5 Burst results for "Four Hundred Twenty Billion Dollars"

"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on The Daily Dive

The Daily Dive

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on The Daily Dive

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By going to seal are brands dot com. People say they see the thin limb of the atmosphere it teaches them. How fragile precious the planet is other no boundaries. I don't know what it's going to do. But i'm excited to find out morgan. Brennan co anchor of squawk on the street on cnbc. Thanks for joining us morgan. Thanks so much for having me on. What an exciting moment for the face nirj and really just the world right now is all eyes turned here to west texas definitely. Yeah i mean. We already went through this last time with richard branson and virgin galactic flying up to the space. Now it's time for jeff bezos and amazon and his company. Blue origin to do this. They're actually going a little further than richard branson did and they're actually doing it in a different manner. This is a a rockets. Gonna fly straight up versus the way. Richard branson did it kind of in a two stage airplane thing so morgan. Tell us a little bit about what we're expecting to see out of blue origin. jeff bezos. that's right so both of these companies in both of these face systems are sub orbital trips to space so basically just past the address space but as you mentioned it's two very different processes in terms of how that happened so with blue origin on tuesday morning with jeff bezos and his crewmates. They're going to be loading into the new shepherd capsule which is going to be sitting atop a reusable rocket boosters do vertical launch those sort of more like those traditional rocket launches. You see at kennedy space center over the decades. For example they are going to blast Past the karman line the internationally recognized. Start up space is about sixty two miles out that they're going to go above that on bucko for a few minutes of weightlessness quote around the cabin the curvature of the earth and strap back in as the pull of gravity brings them back down toward the earth. They're gonna experience something like five gs of four so to like a fast or really powerful roller coaster and then parachutes deploy from the capsule which has already separated from the booster on the offense and they're gonna land back here in the west texas desert and that that booster rocket is also going to land a few minutes prior so very different process and branson. Who was air-launched went up in space plane that was launched at about forty five thousand feet. A what they call a mothership mothership evening tra- his own mother which fired off its rocket engines and then barreled up about fifty three miles in altitude eight days ago. Let's talk about the crew members who's going to be up there. The interesting thing about this is that is the actual mission itself is fully autonomous. So nobody's going to be flying or doing anything specific but there's going to be four crew members can be jeff days those his brother mark basis and then some interesting people who who else is coming on board wally funk who is an aviation pioneer and had started the training process as mercury thirteen member one of the women who back in the nineteen sixties started going through physical examinations in the beginning of astronaut training alongside the man was a program that was ultimately scrapped. So she never actually made it to space. It's been a lifelong dream for eighty two years old. When she goes to space she will become the oldest person to have done so so that in of itself is historic on the flip side the other passing the fourth. Passengers oliver damon. He's dutch. she's eighteen years old on this trip. If all goes according to plan he would become the youngest person to ever go to space. He's also the first paying passenger for blue origin. Which in addition to that being notable for blue origin which with this mission now is officially launching. its commercial service space tourism company. It's notable because it's the first time ever we've seen a. Us company put a paying passenger into space. Obviously as you mentioned right now to space tourism this whole sub orbital flight stuff. All of this is coming into focus. I think elon. Musk and spacex has plans to do something a little bit more into actual orbital space tourism. But this is what they're hoping to do. This is kind of the future that they're envisioning. Yeah i think there's a lot of skepticism criticism. Pair this whole idea of like billionaire boys twice. And certainly you're talking about some very audacious and visionary men whether it is just as those are richard branson or elon. Musk when you're talking about their space exploits and quite literally billions of dollars that they have all poured into their own space companies over the last couple of decades. That being said bazo has been saying it repeatedly. He said it again today. That for blue origin. This is really the first piece in a broader vision to build a road to space idea of inspiring and enabling future generations to basically be able to colonize the final frontier. It's a very similar situation for musk. As well with richard branson he has longer term vision for space. I would say though with virgin. Galactic specifically while space tourism is sort of near term next couple of years Situation and business proposition for that company. Longer term it's hypersonic and supersonic travel point point around earth as well which is part of the reason why it was designed to stay point. This space economy really is about four hundred twenty billion dollars. How much are tickets going for blue origin right now. Oh my gosh. That is the thousand dollar multimillion dollar. Put any dollar amount next to a question. I asked head of astronaut sales around cornell again in the past twenty four hours what those prices are gonna look like now that they have opened up ticket sales and they've announced that they're going to do two more flights with people on board behind this one before the year is out still no details. All we know is that the winning bidder of an auction. That took place ahead of this life for a seat was twenty eight million dollars that person because of quote unquote scheduling conflicts is sitting out despite flight. That's how all over damon made his way onto tomorrow. Or onto tuesday's mission. We know that. That's sort of like probably peaked rice because there was a premium attached without the bragging rights. Last time virgin galactic which is most comparable to blue origin sold tickets. It's two thousand dollars and the expectation at least according to analysts who are studying this as a business. A future emerging business and and given the fact that version lactic for example also publicly traded stock expectations. That you probably look at four hundred thousand five hundred thousand dollars for tickets but regardless of what that price ends up being in the near term longer term whether it's branson or whether it's bays house game plan here to bring those costs down so very similar trajectory expected.

Richard branson jeff bezos morgan west texas desert mark basis wally funk virgin galactic oliver damon west texas cnbc Brennan kennedy space center elon epa Musk bazo amazon
"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"Somebody's gotta to pay it off assuming that there's no we can talk about the federal bailouts and all that but to me. There's no federal bailout. Then it's the ordinary ordinary people annoy. Who are on the hook for paying back. The problem is the debts gotten so large. We've we've made the armenta wire points. There's no way to fix it without cutting that debt. Either through either through bankruptcy or through some kind of reforms and to share with the unions or through some legal mechanism to cut those debts. It so much that they're trying to make people paid off unless you build a wall around illinois people. Continue to leave when you say it's so much. Hope van that put it in. Yeah so okay. There's moody's moody's rating agency arranged. Who it is you know. They they rate illinois. There is a bad up all the pension after they official number right the state puts out official numbers. Nobody believes there too low moodysson calculation. And when you add up all the pension debts and retiree health insurance dad's which pensioners get and you have for chicago for cook county for you all every local government in the in the state at the state level. It's about four hundred twenty billion dollars. Now that's a big number but it means nothing Foreign twenty billion dollars is about ninety thousand dollars a household so imagine you're living in in missouri you think about moving to illinois. Well if you move in you're going to assume in some way ninety thousand dollars of additional taxes to pay down not for not for current services not for better roads not for not for your schools is to pay down simply the old pension debt for services all for services already. So it's ninety thousand dollars a household well think about fat. That's a massive number and the numbers actually worse than that. Why because at least a quarter of the population is in poverty. So they'll never pay into into that four hundred twenty billion dollars so that means people like me and others who have means you'll have to pay so that number what is a hundred and fifty thousand two hundred thousand per household people just won't pay not to a corrupt government that won't fix things in the numbers only grow. The numbers only grow every every year. The debts are billions more than the year before and yet the state says we always have balanced budgets. Never true So so you know the way this plays out is is that it's so much that people just fleet and when people flee it's the same amount of debt on your people and so the numbers spirals up until young i don't know do we debated detroit if they hit a puerto rico so many people leave the debt so onerous that can pay it. Yeah i mean one of the You know you. And i. Before the show talked about the peter thiel paradox in my peter thiel has been for awhile although it no longer works because people agree with me is missouri oughta just set a little money aside and wait for the state of illinois eventually crumble and then we should buy cahokia mounds which i think is a national. You know international treasurer. And do you think it will get to that point that the state of illinois will be forced to sell off important parts of it. Will they ever sell off land itself so this is where it gets complex. Cova coleman cova change the rules of the game for everything all right so here here..

ninety thousand dollars billions missouri twenty billion dollars puerto rico four hundred twenty billion do peter thiel about four hundred twenty bill a hundred and fifty thousand chicago cahokia Cova coleman illinois about ninety thousand dollars two hundred thousand per house cova a quarter of the population one
"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"four hundred twenty billion dollars" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Be right back. Frigging radio sponsored by business. Wars twenty years ago. A new breed of space enterprise emerged now ambitious business. People with sci fi dreams of space exploration have turned it into a four hundred twenty billion dollar industry business. Wars follows the corporate space race powered by big bucks tech breakthroughs and big personalities and to corporate rivals at the forefront of this new galaxy quest space x led by elon. Musk and blue origin. From jeff bezos. Listen to the latest season of business wars space x versus blue origin on apple podcasts. Spotify or listen ad free in the wonder wondering feel the story. I'm kevin hart and you don't wanna miss my new show inside jokes while i have the opportunity to talk to comedians in ways. I've never been able to talk to him before. Why because i believe the most interesting people on the planet intimate conversations and not the way that you take it. I'm not talking about new talk. I'm talking about real talk raw. Talk with great dialogue inside jokes about jumping into the minds of our mazen. Comedians anti jokes is available now on stitcher just tap the imaging your screen and aditya favorites before the break. We were speaking with diane simeoni. I'm a surgeon and also a restraining order. I've been studying pancreatic cancer since the mid one thousand nine hundred ninety s when we first started working on pancreatic cancer there were very few researchers in the field. Now i go to scientific conferences and they'll be six or seven hundred researchers there and that makes a new era for pancreatic cancer simonian practices at nyu lingo and health in new york city full disclosure. I got to know simeoni through the treatment of a family member. I was impressed. Not just with her work as a doctor but her zeal for busting open the paradigm for cancer that is particularly hard to detect hard to treat and therefore often fatal she is one of the ringleaders of a new collaborative platform to change. How pancreatic cancer research is done on both the diagnostic and therapeutic sides. The straw that broke the camel's back for me is the year before we start on this. There were new. Immunotherapy is out and there were. I think six different centers doing the same exact single agent trial to see if it worked in pancreatic cancer and all those trials failed and of course no one talking to each other and they're not talking to each other because why we all work in our own institutions. Everybody's got their own grants. The incentive system is for individual achievement and not group collective effort. Now i think that is starting to change but for really complex problems like what. We're talking about for pancreatic cancer. It felt like we just had a rewrite how we work together and so we embarked upon this effort and build a new clinical trial ecosystem. This ecosystem is called precision. Promise precision promises. What's called adaptive platform trial. And you know. It's funny. Even if i ask clinicians if they know what that means a lot of people don't because it's really a new way to do. Clinical trials precision promise has been rolled out in collaboration with the pancreatic cancer action network or pan. Kan as they're affectionately known which is a large nonprofit patient advocacy foundation. And the nice thing is they could serve as an honest broker. Help bring everyone together. This new platform is already enrolling patients at more than a dozen different hospitals and research centers and hopes to expand to thirty or forty in the next few years. You can't join this effort unless you're willing to work together. And share data data so data sharing. We thought was critically important. Yeah data aggregation is one of my favorite topics. This keeps me up at night. That again is ned sharpness director of the national cancer institute. I think the average american citizen would be surprised by the level of fragmentation of medical data. That it's not held by any central repository and easily searchable so the nci is long been frustrated by our inability to really see what's going on and has developed a number of data sets that try and aggregate the national cancer story to make it more understandable. One of the most successful actually is this thing called seer which was created back in the nineteen seventies sear stands for surveillance epidemiology and end results. Seer is a registry of who gets cancer and who dies of cancer. But you can link to medicare which has claims about how they got treated but still you would like more information than that. You'd really like to be able to look at the medical records of patients understand. You know what therapies they had before and what risk factors do they have for cancer and to get that out of the medical record that turns out to be complicated. What value would there be in aggregating all that silo data. What would it actually produce in terms of research understanding and potentially cancer treatment. I personally believe that would be highly valuable because you know once you realize that cancers lots of different eases you also realize that large randomized trials are hard to do when you're talking about lots and lots of uncommon cancers. You really need to learn from every patient. You really need to learn what happens to each individual with cancer. So computing power is important. Diane simione again and fact as part of this effort the pancreatic cancer action network has put together a big data team because we realize that power of this is the data that we're going to get from every patient not only in how they respond to the therapy but we also have an imaging team looking at the imaging every patient gas which is going to be standardize across all the sites and is there information. We can glean there. We're going to be doing blood based test. To see. is your blood tests. That will tell us more quickly. If we should switch therapies for patients until waiting down the road how do we best treat pain. How do we best treat nutrition. In fact patients are all going to get a fitbit to see how easy and sensors can help and patient care one area where we've seen some progress than lung. Cancer is using artificial intelligence to look at the cat. Scans of people who smoke a lot because we have thousands of these patients. We can train the ai to look at features of that chest. Ct and say this person's increased risk for lung cancer. Even though the radiologists would read this is normal. So i think that what you would need to do that. In pancreatic cancer is thousands of patients with thousands of mri's who've been followed for five to ten years. We don't have that data set yet and pancreatic cancer. So one of the things i realized is while there's all this great science going on we haven't really innovated in the clinical trial space enough to have clinical trials. That could be as impactful as we needed if you looked at how. Many patients with pancreatic cancer in this country on clinical trials four percent of patients. And you don't get new therapies without seeing if they worked through clinical trials and so we said okay if clinical trials aren't working like we need. How do we fix them. If we wipe the slate clean can we try to design clinical trial system to take all that great science.

six simeoni kevin hart diane simeoni jeff bezos Diane simione thirty five new york twenty years ago nineteen seventies ten years thousands Spotify seven hundred researchers four hundred twenty billion do forty both single agent first
]]Securing Public Pensions

After The Fact

05:44 min | 2 years ago

]]Securing Public Pensions

"The first star emission disturbing members can be police officers. They came preschool employees and state employees. And what we do is we. We make sure that they have a retirement benefit at the time that they're ready to stop actively working in calpers over the last four years has been making very difficult decisions about the appropriate funding of these pension plans for the future. We'll trust i'm dan. Lewis can this is after the fact and that was marcy frost. She leads the california public employees retirement system. Calpers is the nation's largest public pension system with a global investment portfolio of around four hundred twenty billion dollars that's a figure larger than the gdp of countries like norway singapore and the difficult decisions. Marcie mentions affect the retirement benefits for nearly two million public employees retirees and their families is a challenge facing many states across the country as they look at the best ways to fund their public pension systems. And that's something. Greg menace works on at pugh helping states develop solutions to close the funding gap between what state pension plans odor their public employees. And the money. That's being put aside to pay that bill up. Hugh analysis in two thousand eighteen found that funding gap in the states totaled one point two four trillion dollars. That's with a t and that's the data point for our episode. It's a number. Experts see growing with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic amid those daunting numbers states like pennsylvania and california have discovered innovative ways to ensure pension systems. Keep their promises to retirees. Most people are familiar with 401k. Plans and over sixty million americans saved through retirement primarily through those kinda plans in the public sector. It's different where most of the state and local workers participate in what are called defined benefit plans by and large this distinction where in the public sector benefits are paid for through a fixed payment in retirement And the money is managed by the state and today there's about four trillion dollars in public assets. Invested in stocks bonds alternative investments is the main differences between that. Most people save for retirement. The all of us have to be concerned about our retirement. All of us need to plan ahead. Why should all of us care about the public. Employees pension system a well funded pension system in the public sector. can literally cost billions billions of dollars less every year from the state or local budget as compared to one. That's severely underfunded. The short answer is that in a well-funded system the state or local government is setting aside money each and every year while people are working to pay for their benefits when they retire and as it turns out by doing that it ends up that compounded investment earnings and up paying for the majority of the benefit. I'm in contrast they severely underfunded system. Where the money hasn't been set aside while people are in their working years. They lose out. On all kinds of compounded investment earnings and as a result the majority of the cost comes out of the state for state or local budget. I'm just to provide some examples. We look at pension. Plans in states. Like tennessee and south dakota and wisconsin all of which are close to being fully funded. It sounds like if states are planning their investments properly in a smart way. The earnings made by those investments can pay for the costs to maintain the fund. What happens with states. That aren't fully funded if you look at states like kentucky illinois new jersey all of which have less than fifty percent of the assets set aside that budgetary cost is closer to fifteen percent of revenue on average so that means no state somewhere between one and ten in one in five tax dollars going to pensions that adds up to about a ten billion dollars of additional cost across those three states alone. And so i think this is important from the public's perspective not only because of the impact that can have on state and local budgets and in turn the resources that are available for public services but also because having a well-funded system helps to prevent reductions in workforce or cuts in benefits that you need to attract skilled public workforce to be very specific. That means there's less money to buy police cars or paved roads or any other public service. That taxpayer dollars fund right. I mean and that's that's a big deal. I mean the government is always looking to contain costs whether it's healthcare or other issues this is. This is a big ticket item for a lot of states. That's absolutely right. And as i mentioned before. I think for a larger state and city the difference between having a well-funded system in an underfunded system comes out billions of dollars every year so everything from investments in education and infrastructure to healthcare ends up being strained in the budget each and every year it almost sounds like innovation is sort of old school ideas of like. Just you know figuring out what the bills are going to be a mixture. You got the money to pay for them you know. I think that that's right. And there are two ways in particular where i think innovation plays a role you to first off it has to do with how plans and pension systems planned for uncertainty and some of the states that i just mentioned tennessee. Wisconsin in south dakota very clear predefined rules about how to adjust cost if there's a downturn or investments underperform. This includes building margin of safety into assumptions essentially setting aside a rainy day fund within the pensions system and then also adjustments to worker benefits. That are clearly understood by everybody and so from that perspective i think innovation goes back to looking at the policies and practices that these states have been following for

Marcy Frost Greg Menace Calpers Marcie California Pugh Norway Lewis Hugh DAN Singapore Pennsylvania South Dakota Tennessee Wisconsin
Ivanka Trump receives 5 trademarks from China amid trade talks

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 4 years ago

Ivanka Trump receives 5 trademarks from China amid trade talks

"Employees need to be careful about what they post online and be respectful if they're applying for a job today because that comments you right on Facebook. Or the impression you leave with a perspective employer. Could come back to bite you down the road slightly more than two dozen wealthiest people on earth own as much as fifty percent of the world's poor. The development charity. Oxfam says in a new report that the twenty-six six richest billionaires on the planet own as many assets as the three point eight billion people who make up the world's poorest, OXFAM's annual wealth checkup says a one percent wealth tax would raise close to four hundred twenty billion dollars a year. The charity says that's enough to educate every child not in school and provide healthcare that would prevent three million deaths. Annually the time right now, he's five fifty five F B K wanna be your own boss here. Some common sense tips from a man whose made that happen for himself ready to make the jump and start your own business. Joe Lopez Gago says you better be sure about everybody that thinks they're going to start a business and coast through that process is kidding themselves. There's a lot of long days and a lot of long nights. And you really have to love what you're doing Lopez Gaiga who runs meal delivery service kettlebells kitchen, also says don't go it alone.

Oxfam Joe Lopez Gago Lopez Gaiga Facebook Four Hundred Twenty Billion Do Fifty Percent One Percent