17 Burst results for "Four Five Decades"

"four five decades" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

08:42 min | 2 weeks ago

"four five decades" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Just spit out now. Quarterbacks three of them start yesterday wide receivers all over the place. The thing that mike is saying that will ward off what mark cuban was predicting twelve years ago. When he's like this bubble will burst. That sport can't keep getting more popular. It is concussions. It's attrition it's violent. It's unethical it's cockfighting. It can't keep growing this bubble's going to burst and in the middle of that we're watching brock osweiler cement footed back in the pocket. I'm gonna throw it out here three yards and i'm gonna spend the season doing that and to the point where you you create in me a hatred. I had not seen inside my body for football since i saw urban. Meyer suffering on the sideline yesterday like the whole spread between that was i never. I didn't feel that again like a vitriol an acid. I don't want good things to happen here. A and now look at it. He's talking about the ballet of basketball. The he's talking about the beauty of those wide receivers are so skilled that even these defensive backs who are unbelievable. they're cheetahs all of them ridiculous. Cheetahs and the wide receivers are more graceful. Because we're because it's julio jones because it's these guys that if a quarterback is gonna throw it to one spot and that guy is so big and strong that you can't do anything about it because he's he's brandon marshall fast. Everyone in the league now is brandon marshall. Fast right all of these guys. The i mean metcalf. What are you going to do with that. Like what's what does any human being the species of time throughout with metcalf when he when he wants the football and so two for the sport to become beautiful artful again after concussions and violence and everything else that is a tribute to them fixing those rules to make it something more interesting than it's been. I think the nfl's just become a lot more like college football now. You see a proliferation of spread area offenses in the nfl and the scheme has evolved to make it more exciting and fun game now in college. You know you you watch a handful of really great players surrounded by players that are not really pro level and now in the nfl. It's the best players in the country. All running these exciting fast paced offenses. And that's why it's just gotten a lot more fun to watch but it is to do with the evolution of these talents because used to be to have. A mobile quarterback was a choice right. We had to run a pro style offense or a system. That benefited a mobile quarterback. Michael vick was not a good quarterback in the traditional way. Use a great runner. A great arm wasn't a good quarterback. It's interesting i heard over the weekend. That lamar jackson spent entire practices in the run-up to this season. Just playing from the pocket like in in a training camp practice never scrambled to try and get better at this and the amazing thing about these talents is that they do have both you can stand in the pocket be traditionally good at playing the position while also having remarkable athletics. and it's unplayable. This is what i'm telling you though about what has been stu. Gods four five decades of this sport getting to this spot where bill polian sees a quarterback looking certain way peyton manning drops back. He's got a stiff neck. We've got to be a pocket passer. I am gonna throw with great precision and that held down the position across decades right. That's what it looked like. It couldn't look like anything else. Nothing but that had succeeded. So fran tarkenton or or archie. Manning was actually an athlete at the position. Nope it can't be john elway. It can't be somebody like that. It's got to be pure back. That just won a super bowl again. Okay but this is. That's fine stu gods and you just say to win for now and maybe tom brady will be doing twenty years from now. What i'm talking about is what's coming for the position. Why it's coming for the position and how it's been held back over the years over the years too because the moment brady went down brady none other all the rules change and now you got at that position. Oh wait a minute. I'm not allowed to hit that guy. And he's more athletic than me. And then watch how. The position evolves forced by merits. God's forced right but forced over. They don't they have not what they look at the guys who get the commercials and broadcasts. It's all the white quarterbacks. All of them all they get the or or greg olsen like those are the guys getting some with like. It's just again and again those are the guys. Get the job. And this is how it is that. The black guys have finally and josh allen but not daniel jones but this is how these guys have finally cracked the code. And all the old guys. They're gonna be gone soon. They played that way now. I need eight seconds to throw the ball. Who's gonna get extra time for my guy to get away from the defensive back and it's just been forced on the sport but you've got to watch it you've gotten to watch it through your lifetime. How it wouldn't change wouldn't change wouldn't change protected by poland's by police won't won't change. Brady's hurt rule change. Okay here's the flood rule change. Here's the flood the athletes. You can't hit them and they're better athletes than you randall. Cunningham was a novelty now. It's the norm and that's a good thing. This is not about right or wrong. And i'm a great i. I love to see the evolution of this position. I love seeing guys like trae leads. You know having opportunities and probably going to be a really good quarterback. I'm just saying you're not gonna get that out of the game. The pocket passer the kirk cousins. It's not going to be as quick as i. I think people it's fine like maybe it'll be ten years all i'm martyrs headed in the right around. This isn't a moral thing for me. I'm just marveling that. Were sitting in the middle of the evolution. I'm not making the like i'm not. I'm not gleeful here. Because i finally the black quarterback. I'm just fascinated that. We're right smack. Dab in the middle of this is how it finally evolves you get people yelling yelling across thirty years to got. You can't win with black quarterback scrambling quarterback mobile quarterback. You can't win that way. And now because of the offensive changes because the college coaches or scheming it up differently because The game is such an amazingly precise thing now so refined that it's shocking when tyreek hill or lock it are in your secondary free because everybody's on top of everybody and these are the best athletes you've ever seen crawling all over other at the height of evolution in america's most popular sport and we are right now sitting through what is the golden age of change to god's in sports sports a like change. You like the things that you've seen resist change. We right now. We're in the golden age of what looks like the evolution because all of you looked at week one and no matter. What your ethical concerns. And i've had him across years. You're like that's beautiful beautiful. That is that is the way soccer's beautiful that the athletes on this field a ridiculous. Everything is absurd. you're throwing it to a six nine tight end and you have to put it in a spot. Because he's got to you know he's he's got three guys crawling up like scaffolding his his shoulder pads beautiful just about everywhere but in pittsburgh that guy was a disaster every time i looked up the bills at twenty yards of offense happening. They're bad game. I thought that was going to be thirty. Eight thirty five. It was like thirteen. Three at halftime. Honestly the steelers looked exactly like they did last year plus nausea harris because the defensive line played incredible. Secondary was shockingly really good. The bills. offense couldn't get anything going. But as soon as ben went on the field i was like. Oh please no well. That's the other thing is this is. This is one of the other evolutions on the other side of the ball. Stugatz these unblock guys. Aaron donald j watts two miles. Garrett's the word. Yeah i mean all of these guys right. That's the other side of the ball evolving. Oh look you're going to go get all of these six seven basketball players to play tight end. We're gonna get to your quarterback faster with all of these six seven basketball players and everybody every the the most dominant guys. You're watching out there. And they all look like lawrence taylor chandler jones. How bad family is the bones. Jones family scary is that in chandler jones five sacks yesterday and every time he's back there it's like why is it only five.

brandon marshall brock osweiler metcalf nfl football lamar jackson mark cuban julio jones Cheetahs josh allen brady bill polian fran tarkenton Meyer Michael vick john elway basketball peyton manning greg olsen
"four five decades" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

04:05 min | 2 months ago

"four five decades" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Found that people who tested positive for covert nineteen. We're wearing fitbit's displayed behavioral and psychological changes such as elevated heart rate. These symptoms lasted longer and people with cova than those with other respiratory john. Deere we've heard about the long term effects of cova de even on the level of superb athletes. We've seen the difference at least in the first half of the season with standouts like a dj lemay. Hugh with the new york mets. Who started out with a terrible bad with the yankees. I'm sorry who started out with a terrible batting average and unfortunately when the yankees rolled into fenway he started hitting the ball much better and he seemed to come around the same thing with iran. Four the red sox. But we know it's even with these athletes who train all the time and train your out. There have been some athletes that get cova last year. Young healthy athletes. That have been slow to recover back to midseason form. Sure i will. I be happy if he went to the mets. We can i sign exactly. Let's let's call it. Call it but you're right. Even some of the very best athletes just staying in the new england area cam newton. The patriots quarterback last year started the season strong got cove. It was never the same even after he returns and they're not the same player. Jason tatum. the boston celtics young star. It took him more than a month to kind of get his air back. He said to really feel like he was himself again. Even after a very mild case of cova so the long haul cova cases or something obviously scientists and doctors are still learning about. This is the brand new disease. We're still figuring it out. And i do think there is. There is a sense of still be unknown as to what the long-term effects were cova could be years from now would do could symptoms crop up four five decades from now one just never knows and again this is just yet another one of those talking points that is used rightly by the white house and other public health officials. Say get your vaccine. Let's not take the risk. There's so much about this disease this virus that we just don't know about yet. Why take the chance with the biggest one of all being the longer this virus allowed to be out there that it can grow and spread mutate that at some point there may be a variant that defeats the vaccine or at least the vaccine is not nearly effective enough the delta variant now. Not quite very. I should say is better at getting around. The vaccine and others still vaccine provides really good protection. The fear is another variant could emerge down the road. That would even more dangerous. All right still ahead on morning joe. The death toll from the surf side conduct collapse is growing as authorities pledged to continue recovery efforts with urgency. We'll have the latest from south florida. Plus civil rights leaders visit the white house amid a fight over voting rights. We'll speak with two. Who were there in that. Meeting and alzheimer's escon eighteen years without a new treatment this week. The fda approved a controversial drug but just narrowed its recommendation for who can receive it. You're watching morning joe. We'll be right back with all that and more. Our world is facing some big challenges. Chuck todd briggs them down a deep dive into a new topic instead of covering all the big stories. We're going to cover one. single subject. Impacting american politics exploring and explaining the critical issues that affect our future meet the press reports. All episodes of season two are now available on demand on peacock looking.

cova dj lemay new york mets yankees Jason tatum Deere cam newton Hugh red sox boston celtics patriots iran new england white house john joe south florida Chuck todd briggs alzheimer fda
"four five decades" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

Star Wars Sessions

07:49 min | 9 months ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Star Wars Sessions

"Kids would look it sign man. He's a blue guyot. Maybe maybe i just don't say now my boy we're talking about robert downey junior and he is of course he is so talented and i love him as ireland grandma thrown. It doesn't sound like you're fan. Doesn't sound like i'm a fan. Do you have any people in mind for a thrown position accident of a throne position. Just clarify so. He wasn't five when he's in japanese. He made his acting. Debut is at the age of five when is about the chaplain. So he's been acting since he was fired. So we've been acting for four four five decades. Now which is unreal decide. I think the of the person i would have picked play thought thrown has. We can't do it now. Because they've been in the galaxy and their out of a ship. I would have picked rich negron as grandma thrown. He would have been my throne whether he would have done the blue makeup. I no Of course the laws mickelson. But i'm sure. We'll meant to name jon hamm on a few of our listeners. Have mentioned him. But i think john ham has got the a stephanie. Got the chops to put it off but to me actually in in a serious. This isn't dodging the question. I'd like somebody to come in. Who is kind of under the radar somewhat. Someone that other is east lock. Daisy ridley and was wasn't a prominent actor actress. So what went through and comes on. We're not blinded. Look don't hamlets. we'd in blue origin looks strange with someone. We don't know before because it's easy to get one of the skull scott boys to do it because they have a serial menacing presence just to them but jim it honestly our driver having no no no that sounds like sitting on the fence somewhat but to me then i'll be out to think roy what are going to get from this not know what these act to bring to the game. Because i've seen him in and films in the last few years but somebody with somebody who. I'm not entirely sure about simply because of who they are. Reachable would have been my first choice but otherwise unknown mike. Well what about you. Ya to be honest. Might i can only think of unknown actors and the people i can think of almost think that too famous icon help fill. That wouldn't work A wouldn't be surprised if someone that would no among all. Yeah no that's a nice low-fare you know when when this happens because this was mentioned in the mandalorian season two which i still can't believe people. Can you believe that my boy can you believe where is grand admiral thrown good. Absolutely my politest little light. It's good night. You know what. Though one thing. I will say i feel like we can't forget because i feel like people off again. We can't forget it. install celebration chicago. Twenty nine teen on was all boy. Pierce brosnan. i was photo shopped. His brosnan sure it was pays bras an awful lot like pierce brosnan it. I mean come on. What would you have peers prisoners. Strong serious the ocean okay. I think he he would absolutely look the paul under like he's to one person and maybe it's because of that celebration mirror but i can pitch with the blue skin and he's he's been busy may be working in Film was he's gone off the radar and he's got potentially got the voice if he could take away some of the irish twang and have a more neutral voice If pierce brosnan was announced. I wouldn't have any issue with hang on. His rosen is irish yes. He's an irish no way he's very roy. He is what i i. Food is british i. I is english to be lots. May what's shaken not stirred. What an absolute gangster fair enough yet. Seriously though that's that is kind of who i think of now thrown just funny just i might even tweet that now on twitter be like guys a we forget in they've already costs throng or just put out a scoop a mickelson played in revels. And there's also that show and if laws mickelson got laws ditman mickelson move for that. Because he's a decent resume very decent resume behind him as well. Yeah yeah i. I'm i'll just rather at nobis. Someone wrote downey junior. I think that'd be crazy. I don't know again. I'm not sure if the roller not now. No one's above. You know maybe they are on and i. I don't want a pet. We wanted to step away from the mcu. Because been being for so long. And i imagine public to try his hand a different type of film. And i might not is plumbing with bombastic but doolittle was an unabashed disaster. So maybe if somebody said you wanna come a place thrown for free episodes. He might probably say yes. Yes the sit my. That's i think. I think to be honest. I think that puts it to bed. Let's see what happens. I doubt it and this is. The annoying. Thing is a little bit of information like this. You know people jump honing on youtube. And i do tree as gospel. Hi i'll like yeah. This is happening. Lab is going to get those clicks. I dunno i don and this smarter needs this because we're talking about it because it gains so much traction but it's always interesting top news like this but i can't see it happen in my really con- and i'll be surprised. If he was cost are really would be surprised. Not be a little bit a little. Bit worried about A sensationalist mo- most certainly complete click by. But hey there is a way some from in clicked by sometimes. It's fun to speculate because it gives us onto the war to picture of. Actually who would we rob have price throw who's better fit potentially for throwing but lucasfilm knowing them have caught a few i basically which will potentially nocco blind so yeah. I agree fun of news. There but simone confirm news commission. Up top is Apparently low key executive producer. Michael water and and overcome multi famous. Whoa he's tapped up now to right kevin five star wars movie Michael wounds can be taken on some more work within the marvel. Disney plus tapers whoa. He's writing the doctor strange sequel. So he's a man who's got some clout behind him. Kevin foggy probably probably the producer in hollywood out. There right now and for the last decade has picked this dudes to be his reuter of his star wars films. You're making multi finance. Well no i think he directed one episode and always producer episodes. So yeah it's nice to have some news about this osen there. Yeah absolutely may is great because this was one of the things that stood out to me. The wasn't mentioned.

Pierce brosnan robert downey jon hamm pierce brosnan Disney Michael wounds youtube five twitter john ham one episode mike Michael kevin ireland four Daisy ridley mickelson one thing first choice
"four five decades" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Can we get the location data off your phone? That might help us figure out where you've been who you might have been in contact with. I don't know what the conclusion here is. Because manual tracing is the better way to do it and and but it seems like some of these health agencies are saying getting in on one of these APPs from apple and Google just isn't worth our time There there's better uses for technology that can help annual tracing ooh Pat. I don't know how you feel about this. It's starting to. We got a lot of lot of conflicting arguments. About what is the best way to figure out who's sick and how the rest of US don't consec? That's why I think we've probably just put a permanent quarantine underneath all of humanity for the next decade. Barring that no. I think it's messy. I think part of the problem is is certainly Most tech companies facebook Other companies have done such a have such a horrible reputation for doing a decent job of handling. You know privacy in and it's just it's a mess Mostly I'm just kind of blown away with with the size of these offices or the size of these groups that like Matt Up Massachusetts thousand okay but like seventeen thousand twenty thousand People this is just. I'm delighted the idea of actually using people for this. I just think it's developing mobile. App is a nightmare for a well-funded Organiz company with world. Class developers. Trying to put something out so I can totally see why actually having physical people and databases probably is a smarter thing. It's it's it's never as simple as anybody thinks just built an that'd be great you know and it does this and then relaxes that and then we'll do this. You know not my data thing that'll track everybody in and invariably somebody sells it to somebody already gets pissed off I maybe a little randy. This you know I. I am very complimentary of the privacy protections that the Apple Google Platform. I think they're really. I think they've done a great job on that. You are correct so you shouldn't. We shouldn't lose sight of the fact that all the health agencies agree we say oh. There seems to be disagreement. There really is only disagreement about whether to implement an APP or not. There's agreement that manual tracing is the best way. There is no disagreement about that. And maybe that hasn't got through in all of these stories but manual tracing means. I've talked to an individual. I helped jog their memory. I got solid ideas of where they spent the most time. Yeah they're not going to remember every single person. They passed by a grocery store. But I'll know they went to the grocery store and who they talked with. They're like oh I remember seeing my friend gene there and manual tracing has fewer places where things can go wrong than Apple Google's Bluetooth because Bluetooth you know doesn't really know distance very well and it can. It can interfered with and it might not work and it might crash and so I can see where some health agency say. Look it could be helpful. Let's do it right because more data is better and I can see other health agency saying yeah but why. Why waste our resources doing that? When we're GONNA get almost all the way there with manual tracing anyway and then we won't have to worry about dealing with the margin of error on these APPs and any privacy problems are gone now because we're just dealing with manual tracing. Yeah yeah kind of Yeah. It sort of trickles off. He continues just putting up on Wednesday spotify. Ceo Daniel Act told Bloomberg that apple has a long way to go before it is an open and fair platform. Spotify is pursuing an antitrust action against APPLE IN EUROPE FOR LIMITING. How third party APP MUSIC APPS work on. Us particularly spotify complained about the thirty percent? Revenue share on any purchase made on Iowa's SONOS CO founder. John Macfarlane said open twitter on twitter rather quote solid irony here having worked closely with both apple and spotify I would say it's more significantly significantly more difficult to work with in spotify's clues ecosystem then apples respect and appreciate both companies but open. Spotify is not Patrick. You could cheer the walls. Year annual the glass walls and Daniel ex house shattering in the middle of that like I was reading an interview. And I'm like are you kidding? Me spotify like there's there's third party platforms that are desperate or spotify. Spotify refuses. They want total control over the edge. It's the fact that he said this is like half. The music industry deals with software is just pointing and laughing at him Not just you know. Sonos has a pretty good operating Relationship with them but other companies that have tried to work with them but like yeah. They have no interest. They don't care. Please stop back to integrate spotify because we can't Because spotify won't let us it's yeah I loved I would normally defend spotify like it's their platform. They can decide what THEY WANNA. Let on as a podcast. I'm glad our podcast is on spotify but when it wasn't I didn't hold it against spotify because it's like well they get to decide who let in and who they don't write but we're it does break down. His spotify is pointing at apple saying but they shouldn't be allowed the same thing and granted. These are different situations what spotify saying is the. Ios Is a much wider platform and they shouldn't force us not to be able to charge in the way we want and that is the big issue is apple says thirty percent no matter what and you can't work around it in any possible way you have to either charge thirty percent or you can't charge your APP on Ios at all and that's one of the big things spotify and others are upset about which is a little different than not integrated with Sonos easily. So so I get where there's a difference there is also some overlap there. Yeah it's also the other thing it doesn't help us at apple has developed special relationships with certain companies that have the where they are not charging thirty percents. That's certainly money's up the water so that is only for video. Only for very narrowly defined very large company. It's couldn't even straight face. Yeah folks if you want to resell our products ticket leads each date about five minutes. Be SURE TO SUBSCRIBE TO DAILY. Tech HEADLINES DOT COM. All right folks as we mentioned at the top of the show Patrick Norton moving into a new house at a very interesting time to be moving into a new house. I mean normally. We want you to talk about Just all the things. You're running into as you try to set up technology in a new house. 'cause that's helpful as as people are always moving but I imagine it's even more interesting right now. It's certainly You know Goodness I I have to fly back to where all of our household furnishings stored so I can get them and bring the back so part of me been like stealing myself. Did Not go into complete panic in hyperventilating On the airplane as I fly to where I'm picking up you know I was laughing at the right word but I'll I'll say I was laughing about that He's also interesting. Because you know especially millennials. are moving more often and Or more frequently. I think than anybody in their age bracket has in the last couple four five decades and especially in urban areas. It's actually kinda shocking. How fast people in that age bracket are moving? These days It's it's funny. The first thing I thought about this. Those writing down notes like Google Search Internet options in the name of the town. You're moving to ISP options Because a lot of people don't actually know even real estate agents or or landlords. Don't actually know what options are available. schedule an appointment early. You know basically get the electric turned on and make sure the Internet shows up right after that and it's ridiculous that sounds in some places or some services they actually have a fairly hefty lag time Say Fairly Half Day. Meeting could be a week after you take possession of the place which doesn't sound like forever until you're in a house for a week with the Internet When you're transitioning to house it's not a bad time to upgrade routers but yourself a favor keep your old reliable router nearby till you verify that. The new router actually works. That may sound silly until you've actually had to walk over to a neighbor's House and borrow a cup of crowder But people don't know the exist but two gallons ziplock bags are possibly my favorite thing ever for organizing parts and electronics Because they are huge they fit almost anything you can actually fill laptops inside of them with their power supplies And you know it's time you spent packing your stuff. The less likely to be running around trying to figure out where the particular power supply for. Your router is I actually you know like to have a box which has sort of the house network inside of it. So that everything. I need like okay. They've conducted the Internet. And I have my box in then my router and all of the things I need to get kind of basically everything up running This may sound obvious to people who are highly organized Or don't move up often but there's nothing worse than knowing like okay. The routers in one of those fifteen boxes kids and you can watch finishing for once. You found the router easy to be packing go like I. Well these cables are in the same box. Sure be easy to find them. And it's like no man could have been that ziplock bag and labeled that bag tape it to the router like do the couple extra things that makes your life so much easier on the other end. I moved nine times for twelve. I literally when I when I pack a box I write up. What's in the box on three sides of it so that if it goes into a storage unit I can always have a side facing out with the name of what's inside of it then Hdtv's you actually should transport them vertically if you're moving yourself You know the the magic. Lcd Juice is not gonNA drip out of the monitor if it's stored flat but The the panel is actually supported vertically. And when you put it horizontally and then bounce it. It's much more likely to create a stress fracture in the center of the screen which is really heartbreaking You know key something. Soft and dirt free between the screen and any furniture blankets. And if you're renting furniture blankets assume that somebody is stopped on. You know a giant pile of sand on. We'll get something you gotta fleece blankets or pretty good firstly spike. It you know bandit around there. And then store it vertically in between a couple of mattresses or the internet or lighter your matches can you. You WanNa take Patrick's advice on this. Because the only way that I felt safe having my D. L. P. TV moved in circa two thousand five. Two thousand six was with Patrick help. He really knows what he's talking about here. I've moved to many times. I remember that You know on my obsession with routers having your Internet..

spotify apple Patrick Norton Google US Ceo Daniel Act Sonos Matt Pat Massachusetts EUROPE randy twitter CO founder Bloomberg Iowa D. L. P. TV John Macfarlane
"four five decades" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Of the sort of widespread feelings that the existing political establishment wasn't working for a lot of people in the middle of the country here in the UK or in the middle of the economic spectrum or the middle of the ideological spectrum you know there was a sense that the new globalized economy was working for people at the top not for people in the middle of the bottom there was a feeling I think the political system was out of reach for a lot of people and I think both Donald Trump in his way and Boris Johnson his way arrived with a kind of a wrecking ball and said we'll take all that down and cut through it all for you and that was a very appealing message in the last war I think or people who are suffering both cultural and economic anxiety and in the UK where skepticism about the you know the whole European Union experiment such as it was for the last four five decades continue to be very high and I think they took advantage of the feelings of anger and insecurity did Boris Johnson the follow the playbook that Donald Trump did well not exactly in the because I think the situations were kind of different I think the biggest difference between Boris Johnson and Donald Trump is that Johnson actually comes from within the British political system either he's basically a product of the political and social system that he now kind of criticizes and is setting out to to tear up to tear down to some extent and Donald Trump is a true outsider but I think what they share in common is the feeling that you know the the the world the political world that it had involved which is no longer acceptable to a lot of people and that they were going to sort of come out it directly and finally and without apology and promised to to to dismantle it to some extent and I think on that front they are similar and Boris Johnsons case that meant following through with the the decision that the British people I've made to withdraw from the European Union and Donald trump's case it took the form of saying we're out of these trade agreements are gonna stop this immigration that you all find distasteful are they alike in personality I think they are in a lot of ways which is to say they're both very self confident very brash very willing to say things that others may think but don't dare to say and to say it in terms of that others might find to be beyond the pale sometimes I I think they're different in the sense that you know I think Boris Johnson is is is that more of a kind of an in inside player politically he can play the outside game in the inside game but I think it both personality terms and in a world view they're actually they actually are similar we're speaking with Gerry side Washington editor of the Wall Street journal Jerry are there other global leaders like them well I think that there are popping up all over the place and I think this is a sign that a lot of the kind of anxiety about the way the globalized economy and technology are disrupting economies and societies and wives are playing out I mean you have kids to take off for few you have you have prime minister mody in India you have the Kerr old brawn and then hungry you have in mind Khan in Pakistan you have did you check your balls balls and Arlen Brazil yeah and I think it most interestingly you also have a manual micronutrients who's not a populist as so many of these others are but who was definitely somebody who decided to take on the existing political establishment he was in the French government he went outside the government for his own party in the sort of with a sort of a centrist agenda and said basically I'm gonna take apart the system from within and that's exactly what he did when he won the election as president of France sure you've referenced a couple times use the term economic globalization what does that mean to the average person why are people afraid of that well I think what it means is basically that you're no longer looking for to find your way in your place in America continent but in a global Kerr to find your way in your place in American icon but in but in a global economy and why is that scary to people I think it means that it's a kind of a country international competition it is a global economy in which wages can be driven trapped down if other people are willing to work for less than you are in in in another place and where a lot of trade flows work not to the advantage of consumers necessarily in a given country but to the advantage of a multinational corporation I make all those critiques are really quite accurate but I think those are the fears that arise with the global economy and one of the responses that people want to see put into place our policies that build walls to separate their country from the rest of the global economy and I think to some extent that's what you're seeing thanks Jerry Jerry side Washington editor at the Wall Street journal it's twenty minutes before the hour.

four five decades twenty minutes
"four five decades" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Us some climate of the flaws change issue. of this climate change debate We in your opinion. generally will report on it'd be natural. Well, But a biggest flaw there's right now still is a lot of the scientists fact that out there who greenhouse just won't believe warming that why is theory that? is physically impossible. Well, the interesting It is thing not is correct there. all I the mean, arguments, as I say, you there hear are people all with the different modeling, beliefs you hear and predicting there major on warming what they in the know future and observe is they, all based they just on the assumption don't want to accept climate that greenhouse change. They gases do absorb climate change. infrared energy What's interesting from earth in this makes case now, warmer what one I'm way showing or another, is the greenhouse and that's just warming not possible. theory is physically impossible. Now in That terms is of all 'cause, the scientists for decades you now know, we and all the scientific admit organizations, and you just explained and all the countries how the planet agree, has greenhouse warmed up gas somewhat theory over the years. is the cause of global warming. In terms of I'm coming what's along causing and saying, wait a it. minute, What guys. are what are There's the possibilities? a problem here in the basic science, there's In something two wrong thousand here. six So I was we're really happily changing cruising the the debate internet now when I found from some data people from Greenland from the scientists ice saying core this data is what's with Israel going on. down into the And into we the gotta do glaciers something about in Greenland it right away and to me conceal coming along something as a about scientist the volcanic and thing. Wait activity a minute. of the past, Look at these and the things temperature that are inconsistent of the look past, at these problems. and fairly good And resolution in fact, we can and show look at rather the data clip. and what they showed was the greatest, Really? volcanic activity Impossible, you can often recorded that science in Greenland in this case, ice we can. was for SEIs Lee, at the time I gotta we tell warmed you, though, Peter, out of it the is last one ice of the most age confusing from twelve thousand issues. five First hundred of years all, ago, or nobody twelve thousand years wants ago anything to happen to nine to the thousand planet. five Nobody hundred years ago in that we wanna would imply taking care of the we Balkan want the issue ISM caused solved, warming. but I've never seen Now, something so my disruptive. first active Have you? volcano when I was nineteen, I studied volcanoes, I call all my it life, the most expensive and I looked at mistake that, and I said, ever wait made a minute. in the history We of all science. know volcanoes What, cause what cooling, I haven't talked about the yet is the Russian real problem amount Pinatubo with greenhouse in nineteen warming Ninety-one theory in the Philippines goes all the way back was. a couple of hundred years ago to a fundamental understanding misunderstanding in physics about what is heat. How does he travel within matter and, and through air and space? It turns out, we made a fundamental mistake over two hundred years ago. Nobody living today is responsible for that mistake, and that there is a fundamental problem in science a revolution going on at science. That has big implications. One of which is the greenhouse gas theory is not correct. But how many people accept? Just about nobody at the moment. I I'm I'm talking to many of the top scientists in the world. I've got a strong reputation and science published a lot as I began to question, greenhouse warming theory. Nobody I became much more difficult to publish. They wouldn't even send it out for review. I've been explaining to scientists for many years now that there is a phone of mental problem here, and just, and I've also had Mussa scientific meetings, I've talked over seven thousand scientists, and that kind of situation, the problem is scientists are very defensive of greenhouse gases at the moment, and they just don't want to the can't step up to it as one of the leading scientists one of the legal authors of one of the recent reports said to make Peter, there is no way that you could be right. And all the rest of us are wrong, and I will give me a scientific reason you can't. The reason I have a website called physically dash impossible dot com is a single page website. And what's written on that page shows? It's physically impossible, and I challenge anybody in the world to find anything different problem with what's on that page physically dash impossible dot com and is that changing getting anybody to rally around you. There's beginning to be motion. I'm getting I'm in the process of putting together a number of short videos that explains all the details and in a way that most people can understand. I'm getting ready for a major push and we're going to see, but there is some interest, I've been selling a lot of books and doing a lot of radio shows, and some scientists are they're, they're, they're not attacking me the way they attack many of the skeptic's, they know that scientifically, I've got a very strong background and I don't know. But, you know, it was max plank, who is one of the fathers of modern physics who said that new ideas, and in science never come from a group of people, no matter how we're gonna is it really gets down to one person who wraps himself up totally in that problem. And that's the only problem in his life all that period of time. And so I'm in a very interesting position right now of, yes, I have some friends who agree on a few scientists who are, are beginning to listen, but I have very, very clear evidence that there is a fundamental problem, and people don't wanna hear that problem, bringing good news. I'm showing the greenhouse gases are not the problem. We can burn fossil fuel safely provided. We manage the pollution. Doc, computer, Langdon ward. His book is called what really causes global warming. Do people confuse warming with pollution, Peter? Not so much. I mean, what's interesting to me is those of us were around in the seventies really understand acid rain and what pollution did in this country. And in that decade of the seventies and end of the eighties, we took control the pollution. I find younger people aren't aware that and unaware of what a major role we played in and cleaning up pollution from burning fossil fuels and other things. So I think there's been a lot of this question about climate change versus global warming. And that kind of confusion, but it's all pretty straightforward actually when you step back and look at it, and that's what I'm trying to put together and they videos the ozone layer complete is one hundred percent solid where is it stand right now? What's the percent? Well, first of all the ozone depletion occurs on the winter, so his major depletion over the end Arctic in the end Arctic winter major pollution over the Arctic in the Arctic winter. So it's only a part of the year that it's doing it. Why, why is there? Well, because of the chemistry that goes on, and it gets down to the fact that chlorine interact with a lot of molecules of, of ozone when if tickly cold in environments that you get a primarily Arctic, but lesser extent and the Arctic, so ozone ozone depletion. We're talking about is only for a few months in each hemisphere during the year. It also I mean, we're still getting significant to thirty degrees, north forty degrees north, but its biggest the polls. So if we look at the Arctic ozone hole it has recovered only a few percent. So we have a long way to go to get back to where we were in nineteen seventy scientists have been quantifying that for many, many years as being three or four five decades in the future, and that's a sumo. We don't mess it up like the Chinese have done. And we don't slow down that recovery. What what's the situation with the ice shelves? Are they are they not melting away? There's major melting going on in an article in the Arctic. The greatest warming majored anywhere in the world is on.

Arctic Peter Greenland max plank scientist Israel Philippines Langdon ward SEIs Lee hundred years twelve thousand years one hundred percent
"four five decades" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

09:57 min | 2 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Thanks, jim. I appreciate your time here. Now you caught my attention because your speech is going to be about the reduction of world, income inequality. I'm told if I paid any attention to the news and the internet and opinion pieces, and these sorts of things that income inequality is a real problem. It's growing at some point, we're going to have a revolution, and all the rich people, their heads, you're going to be on pikes. Well, this seems to be kind of the mania narrative in terms of understanding is issue. It's important to think of income distribution income inequality in of three different ways. One is and the one that you generally here, stressed in the narrative, is income differences, within the country, such as the United States or Scandinavian countries were sale or China at cetera. And of course, that just indicating within the country, the share of income, derived by very high. Income people relative to lower income, people, a second way that you can think about any quality is, is cross country in come differences, countries that have very high incomes, relative to the middle income countries relative lower income countries. So this cross country income differences, right told that, like places like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, and things like that they have the highest income per capita or whatever, but actually there, that there's a huge disparity in that some people get a whole bunch of money, and most people don't. Right. And that then, finally third, you can think of income, inequality worldwide that is to say, suppose that you looked at the income of every person in the world some living in high income countries some living in low income countries, most living in middle income countries things of that sort, what would be that agree of any kind of quality any. Worldwide and it's inequality in both of these last two areas. Both the cross country come in equality that is to say the income levels of high income countries relative to countries with lower incomes, that has declined, particularly since two thousand it was relatively level between nineteen eighty and two thousand an increase basically from the time of the revolution say from eighteen hundred up through nineteen eighty decade after decade that you had an increase in income inequality. Tell about nineteen eight and then since nineteen eighty it would kind of level law for a couple decades. And then you've had a rather substantial reduction in income inequality, and the last major of income inequality that worldwide income inequality has also decreased quite sharply over the last since two thousand and really began. Declining about nineteen eighty so that if we sort of think of looking at at income inequality, both across countries. And for the world is whole actually, even though the narrative is constantly, telling you about how income inequality is growing, and all that sort of thing, it's actually declined. Just rather remarkable. So when you're talking about people here who are on the low end here, the poor people, you're not talking about American poor American poor with smartphones. And you know choosing not to do certain jobs, because it's I don't know. They get more probably get more from their benefits than they do from the jobs. So why would they do it? You're talking about people who are in what we call third world or even four th world countries. I'm not even sure what that means. But I've heard the term used. And that their lives are getting markedly better and that they are getting closer to having a life where they can make some money and raise kids in that kind of thing. Right. That's right. And in fact, we really live in a remarkable time period for the first time in world history, you've had quite substantial growth in capita income in fact, growth in higher roles of per capita income than you has during the eighteen hundreds in the first half of the of the nineteen hundreds, so we've had some dangerous growth, but the most rapid growth is taking place among countries that were poor at the beginning of that period. So you increase thinly have lower income countries that their income is growing more rapidly. And as a result, you're reducing both the cross country income inequality and the worldwide income inequality. So it's just a remote. Arquebuses period that we live. Can you tell me why it's happening? I mean, you know, this would be if you want to replicate something, you'd have to know what you're replicating. So do you have any clue what is occurring, that's causing poor people to do so much better than they were a decade? Two decades three four five decades ago. Yes, absolutely. That the primary driving force is a sharp reduction, what we refer to as the transportation communication revolution. And what an involves is. There has been a very sharp reduction in transportation costs, both in terms of transportation of people as well as transportation of goods and a sharp reduction in communication costs and sort of think of what was involved in communicating across long distances from country to country, even a few years ago, I lived in project Republican nineteen. Ninety three ninety four and it was in terms of the internet kind of keeping up. What's going down around hall? That was not easy. Secondly, if you were going to make phone calls were expensive. The audio connections were not good. But today at all that's changed that today. Amid fact they've changed in such a way that as a result through Skype and other kinds of communication devices and internet that a lot of things that were very Crossley and made communications inaccessible just two or three decades ago are economical today. So what is happened in contrast? This transportation communications revolution. In contrast with the industrial revolution. The industrial revolution. We think of as well in our surveys class, we're talking about how that changed the world sort of thing and it did but only for a relatively small portion of the world twelve to fifteen percent of the population and so between eighteen hundred and nineteen fifty the United States. United Kingdom, of course later a little bit later Japan. What we think of the west that incomes began increasing for the first time in world history. And that, as I mentioned earlier that decade after decade those countries became richer, and worldwide income, inequality increase, and that continued to, but up until around nineteen eight but along about nineteen seventy you had this other revolution that has changed our lives as much as the industrial revolution that has resulted. He had us. Experiencing more gains from international trade or gains from from a centrally. Entrepreneurial kinds of ideas, introduction of, of new production processes and goods and services that we didn't even have access to. Well, what is this, this revolution that happened in the seventies, I presume it's not disco. So no. But it's this reduction and transportation and communications cost as made mad that a number of countries people living in countries that were pretty accessible to the major markets of the world, say the European market Japanese market. Maybe think of Senator in Tokyo North American market, maybe New York alone ways away from those markets. And they were not integrated into the world market network, but this reduction and transportation communication cost increase their integration into the world market network and their income started growing very rapidly now, particularly if they had good institutions, I've been involved in the major economic freedom of the world project, where we major the importance of economic institutions, their consistency with economic freedom, one could think of it as kind of a dentist by marketing that agree. That, that each country relies upon markets. I is the political process, and so countries that became more economically free. They started going quite early less developed countries countries like Hong Kong and Singapore, which actually rank into very top of that index of being the most economically free. Taiwan South Korea. They started growing in the sixties and seventies, but this reduction and transportation and communication costs resulted in a lot of other countries beginning to grow more rapidly. It became more feasible. To produce places outside of, of the major markets of the world and that you found other countries in Asia, for example, that began to go rapidly countries in, in some countries in Latin America. Dr Jim, Gordon, can you hold if you wanna get the rest of this interview? Good archives dot freetalklive dot com. That's archives, freetalklive dot com and pull up the month of June. And search.

United States Dr Jim China Hong Kong Asia Singapore United Kingdom Taiwan Saudi Arabia Skype Kuwait South Korea Latin America Senator Crossley New York Japan
"four five decades" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on WJR 760

"The layoffs communities are angry. At least one lawsuit has been filed in Detroit by activists who charged GM with going back on promises involving the poll town plant, Detroit, Hamtramck members of congress have protested even Debbie Dingle, the former head of the GM foundation and who worked as a Washington operative for GM leave the the difficult announcements that we made at the end of last year as we look forward, we think those are the right to. Visions, and we think those are what we need to do. So I don't see additional additional changes need needing to be made. So right now, our focus is on the GMT members that have been impacted and also the communities that we've been patented you've got pushback, obviously, whether it's from senators in Ohio, congressman, Ohio or elsewhere in Washington. Is there any chance that any of these pros were planned closers or idling that it changes? These are things we need to do to strengthen the company, and when you look at Motors overall, we need to make sure for the hundred thousand employees, we employ in this country alone. That General Motors is an entity that has not just a three or four five year teacher, but has a three or four five decades huger NPR, those are why we're making the tough decisions, but we're making it when the economy is strong, which gives people opportunities, and then even within her company know, we have because of the shifting customer preferences. We've had reductions from in some of the passenger car market, but we're able to provide opportunities for these people in our crossover and our truck plants, and that's why we believe we're really going to be able to place most of those you know, what the announced way main later in the year last year of the twenty eight hundred employees impacted we'd have twenty seven openings so right now, we're working for a plan for every person. We have fifteen hundred of those employees who already volunteered we have seven hundred that are already in route. And so. Our focus right now is on each of those people. I think as we do that. And then we work with the impacted communities. I think we can address the concerns the appropriate concerns that were raised by.

General Motors Detroit GM Debbie Dingle Ohio Hamtramck congress Washington congressman NPR four five decades four five year
"four five decades" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Have in mind. Well, we have in mind, and one of my and my policies most closely resemble what we see in the UK in Norway and Finland Sweden. I. Oh, yes. The old Canard of Nordic socialism. How exactly did Sweden? Get to the supposed utopia that it is it experimented with democratic socialism. Kind of often on it had unrivalled growth when it was a fully capitalist country when the democratic socialists took over about four five decades ago. Growth slowed. When Sweden adopted a quiz is socialist model. It was the second slowest growing European economy. The idea here that Sweden built itself into a prosperous nation or Norway or Finland or any of the other countries built themselves into prosperous nations through socialism is just a total lie. As is the idea that they are in fact, socialist countries, they are still they still rank highly on the global economic freedom index, which one would think if the government controlled the means of production, which is a socialist state by definition. There would be no economic freedom yet the Nordic countries have economic freedom because they are still fundamentally capitalist nations. They just have a rather confiscatory tax policy. And this is exactly what Oko Cortes is talking about. She sang. Okay. I want us still sort of embrace of capitalist model because we need wealthy people to soak in order to pay for my nonsense. But I want you. To take a listen to what she says when she is asked directly. How are we going to pay for this notice that Anderson Cooper does not get into the left leaning study? I believe it was the urban institute. That came out several months ago and said look Bernie Sanders Medicare for all universal health care proposal, which oka- CO Cortes adopted. And I think doesn't believe goes far enough will cost three point two trillion dollars per year for the next decade thirty two to thirty four trillion dollars of government spending. By way of comparison. Total government spending is roughly four trillion dollars. So we would nearly need to double federal spending. Just for one plank of this, Neo socialist agenda. And notice how she answers the question. How in the name of all that is holy are. We gonna pay for that. How are you going to pay for all this?.

Sweden Oko Cortes Norway Finland oka- CO Cortes Bernie Sanders Anderson Cooper urban institute UK thirty four trillion dollars four trillion dollars two trillion dollars four five decades
"four five decades" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Capital Ideas Investing Podcast

"We're talking about slow growth underneath the surface or all these innovations. Our starting to happen with an AI, and they're not just in artificial intelligence also in other areas like walk, Jane, and bitcoin and other technologically interesting areas that will really have an impact I think over the next decade or even longer. So based on pass revolutions we've spent some time talking to the steam engine. How might we expect this to unfold that's the hard part? So I think when we think about revolutions they're easy to kind of like, oh, historically in retrospect that was a big revolution. Whether it's microchips or steam engines, or what have you we're not good at kind of predicting how these will evolve. Over time. I I like the steam engine as kind of one way to think about it because it took a long time for the implications of the steam engine to p come realized by not only I I always think of myself if I was kind of alive when the same engine came out, what companies would I have invested in. Yeah. And it would not intuitively obvious that you would invest ABC in d- when the engine arrived because you weren't sure how the technology was going to impact the economy and other areas. So that's kind of caveat number one is that we're not that great predicting the future how these will evolve caveat number two is that we always think about the labor market disruption. So the person who was draining the water out of that mind when the same engine was I use he's out of a job, unfortunately. But hopefully, they were able to take his Gil said and do something else with it. And we always talk about the kind of bad aspects of technologies and industrial revolutions and whatnot. But if you. Look at where we are today in eighteen sixty we had two thirds of the US employment within agriculture right now. It's nine percent, right. And we saw we have more jobs than we've ever had before. And so I think when we look at the a I kind of this revolution. That's coming forward. We should think about a there's going to be jobs that are getting created. Because of a I am sheen learning that we're going to be helpful for other labor market and be it's gonna take a while. It's not going to be something that's going to happen in ten years. I think what we're seeing today. Just kind of first innings of what can happen in kind of a cross companies across industries in this could happen over two three or four five decades. And so I was going to be a long time just like the steam engine it took a while even see the productivity improvement in the data in actuality. It was very slow with a machine learning. I think it's going to be a similar that we're going to see kind of the domain of a I I've being very specific. And then kind of generalize afterward. It's going to be a while. Right. Well, so much. VI is area theoretical right and abstract and difficult to grasp its pattern recognitions in within big data sets to solve seemingly problems that are far removed from our daily lives, or so it would seem what's the application of AI to more kind of ordinary problem that you and I might encounter or something. That's not a problem. But it's industry looking for inefficiency and deploying AI to do it. Yeah. It's an interesting technology in the sense that you don't go out every day and use AI, right? You're not oh, I'm gonna use my tool. Right. It's not it's not a wrench. It's not a hammer or anything like that. I think economists in those who look at the history of technology like to think of a it's kind of a general purpose technology. And so what they mean by that is that it's almost it's in a lot of places, right?.

AI US ABC Jane Gil four five decades nine percent ten years
"four five decades" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"But it just seems how tall come together on this first weekend in November. This university has had big moments in football over over its history. But tomorrow is going to be one of the most remarkable days. Yeah, I've been here seventeen years. And what you think back on is. Is there a bigger game in the history of our program? There may have been a couple you go way back, but I would say. I say the last forty years, probably not. So we've always I've always been in the conversation. Have if you win your last two, and these three teams all lose you got a shot if all the okay to put that aside. It's all on our our hands. We have chance it's on our plate. We have chance to do our deal. And if we win the game, we're in this probably the first time in. Argued last four five decades we've ever had that in the conversation. No one can predict but the significance of that. How that resonate from to? What you do? I'm interested in in the the impact because win or lose this program has. Is going to be at the epicenter of college football tomorrow at three thirty. I think when you look at it, you talk about branding. That's the new cool word out there. And everybody's got their brand. Right. And I think for us to be able to say that the university of Kentucky in the state of Kentucky has an opportunity to to be on center stage. Tomorrow at three thirty across the country. Because what this program is done for. It is is really really important every state goes through pieces of turmoil. Whether it's Appalachia we've got some issues Apalachee, we've got a head of school shooting in January and in western Kentucky athletics tends to bring people together in very unique ways. And I saw her staff coaches, go border to border in our state this summer, and it coal nights a little bit tomorrow at Kroger field for all these people that bring their heart and soul in their emotions and everything that this program. This university means for the state together to sort of brand we are UK, and that's sort of been what what are heartbeat is and had walking off a plane two days ago in a woman, put her arm around me, and she said, Mr. Barnhart, we've been waiting for a moment. Like this all of our lives. Wow. That's a lot, you know. But I get it. There are generations of people that have waited for this opportunity. And so we hope we can deliver it tomorrow. There's no guarantees we understand that. But there's a lot of emotion that will be poured into it from the players. They'll be equally amount emotion. Poured into it from the fan base. Well, congratulations because I think it's a significant moment in and I see as you do all sides of all issues. And and you never know what the right answer is. But I think the decision's by you with the council of others here, of course, turned out to be one of the more remarkable decisions. We've seen in recent years. Thank you so much for being a part of our program doing the right thing. I'd like just to say is including I know, you gotta go. But I'd like to just say tomorrow, we're gonna honor the veterans tomorrow, they'll be four empty chairs in each corner of our stadium where the POW's name, I as will they'll always be empty, and we're unveiling those tomorrow fans can walk by those eighty thousand POW's MIA's missing since World War One. And so we've worked with a group called rolling thunder. And onto the veterans knows missing in action and that have served our country. And so to all of us, we'd say, thank you. Thank you very much. What.

UK Kentucky football university of Kentucky Kroger field Appalachia Apalachee Mr. Barnhart four five decades seventeen years forty years two days
"four five decades" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

The Upgrade by Lifehacker

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on The Upgrade by Lifehacker

"Saving twenty percent. I will retire at sixty five of a thirty. You know, it's this chart that you can look at and say, okay, I can make a goal of being out by the time I'm forty in order to meet that goal. I need to be saving sixty five percent of my income. So the mechanics of it and they're working. It exquisitely the part of it that was meaningful to Joe is extremely meaningful to me is the question of what is freedom for, you know? Okay. So I worked really hard. I got fi- celebrate, celebrate, you know, figure out a Netflix sleep. Go live in a beach for four months, and then what you know, you've actually achieved a level of freedom where you really need to create meaning for like four, five decades without somebody else structuring the agenda. It's an identity crisis. If you don't have an identity, this larger than your job, then if you eliminate your job, you really need to grow another skin and it's fat part of it. This question of what is meaning, purpose, happiness, joy, relationship, all those social, emotional intelligence, all the things that really make life worth living. I think that's the piece of the fire movements that isn't as well developed. So just to go back to the book for a bit, what led you to come out with a new edition of the book? It had been fifteen years. I think I've been away from this money work repeated myself so many times that I became bored with myself just needed to do other things. But I realized that this big dream we had that we were going to transform the way Americans thought about an earnings spend and save money that we were gonna save the world that big dream that I let go of after a decade. I felt like consumerism was actually as big if not a bigger problem than twenty years earlier. When I started this work, our consciousness in our country had not changed in this issue. You know, the idea that we're going to in debt our young people and then enslave them to jobs to pay off their debt, which they may never be able to do. As a matter of fact, legally, you know, you can clear bankruptcy but you can never get rid of your college debt. So I started. Talk to millennials on average people thought I may never move out of my parent's house. I mean, never be able to afford an apartment. I may never be able to afford a house. I mean, never be able to afford to get married. I mean, may never be able to afford children. I may never get a job in anything that I've trained for as like, what is this? I mean, I guess I was like a momma bear. I got really mad. I thought in most people I talked to hit and heard of your money. Your life did not know about read it. I did not know about the three hundred fifty thousand people. You know, many of whom were fans of your money, your life. I didn't know about that. I just thought this book is fading into obscurity and it has a job to do, and I will update it in service to millennials. So the first step in your book talks about how you should sort of take every bit of income. You have figure out exactly how much money you have. And for some reason, that idea just completely freaked me out. And I was like, what closing the book don't wanna do that? No, no, no, no. But but tell me what the reasoning is about knowing exactly what sort of like how money comes and goes into our lives. Why should we have an exact number in impart? It's doing a balance sheet and you know any financial planner. We'll just try to get you in prison moment. What do you own? What do you owe? Are you balance-sheet positive or negative? I mean, this is what this, these are all tasks that a financial planner will actually have you do. Then it's just getting into the present. There's something though about the way Joe constructed that step, which is it introduces the question here I am. I've been working for twenty two years and..

Joe Netflix sixty five percent twenty two years twenty percent fifteen years five decades twenty years four months
"four five decades" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

The GaryVee Audio Experience

04:14 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on The GaryVee Audio Experience

"Go back a little bit into the buck. Brad, this Gary shuck, and you're in the ass. Gary v show with Michael Ovitz. Oh my gosh. And having an out of experience. That is a very good thing. Thank you for taking my call. No worries. What is your question? My friend. Well, I know that mister Ovitz you had a tough slog with Disney that ended poorly. Just wanted to get your comments on what lessons you took from that. That session don't go to Disney. Now that doesn't include the theme parks. I happen to like them was, as I said in the book, it's the biggest career mistake I ever made. I completely misjudged it and it's a, it's a really good example of how and why not to be your own counsel. And it's funny you brought that up once when we first met about not being your own council and the value of y were Cindy other for everybody at home. Just give him the one to two minute. Cliff notes, three of us know what we're talking about, but I think it'd be fascinating for everybody at home. What is the Disney chapter? The Disney chapter is about starts with my set of meetings with Michael Eisner. It goes through the time when he had a heart attack, and I stayed in the hospital with them for five to six days. And he asked me to come on board to originally be the co CEO, and then that went back down to being the president COO and then went to be the president, and then. I showed up at his house for first meeting prior to starting all the people were supposed to report to me, he decided weren't going to report to me. So it was kind of over before it started yet. And did he know that at that point I end line new at the minute that point you knew it when I was sitting in his living room at his house when the when he had the CFO the chief legal officer there, he, they said, they weren't going to report to me and he didn't do anything about it said, okay. I mean, if he was the CEO that really wanted this to get it and he wanted a partner. I mean, what we were trying to do is set up a partnership the way Bob Daly and Terry Semel had or Don Keough and Roberto goes at Coca-Cola or Tom Murphy and Dan Burke at ABC cap cities were powerful partnerships. These were big companies. Disney was about the by, say, it was going to be a behemoth company more than one person could run. So the concept was to create a dynamic partnership. Understand, thanks for the call brother. Hey, thanks, Gary quick. Quick question. What do you know about Okeanov and wines? I know that the peon award from that region super treat me like right before I made the transition to Silicon Valley from the wine world. I thought that the that British Columbia and Vancouver was an Okinawan region specifically was make were making wines that I thought were world class, but nobody knew how to market them in the same way that I look at Baja, California Mexico. I think the two best wines in the world that nobody knows anything about our Okinawan Pinot noirs and Baja California cabernet from Mexico, because if you roll up on anybody and talk about wine Mexico and Vancouver or not coming out of their mouth. So what I know about them is they're obnoxiously high quality with absolutely no brand awareness. Antastic. Got it. And I thought Okinawa's in Japan, I. I know. No, you're, you know you, you love Japan. Our love Japan. That's like you still. Do you go there often? I haven't recently, but I used to go once a month once a month once a month. Oh, man. That's hard core. We're gonna leave it off here. I want to use the final time for Michael. I've so many entrepreneurs. Young entrepreneurs were all ages, but I know the base who's listening to this show lot of fifteen to thirty five with plenty older, but like what's at this point as somebody who spent the last decade plus in Silicon Valley culture and all those leaders obviously l. a. just, you know, man of the world would Japan in New York. It just you've played it. You've played it at the highest levels for three or four, five decades..

Michael Eisner Disney Japan Michael Ovitz Silicon Valley Gary Gary shuck California Mexico Gary quick Brad president COO Michael Cindy Cliff heart attack Bob Daly Baja California CEO Coca-Cola
"four five decades" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

Crooked Conversations

05:22 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Crooked Conversations

"That and so it's sometimes it'll be interesting conversation doesn't like personal conflict so it's really really wants to say to you he thinks you wanna hear but you have no sense of whether he can back that up or stick with it i'm sorry is it sort of like he he wants so badly to avoid personal conflict that he just wants you to leave happy and you don't maybe know whether what he said it's gonna stick there's a i suspect there's a there's a bit of inconsistency to from day to day and all of the yeah there's a there's a a little little bit of existence yeah it's a little bit hot in missouri in the summer just a little same kind of little but he is going to do a supposed space program hey let's us land on the sun i am concerned that after this conversation we're both going to get drafted into it i don't know if the mics go off you'll know that these lists yeah that's right perhaps we will conduct the rest of this in russian if if then they'll be like continue if you could make congress pass one bill for working families what would it be you know that's impossible to answer because you can pick two you know anything we did a series a laws that start to reverse the rules of the global economy because look here's something to i i tell people along for decades they've tried to make us believe that the economy's like the weather that there's nothing you can do about it but the economy isn't like the economy's nothing but a set of rules and those rules decide the winners and the losers and those rules are made by the men and women that we elect and quite frankly for the last four or five generations those rules have been decided for workers to lose and the rich to win and they've been successful at it so you would have to reverse a series of things you would have to make it easier for people workers to come together and have a voice on the job and into community you'd have to change the tax laws so that they didn't reward people for sending jobs overseas but they rewarded people were making things building thing and bring them here the the trade laws i mean what we've seen over the past four five decades is these don't what was passed and called trade laws really worked trade lawns they were attempts to prevent us the world from regulating global capital so what they would do is they would write a law saying it's a trade law nobody can regulate capital this way or nobody can regulate capital that way but they weren't really about trade laws so you have to change those infrastructure right now disintegrating the greatest generation my parents generation gave us the best infrastructure in a world where about seventeen right now this society of civil engineers give us a deep loss in in infrastructure we need to change that we need about three trillion dollars to do the old stuff and make it new and the new stuff that we need to get ahead and so there's a series of things that have to be passed and there's just not one magic bullet or magic one that you could wave at one time and it would correct what they've done to rewrite the rules that's what we have to do in all fats thing and have the beneficiary be the working people just country and not the rich original done fine they'll do as you've gone around the country and done the work that you do the afl cio you've also gotten a pretty good look not just the labor movement but at the resistance and you've been doing this for a while you were you became president of the mineworkers union and eighty two became president ceo and nine right and now you look at this movement that's going on around the country that the labor movement and others are really at the center of d how is it different to you what you see going on in the country right now how does it feel different or maybe the same well it feels really good and i'm really a more optimistic right now i've been in in a lot of years because what we see is collective action is on the rise and let me go back and t that up economically so you can put it in a frame we've seen for four five decades that the.

four five decades three trillion dollars
"four five decades" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"That's great i'm amazed by how many how many people i know that have gone to asia and never come back once they discover the quality of life and and the freedom that you can have their particularly as an ex pat so let's get into the finance there's something about trend following that i've just never been able to wrap my brain around and you'll have to forgive me my because i'm probably a bit of a dinosaur you know i see shares and stocks i know you trade lots of things besides equities commodities currencies but i see stocks is being a part of a business and and as such see the value that is built over time by adding new customers building new profits reinvesting dividends and repeat thickly as a small business person i know that's how it works and another valuation of the company is a reflection of that obviously my my businesses don't trade on the public markets but even if they did i wouldn't really care much about the share price had focus as an entrepreneur on on the underlying intrinsic value getting more customers earning more profits and reinvesting in the same you as a as a traitor you have whole different view what you care about is the is the price you care about the the price on the screen not really the underlying value and what i what i want to ask you is there any way to connect those two concepts as or anything about trend following that you think is caused by underlying business or impact underlying business it's a great question as as you're laying that out i was thinking there's they're not neutrally exclusive they're not designed to you know it doesn't have to be all one one way because what's so great about a trend following strategy combined with what you just described a value strategy if you combine the two you get more return less risk because typical trend following stream of return is correlated with the value stream that you just described generally zero for the last three or four five decades so.

asia four five decades
"four five decades" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"This big i believe in commands like this if you've seen the numbers of illegal immigrants coming across in the past four five decades i believe this caravan happens every hour actually does seem like alexander riddle says i wonder how many canadians we can convince to walk across the us all the way into mexico ben hill mayor q ten think of our planet as a giant movie screen the aliens are all pulling up to earth to watch the hilarity and sue some of murder missed the first act i think putting on quite a show for him though travel because did jeffey every t rex it of so based should've asked him in that i guess it was like chicken but i want comp confirmation caitlyn in joy eighty nine billions of years later jeffy is still doing the same thing just trying to feed himself he did say that we're just trying to feed ourselves yep and still going strong true no matter what the caravan or how often the caravan happens it's going on right now and we actually have a president who seems to be concerned about it unlike presidents in the past obama even to a large extent bush he he did very little to shore up the border except he did however have couple of border agents put on trial and made sure that that political prosecution continued i'm still upset about that wow me to that was horrific that was just insanity but the president said we're taking some steps and here's what he said about the military on the border by mexico and i respect what they did i said look a very powerful ulitsa very strong we have very bad laws for border and we are going to be doing some things i've been speaking general mattis whether it'd be doing things military until we can have a wall and proper security with going to be guarding our border with the military it's a big step.

alexander riddle mexico murder president obama bush four five decades
"four five decades" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

Side Hustle Pro

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"four five decades" Discussed on Side Hustle Pro

"At it and something else i feel like if this was the textbook right now i would be highlighting something you just said and you said that you have to re framer thinking so thinking about everything you've done in the past and using that to decide what's going to happen in the next four five decades of your life is just ridiculous thing about the future and what you want that's a look like instead of being like what i've been a management consultant for as long as i can remember night no no yeah yeah really i mean definitely and i also wanna stress to that it you know it takes a while like a really took me i would say probably a good to hear of going back and forth in thinking oh my god i just got this mba crazy to go back to school you know so yeah there was a lot of that i think a big part of it too was my i guess on see my fiance at the time or was he even my fiance but my boy we've been together forever but he was i think especially once i started taking those continuing education classes and he saw how into it i was he was like what are you doing in height wire yuban why did a question like you're just so passionate about this go for it you know so you know it helps also to have somebody who is you know just a very supportive of what you do and celebrates all of your winds and is there for all of your fill here is also he is definitely a huge part of my deciding to go back atkins he he's just been so supportive of the here yes yes yes absolutely i couldn't have done it without him so yeah so that's also a big part of the background story as well okay.

consultant four five decades