35 Burst results for "Four Five Years"

What's it Like to Run a Successful Cyber Security Company?

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

05:53 min | 6 d ago

What's it Like to Run a Successful Cyber Security Company?

"You know since we have this opportunity of of being to leaders of cybersecurity companies. When are we digging a little bit and talk about what that experience is like. What the day to day is like of running successful cybersecurity companies christopher. Why don't we start with you. Good question so i think about it. Sort of you got to have sort of balance your time First of all start with your customers or your clients. You know you gotta make sure the in you know the the thing when you run a company is that. There's so many things that people try to make you do so. You have to be vehemently focused on. Stay focused on customers trying to understand the problems they want to solve. You know figure out how you can do. Clever things without I'm a technical. Co deep by background. So i tend to try to think fair fairmont and spend time in our product stuff you know. How can we actually shape this. You know to to sold for for the customer problems and then making sure that you have the right people on board which means that you involved in recruiting and all kinds of different things. That are whether it's sort of very short-term get south sally or bob were lisa onto the team or you think about the long-term two three four five years. How do we make sure that we get great. People on board make sure that those can develop themselves in great ways inside the company. And just make sure that you have a great team so if you spend time on those three areas. I think you do pretty well. A lot of people tend to be focused on fundraising and all kinds of other weird things that i think. Sort of come for free. If you do what i just talked about sort of And and so customers and sort of product and technology being real clever about that and your people and then then things will work out great. I agree with what christopher said. But i would also say are being. I built a number of businesses in my career and in cybersecurity. While what i find intriguing is that we are all trying to make turn trying to turn bad news into good news Security is dealing with problems dealing with risks dealing with nasty things dealing with things. You wouldn't want to deal with dealing with things where people have made mistakes. So there's a lot of sort of cleaning up and dirt and bad stuff there but but for the business to work we have to turn it around and show the benefit of it and a customer sees so or anybody else in the security business. They don't want to be the one saying no in their company. They want to be a business enabler. So so it's meant thuillier demanding question how to turn all that bad stuff into good news for business and to me. That's that's an intriguing challenge with any cyber security business. Does that resonate with christopher. No i think so. It is very interesting and you know. In general running companies general running startups. I always like to say that people say they try to say that this startup stuff is sort of has good and bad days. And i'm like no you know it really. It has twenty nine bad days but it is just sat. One one day out of the thirty. That really awesome. That makes up for the twenty nine so you sort of generally in startup land live of pretty up and down and lots of downside of days and then you overly that to to morton's point the idea that you you frankly are dealing with you know potential bad constantly and it's it can be taxing and i'm fine with that. I'm sort of more than as a super strong guy. So he can sort of deal with that but you gotta make sure that your team can deal with that in a decent way and you know through the last year when you put sort of covert on top of. This is certainly hasn't been really easy. So i think it's a great point. Yeah there. is this a picture circulating social mediums cybersecurity people with this dog or cat sitting in a burning house and the their flames all over and then the animal says it's all right or it's good and it's it's yeah. This is fine exactly. It's so much the the reality that we have to deal with burning fires all the time and yet we have to maintain our calm and balance and composure. And and see the the good news in it. So that's that's what makes cybersecurity excites i think. What would you know. What's interesting is that. I think about our business being intelligence and our our job is to make sure that a c. So or other decision makers get the best information flow there can ever be. And what you're doing by sort of crowdsourcing vulnerabilities these ethical hackers sort of similar. You create a fantastic information flow in decision making sort of flow to to the sea so and and other people on the climb client side of things and you're right when you get that information flow. It's not unlike somebody who works in whether it's a you meant intelligence organization or organization. Whatever it is. It's sort of like you face having bad news coming out you potential bad news coming out you at high pace and if you start if you operate it away where you panic on that and yukon you just can't you know there's and i think that's sort of as leaders. Our job is to sort of take this. This sort of flow information. It just make sure that turned turns it into something good and i like that. I'm starting to think about product changes that we need to do to to think about that. That's very powerful. Yeah i tell our customers. Sometimes that somebody will break into your system and please let it be us and because when we do it we will actually help you fix it by. There are many other other people and groups and at not who will just break into stealing formation or disrupt operation or change change what goes into drinking water or something like that

Christopher Sally Lisa BOB Morton
Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

The 3:59

06:13 min | Last month

Verizon Business CEO on how 5G can solve the problems exposed by COVID-19

"Thomas driving is on the topic of one ahead. Our companies have been testing it for a while. I think they'll the lockdown. But the social distancing status quo has made the idea of the self driving car former attractive. Here's how five helping to make a time. Striving more reality yes. This is one that i could visualize. I think about the difference between a four environment. Gene i did we talk about this for a long time. When will come to. Fruition will be real. We're seeing this being tested today in pockets throughout the country. And it's not just for driverless. Vehicles thomas eagles. It's also drones. Iii sauce announced this week. Work that we're doing with. Ups on jaw hit ability. When you think about four g Urine at a time of the world today in a forge ecosystem. You want clear the harm front of you on your clearances about four inches. They sung lazy kicked very inefficient to eat assistance. Because you bet latency Attended mills Also used to find yourself in environment where you've got four foot clearance to the carn- primarily because the low lazy kimberly allows that we're having conversations with cities of around the contrary to really understand their planning cycle. Talked about san jose this week at. Cbs in work. We're doing with them. Generally bills smart city capabilities. You build a smart city capability. Five g capability of low latency and bandwidth capability ability for the signals to travel at sea allows a barrier differentiated in a very real experience for smart cities or thomas vehicles and for jobs kicker to be very real as you think about the ups deliver against the demand that they have for home. Delivery drones will played important part of that worry. See not in project and testing. Come faster than you imagine. Because we're finding new in different ways to use power a and how much work has been directly inspired by what's been going on over the last year and in all these solutions are they quick fixes of the problems that we've seen exposed now or solutions that can be applied to society of the long term. I believe tree pandemic everyone was talking about digital transformation and we talked to that everybody will go through digital transformation. Everybody's planning board. What we've seen over. The last month is real time her information. When you're in the middle of a crisis we gotta see patients. They can't come into an office. Got to educate kids and they can't come into school environment when he watery magin entertainment. We've found all kinds of ways with the bronco system to reimagine. And i really do believe that. We've cut three four five years off of the planning cycle going from planning for digital transformation actually deployed digital transformation with our customers is. They're beginning to see possibilities of five jeep whether it's in our lab environments whether it's in cities were of actual diet deployed it's just creating warm more sheer yossi non-commitment to accelerate transformation. It's one of the reasons why i'm really excited about the work that we've done with. Aws in huge. His wouldn't rule that out. Is we now have developers access to whatever it is. They're developing they wanna pull in the power. Uwb work done with edge. The he do that through the normal process that they follow near all cyclone. So we're really bribing out crazy all kinds of exposure to what's possible and if we're truly power five g received look celebrate the potential and identification of those solutions igloos accelerated lead accelerate. Nali as we imagine a whole host code but really we reacting responding to reimagining. An reimagining is happening real time. We think about having dry cheese today. That's good for today and really crisis management to what will be good in different in the future that will have strong society benefits. It's one of the league's About strategy we've said we create the networks roll forward that's the nar defying purpose todd We live now ever before because we have a responsibility not only to employees customers. Shareholders that to society as a stakeholder all right lastly assuming five j works exactly as promise but snappy speeds responsiveness all the way and see. What is your dream application for this technology. What is my dream application. Well how much time do we have to talk about dream applications. I believe a feigen working exactly as we've defined it. I'm super proud of the ability for us to deliver on the timelines. The we've many brown. Deploying city's making the capability Incredibly appreciative for partnerships developed with aws with jerem with apple in same's on other ecosystem. Come to life because who in your law power ecosystem that you begin to imagine solutions. I read the things we talked about today. Healthcare education digital divide are the big ones. And i think five g will absolutely help solve the. We've also made predictions to technology. Used to help invited crew the environment as we think about how to make sure that we play a responsible role in using technology to solve. The world's biggest problems environment includes so we responsibility. We have not location. Were honored to be part of that. Stand that anything. The ability to use technology saul. Some problems is that ryan ismay because we understand and are honored to be part of serving society has a stake over

Thomas Eagles Iii Sauce Magin Entertainment Kimberly Nali Thomas San Jose CBS Jerem Todd Brown Apple Ryan Ismay Saul
Onion Domestication and Improvement

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:20 min | 4 months ago

Onion Domestication and Improvement

"We're going to talk about domestication again of a unique vegetable and when you ask people what their favorite vegetable is very few people say the onion however it's hard to think of vegetable or plant item for that matter. That has a more ubiquitous place in our culinary universe. It's you know the powders. The the the the basic parts of onion are important flavor in many different things that we consume and i think about just about everything i cook starts chopping up and onion so i wanted to pursue. Where did it come from. How did we get it. Where is it going. And so we're speaking with dr mike heavy. He's a he works with the. Usda agricultural research service in madison wisconsin and also as a faculty member in a department of horticulture. So welcome to the podcast. dr heavy. thank you so much. This is really cool. I think i actually got to see you. Give a talk once. And i can't remember where it where it was but i think what did you ever give talk in savannah georgia at the national onion association meeting. Yes i did about four five years ago. We had a joint meeting between the national onion association and then all the research community. I think we met there. Yeah that's i seem to remember that. Yeah i think. I may have asked you at the time too. If you'd be a guest on the podcast and just takes time so. Let's talk about onions. Like i mentioned before it has such an important culinary value. Where did it come from end. Do natural populations still exist. So the onion like many of our grain and vegetable and fruit crops was domesticated in central asia specifically iran. Turkmenistan afghanistan that area and it spread from there around the world and is now consumed in produced on every continent except in artika. There are still the most closely related. Wild specie is called alien babalola by and that grows naturally still in the kopech. Dr region which forms the border between northern iran and southern turkmenistan. And so the wild relatives still exists. There probably was in prehistory was more widely distributed but We can still find alien. Below by inet area oval ovalles. That was a discovery or at least a characterization by vavilov the species is named after him. Allie taxonomy in the former soviet union named this wild species after nikolai. About by batalov. Okay i never remember seeing so much about his his expeditions into places like iran. Turkmenistan you that he was Know prolific in that area. So but that makes sense to when you talk about the species of wild onion. I know that even here in florida there are things that they haul a florida. Wild onion and in chicago is named by from indigenous peoples term for stinky onion. So are these related to the major culinary onions or are these some kind of distant relative first of all the alliens. The genus of onion is distributed around the northern hemisphere and here in north america. Most albums have a seven chromosomes whereas onion and garlic chai have a basic chromosome number of eight. So they're distant relatives and we can't cross them with onion but they do have unique flavors in many places there still collected in consumed but really are very distantly related to the onion that we know. Have there been any efforts that you're aware of to domesticate those regional varieties that are grown with the seven chromosome ones that are growing around. Say the native united states. Yes you do find him showing up. Sometimes farmers markets different species out west in the california in the rockies. There are numerous albums that can be collected in consumed but to my knowledge. There's no effort to really Breed them in and develop some unique flavors or production characteristics from them so the primarily just collected so when you talk about the actual album that was used that is the forefather of the modern onion. Who was really the first to domesticate that they would have been probably nomadic tribes in central asia most of the central asian republics of the former soviet union onion and many of its wild relatives naturally exist and probably these people's started collecting him in eating them initially and ultimately i feel Asexually propagated them. Much like you would. Shall it today break apart. The basal plate planet and then i think probably seed production at conscious breeding occurred later but it would have been nomadic tribes in central asia tens of thousands of years ago they mostly use it for food flavoring or were there other potential uses of onion now. That's an interesting question that has been quite a topic of debate. A couple of things may have played an important role in the domestication of onion. One of them is that Because it was an editorial form is a perennial grows every year. It sprouts very early in the spring and many of your listeners may grow chives and the green leaves of tribes. Come out very early in while alley. That's true as well. It's not a good source of vitamin c. But it does have vitamin cs. I think you could think about a nomadic tribes taking advantage of that early green growth of the leaves in the spring as a source of vitamin c and potentially other vitamins and flavorings but the taste is also has to have an effect. I think and. I wonder if maybe wasn't important to mask off. Flavors maybe for some ranson meets or different foods that may not have it have an off taste and that maybe the early domesticated is used that straw salt pungency flavor compounds in the album's to their benefit.

National Onion Association Turkmenistan Dr Mike Heavy Usda Agricultural Research Ser Dr Heavy Iran Artika Babalola Vavilov Batalov Soviet Union Savannah Madison Wisconsin Florida Nikolai Asia Allie Georgia
How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

Bitcoin Radio

04:11 min | 4 months ago

How to market Blockchain with Itai Elizur from MarketAcross

"And partner at a marketing agency will actually to marketing agencies under the same roof when it's called inbound junction. Still active in historically into the bbc asked base. I'm a marketer for about more than ten years in the b. two b. safe-space which is very big in israel of work tel aviv based agency and about four five years ago we were getting pretty big fintech space and some are bigger and better partners in israel talks about about the growing space into my partners very early investors and bitcoin lost a lot of money in mccormack's ended just kind of opened a sister agency called market across and started working with projects. We were very active. In the seal boom downs of jean-ann we've matured with industry today. We are a full stack marketing agency working with a lot of big macs. How does marketing. How does marketing. For blockchain and crypto. How does that differ. 'cause said you're kind of doing both sides you have under one roof. How what's the. What's the core. Differences remark integration question. I would say lease the first generation of projects that i was part of thousands of so there. I always say that i think blockchain is over. Pr and marketed. Because there were actual products it was more of misstatements ideas and most of these eight based protocols again you know. You don't have a big city on the website of sign up or purchase. Or whatever. So very different from classical. I would say. Vw marketing which has literally a conversion point. Put something in relics alright optimizing towards a funnel or something like that. So i would think that that is the most core core difference between product marketing and more i would say branding and marketing and maybe even assisting fundraising style marketing. That's i think the core difference. And i think the other one would be today about. There's just so much charity very fast. So when you go to the other part which our product will be a wallet in exchange. Whatever you have environments where there's fifty or sixty comes king in two three years and it's so hard to differentiate especially for a marketer to try convey that message so i think that's how it this is so new and it kind of there. There are some leaders in some spots in the sphere. But but still. Is that a big issue. This this problem differentiation. Where we're as a marketer. You have to single out. You know you're trying to take your client and say this is why they're different but is the customer. The customer base even knowledgeable enough about about the technology that you could differentiate easily here. That's a that's a great question. So let's different you between i would say Based protocols and technology and then products like exchangeable so when people who come to us again mostly developers or developers in the blockchain space are very very techy. Maybe don't come from a business or marketing background. They'll come to us and say oh you know my network goes to eleven speed or whatever and you're in me as a marketer i'm gonna say right but what's on the block you know how many people transactions are actually processing so in. That's a. that's a big gap between when people want to sell the technical capabilities and want to say all right the me as a marketer pr person at least today people much more wanna see about adoption. So that's like. I think i'm the tech level where you need to go and say all right you're not gonna talk about triple charting. Whatever because that's not really the main thing had to bring that chored usable business use case and when it comes to product marketing and it's also a bit together. I think it's kind of like schilling. Is is great outside but when sit inside the strategy. That doesn't look right. there's a lot of exchanges. What's different about this other than you know. Argos secrete the easiest platform okay. Great but right now in other space would you giving people what's different in. How do you play on. That really executive could be the non. Kyc concept could be the fiat pairings. It could be a really good mobile interface. But we're in that place already. Were ordinary place where people are discussing that not just stating we're going to build a the nicest exchange so I think we're an industry. That's moving in the marketing. Space from wall want will ken to like our is in doing. So that's for me like my biggest mission with my clients. It's really trip. Notch it down from the potential to what's actually

Blockchain Israel Bitcoin Mccormack Tel Aviv BBC VW Schilling Argos
Microsoft keeps head down while other tech companies come under fire

This Week in Tech

09:49 min | 4 months ago

Microsoft keeps head down while other tech companies come under fire

"Of the most interesting things when you. When you look at the quarterly reports, the ten cues in the annual report ten ks the one of the things you know always skim through the results because. They're the numbers matter and everything. That's what everyone's going to be writing about tonight and tomorrow. But the thing that I always zero in on is the section called risk. Factors. And then when you look at the risk factors section, then the thing that you do is you compare the wording in the risk factors section for this quarter to last quarter and a quarter before that and and boy oh boy, you can find some really good stories when you see that all of a sudden showed up as a risk factor that had to be disclosed this is this is the kind of stuff that that they're putting they're putting that in. There because they see this as possibly something that's going to happen. Right? You know six months from now or two or three years from now. But when when the bad news happens they're they're they're basically inoculating themselves against shareholder lawsuits by disclosing it in the risk factors. So that's from a from pure lay persons or journalist as opposed to analysts point of view. That's the place to go and read I as you get get all the juicy dirt. of course. Sorry before before we. Miss this point you talked about Ed about. What Google the breakout cloud business on their fact sheet but they may never do that because wasn't it last year they said that they're going to give it a couple more years, and if it doesn't work out, they might diverse divest and like. Google way. There's possibility. They're not breaking out right because they might get rid of it and They don't want it to show up in the book. That's there's a certain discipline that Google CFO ruth poor at his imposed over the last few years that that wasn't there. Maybe in the early days of Larry and Sergei where she she's pretty quick. If something is not going to turn a profit she's pretty quick to say, okay, boys it's bye bye and There has been a little bit of a detriment to Google because I think there's also the impression that Google doesn't stick with anything. You know well, that that same thing you know what poor it's been doing with the various other bats I think is actually behind something that happened with waymo earlier this year for the first time back in February of this year, Waymo took outside investment from outside of alphabet up until now, it's the self-driving project at Google has always been internally funded by alphabet and Google and this year they took three billion dollars in outside investment for the first time and you know it wasn't talked about very much. You know other than saying Oh. Yeah I've got all this. Is all excited about you know Google raising this extra money. You know why? Why are they suddenly taking money from other investors and I? Think it's because poor at looked at, you know the the prospects for automated vehicles becoming a real business and decided to you know it's probably going to happen but it's GonNa, take a lot longer than everybody was thinking. Two three or four years ago, and she probably told Waymo look if you WanNa keep this going, you're going to have to find some funding elsewhere and that's why they went to Silverlake and Magnano few other investors and raise this extra money to give them extra runway until they can actually scale a business out of that in three four five years time You know. So you know poor at probably told you can keep it going. We're we're not gonNA shut you down but you're going to have to find funding somewhere else and it's not just more money. It's also reducing their exposure the. The bet fails only owned two thirds of it. That's better than if they own one hundred percent of it. So at data away with Google, calls them as other bets. Historically Google's noth- nothing but lose money on other bats. They make enough money in search and advertising that they can fun dollars stuff but they've yet to find the magic bullet that's going to give them a new business. They really haven't even android I don't think is a huge benefit to them. Only, to the extent that it that it props up search search business or. Yeah. Yes. Search and advertising sixty or seventy percent of of mobile traffic worldwide that my you know my question on the for Sam on taking the external investment in something like Waymo is that it also? Lessons that the the the likelihood that if they have a home run if they if this becomes the business, you know one of the businesses that can help sustain them when you know if search advertising gets into trouble, but all of a sudden, you've allowed a whole bunch of outside investing in their year now, sharing the profits with other people and a lot of that ameliorating effect that you're hoping for. Doesn't approve you, right? Yeah. You reduce the risk, but you also reduce the upside when you bring in other partners and I mean, that's that's true of any startup business, the more investors you bring in. The founders are ultimately going to get less of the the the windfall if there is one. aright. So say ED having looked at the risks and the rewards of the Microsoft. Balance Sheet. It was pretty good quarter, right? It absolutely. Was Yeah and. The thing to me that's amazing is they have in terms of risk they have managed to keep their head down. While every one of their competitors is just taking fire left and right and there you know I didn't see. Sacha. In you know. In those in any of those hearings this past week. So you know it's it's This is a company that is they are really humming along with a boring. But? Profitable. Business. INCOME UP THIRTY PERCENT YEAR OVER YEAR Thirteen, point nine, billion for the quarter not bad not shabby although on par with every other these companies we're talking about all the all the other big. Tech giant's behemoths little sidebar here. These investigations by whether it was the house antitrust subcommittee that issued a very long scathing report that did include. Did it not Microsoft? Maybe not maybe they feel like Microsoft's been spanked already. So they don't need to be spanked again the Department of Justice investigation into Google, a number of investigations in the EU but the US investigations. especially. This past week's testimony. Really. About section to thirty cm tainted by politics to some degree and I have to wonder if there really is any real risk. To these companies anymore than. The president's executive order against TIKTOK has harmed Tiktok in any way if anything, it's probably just increased downloads. The politics seem to hinder the ability to kind of. Agree on what to do. You. Agree. Ed. Oh God. Only, the the whole the whole you know, the the section to thirty hearings that weren't they were just they were just grandstanding no political grandstanding it was it was political grandstanding it was you know and and and the real thing is when you look at. A hearing that is legitimate is going to have legislation that comes out of it. Right I failed to see how any legislation could come out of this that would that would get past senses. There's no concern about what to do on on anything no and and all of the possibilities no matter which direction you go make things worse not better for everyone I mean, it's it is the classic lose lose proposition. So this was just an opportunity for primarily this was. The Senate you know. So it's run by the It's run by Republicans and it was an opportunity for Republican senators to yell at social media companies and create sound clips right for their round by taking us for the running ads or to share with their chair with their constituents tough on twitter. Let me tell you. It also diminishes the power that it would be in the past like, Oh, I got called in front of Congress, I don't want to happen. When it happens every other week, you could there is a note about how calm all the the CEOS were like when they were being questioned even though they're being screamed and yelled at, it's because they're like so this isn't going to do anything no one cares and nothing's going to come of it. So it's unfortunate that the power of Congress or the power of the Senate. Is having diminished effect because of this theater in an era where facts are don't hold the same weight. So it's the IT. Even, both sides Republican and the Democrat size they're talking as if they didn't really understand what the law was governing the these companies or how their place in it could affect the future of the Internet.

Google Waymo Cfo Ruth Poor Magnano Sergei ED Microsoft House Antitrust Subcommittee Larry Tiktok
Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

Entrepreneur on FIRE

05:00 min | 4 months ago

Grow and Scale to Unlimited Processing with KhaazRa MaaRanu

"Cadre say was up to fire nation and sure something interesting about yourself that most people don't know fire nation. Hello. How're you doing? So glad to be here John One interesting thing about me is that I'm really. Fun Guy I just love doing things by Tanis -ly travel at the drop of a dime I'll do anything and everything at least one time fire nation where Zesbaugh. Naty like you can't blame Cova forever. You still have to be spontaneous from time to time and I think that that is something that caused red definitely has in spades there'll be communicating over the past few weeks I feel like you're just always traveling cadre. Used to travel a lot more before this whole pandemic thing. So that bug is absolutely there unlike you I loved tropical vibes. Places A Beautiful Landscapes Yeah, absolutely. I love her brother and I also personally love your arch Merill Journey, but I want to share with fire nation now. So talk to us about Your Arch Moreau journey to get you to where you are today. Sure. Many years ago with been around for maybe twelve to thirteen years. Now Time Flies John and I started as a door to door sales. Read Right I was working at an Elementary School in Orlando Florida and working my tail off to get into like twenty eight, thousand dollars a year a two weeks vacation hoping seven thirty to three thirty at whatever time off of work and I wanted to do something they gave me more time. Gives me more time and I work hard is up. Can I do something that doesn't can't my income but I, really just wanted to have more time. I'm like you after I just WanNa sit at the beach I. Just WanNa look out the window I just want to play basketball or actually I wanted to do with my children by how can I do that and so I went online inbound a position In a one, hundred percent commission sales opportunity. before and to California wasn't successful at all initially. Because he was trying to do with the corporate way with you know the sales pitch in the book and. Corporate approach in just got turned down. At. Every business that I went to drop it right now. So you know what? Let me just Relate to people from Detroit Michigan School of hard knocks in the thing I I know how to do is connect with people. You know winner talk we're not to talk sometimes and I did that in super. Just to speed it up really quick I. had a triple my income that year a quadruple did the next year. But then I realized that what I was doing wasn't what I thought. I was doing meaning that I was selling the product that I didn't even understand myself rice. Even though I had dropped the sales pitch book, still have the spirit of that particular company in the industry itself, and that is the spirit of confusion. So you know I was selling merchant programs where the be rates were. There'd be tough with at least not by Terminal Benign, bucks you Lisa for three hundred bucks. This is especially for brick and mortar businesses. You can lease terminal could cost ninety nine dollars you can. Literally Lisa the terminal but three to sometimes a thousand dollars per month for forty eight months in into the least they do not own the machine and it was just you know even the in the way we would pitch them. It was just a real messy thing once I realized what I was doing because I had never read the contract I had never really met the contract myself. I was just starting the program. And once I realized I had to move decision it was totally against particular companies I guess goes to really client on what's really happening behind the scenes by the time decline realize what going on it was too late they were locked into. A four, five year contract with all kinds of these anti get out of it was it will require legal entanglement right with them as you have to hire attorneys go through this other stuff in its contract. So it's Kinda hard to get out of it. So. I had to make a decision to leave that company, lead all the money that had all the recurring incumbent had to. It's up deleted lead cable right and so I did that I went to work with another company and in six months I had. Replaced the incumbent Henry the other company, man those bags were not. They were robbing me and I was by taking advantage of announced robbing Murchison's basically right or Robin clients. So. Same thing had been there all of a sudden. They create money out of thin air when I say thin air veneer. So as an example, there's something called Pi compliance that every business needs to happen in particular Brigham mortar businesses by you don't necessarily. Do but something healthy you it helps protect

John One Lisa Your Arch Moreau Zesbaugh Cova Elementary School Basketball Henry Orlando Florida Detroit Michigan School Brigham Murchison Robin California
Milt Shirleson shares his Navajo experience

The Storyteller

06:47 min | 5 months ago

Milt Shirleson shares his Navajo experience

"My name is Milton Shirl Susan. And I'm from Tallahassee and my plan is A. SICARDI. Shegal. Senate Bill Pushes Gene August she does she Changed cavendish another. Without an inch. Two hundred. Yards. Lee. As my early remember one back. Grew up in. Church route. And that the standing rock when nudges located? A see these people walking around on my. Father's side of family. Lira. Found out that they were lot of alcohol. Substance, abuse their family. went on mom try to find a place where that She could raise two boys. Myself and my little baby brother. She didn't have very much. So we travel a lot dismissed community. One day that you know that we just couldn't find. Mom couldn't find. A, city job stability. She took us back to GRANDPA that he remarried. In a way you have a family over by Triska scream out by the. Way Back over there. And the parents of the minute, step? Grandma guess. There were there they have lifestyle. And that the from day one begin to hurt sheet. and. They kind of adopted me as a grandson. Of course, just a kid just came on scene and. To Care Life Stop Sheep and goats. They're on, went to a boarding school. Then after boarding school was out. To. Elementary. Down to up to a high school. which. I. Went Down to Phoenix the first time I went to a big city. Lot of native Americans and a lot of different nationality or different tribes. There were going to school there. Were finished high school. From there that I went to a special training done Dallas Texas. From their. Energy. Military service spent several years there. Then, it came back and. I was already begun to use alcohol quite a bit. Anton went on new just increase and later on. A came to the level. Rodeo. and not necessarily as a was sober mind minded with a lot of my friends and drinking pardons. And Smith Show years in there. I'm a lot of friends. Alone. They're lying on those years I met my wife. As I've been raised in a very traditional family to teachings grown to be medicine man, and also later on the new moon was Yoda. American church hours or Dane and that movement. My wife was pretty much on the other side of it where traditional ways. Yes. But the same way to that was raised by her immediate family in the sense in our sisters was mom and dad was pretty much using a lot of substance abuse. So she kind of was raised in a very independent. She didn't. She doesn't really know about the traditional ways of teaching, but I was groomed pretty much into that. So when he came together. Through a dangerous Rodeo this how That we came together. But we got to know each other and she stuck around. I. Soda Job Medifast I would say that was given the job. A job that with a big corporation IBM. Then spent twenty years with the company. But one thing that I want to stress his about my mom, my relationship with my father. When I was a kid that you know, Lilla one that Probably about four five years old. Every time when he comes home, he always comes home drunk. He always said my number one son. He would play with me. Always being rough with me to be a man. And always makes me cry. A remember that. Whenever he comes home and on close to home it. Oh, my aunties Manco used to hide me different hiding places. And by the time when I was about probably about four or five years old. My Dad chose alcohol over. Over my brother. Ni- he left us a never came back. All, these years growing up. Just kinda strange. As. I said, know went to a new family GRANDPA family and what to boarding school. And that the. Holidays. Kiss been picked fathers or their. Grandmother grandparents. And there was nobody. A see that water school for about nine months. Nobody will come pick me up. And that the grandparents raised me The very, very, very strict. There was hardly any love was mention. Saw Yearn for that. For that word that relationship never had that. And finally that I want to run away. With treated very harsh. When a runaway but to. I known anybody besides my mother there and that the this new family. So I was lucky prisoner, you might say this family here. For Years Pass. I find. Realize that you know they really know how to express. Love. Verbally in their actions. What of my life of unrealized. Love Me. BELIEVE THAT'S A. Beginnings since I was a kid that. Never. Felt that love. So one with with a body will come up to me son grandson. Really hold me. Never had that experience on Lonzo? There's all this. ANGER BUILD UP What's wrong with me am I Look. In like stupid innocence or not good looking or wherever it is nobody went close to me. Just thinking back on how many other native youth had go through this. Relationship Among the native brothers and sisters, my family's. been. Express. Openly. Son Daughter. Grandkids. We love you so much.

Milton Shirl Susan Lilla Senate Tallahassee LEE Texas Cavendish Phoenix Grandma Triska Lonzo Anton IBM Dane Smith
Houston Rockets fail to stave-off elimination in loss to the Los Angeles Lakers

The Full 48

04:20 min | 6 months ago

Houston Rockets fail to stave-off elimination in loss to the Los Angeles Lakers

"So, there's a whole list of ways to For a whole host of the culprits here. Right IF PEOPLE WANNA start scapegoating or pointing fingers at the reason for the rockets. Quick Demise. This postseason I might point to James Harden just say they're fundamentally flawed because of the the style that he plays and how how hardened centric they are that I will always key on that. I but there is the Russ Hardin experiment. There's small ball itself. There's the catch all analytics failed that there's there's the camp out there who wanted to blame analytics or Darrell Blame Mike Dan Tony. It's about maybe it's about his system although I don't think they were running what Mike is usually known for. Is there one thing that stands out to you? That was that the primary culprit for why they failed this particular postseason? Well I'll answer that two ways first and foremost is that it's very hard to win an NBA championship especially coming out of the Western conference I think people forget that think how you have to beat our. You know now with Lebron James Who's arguably the best player in the League one of the best of all time he is here, Wilde Leonard whose I believe has the best. Regular season win percentage in the NBA history who may be on the verge of leading his third different team to an NBA championship is the best player he's out here and the no. Forget the team in the bay that went to the finals five years in a row they're going to be back next year and how are those are the guys you have to just to get To the NBA finals out of the West. So I think in our winner, take all society it's easy to forget that as I mentioned, I think the rockets have been arguably the second best team in the NBA over the last four five years So they are close however to answer your question more directly. The biggest concern I have like I said is on the biggest stage look. Who sometimes as an executive coach or player, and sometimes it's not that's what happened to him a few years ago in game seven when they missed twenty seven consecutive threes or whatever it was that's part of the deal that way this thing goes the way it shouldn't go. Howard. If you'RE GONNA WANNA win anything at a high level is you always have to try you always have to compete. You always have to give your best effort. Now can Houston do that? Can they answer those questions that remains to be seen and unfortunately were they new head coach coming in? I think to some extent Howard whenever next season starts it doesn't really matter what they. Do in the regular season you and I both think the Houston Rockets as you know currently constructed or very likely to be playoff team again, the western conference but the questions are going to start again when they get to the playoffs and frankly I don't think they'll be able to answer those questions until the playoffs are ending as far as did they show up and compete every night because we have two examples in the last four years where they haven't done that in the big stage and has a lot of people myself included scratching their head as far as you know why James Harden, his teammates didn't even try to rise to the occasion. Yeah it's. You lay it out correctly or I would agree with the way you laid out, which is as you start looking forward. Immediately you have to think about. All right. Well, who who are we chasing and if we assume everything stays static that Lebron Anthony Davis are still together that Paul, George is still together. The nuggets aren't going anywhere. So there's a three teams at the top. Already, the warriors could very easily and should jump back into the top four. Even Gotten to Utah or the rising mavericks or anything else yet, and at best the rockets are V before we've even gotten through this season much less the off season and getting next. Look ahead like do we know how do we? How do you forecast them's anything better than that, and that's fine. If you're young team on the rise, if you're the mavericks and you look out an next year source, maybe somewhere in the four, five, six range. That's fine. You're young team on the rise you're you're you're building as you go the rockets are you know you're built around two stars in their early thirties? And if you're if you're not going forward, then you're going backward the you're sliding and I don't know that the flexibility is there to to really rebuild around those two guys on the fly here. So I don't know whether assuming darryl still in the job because there's been doubts about that too. But whatever. Whatever the Front Office does this off-season I I do not envy especially in an Arrow or in a year with potentially a shrinking cap with the little or two zero flexibility I don't I just don't know where they go from here unless you go and start entertaining the extremes and that's trading the stars and that that might be even harder. So maybe they have no choice but to just stay on the path, try to find some bargains and hope for the best I

Houston Rockets NBA James Harden Lebron James Howard Scapegoating Russ Hardin Houston Mike Dan Tony Lebron Anthony Davis Darryl Wilde Leonard Darrell Executive Mavericks Nuggets Utah Paul
Fed sees interest rates staying near zero through 2022, GDP

Stansberry Investor Hour

02:21 min | 6 months ago

Fed sees interest rates staying near zero through 2022, GDP

"Bloomberg is reporting that the Federal Reserve is likely to hold interest rates at zero. For five years. Now the Fed hasn't made this announcement yet. In fact, by the time you're hearing my voice maybe they may have made it maybe not I'm not sure. So it right now it's in this kind of limbo where lots of serious financial people are taking this as Gospel but we haven't heard the official announcement and you know this stuff leaks out. So here we are, but you know something I have to believe it. Because Jerome Powell is a fed chairman is like he's The let's it against the wall and see what sticks guy, right so I believe this I believe that they're going to try to signal to the market. Don't worry about anything. We're going to keep rates low near zero for five years. I believe this even if it doesn't turn out to be completely true like you know. One two, three, four, five years from now whatever. It's still it's the idea of believing that they intend this kind of signaling. Or something like it right and it's it's their way of throwing up their hands and saying. We really don't know what to do and you know something there's honesty in this we've talked about this before with the Fed actually talked about it with the European Central Bank and the Fed. And you know when remember we talked about Mario Draghi and he said back in with God it was twenty twelve or something. He said you know we'll do whatever it takes, and then he said I think it was twenty fourteen or sixteen or something whatever years ago he said don't worry you know negative interest rates will not collapse the financial system and we said it was Shakespearean Right. It's it's a kind of telegraphing of the truth it has more truth than the actual truth. It. Has More truth in it than if Draghi had said. This could result in a huge crash down the line but right now we don't know what else to do. And that's what this five year fed holding the interest rate near zero thing does. It's got more truth and more information in it. than. Than? At first blush.

Federal Reserve Mario Draghi Jerome Powell Bloomberg European Central Bank Chairman Official
Episode 16: What Do You Meme? - burst 1

Youth Ministry Maverick: Mold-Breaking NextGen Investment

00:59 sec | 6 months ago

Episode 16: What Do You Meme? - burst 1

"Five, four, five years ago where I started addressing like more. Controversial topics if you WANNA, call it that and. I found that memes can go so far but not as far as they need to go sometimes in really opening up the discussion. So then try to start putting As what some people have called described as books in the description section of kind of unpacking that. So I think what makes a little different is that we use it as humor sometimes and it's still a lot of stuff we post on humorous, but it's really more of a page that theology mean page or really more theology that uses means to communicate that than just a Christian mean cage with relatable funny church Christian content. There's plenty of those out there and those guys have. Awesome stuff. But really the pages kind of moved along in regards to Kinda how I've developed as

Is Tiger Woods about to make a putter change?

Fore Play

05:50 min | 7 months ago

Is Tiger Woods about to make a putter change?

"Talked again, we talked a good amount about him. He looks great. There's a lot of positive thoughts about his chances this week he warned in Oh five. He won here I think that he never shot higher than sixty eight and then in two thousand, nine, the President's covers here at harding park he went five Oh and so he has good history here he is still the. Reigning Masters Champion. Ugly, Fifteenth. In the world, some are trying to point. So some negatives like he's only played four competitive rounds in six months. I'm not focused on that I. Don't think he gives a shit about that. He showed up to Zozo championship last year in Japan and it felt like we had seen him play golf or any decent golf in months, and he's won that tournament in Atlanta. He showed up to the President's cup. We were there. We were physically there watch the entire thing. Play the president's coverage has several the best players in the world, their best player, the President's Cup in a landslide. So Tiger Woods smile and yet focused I like his chances this. I think he's come a long way since Monday and a lot of people's minds in that. All is incredibly exciting. On. Monday because. If we remember in the last podcast, you said, he really had no chance. That's true. Well, said, he's the favourite. Video and a you know with the weather and everything else that I would write this low on his list Jimi play whatever rig said because it wasn't that wasn't what we said and it certainly wasn't when said he was literally what I just you in you in the New York Post or two peas in a pod newer post tweeted out. Tiger Woods needs a miracle this week at the championship it was like what the fuck is going on and you know rig says similar points new. York Post. I said tiger. Woods is the favorite I said that on Monday show Tuesday show Jake will find that but I just ranked course and the the fact it's fifty five fucking degrees and narrow fairways. Low on the list of tiger woods majors coming up in the next four five years. It's not that hard. Of course, is not the art of course, I gave Frankie thumping already park last night. On the game. So it was like I I I could go out there right now in wooded. So the overall. Well I you know. I didn't realize we were GONNA play a marathon session of golf club twenty, nineteen I looked at the time we're finished up three and a half hours. My back was sore. I couldn't feel my feet like it's not built for endurance I'm just not built for endurance but I smoked you. At harding. Park. So I'm not too worried about art course conditions. By the way, we're not just a heads up just while we're talking about it. We said we were GONNA stream tonight, Thursday you're listening to it but we didn't realize that the coverage goes so late. So we will not be streaming tonight, but we will doing Tuesday Thursday next week. So be on the lookout for that. Last Tiger related thing new putter. About the new potter, he's got the Scott Newport. I think it's like the two point. Oh it's the one with the different weights and couple of different reports about it. Some saying he's definitely putting it in play other saying it's GonNa be a game time decision he. According to Steve Stricker, Tiger really likes it. It's a little longer in length with have been over as much. We can practice as putting a lot more which makes a lot of sense So that would be a good thing for the back and then another aspect of it is that apparently it's got adjustable wait we have heard for decades now tiger. Could just couldn't get the speed right or you know other Greens were little slower than I thought and I guess instead of having to make that adjustment in your fields or in your judgment calls in, you're putting in how hard it he can just tweet the weights and the Scottie, and that's what he likes because you know if the Green Bay speed them up from. Wednesday Thursday early days beat him up from Saturday Sunday whenever he can just kind of tweak the weights part of me going into this feels like well, tiger woods has won thirteen or fourteen major championships with that part of that is the elder wand. That is the thing that he flipped and spun in circles right in front of our faces that ad US bedazzled. Is the horn. Rocks. And any other usage of any other putter is not only blasted, but it's it's him searching a tim trying to find something which means he's not comfortable, and then the other part of me says, it's Tiger fucking. Would you give them a wooden stick? You give them happy. Gilmore's little hockey stick putter. He'll go out there and win because he's the greatest time you give them any driver persimmon would as a matter it'll just go out and win because he's better than everyone else and it doesn't matter So I'm a little torn on the whole thing. But it's Tigers putter. So everybody's talking about basically I'm just praying for success I mean, I do I think it's the right decision and adding and subtracting weights based on green speed that seems Like, if I'm just going to pick up a new tool every time when it's GonNa be different weight I don't think that I'm going to have much accessible but again, I'm not tiger so I'm not so keen on that. But Hell. If he's got confidence conferences key and if he thinks that's going to help them make more. Than you know play with a hockey stick or whatever. You just said you know so. Tricky one, but you were rooting for dagger. But I don't like I. Don't I'm not as doesn't work for me and I'm not a fan. I am not a supportive of the change I want that other potter to just pile up major victories and lurch. You said what I was GonNa say where changing the way day to day on a putter seems like a nightmare scenario I get that stegar woods. He's the greatest Golfer of all time but I need everything in my bag and again I'm not comparing myself to tiger woods but I need everything to be. One way just needed to be the same all the time. So messing with putter way just seems like a crazy idea but again, if he likes it if it makes him comfortable, that's GonNa give them better chances week. Thank God.

Tiger Woods President Trump Hockey Harding Park New York Post Japan Harding Steve Stricker United States Jimi Tigers Frankie York Scott Newport Atlanta Jake Green Bay Greens Gilmore
How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

How I Built This

18:03 min | 7 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Taha Bawa of Goodwall

"Hey, everyone and welcome to how I built. This resilience edition on these episodes were talking with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're thinking creatively during such a disruptive time and today we're GonNa hear from Ta the CO founder of Good Wall Good Wall is a social network that connects high school and college graduates with jobs and scholarships. Today Good Wall has raised over sixteen million dollars with more than a million users on the platform I. Spoke with Taha, from his company headquarters in Switzerland where he gave me a rundown of goodwill's mission for people who've never heard of goodwill just tell us how how does it work? It's essentially a mobile platform that's designed for the next generation. We started off with high school students helping them build up their first profile showcase themselves in a way that I'm accentuates their extracurricular activities in particular, connect them to opportunities mostly scholarships in colleges and all. This happens within a positive and supportive community. Over time, we've grown with our members into the college and young professional space. Our whole goal is to level the playing field, maximize the potential of as many people as possible. So it's been compared to linked in is that a fair comparison I? Think there are similarities however, we're really focused on on our part, which is this next generation starting as early as sixty and guiding them through almost Sherpa in. Them through the future of earning learning and those opportunities. There are various features that we have that they don't, and we're really focus from a user experience perspective, and then from a community perspective, it's it's very different posts don't work here. You wouldn't find students talking about being on the chess team being on the robotics team being on etc etc on goodwill mean if you are, let's say eighteen years old and you're interested in applying to college. What does it look like you go to? While you create a profile for yourself and and then what you're going to goodwill, you help yourself our initial early adopters were mostly international school students who maybe didn't have as much guidance as others or since the US who maybe didn't have as much guidance from their parents from college counselors it come on. Here's he would other people are doing they'd be matched with colleges and universities and. Also. With scholarships based on their data on their profiles and then they'd be able to connect with like minded youth. So we had this girl based out of Jordan who was really into robotics science and unfortunately no one really around her who had that those similar interests and she was able to find others like her in the US connected Internet. NASA did incredible things afterwards actually many of our students have gone bound exclusive opportunities at. Like Oxford and others that we've partnered with an. Super fulfilling perspective. Yeah. It's really caused US checking it out last night and it's it's a little bit like if you didn't have a mentor or a guidance counselor like here you go. Yeah definitely I think a lot of early adopters were privileged in the sense that they had a lot of ambition and maybe they went to good schools. But over time we've especially with last year we've really. Put a lot of effort and a lot of energy towards helping youth who are maybe a little under privileged that privilege is actually not necessarily one hundred percent linked to financial situation but it can be for example, we're doing now with UNICEF death and other organizations in Africa for example, is running programs they are and were really helping you bring out their ideas, build up their confidence show who they. are in connect opportunities and it's been really really fulfilling and we expect to do more underrepresented communities in the US. For example, we're doing more and more there. That's where the biggest room impact is. At the end of the day, we are a social enterprise and it's very fulfilling to help youth who go to elite schools and connect them to lead universities and colleges, but it's even more fulfilling. Even more important for us to step in where the impact Delta's the biggest for, for example, youth in Africa who insert African countries that just don't have any exposure don't have opportunity. Don't have the guidance but do have access to a phone and can has result go through. So we're really trying to do more there in particular and are you started this company in two thousand fourteen with your brother? Where did the idea come from? So my it was my brothers idea both of us were born in Switzerland we lived in Iran the US came back to Switzerland. Our parents used to work in the humanitarian sector. My father worked for or Serb refugees around thirty years, and we experienced a lot growing up. We was like quite a contradiction going skiing on the weekend in in a very affluent privileged, no bubble in Switzerland whereas at the same time, we'd go in summer vacation and give candy out to refugee kids who are age your ten eleven and that that really did shake US quite a bit in throughout our upbringing we realized that we are. We are I'm here not because I'm smart but because I was lucky osborne that could have been born two doors down in that, my life would have been very different and I'm confident because of the experiences I had rather than because I'm innately able to do so and that's really what pushed us to say we were lucky in this sense what would happen if we were able to give those opportunities in terms of particularly experiences. So education is one thing traditional education is one thing but particularly experiences to millions of youth around the world what would happen how can we change things and that's where we thought it has to be mobile first it has. To be a digital solution and it has to be able to tackle millions and we wanted to go a step further. We said it's good to maximize one's potential but hopefully, we can do that in a win. We're very idealistic in that sense in a way that it maximizes or improved society as well or impacts society positively, which is our mission statement that if we have enough people that are exposed to not only improving themselves but as so often it's a form of education knowing what's out there if I hadn't gone to refugee camps or if I didn't have the background where my parents are Richard from Sri Lanka, would I really be so inclined to How this positive impact who knows I did have that chance I view that as an opportunity to give those opportunities in showcase through volunteering through being aware through connecting to people from different backgrounds. Hopefully, we can move the world forward I. Think it's needed now more than ever, right? Yeah. For Sure Tyler, the business for a second I think you've got around fifty employees the world you've got offices in Switzerland, the US Germany Serbia the Philippines mean you're growing you've got presumably some cash runway but these are tough economic times. I mean Lincoln just laid off a thousand people, their record numbers of people in the US for unemployment. So first of all. How is your revenue been in your business been impacted by the global economic slowdown? Yeah. I mean when it happens I think the first week where we started notice he was getting really serious I. Remember it. The first thing we did was we we had a board meeting and we talked about, okay what's our cash situation and let's make sure we get through this are along a be while maintaining the team for two reasons. One is like you don't want. Downward debt spiral. But also because we have the opportunity to have real impacting this time if we make the changes in adapt effectively, but we won't be able to do so if we don't have the team to do it so we've actually hired over the past few months and we've actually grown over the past few months and we've adapted to do. So the first week was really about scenario planning getting through that after that, we assume the worst but we. Ourselves decided. Well, there's definitely GONNA be less demand for recruitment is definitely less hires which hurts us which hurts our users or are members and we said, okay how can we can we help because if they come on in the no jobs? Well, it's a very bad experience, but it's also it's hurting us. So what we did was we put we put together this program better together and other challenges where youth can develop work experience at the end of it. They get certificates that show that they've accomplished these different challenges participated in it, and at the end, it can be used as work experience towards all of our partner companies. So it's actually giving them something to do some hope, and at the same time, this is generating revenue for us as one example of revenue for us. Another example is just before the crisis a part of our model is we work with large partners and a couple of these large partnership so. Leading recruitment than leading education routes, stunts or came to a halt. And then I don't know if this is despite coverted or because of covid other opportunities came about we've now partnered over the course of Kobe with market leaders in markets that we are not present in or were very marginally presents and he's actually allowing us to take up extra market share and grow in more significant way to timber onwards. Let. Let me ask you about the demographic that you target. Right I mean and I'm Gonna I'M GONNA use this term Gen Z.. Always cringe when I say because I remember like when I was in my twenties and people talked about Gen-x and their slackers and I would just cringe and you're older people talk about Gen xers and I was like, what are you talking about but just just to make this kind of simple we'll we'll just say Gen Z.. So if you're Gen Z. I'm sorry it's annoying I know. This is a really challenging economic moment if you are in high school now and you're going into college or if you're in college, there's a pretty good chance. You'RE GONNA GRADUATE INTO A world with very few jobs. You know a world that we haven't seen certainly since two, thousand, eight, nine and ten but maybe far far more challenging than that. What's your sense I mean? What do you think I mean do do you think that's that's actually true that that is likely to be the case for the next three, four, five years or more. Yeah, I think whether or not we go through a deep recession with mass unemployment particularly for the Youth USA next three four five years very probable that US at least in the short run or to suffer they're normally the last to be hired the first to be fired and that's justified for various reasons including ethical. Oh, they have less commitments than, for example, someone with kids, but it is incredibly difficult and the mental toil of, let's say an eighteen year old doesn't know what's coming up next we need to be able to be resilient and we need to be able to learn how to learn and adapt because we just don't know what's going to happen. So they could be a second. Downturn there could be a third downturn. It could be sustained downturns and US like across society but in particular for the youth they we have an opportunity they have an opportunity to take this and say, okay, it doesn't kill me. It might make me stronger and I can learn from this develop that resilience that five, six, ten years from now I'm able to deal with the next crisis in a more in a stronger way because I'm going to have to do that and some of the skills that need to be developed in my in my opinion or entrepreneurial thinking that ability to be flexible and resilient we we need to do more though the on just the the these massive stimulus packages and. Is trying to do whatever they can for sure this generation needs the government needs to intervene to be able to organizations needs to be able to intervene to support them to the best of their abilities in terms of developing skills and able to resilient. When we come back in just a moment, I'll talk with Taha about college graduates who will probably face a shrinking job market over the next few years stay with us. I'm Guy Roz and you're listening to how I built this resilience edition from NPR. For this podcast and the following message come from the American Jewish World Service working together for more than thirty years to build a more just and equitable world learn more at age aws dot org. Hey welcome back to how I built this resilience edition despite the economic slowdown tie and his company good wall have been able to grow their team and stay afloat. But as jobs are drying up across the globe. Many college graduates are looking for opportunities and can't find any if you're like in your early twenties now and you're looking for an opportunity and you can't find one. What would you recommend a young person? Do Who's who's graduating college is just entering the workforce and is kind of trying out different potential career pass. Is it a good time to just steer clear of the workforce for a while and get some more education which in the US means more debts? What do you think? Yeah, I think. Definitely, trying is important, but this might just be an opportunity to start your own thing. You know a lot of great companies came out of the last crisis because they just couldn't find jobs or that opportunity just wasn't there for your. So maybe start one's own thing. It's never been easier to start a business. It's never been easier to try something new. So if even. If it doesn't work. That's incredible work experience. You know when we talk to HR owes of some of the leading companies in the world, what are they looking for or what were they looking for before the crisis indefinitely after is that ability to be entrepreneurial even if you're working for fortune five hundred, so it can't hurt best case scenario you build something. Amazing. Worst case scenario. Fail and you take those skills and you leverage those skills and you keep your mind active. It's so important from a mental health perspective, keep your mind active and then apply them when the market comes back, which will at one point another opportunity. If if maybe starting yourself isn't it join some friends or join or reach out to small startups definitely volunteer is an opportunity. There are a lot of NGOs are nonprofits that need help or need support right now, build up your work experience gained some experience concrete tangible work experience that differentiates further rather than just having eight twelve months in your resume which are empty. Unfortunately, it might not help financial side and that's where that's where one has to be creative and it's it's just really tough and that's What does the government intervention on that front need to be because there's some that just can't afford to do what I just said, which is volunteer or build your own company because they don't have that safety net that don't have that opportunity in and unfortunately there in we're almost out of ideas because he go back to college, you just talked about extra debt but for some unfortunately are going to have to do it, and that leads to more a more philosophical discussion on what is there so much debt attached to a college education where you know in Switzerland, for example, I paid for my undergraduate I paid around a thousand dollars a year it's a leading edge I mean it's like A. Top universities and so that's a that's another discussion. Yeah. I agree with you I think that this is a moment to be entrepreneurial and it's challenging because you're you're right. I mean not everybody can do that from an employer's perspective you mentioned human resource officers, and by the way you're right I mean a human resource officer is very attracted to an applicant who started a business or try to start up in it failed. Because as you say, that's incredible life and work experience. What are some of the characteristics and sort of ways that quote Unquote Jersey works that might be different from previous generations maybe what their expectations for example? Yeah. It's something that comes up quite often the expectations are are huge I think even if we look at the generation before part of it is there needs to be in there. Always has been this need for grits for determination. I think post Covid, we're going to have very likely incredibly resilient and determined generation I. Think it's it's really great for I mean it's it's very tough. Love going to suffer and I hope I hope it will be as as few as possible but coming out of this generally on the whole, there's good reason to believe that this generation. is going to be really conscious a bit like after World War Two really conscious of financials very conscious sauce how lucky they are how privileged quickly things can change how precarious the society within which we live is actually it's a disease that, yes, it's it's it's it's serious, but it could have been a lot worse. It could have been worse could be one hundred exists and it's brought. Our global economy to its knees and you know we feel like we're often the masters of the universe and that's not just Jeb across demographics and we clearly aren't on I. think a little bit of humidity goes a long way. I love the energy of younger people coming in because their ideas are just so radically different from the way people in my business have have seen their profession What is your advice for employers looking to harness the intellectual power of Gen Z.? Yeah. No, it's a really good question. There basics of management that have been the same for every demographic every every niche within that demographic. It's look at maximizing the potential of the particular individual to different people react differently to different forms of management. Within this can talk about trends, but the ability to give them that chance to express themselves. The need for trust is always been there now definitely, so I mean even more so because they know what they're capable, but then also must not forget they are still with very few years of experience and being able to be there to give feedback to to tell them what they're doing. Right. Tell them what they're doing. Wrong. Both sides is critical. So just leaving someone out there in the world is not going to necessarily need to great results either but giving that safe-space giving that trust and creating an environment of being game your to maximize your potential and the. Direct, order may have worked. They may have been able to get away with it in the past, but some people might be okay with it but generally speaking that's that's especially for for you a lot of potential that's just not conducive for maximizing the potential where do you see your your business and what you're doing in five years from now what do you want it to look like I think for us it's always been about really helping as many youth as possible be as inclusive as we. And so we're ready serving youth in one hundred, fifty countries would like to go deeper in certain areas through our partnerships or load serve more youth in a more significant way. Provide more opportunities just re the best experience. That's probably what's most important. I think that's where we can have where we can make our contribution towards society. That's what we're good at, and now it's just about going to the next level. Yes. It's a challenging period, but we're going to be okay. WE'RE GONNA get out of this, and then it's about really taking this opportunity and doing the best we can because we are in a privileged situation if we were if we were unlucky which is the case for many other start ups I, friends who had term sheets for massive rounds of financing evaporates we hear the stories and then know they're just unlucky. So we're in this lucky position to be able to operate and to be able to do what we're doing. Let's. Make, the most out of it and I think that's our that's kind of our duty and I think that's yeah. TOBBACO

United States Switzerland Africa Good Wall Good Wall Taha Nasa TA American Jewish World Service Co Founder Oxford Youth Usa Jordan Osborne Richard Partner NPR Lincoln Officer
Google cancels I/O 2020, its biggest event of the year

All About Android

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Google cancels I/O 2020, its biggest event of the year

"Android news is not going anywhere. Thank goodness I wish the same could be said for Google. I O O is it. Another one where flip the light switch off now. At least at least this isn't going to end up on the killed by Google web page. Okay we know are lining a silver silver lining wherever you can totally inevitable you had to know. I feel like the second. I saw the the news break that facebook was canceling its FA development conference. I felt like the writing was on the wall. Right if facebook's willing to do it Why would company like Google be like? No we want to fry potentially endanger all the people arriving to shoreline in a couple of months of course. They're canceling even if we were just going to give them free t shirts when I got here. Yeah totally the free. T shirts would have been worth it. they are. They are canceling the May twelfth event while twelfth through the fourteenth That would have been held at the shoreline amphitheatre as it has been done for more than a decade while. The event has been held for more than a decade at shoreline passed. I think four years four five years. Shoreline Corona virus of course to blame for that First of all joe were you going to Google. Did you just going to cover it from here in the House? So nothing jazz. Yeah for me. It's the same thankfully but again like you said one of those things where it was bound to happen sooner or later with everything else going on. Yeah exactly everybody's EV. It's in fashion. It's in vogue right now to cancel your your life event well because of Corona virus. I posed the question. What'S UP Would would you hold it against Google? Had They not canceled this event? I personally I would. Yeah I probably would have. If they had kept the event if they had kept the event I I guess I guess it really depends if we get a month and a half down the line and we realize that you know it's it's not it turns out to not be a big deal. This whole corona virus thing compared to where people feel like. It's going maybe not so much but I but I would question Google's intentions and they're thinking behind the scenes if all of these other companies are thinking about the this the health and safety of people who would be attending this event and they still decide. Oh we don't care we mean. We're currently two months out right. Yeah so what if this had been April first instead of March first and then they said okay. Let's we can go ahead and put in a cancellation notice. Now would that be okay or is that too late? No you're right I mean if they well however at the same time people at her boss. I appreciate it. People are planning travel right. They're buying plane tickets. Non Refundable People in the in the you know the the area around shoreline. You know all of those. The the local economy is being built up. I mean it's the same story that we heard with Mobile World Congress brain and all these other things so I kind of feel like the sooner you do it the better. It is like tearing off the band aid. Earlier's that more problems. Don't come out of it what do you. How do you feel about this joe? I mean I think I agree with you too. Because the whole World Congress fiasco I think at least on twitter. When that news broke there was a seemed to be a lack of communication from the GSA may about what was happening and it was relatively soon the event was supposed to take place so I think Google wants to avoid any potential fallout bad. Pr that all last minute wasn't it? Yeah so I mean it's the virus itself is in such early stages. There's so much we don't know that it's probably better to be safe and now hold it censors. Probably a lot. We're GONNA know in the next month or two months. Once I o would have happened. Certainly no question There's also just the fact that like Google already streams so much of a Mayo online so of all of the events that like I've I've seen fee. Fa would probably fall into this category two that I definitely follow much closer than I do. F- eight but Google does a great job of streaming these events streaming these talks Really leaning into their youtube presence for broadcasting everything. That's happening at IO. They've got their keynote that they're gonNA stream so of all the events that are canceling right now. I Oh seems like the prime candidate to do it and still still be able to hold a virtual event. That's very successful soda. Used to it. Essentially totally their systems kind of designed to be able to To SUSTAIN THAT. I wonder about Facebook can it's a conference. I never really paid much attention. I know with Iot. Have the key note Doing a livestream. And they do not necessarily the sessions that the developers are paying four but they have all these other little little things going on ought to decide station with Sullen. So that they'll have up on livestream. Whatever does I don't recall facebook having anything like that. Other Than District Keno. They're they're big KENO. Yeah that's why I say like I haven't really followed it closely. Enough to know how wide their livestream presence on those events. A lot of what ends up online from Google isn't livestream. Necessarily it's pre- it's recorded. And then they publish it on. Youtube after the fact At least some some of the events. That's what it is. They if I if I recall correctly when you look at the like rundown of of each day's events there's certain things that have a little video camera next to it which is essentially means if you can still check it out on the livestream. But I don't think that's every single one of them. Maybe that changes. Maybe there won't be as many of these talks Yeah I mean. This is going to change the structure and also doing it. This far in advance. I think is really Responsible for a company like Google because they've got their entire machinery working to create this event. I don't see why they would want to wait until the last minute to cancel it because that's all of that effort and going into into creating this event that they suddenly pulled the rug out at least now they have a couple of months to say. Alright that's not happening anymore. How can we create a new experience that still satisfies the goals of what I would have been? Well I think now the biggest Question is we can. Now have these google executives come here to the studio and so yeah total chat. That totally totally all right. Well I know I will certainly i. I will do my best and I don't WanNa let you down Yeah but it is but it is a bummer and areas. Roshii if you ever want to come back on the show We would love to have you. Hiroshi locked time now they can just drive on. They have nothing better to do now that Io's done their schedules wide open

Google Facebook IO JOE Congress Youtube Twitter IOT FA Hiroshi GSA
Solar Orbiter promises first look at sun's mysterious polar regions

WIOD Programming

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Solar Orbiter promises first look at sun's mysterious polar regions

"Solar so this this new solar probes launching tonight from the at space coast Kennedy Space Center it's going to take some of the first images of the polar regions of the sun which is a very cool thank the project manager says the European Space Agency has been developing the solar orbiter for about a decade liftoff in just about twelve hours eleven o'clock tonight so that'll be something look for just gonna study all kinds of stuff probably by who knows what right yeah it's exciting to me they they've useful takes on space for for years now but are the proprietary technology that they're using here I think it's gonna be completely self sustainable and be able to walk the take all those pictures and get the angles of the the sun and its relationship to you are the planets are exciting yeah and then of course improving things here on earth yeah thank I have a little bit of money out for us now in solar beer we were talking about that just a couple of minutes ago the world's largest brewery InBev is announce their virtual power purchase agreement some fifty plus brands including Budweiser gonna be brewed by the sun which is kind of neat why not right right well you know I'm going back to what the beginning of the show you know you ask yourself is it worth it so these guys asked if it was worth it you know these these are our companies are used to making millions if not billions of dollars annually you know and it's a business so if they can look at you know their balance sheets and they're seeing how much money they're spending electricity which we're probably talking about hundreds of thousands not millions of dollars across all of these and they're doing the math and that math is Hey if we reallocate these these dollars and we actually produce our own energy we're gonna see major tax incentives we're going to see you know a return on investment and we're gonna really have all of the savings at the bottom line if not the first year and a and a nice manageable you know sort of sort of manner where you can take the expense of of this you know and look at it on a cruel basis whether it's twelve months whether it's the whole cycle that it would take to pay it back and each month you're actually you know netting you're you're becoming positive and seeing return on your dollars and whether or not they're taking some the tax incentives that they've gotten this year from that some of the federal tax cuts and reinvesting into our technology and energy like this they're going to see the savings and that's for years to come yeah no doubt it in this purchase agreement they're saying they're gonna buy a hundred percent renewable energy from two major solar farms two hundred megawatts that's a lot of power yeah we don't need a second at our house sure and you know I guarantee you that power when it breaks down to a kilowatt hour or a megawatt hour or whatever you know unit of of power they're they're looking and it's going to be cheaper it's going to be something that's not going to require any pollution or or maintenance on you know large power plants or or extra fuel fossil fuels or any of that stuff it's just going to depend on whether or not that the sun comes out we feel pretty good about that bad and you know chances are when they have buying power like this to really make solar farms or to invest in them you know they're going to really really see a much cheaper price for electricity and once it's all paid for it's essentially going to be free yeah other big companies have done this to of course we we talk a lot about the F. B. L. thing they're they're thirty million panels in thirty years or ten years actually Nike Walmart three am I keel over did have a couple issue as with their panels but yeah they they they they get in you know it's it's far as locally if anybody were to ever get there Google maps out on the phone like you said I I kia you know we do have a couple of them in the South Florida area here this one just on down the road here on five ninety five and is completely covered it has a about a megawatt on the roof and they all do you know and that's that's something that they've done for years and that's our independence of of any of the you know local restrictions or anything all of their buildings do you have a solar on the roof obviously apple made their huge campus you know what solar on the roof Google has the same thing at all and a lot of these companies who are smart with their money and that's the that's the whole trick your guys they would never rent you know a huge part of their income in something that they could out you know and maybe it's difficult to own a house but but we do we do because we put a small down payment down we gather our credit and jump through the hoops and play by the rules and we can get a four five or six hundred thousand dollar loan just like we could for you know a boater really expensive vehicle or something like that and then you spend a lot of time paying it off you know but with the finance capabilities of this you could essentially without having to put all these things on the line get a are renewable energy payment cheaper than what you're spending right now it really really makes a lot of sense and if if you have big Bucks like these guys here you can reach into your own pocket buy the equipment and see the fastest return on investment possible but they all know that in three four five years they're gonna be sitting pretty and seeing huge huge dividends on

European Space Agency Kennedy Space Center Project Manager
Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

People of the Pod

10:29 min | 1 year ago

Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

"Talk about some. I'm pretty heavy issues. Israel Iran Patriot of Jews. So our next guest is a pretty big leap for us. Ashley Blaker is Jewish standup comedian. He is the first Orthodox Fox Jewish comedian to be given his own BBC. Show Ashley Blaker. GOYA's guide to Judaism which returned to the air in October. Two Thousand Nineteen. Now he's in New York for his latest off off Broadway. Show Ashley Blaker Goi friendly which premieres at the Soho playhouse. On February third and runs through February twenty third. While his previous off-broadway production strictly unorthodox was tailored for Jewish audiences. This one he says is not just for the Jews. It tells the story of how Ashley's close friendship with Muslim. Comedian Imron on. UCS completely changed his life with antisemitic incidents on the rise around the globe and even here in New York actually hopes to make the audience laugh but also understand stand a little bit more about their Jewish neighbors Ashley. Welcome to our studio. Thank you for having me so I have to ask you right out of the gate. anti-semitism is not funny. So how how do you address that topic with humor. Well the reality is I think he's anything can be funny. So I'll let you come to Louis showing judge whether I make. It isn't about antisemitism. I should say that there is actually a section is a band. Semitism thought. I think the more interesting is the fact that that when antisemitism is on the rise there are two ways of dealing with. This is a way of kind of hunkering down. Just going. We're we're now gonNA stick to ourselves and and try and protect ourselves and put up the security barriers and let's have lots of armed guards on the on the door in social ones bags and all of that stuff all you can kind of outreach. As it were and try and engage with the outside world and that's what my shows about about the latter it's about reaching out to the outside world and in a way this makes wants a comedy show. You know hopefully nonstop funny. Sound sound incredibly dry but Hopefully demystify Judaism a little bit. That's certainly one of the aims. Okay well I would say you could do both right. Do the security see the undercover getting having no security either. All kind of you know very good at that accused but I actually my playbill. I wrote a Performance note and for Bates Him. But I said something about how you know very good dividing ourselves as a as an in one of the things into I enjoy doing you mentioned my show strictly and also those I I love bringing choose together because we figured it kind of separating ourselves in so many different ways you know on the whole joke about the Jewish man who lands on a desert island and he builds two synagogues one ones that he'll go to one that he wouldn't ever be seen dead and that's like what we're like but I do think that there is it is an important time to actually reach out a little bit and we can. I think sometimes certainly not in any way suggesting that we. We are in any way a foot four and symptom of course but I sometimes think that actually being too insular. Isn't that helpful. Listen so now you are from the UK so well the Labor Party. I have to ask you about the Labor Party. I'm afraid But it's often regarded as the political liberal party of choice by many Jews in Great Britain. And I'm curious how you dealt with the last election and whether or not you felt politically homeless as I kept had reading about the Jewish community. There didn't myself but I'm sure other people did and I think that yes certainly in the post for many Jews the Labor faulty will have. I've been there home by just as much as the Conservative Party would be for many Liberal Democrat. We have quite a different political system. Should know to to to the Americans as many but yes I mean. It was incredible. What happened over the last few years and how symtas I'm just rose and seem to not be dealt with toll within the Labor Party in? Yeah it was a terrible thing we still really really been dealt with properly gone away. Yeah I know there were. There were several vile things said many vile things said ed by Labour politicians but then also Jeremy Corbyn himself was talking about the lack of irony that many British Jews seem to have. I don't know if you recall that particular. Yes it was Avia. Yeah it was a video I think from a while ago. Actually but he had yes he had said something. And there's a lot of these kind of allusions I think is because they. They caught clever then. They don't outright. This isn't the foul right then marking the street saying killed the Jews. It's a very allusive. Quite clever thing of of Hinson these particular weight alluding that Jews and Israel inflating the to and to you know the whole talking about antisemitism and anti Zionism also that that things that really came along with the Labor Party and I saw something videos of people saying no no we. We're not intimately to we like the right to choose. I think there's that thing of the good news and the bad news and I think that's a really good. Jews has ones March against Israel and kind of write letters to the Guardian saying that we support Sanctioned bedia smell that kind of thing uh-huh and then the ninety five percent of the badges. I mean that's clearly terrible things so it's been a really dark period and I didn't know it'll be interesting to see in the the next four five years. How things change? Have you tried to address it with humor. There over showed. I just did a toll in opened in in May with my friend Imran you mentioned draymond so imminent. He did a tour together called profit sharing actually breaking news in profit sharing seek clever title. And it's not address head on there are other people addressing this head on and the the truth is the way to look on twitter five minutes especially around the time the election to see that kind of Echo Chamber people. Don't WanNa hear they. You know you you tweet. Something about Labor Jeremy Corbyn and immediately comes back. This prepared list of twenty times. Jeremy Corbyn has both a motion ocean in parliament. That's been helpful to community Blah Blah Blah say. No one listens to each other anymore. People just spout the same thing. So I'm not sure engaging in that kind of way addressing head on is that helpful she because people just don't want to listen right. I'm sure it's the same here with trump and I'm sure there are people who are vehemently say one one thing you don't want to listen to the side. Yes that is. That is a problem that area. So I think that's something we've seen a lot particular around brexit and all these issues as we've had in the UK and the F. But so my show anyway. Mike show look comedy show. That's the the the main PARV. So I'll tell you briefly I mean essence shows. It's about yeah. Tell us about the show but then I also want to hear more about Enron and your friendship so the show about my friend she was Enron said. So that's the kind of I think in film in terms they call that the macguffin. He's kind of you know that you heard that term. I'm not familiar with that. So it's like using the original star wars. I think C. Three Po an onto d two of the macguffin that they're the ones like sent off into onto the desert and enter tattooing. They've got the messages item. Thank you the whole plot revolves from. Then there's no actually about them but it starts from them so in a way money's the macguffin hit because is a true story we're good friends we went untold together. And he's very interested custody my life he didn't know much about Judaism me belly of June. We spent many hours together in the call. He was always drawing because he he's Muslim. Couldn't in claiming been drinking and he's always asked me questions and I kind of wanted to teach him about Judaism. But where do you start. We've got six hundred thirteen commandments. It's too long to the call I didn't want to spend money on guests so I thought well I teach him about the Ten Commandments. And we started looking at the Ten Commandments. And I unrealized. They're not that practical you know he doesn't have an ox next all so there's no need to worry about not coveting it and I so I could. Maybe set myself challenge of coming up with my own ten commandments. That I could be a bit more practical. But they could actually explain what it's like to be an Orthodox Jew in two thousand twenty and in a way. It was my friendship with him. That made me reconsider my Judaism. Because she had I've been living as an Orthodox Jew for the best part of twenty years but it's only when an outside comes along install challenging us at you start having to think about it you start thinking about your love. So that's what the shows about and it's about me going through these ten commandments. My New Ten Commandments. antiquing this to him okay. So do you mind sharing a few of the talk commanded if you're the one of them is thou shalt develop obsessive compulsive disorder okay. She's an integral Paulsville so shoot as But we cover branch of Judy. Check that box right exactly. So we cover a lot of these areas we cover kosher food and living in a Jewish area. We talk about the curse of praying public and this covers a lot of ground really comes a lot of ground in the show and then And then the story I keep finished. The story has a continuation because of how Im- reacted and then what we went off did something together which I don't want to spoil because that's the narrative But it's a pretty funny chairman. I it really is. I'm super proud of it. So you say I did. This show could street Lennox. It was aimed at a Jewish audience. All Jews knock. He's also dogs. Reform Perform Conservative unaffiliated. But Still Jews and I think it's a really. I really wanted to do something. Everyone could cutting joy That would be in a language WIGGs. Everyone can understand but the is serious does not scrimp on the jokes atone. It's the funniest show of ever done this by miles miles because I've already but still called the serious stuff when we do discuss antisemitism and there are some real takeaways well foam it excellent zone. The show's name. Is Ashley. Blaker friendly it's at the Soho playhouse here in New York City from February third to twenty-third. Thank you for joining us. Thank

Ashley Blaker Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn Israel New York Soho Playhouse Enron Goya Comedian Imron Conservative Party UK Semitism Twitter Louis Bates New York City Great Britain Avia Guardian
NFL Renovates Gwen Cherry Park Football Field

ESPN Daily

05:26 min | 1 year ago

NFL Renovates Gwen Cherry Park Football Field

"Gwen Cherry Park. which is in Liberty City is where players like colts wide receiver T Y Hilton in former steeler Antonio Brown grew up playing pee wee football yesterday yesterday? NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell showed up here to unveil a new turf. Field and several. Local officials spoke at a ceremony to commemorate the occasion the in addition to building strong children Mister Dale. We build champions here. The gwen Cherry Paul Bulls have one six. Pop won a super bowls. And I think that's the total number of the Patriots have won so we can't be doing too bad and at the moment as we speak fifteen. NFL players will come from this part does NFL players include Teddy Bridgewater Amari Cooper Delvin. Cook Labonte David remarkable list given that Liberty City is home to around twenty thousand people. I spoke with one of the neighbourhoods. Youth coaches not. My husband's father tyrone my name. Is Taro Hilton. I coach I don't know how many kids but there's a lot of kids in Miami here Gwen Chair Park coaching since nineteen ninety nine. So I've been coaching in for a number of years and I enjoy coaching these kids here. What does liberty city like? You got to be your own man like I tell you why you gotta be on Man Maybe neighborhood you have a bad and you gotta good but it's up to you to follow the good. You know you see wrong over there. You don't have to go way wrong. You go way right. Just do the right thing. So what was it like when you were growing up here when I was growing up here it wasn't as bad as it is now. You know you got more games You got more stuff to Troubled kids can get into right then and there. You know You fight you get back together as friends now you fight the guys see you next day you know it kill you. You know. That's that's the hardest part about you know growing up. Here is my violence now than when you're a kid it's more violence way is more violence more violence you see a gunshot You know you duck and everything. It's it's really tough stuff you see on. TV Israel who are some of the NFL players. He came from this neighborhood. Wow it's a whole lot. You Got T. Y.. Hilton you. You Got Tonio Brown. You've got Teddy Bridgewater. You Got Devante Freeman. We own a football field. devante Freeman on that bill. devante Freeman wasn't running back always always had devante Freeman at quarterback so I turned Costa offense. He walks up to coach running back. I put him at running back. I actually really did and I said wow look at this kid him before I knew it. He's running back next level. They take them through the mill. They take him to the ground. You know Tamp Down Bill Amok yelling at them screaming at him to make sure to get right. That's why you see motives. Were colleges now come. They come down. They told me Nick savings over like four times last week. This is found. This is this is to ground right here. There are so many activities comfort. You know whether it's on the pee wee we level what is on the college level whereas school level. You know to get good quality coach. I remember watching you coach Peewee a few years ago. I think there there were like four five year old kids but usually four or five year. Old Kids it's just run run run you know one kid. Everyone chases they are running place. Yeah T- wise little boy. I think you saw touchdown still remembers on that side of the field. And it's just a football instance. Now here I mean you see a little kid at four and five stopping on a dime going across the new and it gets better and better as you grow up. You Know Glenn. Cherry Park is now hosting the third generation of the Hilton family. On the ninth field. Open tyrone son. Ty brought his own sons nephews to practice and carry on the family tradition receiver for Jerry. Pollock just taught me everything I know we had. We had star pledges sit on a bench waiting for the competition was always there to competition was always so you know always full five deep. Every position always wanted to give back community. You know Chad Johnson did Repairman data for me to follow in the footsteps. She knows on your identity paid for this is why we're gotta gotta you know so. I'm always here every year every chance I get another workout so I'm always you got my son. You know my my close friends you know Rochelle. Oh Cato Buki Raj and my tight end I used to play for the coast. Ross traveled. No He's in second grade and he's playing with third and fourth graders in my my son Jean. They're dominated seventh grade football and basketball. They have lost the game. Never know the kids that I grow with you know a lot of kids. That's competitive competitive. Drive as you so I wanna see that you know because you know anything competitive job. It ain't like this so you know it's pretty special. Oh absolutely you never want to forget where you come from your mom and dad always I mean on no forget where you come from so I always always come back to give back to the kids. Let them know you know. I was saying shoes I was in the same season that you can trust me. You can do it

NFL Liberty City Devante Freeman Football Taro Hilton Antonio Brown Gwen Cherry Teddy Bridgewater Amari Cooper Gwen Cherry Park. Patriots Commissioner Roger Goodell Teddy Bridgewater Gwen Chair Park Mister Dale POP Israel Cook Labonte David Chad Johnson Cherry Park
The many ways professional organizations help product managers  with Mark Adkins

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

09:32 min | 1 year ago

The many ways professional organizations help product managers with Mark Adkins

"How pita evolving to keep up with the Times. So it's funny because the one thing I in kind of full disclosure sure is I have two sons I four children. Two sons oser product managers. Not that I made them do that. Once a senior product manager at Google the other one is a product manager for ten cents the Chinese company that owns we chat but they also own riot games. James and he's part of the League of legends brand so I have these two sons who think they invented product management right. No no no no. Oh No it's been around a long time. I can't remember. I don't know who to ascribe it to a friend once called it the accidental profession. That's right and I. I've always loved that term. Although it's changing right I think that's what we'll talk more today about it. It really is a legitimate profession Russian. If you will but twenty thirty years ago it was you're tapped on the shoulder you know you're working at a company and you have an engineering degree or Marketing degree or finance degree. Somebody says hey. Atkins I want you to Ron product development in like what really and boom you're a product manager and that's part of again my history with PD was when I was tapped to run a product development program. I'm like who do I return to. How do I learn it is a profession? How do I become better at it? And that's where we are today. The role of product manager product owner her and so on his exploded and I think pedia may as well position to be the keeper that Professional Association for for this community. Because the other thing I would like to add is product. Managers are in corporations. Say We're practitioners but we have a great great history with academics. We welcome service providers so one of the very unique things about PD. Ama Professional Association is we include the entire our community so it it yes. It's people incorporations is people in startups doing product development. But it's the academic people that give us the foundation that we need to be he great at innovation and it's the service providers market research companies. The the design firms that are instrumental in doing great product Komo. Yeah I think that that Nicks is really key to PD me. And what I find so appealing about it and I was having a discussion with someone. This wonderful experience. I got to train in their product managers in this large organization and the guy that brought me and it was senior director of product management for them and he was talking about what we did for the training raining. My group is all based on. PDA's body of knowledge and put my hands around that. And the reason why I chose that is instrumental in the work that I did that. I successful and it's also grounded in research every what four five years. There's this study that does about what are the best organizations doing in the space. And how does that compare to everyone else and it gives you a real appreciation for what you need to be doing right. The distinction there and his reflection on this. Was You know Chad. Yeah I've done training from all the different organizations right. I've been in product management longtime. I've never seen something that is as wide breath and as integrated as this Body knowledge that covers all the things that you really need to know. So what I'd like to do to build on that there's two elements one is going to be China. Our Program in China is going to be teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Environ January. So let me let me start with my personal program. I teach a course I in the technical title is managing medical device. RND right but I use the PEDIA may body of knowledge approach as my textbook. Because when I looked at what I'm trying to do with these graduate students who are pursuing a master's of science and bioengineering. I I I WANNA give them the full breadth of understanding of what it is to develop new products and the PDA body of knowledge is the guidebook is as a wonderful resource. So I use it personally might textbook as far as China. There's not a better example when you were talking earlier about. PM Am I and project management and Pedia. May We have a wonderful program. I've been twice to China to be representing Pedia. May It was is our former chair. Alan Anderson it really got the program going and we are certifying thousands of Chinese folks who have a PM so they were project managers but now literally the government of China wants to move up the value you chain. They WANNA be innovators. They don't WANNA be simply low. Cost manufacturing companies in a country. That just can only make cheap product. They want want to innovate and so they've turned -pedia may as their partner in developing a certification program. So if you WANNA be a product manager in China China you need to get your n. p. which is our revocation and we have literally trained thousands and thousands of Chinese and it grows every a year so I think it's a wonderful example of this differentiation and the move up if you WANNA call it. The value chain from project management into product management innovation. And we're doing it in China in spades. I think it's really interesting. How PD may is in? A sense has always been international nationalization but exporting what has been known as the US has capability dominance in product management to other places and China paid attention to that right an open the doors to this just as they did two PM. I sometimes goes well. Can I also add the global nature on our former tair. He's a key week he's from New Zealand. So for the last three years our chairpersons been the New Zealander so I agreed read the PDF roots are in the US but it would be complete underestimation of us to think of us as a US only organization. Yeah I I do. Think the recognized dominance in at least the area of product management has been kind of US base. Because when I talked to other people in other countries they talk about well. You guys have so much experience in that. How do we get that experience to? And this is one way. And that's awfully kind of a wakeup call. I think for product managers. If you're listening to this now certification. Should I think historically has not made a big difference in our industry frankly. I very rarely see job. Announcement saying some kind of certification is desired but if if we have thousands and thousands every year of product managers in China getting certified. It's going to start making more of a difference and it's something just to look into frankly clearly the value to me. The value of many people that have helped train for specifically for the certification isn't really getting that certification right. It's not the piece. The papers not magical but learning that body of knowledge learning the framework man if there was big light bulb moments. That went off for me as I was doing that personally. And I had the pleasure of helping to co train on that body of knowledge at last year's conference of you and I were that and I assured just my journey with that too and said when I learned about this. That was huge. I suddenly put together the pieces that I've been doing for the last ten years that I didn't really know how they fit and there were other people in the room that came up to me afterwards and said you know. lightbulbs would offer me too during the training today that I never made these connections before it was just really powerful. Really good so let's talk about the benefits associated associated with a so if people want to check out the professional organization lots of free resources available and of course it is a professional association. If you're a paid member when you get access to other things to just what's involved in those benefits I really WanNa go instead of going down into the dark details of everything everything when I reflect on my time with. PDA In this recently yesterday. On a link to impose it's been a couple apple decades of meeting fantastic people so whether you volunteer for DNA or you're just see participating or online or as part of a chapter after I can guarantee you're going to meet some of the smartest most interesting most dedicated people you'll ever meet you'll meet them through pedia and that's pretty priceless kidding. It's very priceless. And then the second thing is what you learn right. Yeah so like to your point about body of knowledge right. I tap on the shoulder twenty years ago. It's like you're in charge of product development. Oh man what does that mean. And the ability to go to the website the body of knowledge all of the books we published all the webcast we do. There's so much you can learn is part of PDA so rather than going down into the weeds of benefits in listing a dozen. You'RE GONNA meet great people and you'RE GONNA learn a lot. Just become become part of our community and I can guarantee those benefits you'll get

Product Manager China Product Development Pedia Senior Product Manager United States Senior Director Of Product Man Times Professional Association China China Riot Games Google James League Of Legends Ama Professional Association New Zealand Nicks University Of Pittsburgh
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Conversation

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

07:30 min | 1 year ago

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Conversation

"Congruence! My name is Hudson I'm here with professor yes it is. It is good to be here and I think those who have listen to the show will probably long enough where anticipating and waiting with breath debated off this episode. To hear Zaki, ruminate about the brand new star wars. That's right about the star wars episode, but not just Kim and I. Yes, we are joined by our special guest Omar sorry guys found like has gone from one from one to another rumor. So that's right we we are. We normally have a Omarosa for. Critic noted film critic joining us, but we decided to to. Keep it in the family, maybe family. And I'm not a film critic. but I am a huge huge star. Wars. Fan Simon excited to be here. Thank you very much fun talking about the movie which we saw together on Thursday night. That's what we've been doing for the past four five years for all the newbies right, yes. so we are of course talking about the rise of Skywalker and nine, which is the close of this current trilogy and Per Disney's marketing. Of. The skywalker saga began forty two

Hudson Zaki Disney Professor Omar KIM Simon
"four five years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on WEEI

"The same way for ever every three four five years the Detroit Lions are changing coaches so if you do that again I I get a map Tricia is not that good right now but if you do it again let's make it ten coaches in twenty three years and how do you know the next guy's going to be the right thing I think part of it they don't draft particularly well I think part of it the quarterbacks over rated and I do think part of it is they continuously switch coaches over and over again Jim Schwartz was given five years with that franchise and what twenty nine of fifty one what Marinelli got three and what ten thirty eight you can't change Matt Patricia yet or you're right back in the same spot they have to find a way that they want to go about their business they have to find a way that they're gonna have a direction where they want to go about their business and if they can find the right direction they're going to be better I feel the same thing here in Atlanta because falcons you know what we're talking about coaches that potentially could be gone the falcons are looking at the same thing Dan Quinn could be a guy that is shown the door at the end of this year mind you Dan Quinn three years goes in the Superbowl two years ago they were one point away from going back to the NFC championship game that's how close the falcons were get queue is thirty six and twenty eight and it's four plus years he's got a FC championship game he won the NFC south been in the playoffs couple times three and two is is playoff record before that they got six and a half seasons out of Mike Smith actually got seven full seasons out of Smitty Smitty what sixty six and forty six one out of fifty nine percent clip his problem was he was wanted for the playoffs the year before that unmitigated disaster was one year a Bobby Petrino that we usually son of a gun who who left notes and left town you can't tell me a little bit out perturbed by Bobby Petrino one of the biggest dirt bags in the history of the NFL Jim Moret got three years with Mike Vick when he didn't really give a damn what twenty six and twenty two won a playoff game in Green Bay Wade Phillips said some interim time Dan Reeves go back with their ninety seven to two thousand three they go three into in the playoffs they do make the Superbowl they win the NFC south medical forty nine fifty nine and one in his coaching time so it let out a little more stable but you're talking about when you when you interject interim coaches as well they've had seven coaches in the last twenty years if they're Quinn get shown the door that's gonna be eight coaches in twenty years for the Atlanta Falcons as well you can not continuously win football games you could not continuously be A. R. an NFL franchise that has stability when your change approaches who are the most stable franchise New England Pittsburgh Green Bay Green Bay just made a coaching change but those three typically have kept the same coaches for a long time we'll come back out is it too early to think about Christmas where to that question exit so Michael's on SB nation radio made of the cavern X. agent Jeff now we had sent the entire fifty eight minute video work out from Saturday it's all thirty two NFL teams I have.

Detroit Lions twenty years three years three four five years fifty eight minute fifty nine percent twenty three years five years two years one year
"four five years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"The men and women that you know are suffering and what they went through and like you said connect the dots because it's very very important people understand do you have any other message for our listeners today eighteen years after September eleventh were safer nation what are folks armed forces do overseas to protect the homeland is just amazing and I think the work that all police fire first responders do on a daily basis I think sometimes folks don't realize what we're confronted with each and every day every day on my mind as the head of the Port Authority in our critical infrastructure that we protect could happen today could happen tomorrow I think it on every American's mind so I think we need to be diligent and what we do carry on with our lives you know that is a very important message that we're not gonna let somebody dictate what we do or how we act as Americans and you know people need to trust that the police the fire and first responders to protect them and do their job and I believe you know the men and women of. authorities are doing a tremendous job we've doubled the size of the force since nine eleven we are committed to protecting the infrastructure and we know what happened to us and everybody every day knows it roll call what they may walk into and what happens preparedness in training very critical for us and you know we just thank everybody for their support every day because a lot of folks don't forget was happening but some folks as we get years away from an I. continues yeah some kids were never even more and at that time or some my police officers were three four five years old at the time so you know the history and traditions are also important to understand what impact that America today well I thank you for all the good work that you do and I wish you well and you look wonderful I have to say ed said nor the superintendent of the Port Authority police of New York and New Jersey suffering from stage four cancer you look fantastic and I'm glad.

Port Authority America superintendent New York New Jersey ed three four five years eighteen years
"four five years" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Have insurance my husband in an iro sixty four five years away from medicare. That's a very scary prospect for somebody. My age not to have insurance what i would like to see is a public option to buy into medicaid at the state level. Bring more people into the system and it it was definitely helped our <hes> our rural hospitals because our all hospitals are suffering because of the lack of payment so that people can make without people not having health insurance third thing is education as i said the main reason i decided to run for office was the fear of the special education services being cut tonight in virginia talk a good talk about having best public the best public schools well in virginia virginia weird swell in the nation in per capita income but we're forty second in the nation when it comes to per per pupil spending ending that shouldn't be happening and it's really obvious when you go into a rural school where they're trying to recruit the teachers to stay to keep some sort of continuity with teachers but when they get teachers will stay here for a couple of years and then they'll go so to the urban areas where they can make a whole lot more money. Our primary school here in addison was built in nineteen seventy seven. It's going to take anywhere between ten to twelve million dollars. In renovations madison county only thirteen thousand people. We can't afford that can the the state really needs to be providing more funding to at risk schools like the ones.

virginia medicare madison county addison twelve million dollars sixty four five years forty second
"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Says one in three Illinois ins are currently in the data collection process the federal government has approved public disaster assistance for sixty eight to Missouri counties following recent floods and tornadoes governor parson announcing FEMA has approved the public assistance for damage because between April twenty ninth and July fifth preliminary assessments have identified forty nine million dollars in public costs mainly to state and local roads and bridges public buildings and utilities it's eight oh seven Saint Louis is the only area to have to start up organizations when a recent round of federal grant bio generator and arch grants will both get seven hundred fifty thousand dollars out of twenty three million awarded last week arts grants director Emily Lowe's Busch notes it's a matching grant so feel really receive one and a half million she says this money is to develop programs to keep start ups here after they get their initial arch grant so we've got this incredible cold court of companies that are two three four five years old that we need to really build out a more robust support system for their challenges include follow up investment in hiring skilled workers bio generator meantime will use its grant to quote xcelerated act tech innovation and commercialization Michael Calhoun St Louis's newsradio cable acts coming out of your delivery driver might be enjoying your next door that is a loud chewing she's in this one character traffic and weather together baseball's trade deadline is Wednesday afternoon the cardinals do and how will the National League central look exports on social media for all the latest and keep it right here on your own cardinals baseball in America sports.

federal government governor parson FEMA Saint Louis Emily Lowe Busch cardinals Illinois Missouri director Michael Calhoun National League America seven hundred fifty thousand d forty nine million dollars two three four five years
"four five years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I knew was I just needed more of it so I joined the men's glee club I joined the chamber choir I became president of the choir social club I just inundated myself with it and then in my third year when I was twenty one years old I decided to write my very first piece and a little piece called goal of the rose as a gift to this conductor who it changed my life and in that piece was published and then I wrote another piece called cloudburst and that piece was published and I I sort of woke up one day and was a a clean composer have you studied composition and in college a not at all really and I I really didn't study composition in my undergraduate degree I did a little bit but I did a seven year undergraduate degree if frankly for the first four five years I could barely read music and so a lot of it was just by ear and trial by error and then finally when I did my master's degree at the Juilliard School that's when I had some real proper study with John Corey on one sound that that comes up a lot in your music is something that I've learned is called a tone cluster which is when the voices are singing accord but there's this hand of dissonance I wanna play an example from your your piece Julie only him to to illustrate this can you explain to us what a tune cluster is yes normally there's a triad dum dum dum dum dum and any note this included from the scale this non that try it starts to turn it into a cluster what.

president Juilliard School John Corey Julie twenty one years four five years seven year one day
"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Hi, right. What a pleasure to talk to you. I am a first time caller longtime listener and what you're telling everybody's exactly. Correct. And Trump is doing the right thing being being experienced businessmen, thirty years doing international trade with China. I can tell you business is already have these things factored into their business. Plans the terrorists, wait, wait, wait, wait, wait have what things factored into their business plans? The existing trade agreements. Well, they have they have terrorists figured in there and never watch. Well that affect your negotiations. These companies have long term agreements with other companies so that the praises won't change for one two three even four five years. So you're saying that because the factors in all of these companies trading with China have been included such as potential tariffs and this stuff that you're, you're saying that these tax increases drive bys talking the new increased prices. We're not gonna see for years because they're operating on contracts made way in advance and still. Right, exactly, correct. Yes. That's exactly right. Well, it makes it makes what will let me just ask you this play devil's advocate. These contracts have been made, and there in force, these companies are talking about importing Chinese products now, new tariffs on them wants to say that Chinese are going to continue to honor those contracts and not tell these companies, hey, if you wanna keep doing MRs Tara and renegotiate Newton again with, with these tariffs included, what's to stop the calms doing that, that business. You know, there's other countries that can make stuff Microsoft buy stuff from China. Apple, but they combined us for to. Some. Yeah. The Chinese products are attractive for a lot of reasons. Well deals with Chinese manufacturing, their labor costs are much less than they would be the United States, manufacturing things. But that does make sense if existing agreements between companies here that import CHAI com made goods are enforced and enforced for another two to three years, then whatever's happening here will not show up until in probably never because this is going to get solved. At one point now, you're going to see in the media, and I've already seen it which is why I am passing this on. You're already seeing some of these scare tactics stories in the drive-by media why you know what? These terrorists may be permanent. Why we may have a new round of permanent trade war status with the Chinese. I saw that same people that told us the economy of Barack Obama was the new normal one percent economic growth United States, greatest days behind this, get used to it gang, we didn't really deserve all that robust economic activity in the past. It was all phony. This is the new normal. This is the new real one percent economic growth where the people to manage the same people that we may be a permanent trade war with the truck on there. I'll tell you there is so much call. It idiocy stupidity. It really is. Thorough ignorance. On the part of even including economics journalists who really have no idea what they reduce it down to this, the single common denominator. How can we hurt Trump? How can we report this and hurt Republicans? And that is the spectre. Which..

United States China Trump CHAI com Apple Microsoft Barack Obama MRs Tara Newton one percent four five years thirty years three years
"four five years" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"Whole hardly endless in these things absolutely exist, and that show the exist in the United States, but they definitely exist overseas. Do you think that by? By having these getting these cases out there of missing children, the disappearance of makes parents now sort of over parent their kid like are we doing a disservice by not giving our kids freedom now because we're so worried about them being the next Madeleine McCann. I am relentless in in my job, which is to protect my children. I will not apologize for that. And that way, and I think that many of these documentaries like -ducted in plain sight and leaving Neverland that and I've had the privilege of talking to the directors and producers of some of those films, and I've said the same thing to them that I think that it has been hugely important for those films to be shown because we need to remember how important it is to pay attention to the people in our children's orbit, and who you know, where they go because we need to protect children. So I will not apologize for that. And the truth is is that Hirsch chief fit the profile. File for a trafficking ring. She's she's a white three year old almost four year old girl. It's awful. But it's the truth is that that there's there's a tier system, and she sort of hit the fit the profile, and she was targeted and there were people that were taking photos of the children that ocean club. So I I don't think that having money still go to the fund will upset people and the other part to your question is I if I were the parent I would try to keep that secret as long as possible because right? It was suggested to me that Natalie Holloway may have been hod like track marks, and you know, had been subjected to awful things. And so if someone is taken and they have been under drugs for like four five years and they've been abused. It's gonna take a long time for them. Unwind. This is not like an aerial Castro situation where five girls live in Detroit in a home. This is these are peep, women and young men who have is slaves a transported from country to country, and and and been slaves, and it would take a lifetime to get over that. So I don't know what the timeline is for for us to know what has happened, but I have to trust that their parents and the mental health professionals that are working with them. We'll know the answer to that. It's just so scary to even think about you know, when you were talking about the perfect profile of like, and Madeline McCann really hit it, you know, because in my mind from what I've seen in the cases that we've covered at least Martinez murderer and the stuff that I read in the news is that you kind of want to get them young. So you can have them for a long period of time her being three, you know, you could have her for fifteen years before she's a full adult. A three year old girl is going to start to forget about her mother and her father and her siblings in shorter. Periods of life. Right. And this is how how it should be. You know, that's especially officially today's age of just you know, it almost seems like these these types of captures would have been easier twenty years ago to pull off. But now social media, you know, I don't know it seems like especially if you're going to three year old. Okay. They're not gonna fight back. Probably not gonna say anything, you can manipulate them in any way. But almost like stealing, you know, an eighteen year old. It's kinda like how could you possibly keep that quiet? So it's such a disgusting. I think people would be surprised to know how easily it is. I've reasons, but Amy Bradley who disappeared from the cruise ship, you know, eighteen years ago, remember, Amy Riley up. I believe she's still alive. I think that she was taken into sex trafficking. And I think that she probably. Feel some sort of shame and doesn't know how to get out of it because in the process of surviving. She may have had to do things in order to to stay alive..

Madeleine McCann Amy Riley Madeline McCann United States Natalie Holloway Amy Bradley Neverland Hirsch Castro Detroit Martinez three year four five years eighteen years eighteen year fifteen years twenty years four year
"four five years" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"I saw you know it. I saw story today about Magic Johnson telling Brandon to be patient not to listen to the outside noise. And all that look in theory that all sounds good. And I get why he would do that. But do you buy that they're going to be patient with him considering what we just talked about about their kind of big plans considering LeBron is it'd be thirty four in like two weeks like how much patients can you have with someone like that? Erma tell you like this. If there's a deal on the table where you have to England to get a better player or a better package because you know, that lebrons time is running out in the next four five years. And if you have to wait for five years for Brandon Ingram with the object of the game for right now is to win. Now, you know, maybe not this year or if they can possibly swing it. But anything can happen in this league. You know, you're not gonna wait on a player when you have a direction of trying to win. Now, if they feel like as development is not going faster. They would like it to go. He could be dealt easily. Now when you were in Boston you guys had Rondo as a young guy. Now, he kind of fit with what you guys were doing this just seems like an odd fit when he's on the floor. Lebron like the numbers of crazy when he's on the floor LeBron as opposed to off the floor. He's much better. He's more himself. I guess when he's not on the floor. The brian. What would you do schematically there? Would you try to stagger? Their minutes, would you potentially? Bring him off the bench to maximize his potential and get him confidence. You know, you gotta figure out how to make it work because big about the in the situation where Rondo Rondo was a guard when you see Ingram, you know. He's developing yourself away praises if he's a star player. You know, it's not like he has a defined role. Right now. It's not like saying you have a Concorde row. K count. Core is a shooter Abram is needs the ball in his hands. So you know, that kind of contradicts what you're doing wetland, Ron whatever same time. If you're in a situation where they know they're not gonna wear right now, you plan as much as possible to develop them because maybe you need him as a tray piece or he made the to that player sooner than later. So I mean, you have the the way the way the situation is all about the situation where they are now. Paul Pierce hanging out with us here. Yeah. I'm with you on that couple of quick things before we let you go one more K D story. I don't know if you saw the store. Yahoo had. I'm sorry. Not yahoo. The athlete. Shamsher rania. He wrote a story about K and Katie talking about the goat and the goat players, right? And you mentioned Mike, and you mentioned Koby, and then he mentioned kyri, but he they mentioned the Brian. Let me ask you this, man. What is what your boy K D because this is a current role job here. Right. Absolutely. There has to be a toilet throw job because him Brown. Our good friends. You know, I've seen them in off season hanging out together. You know, I think he's you know, what this could be a setup for him. Joining the every doesn't want anybody else. The I don't know. But that's definitely trolling. Brian definitely I don't know if they fail under under bad blood as a, but I know as soon as as early as the summertime this past summer I've seen them hanging out at SP's parties and hanging out together. So we have to be a troll because I'm sure LeBron is probably texting where he takes the bra or some kind of stays to where he's five just throw them. So you'd think okay. So you think it's a ruse. You think he's trying to get everybody off the set and be like, oh, but Laker? You never know think about these days..

LeBron Brandon Ingram Rondo Rondo Brian Magic Johnson Yahoo England Abram Boston Paul Pierce Brown Ron Katie Mike Koby kyri four five years five years two weeks
"four five years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"A mindset pitching in in albuquerque much like it's a mindset pitching course field so developing that mindset understanding how to take care of your body is a really important part of of their passed through albuquerque has they come as they come to denver he's part of what it is when the guys are down in the minor leagues is really teaching them how to be pros so that learning curve is much smaller by the time they get up to the major league club there's no doubt about it you know when we first draft kids and get them into our system sign them and send them off to one of the short seasons you know that's really the first step what is professional baseball really mean what is the definition of professional baseball and then how do you start acclimating your day to day week to week month to month and then eventually eventually you're twelve month cycle of baseball life to prepare yourself for three four five years down the row down the road and you know it comes together over time certainly developing a mindset of a professional and what it takes and means to be a big league player is a big part of that one of the guys that are working with pitchers down there and tom murphy's kinda bounced back and forth with the rockies i know that you were quoted by kyle newman who doesn't nice job with the denver post earlier this week saying he's ready to go boy looking at his numbers he's breaking near three hundred and he's got that pop in the bat for him the last couple of years it's just been getting used to and trying to figure out major league hitting but it sounds like toms chomping at the bit to get up here yeah we'll tommy you know continues to get better and he continues to prepare himself and take advantage of every single day that he's down there to do both of those things and he's off to a great start you know really as he came towards the end of major league spring training and and started the.

albuquerque baseball tom murphy kyle newman denver post toms denver three four five years twelve month
"four five years" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"A back to a b jim van hughley joins us right now jim zona your home hi this is your home i we live in mason how we moved from michigan so we're going to experience the heat in the summer here eventually but this year no we're planning on heading out east and going all the way to maine if we can and i wrote truck our new road truck now let's talk about that adventure that you have with your new trick you when i first met you four five years ago you had a road track but you've had a lot of different rv since then described that to me well we moved away from road trick for for variety of reasons he wrote class class b and we want to a class c v thinking that oh we wanted a larger aathroom he wanted a shower and we had that but we found that the drive was so difficult in the cease for us that we had to put out on a quick moment to have drive better on the road and it wouldn't you say the drive was difficult you mean it was bumpy hard to control what it was actually hard to drive it straight down the road we had a heart my wife would point at something on learning the road to sco look at i look and i'd find out i was almost two feet off the road so it was getting to be a hazard for me and maybe i just don't audit dry but so you put stabilization on we purchase up steering stabiliser and that was the only thing that was available for the class c that we had there are others at have the rear sway bars and all that but it wasn't available for our unit so we decided that we try the as.

jim van hughley jim zona michigan maine four five years two feet
"four five years" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

"No so what's my future i'm not going to have a guy for one more year give me that production versus a god could give four five years on the cheap in comparison because he's on a rookie way scale deal and i just bought myself three x two years for cheap guy who could be as good that's the belichick way but he also could be far from his good yeah that's the risk is is that when you let a su go who's getting ready to get paid when you when you get rid of brandin cooks who's got one year left yeah sammy watkins whoever i there's no guarantee look who's talking about sometimes you go into the draft and you get a guy that's okay sometimes you get a guy can't play dead yet but you know what bill has made household names out of guys who were west walker san diego charger who remembers that good luck then miami dolphins so got to new england on stoppable right now he has chris hogan he gets julian eshelman back he's already mentally thinking i played a season element and cooks did that i'm bringing element back swap that out and get a first rounder all right gronk your back and then guess what we use are running backs out the backfield better to any team there is a conspiracy theory that i am partially subscribing to new england and new england of y'all office players they wanna hear it because i think i've heard the say one and it's a connecting a lot of really small room it's there but it makes a good story.

julian eshelman belichick brandin sammy watkins miami stoppable chris hogan four five years two years one year
"four five years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Dan pat oh man it's red eye radio he is eric harley and i'm gary mcnamara coming up on in the top of the hour just how far has the audience for the oscars fallen over the last four five years unbelievable when you see it in in order just some of the nfl but you look at paul on politics being brought into the nfl and the decrease in the audience that they of seeing which is what roughly seventeen eighteen percent uh over a over a twoyear period you see when you bring politics into our entertainment what happens and you and i believe that's one of the things not the only thing but one of the major things it's hurting the oscars right now is their outright political and preach he well pence yeah and if there is a purge of bad people in hollywood that's a good thing if they are indeed or are bad people who what you're seeing more and more is that you know this hollywood wagging they're finger of the rest of america of were part of their problem and we're the cause of their problem and that is not the case uh uh by the way we got a few comments people calling up in ann arbor wanting to know that uh because when we talked about when something is sold when we buy something and we sell it we understand that a lot of the paper dollars are electronic transfers and electronic mayors can be changed to paper dollars we understand that there are electron of transfers lead do yes just over but he knows he seemed to be concerned yes we're trying to make the point than electron in france were were trying to make that point that if you had twenty thousand dollars in ended with at twenty thousand dollars ended up in the hand you know it's and we said it was an electronic transfer other what we did mention that when we set it said but you've got that papering in on um it represents the same thing whether it's a dollar in the electronic transfer or a dollar paper dollar that you're holding in your hand that's the point there has to be something worth either that electron currency which can be turned into the paper currency or the paper currency that can be again changed into the electronic currency and we.

Dan pat eric harley gary mcnamara nfl paul hollywood america ann arbor france twenty thousand dollars seventeen eighteen percent four five years twoyear
"four five years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"To him in the people had to trashed because prior to about four five years ago we needed to have to trust if he had a certain dollar figure assets they had to trust the attorney said we're going to go ahead and shut this went down and a wolf you first of all you don't shut a trust out yasak you can de fund that you can pull the assets that are out of the trust and it's drew you could put them in the one trust right yeah and maybe the attorney didn't know maybe he didn't understand i don't know but the guy had a a serious issue with his colon and was was deemed to be terminal while his docks that hey you've got less than a year to to make it right now and so we did a couple things on on the financial side that needed to be considered one all of the appreciate it assets i wanted in his name at just in his name not in her name is when he passed away she would get up to step up and basis on all of that meeting she could sell all of that real estate that they had the current without having to pay any taxes or recapture depreciation or any that other stuff yes they also had some losses in people forget about this if you have a loss on a stock or an on any investment in in your spouse dies and it was owned jointly you lost half of that loss right so the losses need to go to the living the gains lead to go to the one who's gonna pass away there is a series of checklist that we go through when something happens to somebody or better yet when we know something is going to happen to some light and it doesn't mean that she doesn't get hit by a car it just means the probability is we're going to lose him first threat hey you're listening to consider this i'm joe clark long share contos you had a question or comment shoot me an email consider this at your life after work dot com don't forget you can go there your life after work dot com forward slash rethinking raf to get our thoughts on what.

attorney joe clark four five years
"four five years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on WEEI

"Good sponsors today smile is supposed to be fun it's a four he is funny he's funny but that's not a hanggliding accident could idiot go from one feral to another well you got the message i say john farrow ice i was driving down the street this morning sure enough other is a john farrow truck like a like an electricity they already john farrow israel already weren't weren't he is a grinder justice gotti that he got to get there gotta you gotta jaeger out there i will sort out the i know people here absolutely hate the yankees but i don't know how you can't look at what the yankees have done and to end we did we all left on guilty of it like everybody else two years ago last year when the red sox ruining the division yankees a three four five years away now hal signed brennan says he doesn't want to spend the money big free agents good luck buddy building that minor league system right well guess what they've just past you in the fast lane you've just past you writing on the fast lane and they are low and i learned they shines great they're young players they're young core has shown when you that they know how to win big games in your young core has put their pants in big say ladies need real leadership and lose right real not not showing great emotion coming up when the when the game is over the other day in cana making excuses forward and what kinda line is that we didn't we didn't feel the media were the fans were be hind us if you want cheers in the in a crowd the cheers don't start before you do something good you have to go out there and perform and do something and then they will follow it started cheering you now the media forget about it they never going to be friends okay we have an agenda we all do this is our agenda to create topics to create controversy so sorry no yes you can forget about us the oak ignore us ignored the noise that we throw out there all right but don't is loose said yesterday david price stupidity of turning your back on the fans just tom gortat performed you want to see how much they love.

yankees brennan john farrow john farrow israel hal david price tom gortat three four five years two years
"four five years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Their families till dawn has it forest today hello dr all right big news in liberty relationships jamie foxx and katie homes are out as a couple they are out they were strolling on the beach in malibu holding hands and this is a big deal because they have to do not ever admitted that their together they've always insisted there just friends and it's taken four years for them to be hiding can you imagine having a fouryear relationship in secret with somebody no unhappy the pomp rod seat following you i mean that would must have been really difficult cuts has especially if that's what they're used sylvia be out there and everybody knowing your visisted to kinda keep that secret yeah well and the the rumor goes that this may have been part of the agreement the of this separation shouldn't slash divorce agreement than tom and though the home so haiti homes had where she was not allowed to talk about this four five years that is i don't understand that like agreement i don't understand like what's the big deal he doesn't want to be i mean they're broken up he doesn't home man suffered yet just to control somebody for five years about who they're seeing in public with that's a little overboard tom by believe me oh i know now celso values for safety and after watching remedies that's right special yeltsin second season now there's a lot of stories why might be smart just scientology's us hushhush your love hush hush and she was seen with a ring on her finger in march two thousand sixteen who but jimmy fox's rep says that wasn't from him but you know what are we believe who knows okay all right selena gomez has a weird soccer fan and he is obsessed with her he's 24 years old he showed us that our house and a couple of days ago with a bunch of gifts herve security team thank goodness she has won intercepted the guy and they've seen him before they they've had to there's been other incidents with this guy he tried to this is what he tried to deliver to her a peanutshaped bouquet of flowers oh this is crazy it's like a flower arrangement that's you know yeah i mean that's the pardon and florist i guess was like called selena gomez is people and said this guy just tried to order flowers for you shaped as a penis so that sort of alerted their security team.

katie tom scientology jimmy fox selena gomez jamie foxx sylvia haiti yeltsin soccer four five years five years four years 24 years fouryear
"four five years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Like riding a bike make especially with this organization you know so many people but it it's been a lot of fun in catching up in in learning by been really impressed with the town on on the field and and uh they you know the last three four five years just that the the athletic ability over i slept billionaires team i think stands out uh the debt that critical spots the offense in line uh was days been very impressive so far in in in his pretty deep uh pass rushers and you go back in the time machine and watch gylys peppers in it's like you know it's like two thousand two again so there's just a lot a athletic ability here lauded depth obviously am i i know rauner rare really well and work with them well and it's he's been a good week how about the coaching staff marty some are known to you summer newer faces how do you feel about the kind of staff yoon kotra there at assemble while like in ryan is ressemble assembled on men just stay very good communication into starts raanan i had kicked communication so when when i will every day meet with the scouts and we will watch the practice taping we will go over um the the wrong mr every scout has a position wax so after we watch the tape the guy in charge a dps will talk about debt group and what he saw new in the defense line at center and then ron is in consequence unification with his coaches he meets with us coaches every night at nine fifteen and then he and i talk in we bring in the opinion he will tell me what the coaches think it certain spot i'll tell him some of the the ah uh comments and observations the scouts have may in its stack continuity is that communication name iran and i have had and i think it it helps because the every voice he here a you know scouts are here for a reason david job in in evaluate and coaches have a job and sometimes the way they look at eight players coaches looking in one way you know they want guys who are dependable and in england town a guys in in but they won one guys who don't have a lot of mental errors in in his scouts look more it may be physical ability.

time machine marty ryan ron england town iran david three four five years
"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"four five years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"The red trumpeting hummingbird's love it yeah they i mean they're fantastic but a lot of times because the grows with any kind of i get so big at the top of the plants a lotta cla mattis do the very same thing they don't put any to let let's say foliage growth at the bottom so you may always end up just seeing of snaking stems coming up with the new with the growth of foliage and the flowers and everything at the top for the most part so anything that doesn't look good go ahead just you'll get rid of that okay and now my wish syria i've had it for about four five years and it's it's only bloomed one time with one group of flowers and it's never bloomed again and it just do i need to hit some who argue i need to just cut it down and put a new one bay basically don't prune it at all in it could take several years i don't know how big it was when he originally got it but it could take your multiple years before you're going to get any flowers off and probably i don't know when the y'all got the singleflower but that may have been the first year that you had it or if first year was in your landscape lotta time right the plants are let's say given steroids they are not available for the homeowners so people can you'll get the excitement of that but then reality comes back and this is kind of what you're looking at so maybe in a hopefully it's in full son and not closer house because they could pull the roof off your house yes it's in full sign and i've got it on a trailer i um a pretty thirty one way and it looks like a little tree i'm let's just so big in full at the top and and hanging down bright but no flour yeah so don't do any pruning at all don't over fertilize it and just kind of leave it alone okay okay thank you very much i.

syria four five years