remarkable artists but they had great luck in being born at what they recognize. Both of them were pivotal moments in in their culture in the arts in the possibilities that were now available to young

Bob Dylan Shakespeare Clayton Song Grammar School Christopher Ricks Sean Wilentz John Donovan Don Quixote ED Virginia Dillon Klay Lear America
Middle Earth Minute: The Numenoreans

Covert Nerd Podcast

05:39 min | 6 months ago

Middle Earth Minute: The Numenoreans

"I'm going to be talking about. The Newman orients the new minorities. Were that race of men. If you remember in the movie airborne was a new minority in. They had a long life and they got their start. After the downfall of more goth sirens master Saharan fled but the gods the allies what they're called rewarded the men a group of men for helping in the defeat of Serotonin more goth and gave him this island. I king of the Newman orients was l Ross. And he had a brother named L. Ronde as we know from the movies they were half Elven so they could pick either the immortality of the elves or the mortality of the men so l. Ross chose to be one of the men but also the land that they got from the valor. They also gave them long life as we know in the movie airborne was seventy six seventy eight. I think if I remember correctly so they gave these men. The Newman orients extended life. They typically lived around four hundred years of age sometimes a little longer later on. They didn't live quite as long. But we'll get that in the later on this island really good. They loved the valor on the Gods and everything good but slowly but surely they started to decline. They wanted not only a long life. They wanted immortality like the elves became jealous of the elves and wanted immortality. They were told that they can never visit the West. If you remember in the movies the end Bilbo and Frodo and Gandalf and some of the others went on a ship and went to the West. They went to this place called the undying land. The deal the valor made with the new minorities was that you can have long life but you can never go to. The undying land will later on generations later thousands of years later in fact they said No. No we're not going to be banned from that. They call it the ban. R- actually going to go to the undying land anyway. And so sorry. Ron Shows up on the scene later. On the Newman Guide extremely wealthy and very arrogant. And that's why they decided to say you know what we're going to them dying land anyway. We don't care we're better. We know better and sarin help feed that. In fact he came to the island as a prisoner and faked being captured by one of the minority and kings. And that's where all this got started. And the Valor said. We're not having any of that. As soon as one of the kings went to the undying land he destroyed the army and sunk the island. And so basically. This is tokens version of Atlantis. But as we know some of airborne's relatives he still door remember. He was from new minore. They left the island before it sank and established colonies in middle earth. And there's where we get gone door fascinating fascinating story. I definitely don't do it. Justice but the whole story has a lot of intrigue and you can find a detailed story of this in the Sylmar million towards the back. It's called the Cala Bath and it's only about thirty pages long and goes into much more detail of the capturing of SAR on and the deception. He gives the king and how he moves. The Newman orients down that dark dark path to the point that they start doing human sacrifices as well. Then there's another book called. The Tales of new Minora and middle earth has even more little short stories about the different kings of new minore and how they had shifted over the years and started getting more evil also in the return of the king. If you remember there's those a pen nixes in the back there's one in there called Appendix B. That gives you an outline a time line. Excuse me of the second age which is when this whole Numidian. Time-line took place and it gives an outline of the second age and talks about how they started. And how you can see there that they slowly disintegrated down to basically evil so you get little tidbits of the new minority ans even in the Lord of the rings books the Cala Bath and the other. The unfinished tales of numerous men are numerous middle. Earth just gives you more detail. One of the quotes from the tales of numerous middle earth is this. They turn their play into great matters and great matters into play. I thought that was just a fun quote from the book and that one details of middle earth is written by Tolkien but edited by his son. Just like the Iranian Christopher Tolkien so what Christopher Tolkien did in a nutshell is take little stories that his dad wrote but never finished and kind of put them together. In a more cohesive matter. Not The best as you know by. The million is very disjointed. But that's the best he could do so he might find a couple of paragraphs about the new minority in kings over here and he finds another two three or four pages about the numerous Newman. Orients over here and put them all into one book? And that's what he did definitely check out the bath in the back of the sylmar million or tales of new minore in middle earth or both good and the Cala bath is very short so you can probably sit down and read those thirty pages very quickly and it's just a fun read. I just but I'm also a token nerd so take that with a grain of

Newman Valor Cala Bath L Ross Christopher Tolkien Newman Guide Saharan Sylmar L. Ronde RON
Fighting Fires with Lt. Sarinya Srisakul, FDNY'S First Asian Woman Firefighter

$6.99 Per Pound

09:05 min | 7 months ago

Fighting Fires with Lt. Sarinya Srisakul, FDNY'S First Asian Woman Firefighter

"We're GONNA introduce guest richest guest. You WanNa take it away. Sure thanks this. We have another righteous guest up. She is the first ever Asian American female firefighter for the New York City. Fire departments and now the first Asian women lieutenant in the near New York City Fire Department. Please welcome Serena's Russa cool so perhaps we usually start off with asking our guests like describe what you do right because sometimes stylised or they're in entrepreneur and you have a title where it's like a firefighter. It's pretty planetary on the surface. But I don't think most people know like what really means. Fighter could you kind of simply due in Lieutenant House? Oh yeah so. I'll talk a little bit about finger. Firefighters I and Lieutenant so as a firefighter besides qualifiers you also do a medical calls for accidents stuck elevators electrical water utility emergencies Water main breaks Anything that doesn't neatly fit in the category of like what? Police officer does usually. It's the Fire Department. See something say something. We show up to that Any weird random rescues anyway that that's the fire department and sounds like is like better better to be safe than sorry kind of situations where you show up fully geared up with the big as like trump and and it's like a cigarette. Yeah our code for when they're smoking weed is it. Smells like incense. It smells like wink. Wink City colitis incense situation. So before you get into the lieutenant part what you were saying you do you guys cover pretty much everything that the police department wouldn't cover a lot with them to you. Yeah so they show up Even medical calls US ambulances and them show up so you obviously had your tenure in that space. So y'all can you describe what that sure basically? I'm just the supervisor so boss the boss there is. You're saying firetruck. There was a fire truck. There's a fire engine. The engine was the difference. Engine has hosing them back. So it's like the shorter rig And so out of fire. Engines stretch the hose line and put the fire out right and it's heavy unwieldy hose so you need a team and they're the ones that need the hydrant right the truck. They have the ladders in the back. So they're the ones that do the ventilation and they do the searches so there have the ladders for the people who are trapped inside. Yeah so and with the I guess. The utility emergencies the engines go to medical emergencies and the trucks go to the stock elevators and water leaks. So that's how we divide up tasks. Yeah so when you look at a rid great Either in an engine or truck. The person who's driving is called a chauffeur and the person next to the show for the officer. And it's either a lieutenant or a captain so in every fire company there's three lieutenants and one captain so I'm a brand new lieutenant so I don't have a permanent station right now. So I'm kind of like a substitute teacher. So whenever any officers sick or on vacation I cover their spot for when they're gone. I'm in North Queens. Which is where I'm assigned So as an officer. I'm a supervisor. Supervise the crew. I'm working with for the day and I do the paperwork for like their how they get paid. People were As a crew during the day. Let's say it's a car accident at the work on that. Cpr Do paperwork on that anything like that. That's the job of the officer to do the paperwork for whatever emergency does and make the decisions Of the best things to do in a fire situation the officers go in with the insight team of the truck and You know you help locate the fire if you're in the truck if you're in the engine then you like hall for whatever needs to happen for the crew to bring in to help fight the fire. Okay got you. I mean thousand foes. Luggage very thorough. There's so many different layers to it. A military base allow paramilitary organization. So we want to rewind a little bit about your beginnings in his career like as Joe mentioned early on the First Asian woman firefighter and ESPN. Y Yes I mean. The FDA wide probably existed for what three four Hundred Years Ono sixty three hundred gifts more than a century. Yes obviously in. Women firefighter in its history. Yes I was the only for a long time. I recently told us a little bit about that. Like what like. What made you decide to do that? I like if you could just kind of explain to us what's What was that like? Yeah it is a good question because it is very different and unique for someone like me to go into this world but I was recruited by my friend who really wanted to be be. A firefighter actually went to school. Down THE STREET FROM HERE. I went to Parsons School of design studying illustration that yeah yeah. It was kind of more Typical route even though. It's atypical or school. But there are other Asian women who are and My Friend Really WanNa be a firefighter was living in San Francisco. Came back to New York When New York was hiring Just want to put a note in New York. Only hires once every four years just crazy? Yeah and you have to be seventeen and a half two older than twenty nine. So he can't be older than twenty years old to take the test so I happen to be twenty one at the time and my friend was like just kind of thought. I was a great job and I never really was exposed to any civil service jobs like my mom was a nurse and my dad like worked at a lake at an office. You know For Asian Shipping Company. And so I didn't really was exposed firefighters cops or anything like that and so I got dragged to this orientation that the fire department was having was first time. I met women firefighters and they showed. It was a really corny presentation They showed us like they. Call us. Sizzle reel fire like Microsoft word. Who SO QUIRKY EVENT CALENDARS NO? Hell no hell no it. Was you know honestly it was looking at the other women and seeing how diverse they were me like? They were like short women's hall when they were League. Normal looking. Women are different than them. If they can do it. You know Addis predisposition thought of what that person looked like right as like a normal person would like firefighter. Thousand Two right after nine eleven. It was right after nine. Eleven and everything in the media was not just a man but a white man And how brave they were and this and that and you know. I guess it was more a fear of like. I don't WanNa die like going to work. It was three hundred forty. Three people died that day and it was like this horrible thing that happened. Everyone's like Kinda shellshocked But then you know they addressed it at Orientation. They said like the trainings really good. You get to help people I went to art school after that. I was in communion organizing worked in the nonprofit world for awhile and you know at the end of the day just wanted to help people The nonprofit world doesn't pay very much and I saw how much firefighters were making union job all the retirement. You Know My pension it's twenty years and retire and I'll say oh I can retire my forties. This is great. You know I was really like bought into a and being the first Asian woman I knew at the time I would have been the first one so that really was appealing to me to to break that barrier so I just like went

Officer Fire Department New York City Lieutenant House Supervisor City Fire Department United States Serena Wink City Asian Shipping Company Parsons School Of Design North Queens San Francisco Addis JOE FDA ONO League
Science News Briefs From Around the World

60-Second Science

02:30 min | 7 months ago

Science News Briefs From Around the World

"Hi I'm scientific American. Podcast editor Steve. Mirsky and here's a short piece from the February. Twenty twenty issue of the magazine and the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine. The article was titled Quick Hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by Assistant News editor. Sarah Lou Frazier from the US off. The California coast scientist measured a blue whales heart rate for the first time using a device attached to the animal skin by Suction Cup the heart likely weighing hundreds of pounds beats from the thirty seven down to two times per minute varying dramatically between diving feeding and surfacing from Peru researchers analyzing satellite. An imaging data have found one hundred. Forty three new Nazca lines. These are largely line drawings of humans animals and symbols etched into the Peruvian Landscape Millennia. Ago The drawings including humanoid figures sixteen feet across spotted by. Ibm's Watson AI system from Brazil despite the long dry spells in Brazil's Catchinga region. Scientists found the tree hyman a Conga era drizzles copious nectar from flowers to attract pollinating. Bats full-sized tree can release two hundred forty gallons of the stuff with thirty eight distinct sent compounds over a single dry season from Norway. Archaeologists ground piecing radar found a Viking era ship surrounded by a filled ditch lurking below the soil of a western Norway farm. The ship was once within a burial mound from Jordan. Researchers uncovered a two horned figure in early Islamic ruins that may be the earliest ever found the roughly thirteen hundred year old object matches a rook found in Iranian chess. Set from about four hundred years later and from Ethiopia microbes thrive in many of earth's harshest environments but researchers found no life at all in briny scorching civic pools near Ethiopia's Dalla volcano knowing the boundaries for life's adaptations helps to narrow the search for earth like life on other planets. That was quick hits by Sarah Lou

Sarah Lou Frazier Editor Ethiopia Norway Sarah Lou Twenty Twenty Brazil Mirsky Dalla Volcano Steve Assistant News California United States Peru IBM Scientist Catchinga
Fishing for New Drugs

The Bio Report

07:18 min | 7 months ago

Fishing for New Drugs

"The Glass Marine Genomics Institute is seeking to harness biotechnology to discover new therapeutics by studying the DNA of marine life. At the same time the institute hopes to breathe new life into a photo fishing village that houses it and create new opportunities there. We spoke to Andrew Bogner Science director at the Gloucester Marine genetics institute about marine biotechnology the ocean as a source of novel. Therapeutics and the Institute's efforts to transform the economy along Cape Ann Andrew. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me. We're GONNA talk about grouse Marine Genomics Institute. The potential the ocean represents a source of new Madison Institute operates. It seems Jaji is Michigan is as much economic is in his scientific. Perhaps you could begin with talking a little about the town of where your base and how the institute came about sure Mcgraw date will this court. In America Foundation nearly four hundred years ago and it's economy is principally shortened fishing industry So but declined temperature. Fishing Industry over the last several decades has really had a negative impact on the local economy and they call me if the region for GMT I really from discussions between micro scientists missing union leader as well as governor officials. Who really wanted to do something to catalyze new economic opportunities for Gloucester and for the KPMG area All at the same time remaining true to the rich maritime history of the region The ruling was different. Twenty-first-century technologies and specifically to novel technologies to see for new discoveries that impact either fisheries are human health GMT. I is not nonprofits Research and education institute not two thousand thirteen and what's the mandate for Jim? Gee I what does it seek to do? Beyond research along the lines of economic development as I see our mission is really to conduct World Class Marine research which extends regional autonomy and our strategy really has three components. The first is to establish a research institute powered by genomics to uncover new discoveries that impact tissues and human how the second part is to create a really vibrant science community in and around officer. And so this is actually encompasses a number of things Which is attracting scientists who trump to Gloucester for collaborative research and conferences occupancy? Translational research generates opportunities to form spin out companies as well as attracting other research and biotech entities to smoking in Gloucester order. Support is growing. Science community are expanding researches if you really need a train. Local workforce in the third part of our strategy is actually one of education. We're training Well if I were training the next generation of Asia There are white ship. Education program is called the blog Gloucester Biotechnology Ademi and it's a nine month vocational training programs. You train recent. High school graduates become entry. Level lab technicians. Prepare them for jobs in the life science biotech industry. There are a number of drugs on the market today that are derived from marine organisms. There's a growing pipeline as well. Junji is not alone. In looking to marine life is a potential source of new drugs. How significant opportunity does the ocean represent as a place to find novel therapeutic? Sent to what extent this truly been explored pot. Well the ocean is largest reservoir of biodiversity on the planet and yet we know really only a fraction of their so tremendous opportunity for new discoveries and the sea And certainly genomics allows us to explore this fire diversity in a very cost effective and to go away so those really opened up a new era. She's covering from the sea. So you mentioned that there have been some marine drives Therapeutics and today third nine. Fda approved marine derived drugs on the market With indications such as Cancer Infectious Disease and education And these have had They have very unique chemical structures mechanisms of action and they'd show tremendous promise in their therapeutic areas. There's been a problem of discovery. Discovering new therapeutic because of the limited supply of starting material traditional drug discovery was based on harvesting organisms. Extracting their chemical testing now for us because many of the compounds were present in really low quantities in these organisms biomass. He's tons of violence in order to extract enough of these compounds to do experiments into tough there So it was a very cheap to call very expensive Process but now it's you know it can take a small sample of any organism liquids. Gino an have a blueprint for all of the chemical and biological capabilities of that organism. Now working from the seven zero you can have a look for other teens and violence and pedic gene pathways but maybe coating molecules with these potential had so really again. I think is opinion happened. New Era just every therapeutic something. That wasn't possible before how is size organized. What what's the roadmap for what you're seeking to do so I started. He is having a platform to address questions related to oceans and human health and we basically have three main program areas. My medicine and biotechnology is one. Inconsistent function houses the second and Fisheries Agriculture so third. So I'm officially side. Were doing as you think you now. To better understand populations of commercial fishing south and creating the next generation of tools to better assess population structure and also the house of Aquatic Animals For the ecosystem function and how program or using genetic to explore the diversity and function of marine environment and developing news. You know tools to assess ecosystem south and function And Response to natural and man-made environment and on the biomedical side were exploring the oceans vast biodiversity a focus on marine microbes to identify novels. Dna. Who's an organism For applications for other applications in biotechnology on also creating the next generation of Genomic To dance marine animals as models for medical research and our focus is on long list. Us resistant animals.

Glass Marine Genomics Institut Gloucester Gloucester Marine Genetics Ins Grouse Marine Genomics Institu Marine Drives Therapeutics Gloucester Biotechnology Ademi World Class Marine Andrew Bogner Science Cape Ann Andrew Madison Institute Kpmg Director Jaji America Foundation Asia Junji JIM Michigan Officer
Plymouth Rock among Boston landmarks vandalized

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:36 sec | 7 months ago

Plymouth Rock among Boston landmarks vandalized

"Plymouth rock along with several other landmarks are targeted by vandals as the historic town prepares to celebrate four hundred years since the Mayflower came to America Plymouth rock was found covered in red spray paint WBZ TV bill shields reports that crews have been able to clean up most of the damage he is also heard from town officials I got a text from the town manager Melissa review this morning saying she is absolutely sick over this because they are in the middle and it really going to run up to the front of four hundred celebrations self they're getting more

America Plymouth Melissa
North Shore Community To Display Black Lives Matter Exhibit For Black History Month.

WBZ Morning News

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

North Shore Community To Display Black Lives Matter Exhibit For Black History Month.

"A north shore community turns back the pages on centuries of history in honor of black history month WBZ's Carl Stevens goes back to class the mind of Google tells me Marblehead is ninety five percent white which is why it's interesting the town is home to an impressive exhibit called black lives matter a struggle for justice and equality it portrays different people who were active in the civil rights movement which lasts a lot longer than we think it dies the artist Nancy earth she researched history back four hundred years and created a series of quilt blocks on display at the cloister gallery at St Andrew's church in Marblehead she says she wants to deliver a message with this exhibit that message participate in the struggle for justice and

Carl Stevens Google Marblehead St Andrew Nancy
This autonomous ship aims to steer itself across the Atlantic Ocean

Kim Komando

01:06 min | 9 months ago

This autonomous ship aims to steer itself across the Atlantic Ocean

"In next year will mark four hundred years he was a four hundred years since the Mayflower arrived in the New World were L. grams would set up the Plymouth colony and future tech is marking the anniversary the Mayflower is once again traveling from the U. K. to the U. S. now this ship won't have anyone on board just artificial intelligence powered by IBM's Watson you have to see the Mayflower autonomous ship A. K. A. M. I. S. which you can have your commander community member it looks more like a plane spaceship hybrid that sales about the warder the ship was built by pro Mar it's a nonprofit marine research organizations power mainly by wind and solar energy while the onboard tech work to avoid any house hazards that pop up during this twelve the journey across the Atlantic the tech also larger marine life and conducts sea level mapping during the trip and this will become one of the first full size autonomous ships to cross the ocean actually gonna sets sail September twenty twenty so welcome to the New World and when it does arrive you can save heard about that a year ago in the gimp commando

IBM Watson A. K. A. M. Commander
What Are High Crimes and Misdemeanors? Here's the History

The Erick Erickson Show

02:55 min | 10 months ago

What Are High Crimes and Misdemeanors? Here's the History

"Let me give you some history here. Because one of the contentions by the president and by the president's supporters others is that the president of the United States is being charged with things that are not crimes it is true. Abusive Abusive Office is not a federal crime that the president can be charged with but more than two thirds of the sixty impeachments is that have proceeded through the House of Representatives. Were based on things that were not also crimes. Federal Judges are subject to removal under the impeachment provisions of the Constitution of the nineteen impeachments reaching the Senate fifteen have been directed at federal judges and an eight of those cases says the Senate voted to convict. Impeachment proceedings were initiated against a member of the president's cabinet in eighteen seventy six when impeachment richman charges were filed against William Belknap. who was secretary of war? The House and Senate debated the power impeachment at length and determined that the secretary remains susceptible to impeachment and trial even even after he resigned the House and Senate have the power to impeach and try and accused official. WHO has resigned? It was conceded a cabinet official can have that happen and and on the record. It was conceded that both could in the case of the impeachment proceedings against Richard Nixon and Judge Judge George English in one thousand nine hundred eighty six president. Nixon resigned following the committee of the judiciary to report to the House recommendations of his impeachment. Judge English resigned signed before commencement of a trial in the Senate and it was agreed by all sides that the impeachment could continue but they did abandon the matter anyway. The constitution defines the grounds for impeachment and conviction is treason. Bribery and other high crimes and misdemeanors when the house determines the grounds for impeachment. Peach Mint exists. The articles of impeachment are presented to the Senate. Any one of the articles may provide sufficient basis for graphic conviction. It's not an all or nothing thing. This House is going to pass out to articles articles of impeachment. They could convict him on either one. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors has been interpreted by Congress. Broadly the framers of the constitution adopted the phrase rays from English practice at the time of the constitutional conviction convention. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors had been used for four hundred years. There's your a little trivia fact. You're at your Sunday School Christmas party this weekend and impeachment comes up. Did you know that by the time. The constitution was adopted. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors had been in use as for four hundred years in the British parliament. Here's what you need to do. Here's what she had to pay attention to over that four hundred year period in the British parliament with high crimes and misdemeanors was used some involved actual crimes but many did not

Senate President Trump Judge Judge George English House Of Representatives Richard Nixon British Parliament Secretary Official William Belknap. United States Bribery Congress Richman Four Hundred Years Four Hundred Year
"four hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Just ninety miles from here in sixteen nineteen the first indentured servants from Africa landed on our shores and old point comfort. What we call now for a while. Wow. The guy sounds like he's celebrating something. They're all happy about Gail four hundred years ago. The first slaves arrived here just ninety miles from here. It's a great anniversary all celebrating here in Virginia. What in the name of Sam hill who thinks this way? We're celebrating four hundred year anniversary. And Gayle, Gayle king. We'll have to play this back to the top. But the cue it back the top. But but she didn't follows known as slavery. She doesn't want him to get away with calling indentured servitude. Look at Virginia's history. We're now at the four hundred year anniversary just ninety miles from here in sixteen nineteen the first indentured servants from Africa landed on our shores and old point comfort. What we call now fort Monroe, and while also known as slavery. And while we have made a lot of progress in Virginia. Slavery has ended schools have been desegregated. We have ended the Jim crow laws easier access to voting it is abundantly clear that we still have a lot of work to do. Wait a minute. I say that's a bad. But you're not supposed to talk about the solutions. You are not supposed to talk about the improvements because to the modern American leftist. They are irrelevant. Do not discount me on this folks, do not. Do not think that I'm offbeat. I'm on right in the middle of bulls eye on this. He's trying to get credit because he's embattled by pointing out all of the successes, but we've been doing that for thirty years, and he doesn't count for diddly squat. Five hundred thousand Americans being killed in a civil war to end. Slavery means nothing. And the reason is one more time. The objective is to transform the country away from how it was founded. And because how it was founded as the original Senate was founded with slavery and prejudice and bigotry in these people's minds. And so there's no amount of fixing possible. It's not possible to fix because it was founded this way. So whatever improvements have been made they know count the end of the day, we need to totally abolish and rebuild. This is what is being taught. This is what young generations of Americans are growing up believing. But he's embattled here saw he's got that black face photo out there. So he's trying to say look at what we've done look at the change. And then acknowledging there's still a lot of work. What if we have ended slavery desegregated the schools if we've ended Jim crow laws there's easier access to voting? Then what is the lot of work to do? Denying there is what what is the lot of work to do. It's just a throwaway line designed to send a message that Ralph. Now, the knows nothing nothing is good ride. Now, he just trying to distance himself from the bad next question. From Gayle king. What have you learned that you didn't know before I was born in white privilege, and that has implications to it, and it is much different. The way a white person such as myself is treated.

Gayle king fort Monroe Virginia Jim crow Africa Sam hill Ralph Gail Senate four hundred year four hundred years thirty years
"four hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Troops commanders and Afghanistan officials. He said he has not received any direction to draw down forces here. There are still fourteen thousand US troops stationed here Han said the Pentagon is part of the peace talks with the Taliban US has important security interests here, the Afghans will have to decide their future. It seems like just a week or two ago that parts of the federal government shutdown hundreds of. Thousands of federal employees on paid by next weekend. They could be off the job and unpaid again congressional negotiations to avoid dot have not gone. Well, the last couple of days there are some very real sticking points in terms of wording on how funding and how much funding goes specifically towards the border wall. And there are other sticking points as well when it comes to the numbers of people being able to be held in ice detention facilities host Margaret Brennan Virginia tripleheader of a political scandal goes into a second week with the state's top three officials under attack but still on the job among them. Governor. Ralph nor them who spoke with CBS news said he's not quitting despite admitting at least one use of face in the nineteen eighties. You look at Virginia's history. We're now the four hundred year anniversary just ninety miles from here in sixteen nineteen the first indentured servants from Africa landed on our shores as noted by Gayle king invention in ventured servants me. Meaning slaves that interview on CBS this morning in the freezing weather over homestate complete. What snowstorm Minnesota Senator Amy klobuchar becoming the latest democrat to join the twenty twenty presidential race? I don't have a political machine. I don't come from money. But what I do have is this, I have grit. This is CBS news. WBZ news time one zero three the Subaru retailers of New England all-wheel-drive traffic.

Pentagon CBS Margaret Brennan Virginia trip US Senator Amy klobuchar Ralph Afghanistan Virginia Gayle king Subaru Han Minnesota Africa New England four hundred year
"four hundred years" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"With troops commanders and Afghanistan officials. He said he has not received any direction to draw down forces here. There are still fourteen thousand US troops stationed Shanahan said the Pentagon is part of the peace talks with the Taliban had though, the US has important security interests here, the Afghans will have to decide their future. It seems like just a week or two ago that parts of the federal government were shutdown hundreds of. Thousands of federal employees on paid by next weekend. They could be off the job and unpaid again congressional negotiations to avoid that have not gone. Well, the last couple of days there are some very real sticking points in terms of wording on how funding and how much funding goes specifically towards the border wall. And there are other sticking points as well when it comes to the number of people being able to be held in detention facilities nation host Margaret Brennan Virginia tripleheader of a political scandal goes into a second week with the state's top three officials under attack but still on the job among them. Governor. Ralph northern who spoke with CBS news said he's not quitting despite admitting at least one use of black face in the nineteen eighties. You look at Virginia's history. We're now the four hundred year anniversary just ninety miles from here in sixteen nineteen the first indentured servants from Africa landed on our shores as noted by Gayle, king indentured, ventured servants. Meaning slaves that interview on CBS this morning in the freezing weather over state complete with snowstorm. Minnesota Senator Amy klobuchar becoming the latest democrat to join the twenty two thousand presidential race. I don't have a political machine. I don't come from money. But what I do have is this, I have grit. This is CBS news. Rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans. Rocket mortgage is with you every step of the way to provide a seamless mortgage experience push-button get mortgage. More.

CBS Pentagon Margaret Brennan Virginia trip US Quicken Loans Ralph northern Senator Amy klobuchar Afghanistan Taliban federal government Virginia Shanahan Minnesota Gayle Africa four hundred year
"four hundred years" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Commanders and Afghan officials. He said he has not received any direction to draw down forces here. There are still fourteen thousand US troops stationed Shanahan said the Pentagon is part of the peace talks with the Taliban, though, the US has important security interests here, the Afghans will have to decide their future. It seems like just a week or two ago that parts of the federal government shutdown hundreds of thousands of federal employees. Paid by next weekend. They could be off the job and unpaid again congressional negotiations to avoid that have not gone. Well, the last couple of days are some very real sticking points in terms of wording on how funding and how much funding specifically towards the border wall. And there are other sticking points as well when it comes to the numbers of people being able to be held in ice detention facilities nation host Margaret Brennan Virginia's tripleheader of a political scandal goes into a second week with the state's top three officials under attack but still on the job among them. Governor. Ralph northern who spoke with CBS news said he's not quitting despite admitting at least one use of black face in the nineteen eighties. You look at Julia's history. We're now the four hundred year anniversary just ninety miles from here in sixteen nineteen the first indentured servants from Africa landed on our shores as noted by Gayle king and Dench in certain ventured servants, meaning slaves that interview. On CBS this morning in the freezing weather over homestate complete. What snowstorm Minnesota Senator Amy klobuchar becoming the latest democrat to join the twenty twenty presidential race? I don't have a political machine. I don't come from money. But what I do have is this, I.

Pentagon US Senator Amy klobuchar Margaret Brennan Virginia CBS Ralph northern Taliban Shanahan Gayle king Julia Minnesota Africa Dench four hundred year
"four hundred years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"And about halfway in. We go to visit the home for the last four hundred years. Of nicholas. All the Marquis. Oh. Ancestral home, and he has a parrot. Well, his parrot doesn't get go outside except in his garden, which is enclosed and parrots go nowhere. Looks just like these parents that are flying free everywhere. It's just it's remarkable. You gotta come here. People you're gonna love this place. And then the monkeys arrive and put on their shell. And they're hilarious. So I have with me. Natalia? Aaliyah natalia. Our arcade. Arcade us together. That Talia I gave us. Well, that's not bad. I usually do a lot worse. I'm almost good. We'll get there before the hours over who is the director here at Tullamore resort. Let's talk about you. So you were born in Costa Rica? Yeah. How far from here for here is eight years is leaving here in campus. And he's worked here for three years and that. What part of Costa Rica were you born in? What where in custody co where you born. Where did you grow up eastern, the my place? Yup. Yes. Is in San Ramon. Ramon is my. How far is that from here? Here in capitol is for eight years. No, no, no the distance to drive for here. I know it's close. Yes. Is fantastic. Minute. Here. So you never left home. Yeah. It's very easy. Yes. Well, was it like growing up here? Sorry. What was it like growing up here on? What is what is life like for child for here for work? Yeah. It's more Florida capitals for. And I need that work and move here is that. I'm sorry for that. Number one you little for your child. San ramon. What is it like to be a child in San Ramon? Yes. My in instarem Aung is my family, and my mom brother, Ali Wednesday, sir. And my father is and I'm sorry. Okay. My mom all their family. He's very big. My grandfather mom is. The ceremony is beautiful. Is there that is very fresh total different for here is more more cow town that cans is very. Yes. Yes. So did you grow up on a farm? You lived on a farm. Yes. Is. Little barn. Gas is for the family. And then is that Sandra mom center? Staff is beautiful is and more time on this. Yeah. So when did you become interested in wellness and being in working in a spa? Yeah. When did that happen? Okay. For Dame Dame for people for me is very very important for their organic product. And this good for that all body, and they're all people and that is good for the property. I like it for that work for that call he kraken ad and they're all their produce. Is that? Aids burying important for that drives skiing for more Egypt aviation is that is good for down. So you're talking about using products like coffee and coconut the ask for the skin. Yes. Okay. So how'd you scrap is that? Very very very get for data stations team. And you use part of the coconut yet you eat or you use the outside is outside like a brush. Yes. Fees to sing that coffees is good for the energy for the scheme and this. So wait. So do you use the whole coffee bean or you use the greens? When you grind grains. You scrub the coffee the company that I would like the coffee. I don't know about. Yes. It's very good. Yeah. And that makes for the Honey and the coffee Honey and orange is the mix for the scrap is very very critical of coffee, Honey and orange and orange. Yeah. So keen. Outside. Yeah. Very interesting. So what they're all products is for Ganic is very important for that. For the property is there. For me. And for the people is no problem for the key meek and. Yes. The bad for the skin better Matra product is very very good. That oil is that lever oil. Olive oil. Yes. And that is a special for them sash dad, dad body lotion. You know in Saint Lucia in the Caribbean. Yeah. There was a spa the body holiday sport. They're still there are what I haven't paid attention in a while. They're there for a long time. They probably is still there and they do a body scrub. Yes with coconut. And cinnamon. And I think CoCo. I said, you know, I just mix it up and give me a spoon. I'll eat. It is fallacious. And in Monte.

San Ramon Costa Rica Aaliyah natalia greens Sandra mom center nicholas Talia I Florida Caribbean director instarem Aung Tullamore resort Little barn Saint Lucia Egypt Monte Ali Wednesday Ganic eight years four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"You could sleep for four hundred years every fucking day. And the earth is the hell scape which is going to happen next year and and then continue on for four hundred more years. And yes, the Hornets group of scientists, teenagers based. These kids are on the space shuttle for two reasons to learn about science and do. It's pretty great. What happened over there. All right. Steve little technical difficult. The year twenty what it twenty four fifty five. Yes. Microphone disconnected. It's so yeah, they come in. They're all dress like steam punks and they, they find Jason and they're like, oh, wow, pretty cool. Good finds day and he's like, he's frozen. If you'll indulge for please. He's frozen like he was an old man yelling at neighborhood. Because last we saw him. He does the all that through the door, right? But when they find him, he's like. Get off my lawn. You want to strike a cool pose if you can. He doesn't know it's happening. Yeah, that's true. We'll get like one of those stances, like what the sword like. Oh, yeah, that's good. Yeah. Across arm situation? No, I would've just gone. The Star Wars reference. I think that's, yeah, frozen man. Fucking Jason, killing someone while being put into cryogenic like freezing Han solo moment. That is, I love you. I know. So in five hundred years at your found, you want the guy, it's a human man, cool Empire Strikes Back. Nice. There is a mention that these archaeologists have previously uncovered a box of DVD. Oh, that's my favorite line of this movie. This guy goes, hey, whoever's supervisors space, supervisor. We've found something awesome and the guy goes, oh, what it's not another box of DVD's. So the edit it's doesn't do we love. TVD's. I just go round like the wastes of New Jersey, like back where like a garage sales were happening, and it's like they found your house. And they find they find Jason. That's pretty cool. They find the lady as well. And Jason somehow cuts dudes arm off because of the falls over like the mannequin falls over, like still holding brevity cuts. His arm off. This, it's comedy. Oh, Hamady. But in once like that, just something being knocked over his tained in break, whatever your knife, hang tag, what would have to be a lightsaber for out where my right, Stephen. Oh my God. But they cut her pretty quickly because there's like Nanno bots, which means we'll make it up. That is the sci-fi cure-all isn't it have little bugs fix it. They'll just crawl around and it's like. Did you did you see them the Tribune how they lifted it from for to city, so really has ever lifted anything from virtuosity ever except for that dope suit wear and man that purple. He lifted it right off the set yet word, hiking. There's home. Don't fit. So I've never owned a suit that fits. I'm gonna wear this to a wedding this weekend and ruin it. More ways than one. You'd ruin the wedding if you show up. Ruined the suit. Oh, well, yeah. I mean during cocktail hour, it's just fuck it stains, but that's the one thing he wouldn't give up in the divorce by the way virtual these. Absolutely. I will sell it jockstrap on the internet, virtuosity suit. Nope..

Jason TVD Steve Stephen Hornets Tribune New Jersey supervisor Han five hundred years four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"I've been doing this for four hundred years and let me tell you a another four hundred who knows maybe you'll the heard on another twenty five stations you're you're you're a great guy walter that those terrible show now listen i'm going to share with you it's it's surprising i haven't talked about this before i have had a blessed career as a suit in media i never talk about it because i'd much rather talk about stupid things but i've had a blessed career as a suit in media i've had high level corporate jobs and really huge frigging consulting gigs like nobody can touch me in terms of having been a consultant where i've had the opportunity to consult in media and frankly what i was paid no consultant was paid what i was paid it was crazy the amount of money i was able to earn as a consultant i'm gonna tell you how i did these things joe because it's important to to frame it and use it and then if you have questions about how to get the job you want how to get a raise how to get a promotion i'd be happy to talk to you about it because one of the things that i find fascinating about our economy today is it doesn't feel like anything's better i know the stock market's going through the roof but i i don't think people feel like they're richer my number's eight eight eight six eight eight nine two five eight eight eight eight six eight eight nine to five eight very specific advice for joe who wants to advance his career in broadcasting just seconds on sterling on sunday the better business bureau heard more than five thousand complaints about alarm companies last year that puts home security in.

walter consultant joe four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"I've been doing this for four hundred years and let me tell you a another four hundred who knows maybe you'll the heard on another twenty five stations you're you're you're a great guy walter those terrible show melissa i'm going to share with you it's it's surprising i haven't talked about this before i have had a blessed career as a suit in media i never talk about it because i'd much rather talk about stupid things but i've had a blessed career as a suit in media i've had high level corporate jobs and really huge frigging consulting gigs like nobody can touch me in terms of having been consultant where i've had the opportunity to consult in media and frankly what i was paid no consultant was paid what i was paid it was crazy the amount of money i was able to earn as a consultant i'm gonna tell you how i did these things joe because it's important to to frame it and use it and then if you have questions about how to get the job you want how to get a raise how to get a promotion i'd be happy to talk to you about it because one of the things that i find fascinating about our economy today is it doesn't feel like anything's better i know the stock market's going through the roof but i i don't think people feel like they're richer and my number's eight eight eight six eight eight nine two five eight eight eight eight six eight eight nine to five eight very specific advice for joe who wants to advance his career in broadcasting just seconds on sterling on sunday the better business bureau heard more than five thousand complaints about alarm companies last year that put some security in the top ten percent of most complained.

consultant joe four hundred years ten percent
"four hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The rideshare driver cole i wanna talk to you a little bit about mister what yeah kanye west definitely not okay he say hold on let's tell everybody what kanye west has said many of you know something you don't he said slavery is a choice this comes hold on this comes to us from cbs via t m z and kanye west was on tmz and said you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years it has all the y'all wow i can't remember ever hearing anything quite that stupid we have more same source i just love trump that's my boy he likes you know it's like so many rappers you'll look at a video snoop dogg love and trump but then he gets into office and now danielle love like trump is one of rap's favorite people right okay he loves trump you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years and has all of course he does but i just have to say look anyone who ever supported by an album pretends to like him received anything that if you're into kenya in any way shame on you okay go ahead well you know i i'm in the music blah blah blah i kinda lightly in the music industry and i think that you know a lot of his work through the years especially a lot of his earlier stuff you know i really enjoy but you know as far as the way he you know puts themselves out there the things that he says you know especially this one you know not not so much not so much at all.

kanye west cbs kenya danielle four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on WSB-AM

"You hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years and it's all of y'all you know like it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because slavery those two to direct to the idea of blacks prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race we're one with the human race so everyone said four hundred years sounds like a choice you got to be kidding me kanye west and the internet went crazy twitter and crazy and he said this he tweeted this out fourteen hours ago the reason why i brought up the four hundred year point is because we can't mentally be imprisoned for another four hundred years we need free thought now even the statement was an example of free thought it was just an idea so what do you think i think this actually goes back to what you always say about sort of the war on history like you can't put our present day values on what to say right now i i mean that's that's sort of how i interpreted it but you know four hundred years ago when they were in that position it sounds like oh we should rally together and really caused an uprising you're different right how how much does it help you to go back and saying you know we were a country that looked at races one better than the other they looked at the men more powerful the women didn't let her vote looked at african americans is three fifths of person so i how much does it help.

twitter four hundred years four hundred year fourteen hours three fifths
"four hundred years" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KPNW 1120AM Newsradio

"The schools again do all of this this is a plan this is in the wikileaks where they're trying to divide everybody to control us so we don't all decide we want freedom now let's go to the unedited clip here it is from tmz when you hear about slavery four hundred years for four hundred years that's how i got choice he was there for four hundred years and it's like it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because flavor he goes to direct to the idea of black singers like slavery holocaust holocaust using slavery is blacks to prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race that we're one with the human race we're human beings and stuff and eventually you know can i go back because i don't want to let him pass you said that slavery was around for four hundred years at a point it becomes a choice right now we're we're choosing to be in slave we're like okay so ebro faced along with candice right and hebrew start bringing up these his version of facts right and candice has fact she's researched flaxseeds research and then kansas just pulls out her jet i lightsaber and just chops ebros head off with facts the ebro faced house me the next day and he's talking about the scoop scoop amusing now you gotta have kansas on your show these like nam nam she's mean so you've got to stifle voice ebro you're choosing to enslave peoples minds you're choosing to not let the truth be free can i give you translation way i see it you don't necessarily endorse embrace the views of donald trump as much as you want to show people that they shouldn't be intimidated from showing their true feelings expressing themselves freely and that the hat is a lightning rod for this kind of free thought that is lost in our society because people get bullied and shouted down and they're intimidated to the point where after shot up is that fair is the mob the mob tries to tell you what the mom tries to make all blacks be democrats to refer food stamps is the mob like about way you just talk to the.

wikileaks candice kansas donald trump ebro ebro faced four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years and his all the y'all it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because slavery goes to to direct to the idea of blacks is like slavery holocaust holocaust use slavery is blacks so prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race that we're one with the human race all righty a six six eight nine two three eight six six two four six eight nine to three big boys oh boy michael friends guy haider's every day diane good style john bond want win owning maybe main cabin mike.

guy haider diane john bond four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"So after that moment he stayed at tmz longer and he gave his thoughts on slavery did you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years it has all the y'all you know like it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because slavery goes to direct to the idea of blacks is like slavery holocaust holocaust us slavery blacks so prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race the human race do you feel that i'm feeling do you feel dumb being free and i'm thinking free i actually i don't think you're thinking anything i think what you're doing right now yes he stands up and basically give and the reason why i feel like that is because conway you're entitled to your opinion you're entitled to believe whatever you want there is fact and real world real life consequence behind everything that you just said while you are making music and be an artist and living the life that you've earned by being a genius the rest of us in society have to deal with these threats to our lives we have to deal with the marginalization as comb from the four hundred years of slavery that shoe said for our people was a choice frankly i'm disappointed i'm appalled and brother i am unbelievably hurt by the fact that you have morphed into something to me that's not real then he walks over tiny storms over there you got to be responsible man bro i'm sorry i got you got to be responsible whistle tanya was gonna walk over invite him was walking stay in your seats so he just they would do they hug it out i think the tmz footage ends right there as he approaches them and he's like joe you've got to be responsible for what you say i'm sorry i'm sorry man i heard you i'm sorry and then it ends there i think they probably hugged it out i think that guy's getting a promotion do you have time for one more well all right thank you i wish i did we'll be back right after these with some news are you ready for it.

conway joe four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KOMO

"Hey west while on tmz talking about his support of president trump began sharing his thoughts on slavery that led to some strong pushback from tmz staff member van letham you'll hear west i mean you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years and it's all the y'all you know like it's like we're we're mentally imprison i'd like to wear prison because slavery goes to to direct to the idea of blacks is like slavery holocaust holocaust use slavery is blacks so prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race that we're one with the human race do you feel that i'm feeling do you feel dumb being free and i'm thinking free i actually don't think you're thinking anything i think what you're doing right now is actually the absence of thought and the reason why feel like that is because conway you're entitled to your opinion you're entitled to believe whatever you want there's fact and real world real life consequence behind everything that you just said while you are making music and being an artist and living the life that you've earned bob being a genius the rest of us in society have to deal with these threats to our lives we have to deal with the marginalization as comb from the four hundred years of slavery that shoe said for our people was a choice frankly i'm disappointed i'm appalled and brother i am unbelievably hurt by the fact that you have morphed into something to me that's not real tmz staff member van reacting to rapper kanye west on your money at twenty and fifty past the hour on komo news now your komo propel insurance money update from abc news wall street now stocks shook off worries about interest rates to close mixed the down start in the month however with a loss down sixty four points it had been off more than three hundred fifty and briefly went into correction the nasdaq and the sp ended the day at their session highs up sixty four and seven points respectively amazon has announced a major expansion in boston the internet retail giant is going to move into a four hundred thirty thousand square foot space by twenty twenty one with plans to hire for two.

van letham conway bob kanye west boston president komo amazon twenty twenty four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Controversial enough maybe he thought he could go a little bit further i am in hip hop but i'm not just in hiphop i'm a blind person about communicating but i'm not just i feel like one thing is people try to minimize me to artists hip hop black community yeah i'm always going to represent that but also represent the world you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years it has all the y'all you know like who okay you starting to realize things are going to little south at this point because he's sitting there with harvey and someone else i don't know who the other person was in there looking at him and do you know that moment when someone says something a little off color a little controversial it's different when your grandparents said it you're like oh that was a different time they just don't understand their eighty or ninety or ninety five or one hundred years old and they get the free pass because you know it was different back then but when someone at work setting or you're in a friend setting you're at a restaurant and someone says something it doesn't have to be racy or or super controversial it could just be embarrassing for someone else in your group and all of a sudden you're like you freeze up you lock up like you have lockjaw that's what they were doing when this kind he was starting to do that you can see the little in their cheek that little bone starting to pop out you know when you start clinching your teeth together that's the face they were giving connie they realize what's he doing and this is the this is what they live for tmz they loved moments like this in konya comes into their own data and starts talking about it he continued it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because slavery those two to direct to the idea of blacks is like slavery holocaust holocaust jews slavery is blacks so prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race that we're one with the human race kanye west are you following along so far it's a little hard to follow but i think you're getting the gist of it you think this is.

harvey lockjaw connie konya kanye four hundred years one hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on KOMO

"West while on tmz today talking about his supportive of president trump began sharing thoughts on slavery that led to some strong pushback from tmz staff member van leith you'll hear west i did you hear about slavery for four hundred years for four hundred years that sound like a choice like he was there for four hundred years and it's all the y'all you know like it's like we're we're mentally imprison i like to wear prison because slavery those two to direct to the idea of blacks is like slavery holocaust holocaust use slavery is blacks so prison is something that unites us is one race blacks and whites being one race that we're one with the human race do you feel that i'm feeling do you feel dumb being free and i'm thinking free i actually don't think you're thinking anything i think what you're doing right now is actually the absence of thought and the reason why feel like that is because conway you're entitled to your opinion you're entitled to believe whatever you want there's fact and real world real life consequence behind everything that you just said and while you are making music and being an artist and living the life that you've earned by being a genius the rest of us in society have to deal with these threats to our lives we have to deal with the marginalization as comb from the four hundred years of slavery that shoe said for our people was a choice frankly i'm disappointed i'm appalled and brother i m unbelievably hurt by the fact that you have morphed into something to me that's not real that's tmz staff member van leith in a reacting rapper kanye west on tmz today police milwaukee have issued a warning to the public about an increase in paintball attacks around the city abc's scott goldberg explains since late last week the milwaukee police say more than sixty people have been shot by paint balls just stung it was worse for a bicyclist hitting the i two postal workers also were hits sergeant melissa franco we act blames teens who are driving around the city basically with paint balls inspired police say by a wrapper on social media urging people to put down real guns and pick up paint guns people like this guy if we have a lot of police shot to make everything negative i don't get the police say.

van leith conway kanye west milwaukee scott goldberg president melissa franco four hundred years
"four hundred years" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"four hundred years" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"In a lab yet jacob this this man articulated his brand of divisive racial tribalism four hundred years of our swift blood receiving in return some of the worst treatment human beings have ever experience we believe our contributions to this and the suffering forced upon us by white america justifies our demand for complete separation in a state or territory of out now do you know white people of intelligence field somebody told me that the all right mr trump's pete we kind of like what farrakhan in the nature of this we risk to separate in a land of their own i said red got all right i wanna talk about it talk and has been suffolk will we should be more convinced that it is time for us to separate and build a nation of our own to which richard spencer replies we in the all right are open for a real dialogue palm oh the two of you deserve one another am tomorrow the perspective i have had on this for a very long time is these these two guys have hell of a lot in common and the one thing that i find deeply troubling is the degree to which minister farrakhan is someone who is permitted in polite society in that lots of prominent people are happy to take photographs with him are happy to share the stage with him are happy to endorse i guess the better attributes of his views and the fact is that i don't see a hell of a lot of difference between doing something like that with him in saying you know there are a lot of good people there too.

jacob america mr trump farrakhan richard spencer red four hundred years