35 Burst results for "Four Decades"

Who's In Biden's Cabinet?

Balance of Power

00:57 sec | Last week

Who's In Biden's Cabinet?

"Elect Biden's Cabinet is starting to take shape ahead of tomorrow's official announcements. We're learning some some of the key names that will lead national security efforts during the Biden administration. Joining us now, with more details is Bill Fairies who leads our national security team here? A Bloomberg News All right, Bill Tony Blinken to secretary of State. Who else do we know is going to be in on the national security team. Kevin. Well, thanks a couple other key names Jake Jake sold on. It was one of Hillary Clinton's closest aides is expected to be named national security adviser. And and we also believe that Linda Thomas Greenfield, who was a longtime State Department employee, almost four decades at the State Department before leaving Early in President. Trump's term is likely to be nominated ambassador to the United Nations, So there's also a lot of other names out there. But those are those are three key names we think are coming tomorrow

Biden Administration Bill Fairies Bill Tony Blinken Jake Jake Biden Bloomberg News Cabinet Linda Thomas Greenfield State Department Hillary Clinton Kevin Donald Trump United Nations
Dating Today (MM #3532)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Dating Today (MM #3532)

"The with kevin mason. I have been out of the dating market literally for four decades. I dated my first wife for a short time after a relationship. Break up then. We were married for ten years and then as my relationship broke up there. I didn't start dating anybody. I started hanging out with people at work and ended up dating the woman who became my wife. So i don't know much about dating. Don't know if i could even do it if i had to. Not that i'm worried about it but our story the other day about some of the terms that go along with dating today and i'll be honest with you. I felt like an old man. I mean do you know what the psalm being or welcoming or benching for. What about cushioning. Cushioning is the newest dating term. And basically what cushioning is. It's you're kind kinda looking ahead and saying well. This relationship was dying out. So i'm going to kind of build a cushion start a little bit of a relationship starts something going so i can ease the transition from one to another. It's a good thing. I'm old because i don't think old people are like that. I don't think people over fifty deal with all these things like the young kids do today. Yes every now and again. I feel like an old man and i act like an old man and i'm okay with that.

Kevin Mason
Dating Today (MM #3532)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

Dating Today (MM #3532)

"The with kevin mason. I have been out of the dating market literally for four decades. I dated my first wife for a short time after a relationship. Break up then. We were married for ten years and then as my relationship broke up there. I didn't start dating anybody. I started hanging out with people at work and ended up dating the woman who became my wife. So i don't know much about dating. Don't know if i could even do it if i had to. Not that i'm worried about it but our story the other day about some of the terms that go along with dating today and i'll be honest with you. I felt like an old man. I mean do you know what the psalm being or welcoming or benching for. What about cushioning. Cushioning is the newest dating term. And basically what cushioning is. It's you're kind kinda looking ahead and saying well. This relationship was dying out. So i'm going to kind of build a cushion start a little bit of a relationship starts something going so i can ease the transition from one to another. It's a good thing. I'm old because i don't think old people are like that. I don't think people over fifty deal with all these things like the young kids do today. Yes every now and again. I feel like an old man and i act like an old man and i'm okay with that.

Kevin Mason
Spike Lee Is Working on a Movie Musical About Viagra

News O'Clock

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Spike Lee Is Working on a Movie Musical About Viagra

"Spike lee has announced his next big project and It's a little unexpected to say. The least he's going to direct a movie musical about pfizer's original wonder drug viagra. Yes viagra in a statement given to deadline leib wrote in part quote. Finally going into my fourth decade as a filmmaker. I will be directing danson all singing news a spike lee joint. And i can't wait. My mom's has been waiting to. And that's the rodgers and hammerstein truth ruth lee co wrote the screenplay with kwami armagh and it will feature original songs music written by the team behind the tony winning musical passing strange. This is exactly lee's first foray into the musical realm. He resigned directed a film version of david. Byrne's musical american

Leib Spike Lee Ruth Lee Pfizer Danson Kwami Hammerstein Rodgers Tony LEE Byrne David
Amy Coney Barrett sworn in at White House ceremony

The Takeaway

01:06 min | Last month

Amy Coney Barrett sworn in at White House ceremony

"Night Amy Coney Barrett became the 9th United States Supreme Court Justice in one of the most partisan displays of power. We have witnessed in the past few decades Republicans use their political majority to force Barracks confirmation before election day. So far sixty million votes have already been cast in the 2020 election embarrassed nomination process was one of the fastest ever for Supreme Court nominee lasting a little more than a month after the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Barrett answered less than 20% of the questions posed to her during her sneering leaving many Americans unclear about how the new Justice might lean and frustrating Democrats who remember how President Obama scotus nominee Merrick Garland wasn't even granted a hearing the current team was the culmination of nearly four Decades of work on reshaping the court Mitch McConnell starkly said this on Sunday a lot of what we've done over the last four years would be undone. gamer later by the next election won't be able to do much about this. for a long time to come

United States Supreme Court Ruth Bader Ginsburg Barrett Amy Coney Barrett Force Barracks Merrick Garland Mitch Mcconnell President Trump
Trump administration violates agreement, releases "60 Minutes" interview footage

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

01:06 min | Last month

Trump administration violates agreement, releases "60 Minutes" interview footage

"Trump has released the video of his 60 Minutes. Interview with Leslie Stall before the show airs Sunday. Be fair. What last time? You know, biting questions asked. You know? You don't ask Biden tough questions, The president said he posted the full, unedited interview and tweeted look. Att, the bias, hatred and rudeness on behalf of 60 Minutes and CBS In response, CBS News Defendant Leslie Stall is one of the premier correspondents in America. CBS says the White House is unprecedented decision to disregard its agreement with CBS News and released. The footage will not deter 60 minutes from providing it's full fare and contextual reporting. Which presidents have participated in four decades

Leslie Stall CBS Cbs News President Trump Biden Donald Trump White House ATT America
Charges not pursued after incidents involving man accused of killing Houston Police sergeant

Michael Berry

00:33 sec | Last month

Charges not pursued after incidents involving man accused of killing Houston Police sergeant

"Killed HPD Sergeant Harold Preston Elmer Manzano, an illegal alien with a long criminal record fatally shot Sergeant Preston during a domestic violence call Tuesday. Doug Griffith with the police Officers Union told Houston's Morning news. He's not surprised the accused charges at the same, which happens a lot in this city, and I'm concerned again with the way the D A's office is running, But that's outside the scope of this Sergeant president spent four decades on the force and was just weeks away from retiring. Top aide in Texas Attorney General Qin Paxton's

Sergeant Harold Preston Elmer Sergeant Preston Doug Griffith Attorney General Qin Paxton Police Officers Union President Trump Houston Texas
How An Airline Worker Honors Fallen Military Members

Weekend Edition Saturday

02:57 min | Last month

How An Airline Worker Honors Fallen Military Members

"It's time now for story course Military Voices Initiative, which amplifies stories about service members and their families. Today. We'll hear from Brian McConnell. He's been an airline worker for almost four decades. Much of that time he's worked on the ramp. The area where aircraft refueled, boarded and loaded. But Taking on other responsibilities, ones that weren't in his original drop description. Ryan McConnell runs the Delta Honor Guard, a group of volunteers at the Atlanta airport who greet every plane that carries the remains of a fallen military member. That story. Cory sat down with his wife, Nora. To talk about it. How did you get involved with the honor Guard driving across the ramp? One day doing my job. I witnessed some guy's taking care of a fallen soldier, Hannah blue cart with all the logo's from all the military branches. And it should all gave some some gave all And I am and pull over and collect myself as I thought. It was just amazing that total strangers could take care of our military fallen. Can you tell me what you go through to honor these soldiers while the procedures are once I get a notification, I'll notify everybody on the Honor Guard. We have folks who come from all over the airport from the bag points from the gates from maintenance. And even the pilots group. Sometimes there's 20 of us there. Sometimes there's two of us there. But there's always at least someone to meet every fallen that comes into the Atlanta airport. We'll cover the casket with the flag. And as they brought out of the aircraft, the honor guard will march up with flags from each branch of the service. In which time I go to the escort, usually someone from their squadron. Present them with a card, a coin and a prayer to give to the next of kin. What makes you so dedicated to do what you do for all of these soldiers and their families? The number one reason is the right thing to do. These folks have made the ultimate sacrifice and the least we could do is take care of him. My father served 21 years in the air force with a tour of Vietnam. Course you know her son is active in the Air Force, and it's served two deployments to Afghanistan. And heaven forbid, if something ever happened to our son, I would hope that whoever's carrying for him went here for him with the love and respect. And the honor that I will care for their sons and daughters meeting You've always been a staunch supporter of me with the honor guard and I know sometimes it gets trying when you're sitting in the cell phone lot for three hours past my shift or coming in early. We're coming in on days off. But I have never watch. Heard you complain and ah Actually appreciate that. Some people say they have a calling in life. I guess I found mine. Although I have never served. I tell people this is my way of serving.

Delta Honor Guard Brian Mcconnell Military Voices Initiative Atlanta Ryan Mcconnell Airline Worker Air Force Cory Hannah Nora Afghanistan Vietnam
UN: Climate emergency causes number of natural disasters to double in last 20 years

UN News

01:21 min | Last month

UN: Climate emergency causes number of natural disasters to double in last 20 years

"The first twenty years of this century have seen a staggering rising climate disasters. The head of the UN Disaster Risk Reduction Agency U. N. D. R. Her said Mommy mid Satori also insisted that nearly all nations have done too little to prevent death and illness caused by heavy nineteen just as they were willfully not doing enough to tackle greenhouse gas emissions Mr. Tori was speaking at the launch of a report comparing the last four decades of global disaster data. She urged all countries to prepare better for all catastrophic events from earthquakes to soon nominees to biological threats such as the new corona virus. Good. Disastrous governance depends on political leadership above and delivery on the promises made. Five years ago when the Paris Agreement in the Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction were adopted. But the sad fact is that we are willfully destructive and that is the conclusion of this report covid nineteen is but the latest proof that political and business leaders are yet tune into the world around them according to the U N. D R report produced Belgium's central research on the epidemiology of disasters at Ucla then that will more than seven thousand, three, hundred recorded disasters worldwide in the last twenty years more than one point two, million people died approximately sixty thousand per year with poorer nations witnessing death rates more than four times higher than richer nations.

Mr. Tori UN U N. D R Paris Ucla Belgium U. N. D.
Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

Between The Lines

09:41 min | 2 months ago

Has Scott Morrison spent too much?

"Me. If you've already heard me mention this but one of my favorite quotes during the covid crosses a pdf the guardian. This is the British lift wing newspaper. Now, this was the heart of the coronavirus crisis. It would have been light much quote just as there are no atheists on a sinking ship, there are no free marketeers during a pandemic. Now, the author of that apt quote Jonathan Freedland, he was referring to the audio logical revolution within the British conservative. Party. Now, according to Freedland Boris Johnson's his have defied four decades of thatcherism small-state free-market, thinking I to spend staggering amounts of money and then subsidizing the wages of workers. Could the same thing be said about Australia's Liberal Party they're the party of Howard and Costello now embraces big-spending high deficit government interventionism. And is a permanent state of affairs poor kilis editor at large of the Australian US pipe and Judas Brit is emeritus professor of politics at Latrobe University poll judy welcome back to the show. Hristo Paul, you've written to calms about this subject in the past week, summarize your faces. Will Martha is that all parties and all governments have to respond to the times in which they find themselves on display in Australia. Now we face an extraordinary economic crisis and the response reveals the nature of Scott Morrison, his prime minister and the Mars and government. So Morrison, not responding as Liberal Party progressive or is it Liberal Party conservative? He doesn't see himself in those terms his responses pragmatic selects able and practical. He's not inhibited by former policy and audio logical icons of the Liberal Party. Say What we say is the government has abandoned the long-term syllabus aspirations. It's A. Big Spending government it's a government government intervention focused on Keynesian demand management. It does however on the Liberal Party tradition of tax cuts will see next week. So it's prepared to regulate or deregulate according to the situation according to what's required. So to sum up say that Morrison wants to be defined by results and outcomes not philosophical principle. Okay. You mentioned the tax cuts leaving that aside traditional liberal governments are about balancing the books Paul, how much an as do you think aries in the Liberal Party about in the parliament and outside about these handouts to preserve jobs and livelihoods? Are. I. Don't think there's much on these at all OPTIMA and Tom. and. A couple of reasons for this if there is to be on, he's He's will come through the down the track, but essentially what's happening here is to govern is following the Orthodoxy or what you might call the new Orthodoxy in terms of meeting the financial and economic crisis. So roller response is sort of radical. It's also conventional. The official family is working together very closely. The Treasury the Reserve Bank, what the government is doing is essentially supported by private-sector economists. It's in law and with Patrick amended by the VCD and the IMF not the cabinet is very nodded, the Prime Minister and the treasurer are working very closely together so far the results look good. I think the Overwhelming sentiment on the back benches. Support, the government strategy in the hope that this gives individual employees, the chance of actually being reelected and my will give the government the chance of being reelected. So the reinvention of Australian liberalism is on full display with this budget judith break you agree with Paul Kelly about the the audio logical significance of these changes but actually think the government had much choice in that sense I do think we can see something audio logical preferences in a couple of the policies poor mentioned the tax cuts they've chosen tax cuts over for example, committing to a permanent increase in new act now co Job Seca. They've also, for example, if we look at the way, they wanted to stimulate the housing market. They've gone for giving money to individual owners rather than, for example, embarking on a social housing project. So I think in some of the means, we can still see some of the ideological preferences of the Patty. One of the things I've wondered when I've been watching the events unfold. If Labor had won the last election was in government with the Liberals have supported the same levels of spending or would they have if you like stayed in the sort of ideological bunker bean and attacked the blow out of the deficit? I mean, it's a hypothetical. In some ways I think we've been very lucky that it's been the liberals and the coalition in government because they can sense being able to Ghana much more support. I, think than I have been able to do for the same levels of spending but isn't cameras response to the COVID crosses more consistent with other Western governments during the pandemic Judy. Yes that's what I think. I had much option but the question is if the coalition of being opposition, would they have supported a Labor government going? You've written a lot about this have many many decades about when orthodoxies or overturned. It's usually bipartisan is that you'll since if the coalition cypher argument's sake wherein opposition I would have gone along with this big spending interventionism. Look are essentially agree with what Judy's said about this I think in a sense we're. Fortunate, if you liked that the coalition's in government because it's taken all the big spending decisions. and. Lay has been prepared to go along with back. In fact, it's argued that there should be even more spending. So in that sense, we've had a broad degree of thought-out ship within the economic framework. It is hot the typical of course to tron speculate about what would have happened if alive had been in office doing this but I do think that the coalition in opposition would have been tempted to make caught a lot of criticisms and to suggest that the spending had gone too far. There's a big difference for party thing in government managing across and being an opposition. Cape with this theme of a political realignment among center right parties around the Western world. If you think about Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen, he tapped into widespread anxieties. America's rust belt. What can class constituencies? Boris Johnson showed last December, he resonated with traditional British Library voters in the Midlands and northern England. Judy. Do you think that Morrison in a wise doing the same thing here in Australia? Now, I think they're very different sorts of crises. I mean the pandemic is an external. Crisis, it's not being caused by politics in any way it's not back nationalism versus globalism or any of those things, and so I don't agree with that. I agree with what Paul was saying earlier that Morrison's shown himself to be pragmatic and quick footed in this and I think we're lucky for that. But I I don't think that this lines up with bricks and with trump's appeal to the rest spilled poor Kelly. Well I think conservatism is changing if you look at. America Britain Australia and there's not a dopey getting very significant changes into servitude. Thought. Different changes argued very strongly that there are very substantial differences between Donald Trump and Scott Morrison. I think people who argue that. Morrison is a pilot version of DONALD TRUMP MAUREEN DOWD in the New York Times by the way, but go on. I think. I think turned him mentally misunderstand the situation I. Think the change in conservatism is very dramatic in the United States. If you'd like because we've got the transition from Ronald, Reagan who a generation ago was the great conservative champion, and now we have Donald Trump, who if you lock is a populist conservative? And that transformation is simply enormous install ending content I mean trump violates all the virtues of conservatism in terms of restraint prudence disciplined respect. Regard for the political system, he thrives on division. So he likes all the traditional conservative norms, and then when looks at his policies. Well he's sabotage the global trading system. He's an arch protectionist. He's engaged in this trade war with China he's appraised dictators and suspicious about. So I guess one of the Fundamental Christians here is the extent to which trump is an aberration. And the extent to which post trump American concert is we'll have to try and create a new position cognisant of the damage that trump has done to the traditional Republican Party

Government Donald Trump Liberal Party Scott Morrison Hristo Paul Australia Freedland Boris Johnson Jonathan Freedland Judy Paul Kelly United States Republican Party Prime Minister America Optima Covid Latrobe University Treasury Martha
Update On Epic's Trial Against Apple

Mac OS Ken

06:56 min | 2 months ago

Update On Epic's Trial Against Apple

"Somehow, we got through Monday without anything new in the epic. Battle. Between Apple and epic. Games. What. Without any decision than the battle? Anyway. Given the speed with which she decided. The first time many myself included had expected judge Yvonne. Gonzalez's Rogers to rule on two particular points whether fortnight would be forced back into the. APP. Store. For the duration of the fight and whether apple would be allowed to kill the epic developer account tied unreal engine. While the first point could be a blow to epochs game side. The second could be a blow to many others at a bare minimum thousands of developers use unreal engine to power effects and their applications. If. Apple succeeds in tanking support for unreal engine, those developers will have to go elsewhere. Either out of the APP store or to another graphics engine. For a Quick Synopsis You can go to just about any site, the next web venture beat scene that. CNN. To me though the fun had to be reading the twitter thread, Financial Times correspondent Patrick McGee's coverage. Fun Because you get to read the blow by blow starting with the judge being irked that epic produced no documents for discovery. She was curious how epic and say Apple's thirty percent cut is unfair when seemingly every platform charges the same thirty percent cut. At the same time, she quizzed apples lawyer on where the competition was. Why is everyone charging thirty percent? Rather than some at ten percent some at twenty and so on. Apple's attorneys seems to indicate that apple started the thirty percent thing in two thousand eight. and. Everybody else followed suit. The real anticompetitive issue according to epochs attorney that apple won't let epic or anybody else set up its own store inside the IOS APPS store. To this McGee had apples attorney saying. EPIC creating its own competing store within the IOS platform is essentially an indictment of apples entire business model which has been committed to the safety security and privacy of its users. That is a fundamental disagreement with the way. Apple has chosen to do business, but apple's business model has been consistent throughout its existence. This is the way it has chosen to set up its model and its trademark is to safeguard its users. Seeming to lean apple's way on the fortnight. As you judge, Gonzales Rogers pointed out that walled gardens have existed for four decades. From. Nintendo consoles and handhelds to Microsoft to Sony. What apple is doing is not much different. She said they created a platform. There was a fascinating argument about whether in APP purchases through the APP store or a product in themselves separate and distinct from the APP store. At big argues they are while apple says they are not. Judge Gonzales Rogers seemed again. Decide with Apple. The were interest was piqued by a line of thought presented by epic when the company started its own sales in the fortnight APP on IOS. Fifty percent of people playing took advantage of buying the box directly from epic. The judge then put the question to apple's attorney. Doesn't that prove that half of apple's customers wondered an alternative to the APP store and it's in that purchase system. Apple's attorney countered all that really prove was that people would rather pay seven dollars then ten dollars for the same thing. Apples attorney said it was more telling that the other fifty percent would rather pay ten bucks through Apple's own system rather than give their payment info to someone else. The question of unreal engine was murkier this time around than last. While epic argued that trying to kill unreal engine To the APP store was retaliatory and had already done irreparable harm that the company. Apple argued that it wasn't fact defensive. McGee, says, Apple's attorney argued that if unreal is allowed to operate than epic, may try to sneak past apple's APP review process. According to the attorney, others would do it too, and that really goes to the core of the system. So it's not just epic and unreal engine that we're concerned about. That would go to the core of apple's business model and unravel it and be a green light to other companies and that would be very dangerous. Apple wasn't retaliating against unreal engine said the attorney it was protecting its ecosystem. As for four nights hot fix plugging its own payment processing into the. Judge Gonzales Rogers was stern saying to epic. You were not forthright. You weren't. You were told you couldn't do it and you did you know there's an old saying arose by any other name still arose. I mean, you can trial you want. There are plenty of people in the public who consider you guys heroes for what you did. But it's still not honest. Don't try to convince me that you were forthright. When you weren't. Up once again, suggested that epic put things back the way they were bring fortnight back to the APP store using apple's payment system and let the Games continue inside while fight continues in court. This prompted an idea from the judge. What is it thirty percent went into some kind of escrow account. What if the thirty percent apple would normally get from sales in the APP was held in escrow until the case is decided. Would that be cool with both parties? The attorney for Apple said, he'd have to check with apple but. That would seem to address a lot of issues. Epic declined however saying the court should not give its assistance to unlawful provision by monopolists. While there are two cases underway here judge Gonzales Rogers said she'd rather run them as one trial while she knows whichever side loses will appeal. She could be a jury trial because verdicts by jury or less often overturned on appeal. That said either apple or at Belk has to demand the jury trial for jury trial to happen. She'll need to hear their answer on that today. As for when the trial should go forward house next summer for everybody. I think you're looking at a July trial date she said. My favorite quote actually happened in the middle of the proceedings when the judge said. I think this is going to be a fascinating trial frankly because each of these efforts makes a compelling argument.

Apple Judge Gonzales Rogers Attorney Patrick Mcgee Apples Yvonne CNN Twitter Financial Times Nintendo Gonzalez Developer Belk Microsoft Sony
Workers rescued from water after Seattle's Pier 58 partially collapses

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Workers rescued from water after Seattle's Pier 58 partially collapses

"Were hurt. hurt. Yesterday Yesterday when when part part of of Pier Pier 58 58 along along the the downtown downtown Seattle Seattle waterfront waterfront collapsed, collapsed, get get more more from from comas. comas. Cara Cara costing costing the the city city says says seven seven construction construction workers workers were were on on the the pier pier when when it it collapsed. collapsed. On On ly ly to to fell fell a a short short distance distance into into the the water. water. They They were were rescued rescued within within a a few few minutes minutes and and taken taken safely safely to to the the hospital hospital looked looked on on the the street street and and we we could could see see that they were OK when they were getting in the ambulance. And so that was a big relief. So So I I was was pretty pretty shaken shaken up up until until I I do do that that when when they're they're safe, safe, and and one one of of those those workers workers has has been been released released from from Harbor Harbor view, view, the the other other remains remains in in satisfactory satisfactory condition. condition. Now Now I I am am told told that that demolition demolition will will continue. continue. I I am am told told that that there there are are materials materials in in the the water water that that will will need need to to be be pulled pulled out out a a CZ CZ well. well. I I do do want want to to add add that that there there is is no no damage damage done done to to the the aquarium or minor slanty. Seattle's waterfront park was built in, 1974 said for a complete overhaul in 2022. We get more from co most Cole Miller for more than four decades, Pier 58 has been an attraction for those who call Seattle home and for those just paying a visit. When it was shut down in August due to possible shifting and failure, a plan to replace it was already in the works. We have been carefully structures, wave action. King tides the saltwater and they deteriorate very quickly once the pieces are picked up, backto work on that pre planned replacement. An investigation

Pier Pier Seattle Cara Cara Harbor Harbor Cole Miller Comas. King
Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

Safe Retirement Solutions

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Afghanistan Peace Talks Open in Qatar, Seeking End to Decades of War

"Tough negotiations lie ahead as the Afghan government sits down with the Taliban in the hopes of ending four decades of war. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is in Qatar, where the talks are being held through an inclusive negotiation process. You each You each have an opportunity. Have an opportunity to overcome your divisions and reach agreement on a peaceful future for the benefit of all Afghans. Negotiations was supposed to start months ago in the peace deal was first signed, but since then, some 1200 people have been killed in attacks across the country.

Mike Pompeo Afghan Government Taliban Qatar
Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:29 min | 3 months ago

Airline Workers Brace As Federal Aid Runs Out This Month

"Employees at the nation's airlines are getting nervous many pilots flight attendants mechanics in customer service agents have been kept on the payroll since March only with the help of federal aid that funding runs out at the end of this month, and if it's not extended tens of thousands of them could be out of work on October first from Chicago. NPR's David Schaper reports. Several dozen flight attendants, pilots, and other airline employees masked up as they chanted and marched around the Federal Plaza Downtown Chicago Wednesday to draw attention to what they say is a dire situation. So I'm I'm coming up on four decades of service and I have to tell you I have never seen anything like this in my career with United Airlines United Flight Attendant Jeff Highs says he's not just talking about the calamitous drop in the number of people flying because of the pandemic lot. The impending mass layoffs year and his co workers are facing. Unless twelve thousand of our members are at risk for involuntary furlough and that's just one group of employees at one airline. Industry Wide Cub October. First layoffs could top forty thousand, and that's in addition to the tens of thousands have already taken early retirement or other incentives to leave their airline jobs voluntarily. The initial corona virus relieffactor past March Congress and the trump administration included twenty five billion dollars in grants to airlines to keep paying employees for six months. But now that time is almost up Democrats some Republicans and the president of all said, they favor an extension of the payroll support program but the airline aid was left of the latest relief package proposed this week by Senate, Republicans and the uncertainty weighs. Heavily on airline employees, we're in this limbo right now other holding is a Chicago based flight attendant for American Airlines. Are we going back to work in October? Are Do we have to figure out and find another job? You know we're kind of time crunch right now what our backup plans going to be airline employee unions held a similar rally outside the Capitol in Washington DC to put pressure on Congress. While their bosses at the airlines fret to right now we're fighting for survival make no bones about it. Kallio. Heads a group airlines for America. He says after a brief uptick air travel this summer that peaked over the Labor Day weekend demand is already slumping again is more profitable business travel bookings remain down close to ninety percent is going to be a different world people are to see you're already seen. Fewer flights come October. First, you're going to see a further reduction in the number fledge that are operating Kellyanne other. Say it may take four to five years for the airline industry to fully recover if it ever does wouldn't another round of payroll support funding for the airlines just delay the inevitable of mass layoffs warmer airline Executive Robert. Man Who is now an industry consultant argues the jobs are worth saving. Job in the airline is probably support somewhere between seven and eleven jobs. Elsewhere, the economy is hospitality in these support technologies in other transportation boats in man warns in a couple of airlines may not survive the pandemic without more federal aid. To Gut check question how much of an economy? Do you want going forward congressional and White House to go shooters? We'll have to try to answer that question this campaign season in which the two parties agree on almost nothing. David Schaper, NPR News Chicago.

American Airlines Chicago United Airlines David Schaper Congress Federal Plaza NPR Republicans America Jeff Highs White House Senate Consultant President Trump Executive
China, India accuse each other of firing shots at disputed border as tensions rise

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:19 sec | 3 months ago

China, India accuse each other of firing shots at disputed border as tensions rise

"India and China, accusing each other of firing warning shots in the air along the disputed Himalayan border for the first time in four decades. In a new sign of friction after both sides have agreed to diffuse tension now, Beijing says Indian troops actually crossed the line of actual control and fired shots above Chinese troops on

Beijing India China
Last 2 journalists working for Australian media leave China

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Last 2 journalists working for Australian media leave China

"The loss to journalists working full Australian media in China has left the country after police demanded interviews with them I'm temporarily blocked that the punches Australian broadcasting corporation's bill Birtles on the Australian financial review's Michael Smith landed in Sydney after flying from Shanghai on Monday night but if journalists had been told they were persons of interest in the investigation into a fellow Australian Chang Leh the business news anchor full CG T. M. and have been told they had to stay the absence of Australian media from China for the first time in four decades comes during a low point in the two countries relations I'm Charles de Ledesma

China Bill Birtles Australian Financial Review Michael Smith Sydney Shanghai T. M. Charles De Ledesma Australian Broadcasting Corpor
Brexit: Boris Johnson to override EU withdrawal agreement

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:46 min | 3 months ago

Brexit: Boris Johnson to override EU withdrawal agreement

"British Prime Minister Boris Johnson attempted to talk tough on Sunday ahead of a crucial round of post brexit trade talks with the European Union. Saying Britain could walk away from the talks within weeks and insisting a no deal exit would be a good outcome for the UK. With talks deadlocked Johnson said an agreement would only be possible if EU negotiators prepared to rethink their current positions, the intern accuses Britain of failing to negotiate. Seriously Britain left the now twenty-seven nation e you on January thirty first three and a half years after the country narrowly voted to end more than four decades of membership that political departure will be followed by an economic break. When an eleven month transition period ends on December thirty first and the UK leaves the e You Single Market and customs union. Without a deal, the new year will bring tariffs and other economic barriers between the UK and the block its biggest trading partner. Johnson said the country would prosper mightily even if Britain had a trading arrangement with the EU like Australia's you governments preferred description of annot deal brexit British Chief Negotiator David, Frost, and his counterpart Michele Bonnie a a Jew to meet in London on Tuesday for the eighth round of negotiations. Britain accuses the block of making demands. It has not imposed on other countries. It has free trade deals with such as Canada without to deal British freight firms warned, they could be logjams at ports and supplies of key in Britain could be severely disrupted starting. January first.

Britain Boris Johnson European Union UK Prime Minister Michele Bonnie Intern EU Canada London Partner Australia Frost David
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 3 months ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

12:24 min | 11 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Nine hundred ninety nine and moved to the Senate in Nineteen ninety-one for the last eleven years. He's been president of the Senate where one of his first acts was shepherding through the impeachment of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in that role. He helped end the two in your budget. Stalemate under Republican governor. Bruce Rounder and worked to give fellow Democrat. Jay Pritzker a string of wins in his first year from legalized marijuana to a gambling expansion engine to a graduated income tax proposal that goes to voters later this year. I sat down with John Color Tin and talk about his long career in Illinois politics and how he feels to be stepping away away from Springfield after four decades. Well I got elected when I was thirty. And I'm seventy one so it's my whole adult life. It seems you know we've been down there and it's really been fun. I mean there's been so many Really Neat things People I've served with nine hundred and and eighty seven people Past five hundred eighty three bills What was achieved sponsor? And it's just been amazing. I mean everything the thing from When I first started you know getting involved in in Believe it or not the first big bill had had to do with car seats. We had this marriage in seventy nine and we had babies ninety one eighty two eighty three and the first one carried. My wife carried her home from the hospital. there's only one state in the nation that had a car seat bill Soon as we had that baby home we realized we got to put the baby in a carseat so we my wife started loaner program for car. Seats are how found out what about I passed a bill to require people to wear have their kids in car seats and it was a lesson because it was a bill that was very limited just just the parent in just their own Car knowing that that's what you have to do and later later you kind of improve So that led the seatbelt law. Believe it or not there was only fifteen percent of people wearing their seatbelts In the early eighties. Pass that bill. Not Not easy again was a secondary fans just to get started so that's been very rewarding and bunch of More bills after that as well as a lot of interesting people if you had to narrow it down to one or two pieces of legislation. You're most proud of what would they be anything where you literally save people's lives as pretty par for you know you press a button and you know that certain number of People are literally the fatality. RATE'S GONNA fall or even in the I've I've never been a smoker. I kinda hate tobacco. I bet after those people the only people that are really happy that I'm retiring are the tobacco industry because I just I just think that the the lives and the money that it costs so I've been pretty proud of those things as well The you know there's been a lot of things I mean. I worked on death penalty reforms before for we abolished the death. Penalty am worked on the school funding. Formula have pretty recently which allowed for Chicago to get started to get a fair amount of money that they but they that they have? In fact I was around. We stabbed the Chicago school reforms in the first up local school councils back in the late eighties. So it's been fun But it's also time to to move on when you first came to springfield lie. Deciding was a much more bipartisan affair. Air and when you look at the at Springfield today do you think the pendulum has swung too far well. I'd like to distinguish ourselves from what's happened happen at the national level Especially this last year now You know we've had forced bipartisanship because the first twenty eight years was Republican governor and democratic legislatures. Six all but two years one there was one two year period where they control it But then After that we we did have the Begovic cheers and Quinn Years And and so we were One party going around four years. Four some bipartisanship This last year though we really did come about at the end of with a lot of support from the Republicans and we had a budget that was balanced. We had to take some votes on some tough taxes with Republican Republican supporters on so And I my experience having been in the minority in the Senate for ten years was When I got to be Senate Senate President I just said you know what we're not GONNA get outvoted. We're a super majority. Why not work with these guys some ideas from the other party? You'll get a bit of work product art. And so I've I've tried to try to keep that as a principal when you think back to the time when governor rounder was an office of course there was a seven eight hundred thirty six day budget impasse during that period of time. Where would you rank that budget? Impasse when you think about the biggest challenges you face during your time in spring oil. It's it was it was horrible Because what we did people say. You didn't have a budget. Well actually. Unfortunately we did have a budget because we we were funding schools rules. We didn't like stop in force ourselves to get a balanced budget. We overspent for two and a half years some six billion dollars each year which ran Hannah bills. The income tax fell from five percent down to three point seven five. We never made up the difference. We kept on spending so so it was. It was really bad and we tried to you know. The speaker didn't even meet with the guy I did. Try to meet with the governor. On a number of occasions we just he just had such animus towards the unions and Madigan himself and spend all that money demonizing Madigan. It was it was horrible and eventually we did actually get the grand bargain with Christina. Donio my Republican counterpart who both of us got elected the same day. I work with very well. We just said you know what we're going to start doing our Our stuff independent of the speaker and the governor and it led to eventually A balanced budget Over the objections of the governor time time many people say it was your unique set of skills that finally broke the budget stalemate. How did you see your role in that case? Well it wasn't just just me was senator rebellious matter of factually initiated. The idea of working together to pass bills on these bills were the these were bills that that Republicans didn't like and the Democrats didn't like there were things dealing with tort reform or workers comp changes that are party didn't want their taxes of their problems and we just wanted to show. Oh that this is crazy what we do is you know we were underfunded higher. Ed People were leaving our state to go to other schools. I mean it was. We weren't paying social service providers. I mean it was just horrible and we didn't need to do that. It was unnecessary so that was a big deal to get people to come together at the end. I think it was so tough to do but in once it happened then when we had governor Spitzer commend. That's how that's what led to this. Bipartisan phenomenal year. We had last year of of of those major pieces of legislation. Where do you think Illinois will continue to fill the fallout from that budget impasse? Well well if you look at our budget We had to borrow a whole bunch of money to pay our vendors and built into the budget every year is like a mortgage payment jeff to pay for the legacy of those past the past years. That's why the governor's proposed and passed All Forty of the Senate Democrats voted for the constitutional amendment. That's it's on the ballot which will if passed a lead to since we also passed the rates to be included Lead to money and that money would be used directly to pay down Those all those all those bills Former governor Rauner was a political neophyte. We have another political neophyte in office now governor Jay Pritzker. What's your assessment of what he how's he's doing so far and what he still needs to learn? I was surprised when he ran for Governor Primary We had one one of our colleagues Daniel. BISS running I did not get involved in in that primary but I had members. I have dinner every night when we're in session with not not lobbyists but legislators to get to know people socially and everyone would would say you know it's interesting this Guy Pritzker who is really working and he's really league showing up and he's not Come across some billionaire. He's coming across. The Guy Really wants to learn and that was his attitude from the start It didn't hurt hurt tab all that money of course that he used the front his campaigns But he also really really think Impress people in the same thing was true true as a rookie and never having been a government. This last year I think he was willing to take advice. and I think proved that that We were willing after around a lot of leeway when you think about the last two governors in Illinois. These are both very wealthy men who are able to put their their own money into their campaigns. What do you think about the future of Illinois and the way money may play into? WHO's able to run for office? You know ideally really And the governor did provide money for the Democrats in the legislature. Ideally though I think to keep the independence of the of the General Assembly the Legislative Branch from the executive branch. It would be better if that wasn't necessary. And you know when we run campaigns both Republicans and Democrats got and And and try to raise money and we raise money from the traditional groups who care about the policies the unions care about the policies especially after governor rounders for years right so they donate dryer. Laura's I care about the policy so they donate And so there's there's enough money there for people to run campaigns and it would be best if it didn't You know come from Just super Wealthy people or even in this matter from a governor himself. You told France spillman at the Times Friday that Mayor Lori lightfoot and other Newbie to politics still has a lot to learn and in the spring legislative session. She didn't get what she wanted from Springfield. I'm a real estate transfer tax a final plan for for Chicago Casino. What do you think Mir lightfoot needs to master in order to be successful? I let me clarify I. I only pointed out that she didn't have the advantage. Just like we were talking about the two governors of having been in government before right and so and especially not springfield which is totally different than than Chicago Coggins City Council and. She's on learning her but she I think she's doing very well In some regards She she came down to Springfield right away from the start and she was a Rockstar It's just that it's tricky and it's tricky part is Chicago's doesn't dominate the entire state of Illinois. There's a lot of suburban urban town state interests. And so if you come in on a special deal for Chicago. That's not the way that's not going to do well What you need to do is make the argument? Sakaba just wants its fair share. And that's what we would be doing in the case specifically of the Casino I know from being there there and having worked on this the language in the agreements between the governor and the city are all worked out and it's fair for the rest of the state because it generates so much money and and it's used. What's it us for us to pay for the capital bills which benefit the entire state? So that's not what's going to be the hang up to hang up at Ben you know always people coming along asking for more gaming related issues. I think once those are put aside or negotiated that issue that can be worked so it sounds like you think that Miami fl agenda can CBS chief. I'm optimistic because again. State the state. The whole state needs the money would come from that that the casino and it's fair to the city because the study is going to make money as well. I want to pick your brain about the multiple ongoing federal investigations into Illinois politicians and their associates. What was your reaction when you heard the story? WBZ see broke about political lobbyists. Michael McLean and his two thousand. Twelve email. That refers casualty. I think it's fair to say to quote Jones's ghost ghost workers and quote the rate en champagne while it was very disturbing obviously because those emails referred to things which are crimes rape or goes payroll and and obviously doesn't recall..

Illinois Springfield Senate Governor Rod Blagojevich Chicago Jay Pritzker governor Spitzer governor Rauner president Bruce Rounder Ed People John Color Tin marijuana Madigan Chicago school Guy Pritzker Miami Lori lightfoot
"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

11:28 min | 11 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Nine hundred ninety nine and moved to the Senate in Nineteen ninety-one for the last eleven years. He's been president of the Senate where one of his first acts was shepherding through the impeachment of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in that role. He helped end the two in your budget. Stalemate under Republican governor. Bruce Rounder and worked to give fellow Democrat. Jay Pritzker a string of wins in his first year from legalized marijuana to a gambling expansion engine to a graduated income tax proposal that goes to voters later this year. I sat down with John Color Tin and talk about his long career in Illinois politics and how he feels to be stepping away away from Springfield after four decades. Well I got elected when I was thirty. And I'm seventy one so it's my whole adult life. It seems you know we've been down there and it's really been fun. I mean there's been so many Really Neat things People I've served with nine hundred and and eighty seven people Past five hundred eighty three bills What was achieved sponsor? And it's just been amazing. I mean everything the thing from When I first started you know getting involved in in Believe it or not the first big bill had had to do with car seats. We had this marriage in seventy nine and we had babies ninety one eighty two eighty three and the first one carried. My wife carried her home from the hospital. there's only one state in the nation that had a car seat bill Soon as we had that baby home we realized we got to put the baby in a carseat so we my wife started loaner program for car. Seats are how found out what about I passed a bill to require people to wear have their kids in car seats and it was a lesson because it was a bill that was very limited just just the parent in just their own Car knowing that that's what you have to do and later later you kind of improve So that led the seatbelt law. Believe it or not there was only fifteen percent of people wearing their seatbelts In the early eighties. Pass that bill. Not Not easy again was a secondary fans just to get started so that's been very rewarding and bunch of More bills after that as well as a lot of interesting people if you had to narrow it down to one or two pieces of legislation. You're most proud of what would they be anything where you literally save people's lives as pretty par for you know you press a button and you know that certain number of People are literally the fatality. RATE'S GONNA fall or even in the I've I've never been a smoker. I kinda hate tobacco. I bet after those people the only people that are really happy that I'm retiring are the tobacco industry because I just I just think that the the lives and the money that it costs so I've been pretty proud of those things as well The you know there's been a lot of things I mean. I worked on death penalty reforms before for we abolished the death. Penalty am worked on the school funding. Formula have pretty recently which allowed for Chicago to get started to get a fair amount of money that they but they that they have? In fact I was around. We stabbed the Chicago school reforms in the first up local school councils back in the late eighties. So it's been fun But it's also time to to move on when you first came to springfield lie. Deciding was a much more bipartisan affair. Air and when you look at the at Springfield today do you think the pendulum has swung too far well. I'd like to distinguish ourselves from what's happened happen at the national level Especially this last year now You know we've had forced bipartisanship because the first twenty eight years was Republican governor and democratic legislatures. Six all but two years one there was one two year period where they control it But then After that we we did have the Begovic cheers and Quinn Years And and so we were One party going around four years. Four some bipartisanship This last year though we really did come about at the end of with a lot of support from the Republicans and we had a budget that was balanced. We had to take some votes on some tough taxes with Republican Republican supporters on so And I my experience having been in the minority in the Senate for ten years was When I got to be Senate Senate President I just said you know what we're not GONNA get outvoted. We're a super majority. Why not work with these guys some ideas from the other party? You'll get a bit of work product art. And so I've I've tried to try to keep that as a principal when you think back to the time when governor rounder was an office of course there was a seven eight hundred thirty six day budget impasse during that period of time. Where would you rank that budget? Impasse when you think about the biggest challenges you face during your time in spring oil. It's it was it was horrible Because what we did people say. You didn't have a budget. Well actually. Unfortunately we did have a budget because we we were funding schools rules. We didn't like stop in force ourselves to get a balanced budget. We overspent for two and a half years some six billion dollars each year which ran Hannah bills. The income tax fell from five percent down to three point seven five. We never made up the difference. We kept on spending so so it was. It was really bad and we tried to you know. The speaker didn't even meet with the guy I did. Try to meet with the governor. On a number of occasions we just he just had such animus towards the unions and Madigan himself and spend all that money demonizing Madigan. It was it was horrible and eventually we did actually get the grand bargain with Christina. Donio my Republican counterpart who both of us got elected the same day. I work with very well. We just said you know what we're going to start doing our Our stuff independent of the speaker and the governor and it led to eventually A balanced budget Over the objections of the governor time time many people say it was your unique set of skills that finally broke the budget stalemate. How did you see your role in that case? Well it wasn't just just me was senator rebellious matter of factually initiated. The idea of working together to pass bills on these bills were the these were bills that that Republicans didn't like and the Democrats didn't like there were things dealing with tort reform or workers comp changes that are party didn't want their taxes of their problems and we just wanted to show. Oh that this is crazy what we do is you know we were underfunded higher. Ed People were leaving our state to go to other schools. I mean it was. We weren't paying social service providers. I mean it was just horrible and we didn't need to do that. It was unnecessary so that was a big deal to get people to come together at the end. I think it was so tough to do but in once it happened then when we had governor Spitzer commend. That's how that's what led to this. Bipartisan phenomenal year. We had last year of of of those major pieces of legislation. Where do you think Illinois will continue to fill the fallout from that budget impasse? Well well if you look at our budget We had to borrow a whole bunch of money to pay our vendors and built into the budget every year is like a mortgage payment jeff to pay for the legacy of those past the past years. That's why the governor's proposed and passed All Forty of the Senate Democrats voted for the constitutional amendment. That's it's on the ballot which will if passed a lead to since we also passed the rates to be included Lead to money and that money would be used directly to pay down Those all those all those bills Former governor Rauner was a political neophyte. We have another political neophyte in office now governor Jay Pritzker. What's your assessment of what he how's he's doing so far and what he still needs to learn? I was surprised when he ran for Governor Primary We had one one of our colleagues Daniel. BISS running I did not get involved in in that primary but I had members. I have dinner every night when we're in session with not not lobbyists but legislators to get to know people socially and everyone would would say you know it's interesting this Guy Pritzker who is really working and he's really league showing up and he's not Come across some billionaire. He's coming across. The Guy Really wants to learn and that was his attitude from the start It didn't hurt hurt tab all that money of course that he used the front his campaigns But he also really really think Impress people in the same thing was true true as a rookie and never having been a government. This last year I think he was willing to take advice. and I think proved that that We were willing after around a lot of leeway when you think about the last two governors in Illinois. These are both very wealthy men who are able to put their their own money into their campaigns. What do you think about the future of Illinois and the way money may play into? WHO's able to run for office? You know ideally really And the governor did provide money for the Democrats in the legislature. Ideally though I think to keep the independence of the of the General Assembly the Legislative Branch from the executive branch. It would be better if that wasn't necessary. And you know when we run campaigns both Republicans and Democrats got and And and try to raise money and we raise money from the traditional groups who care about the policies the unions care about the policies especially after governor rounders for years right so they donate dryer. Laura's I care about the policy so they donate And so there's there's enough money there for people to run campaigns and it would be best if it didn't You know come from Just super Wealthy people or even in this matter from a governor himself. You told France spillman at the Times Friday that Mayor Lori lightfoot and other Newbie to politics still has a lot to learn and in the spring legislative session. She didn't get what she wanted from Springfield. I'm a real estate transfer tax a final plan for for Chicago Casino. What do you think Mir lightfoot needs to master in order to be successful? I let me clarify I. I only pointed out that she didn't have the advantage. Just like we were talking about the two governors of having been in government before right and so and especially not springfield which is totally different than than Chicago Coggins City Council and. She's on learning her but she I think she's doing very well In some regards She she came down to Springfield right away from the start and she was a Rockstar It's just that it's tricky and it's tricky part is Chicago's doesn't dominate the entire state of Illinois. There's a lot of suburban urban town state interests. And so if you come in on a special deal for Chicago. That's not the way that's not going to do well What you need to do is make the argument? Sakaba just wants its fair share. And that's what we would be doing in the case specifically of the Casino I know from being there there and having worked on this the language in the agreements between the governor and the city are all worked out and it's fair for the rest of the state because it generates so much money and and it's used. What's it us for us to pay for the capital bills which benefit the entire state?.

Springfield Illinois Senate Governor Rod Blagojevich Jay Pritzker governor Spitzer Chicago governor Rauner president Bruce Rounder Ed People John Color Tin marijuana Madigan Lori lightfoot Chicago school Guy Pritzker Chicago Coggins City Council
"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"The nineties the and you know like like you said it starts with the Persian Gulf War and very popular George H W Bush. But that's not what defines this decade. Because as you said he goes on to lose reelection to Bill Clinton the first baby boomer president and sort of a new generation of American political leaders of the handing off from George H W Bush sort of seen as a World War Two You know Someone connected to World War Two connected to an earlier generation of Americans. Bill Clinton comes in as a very young president with with a young family with Hillary Clinton His Vice President. Al Gore is also very young and I think the countries are disease starts to look ahead to the again to the next decade into the you know the turn of the century okay but throughout the nineties Clinton brings a whole new bustle to government Ways to try and Redefine government. This is one of Al Gore's initiatives there in the ninety s was Reinventing government and you know. They had big ideas. They didn't necessarily succeed because most famous example would be Hillary Clinton's attempts to try and pass a major the healthcare overhaul that collapses of its own weight in the early part of the The Clinton administration and they also tried to deal with major energy issues there at the beginning of the nineties and and that runs into the Republican revolution that comes in in the mid nineties in the next ninety four midterms. And and you know. We're we see the rise of the Republican Party again with Newt Gingrich Richard and the GOP. Yeah in some ways. The one of Bill Clinton's enduring political legacies is the Republican revolution that was inspired the opposition to him. Yeah I mean we we learn of the The Newt Gingrich. He runs in one thousand nine hundred four on the contract with America which is sort of this pledge of things that he's going to to try and implement to direct the country in a different way. You have this. You know huge clash between Newt Gingrich and the Republicans in the House and Bill Clinton which continues all the Waif through the Through the entire decade. And you know there's Clinton is dealing with domestic terrorism The Oklahoma City bombings are happening. The the unabomber Atlanta Ends Olympics Atlanta Olympics Waco And David crush these moments that happened. These are sort of the first twenty four seven news cycle moments too. That people are watching In real time on CNN primarily You know this is still an era when NBC ABC and CBS would break into you know regularly scheduled programming to to tell us something that's happening but CNN is giving this this news in a in a constant way. And I think Americans are starting to slowly absorb The world that we live in today. But you know it's starting to happen there in the nineties and of course this leads into well absolutely and also so just at the end of the nineties. That's when we start at the Internet we start to get the and and the the the fears about kind of this new wave of technology also can manifesting in the Y2k concerns and stuff like that. We're starting to see that bubble up in the next decade will see a lot of that in the phases technological advancements. But there's there's a clash in the nineties because I I was. I was a journalism student in the ninety S. Still writing for a print newspaper and the beginnings of the DOT COM era of trying to get your head around. I'm writing for an online news service. What does that mean versus writing for a print newspaper with a deadline? And you know a thing. Stop at six o'clock in the evening and you couldn't get anything anything else in the morning newspaper after that. And so yeah the rise of the Internet. Obviously the drudge report is around in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven ninety eight ninety nine which breaks you know the Monica Lewinsky story in a way that print news wasn't able to so we saw the beginnings of the power of the Internet there At the end everyone starts to get their first email addresses. AOL is dropping. Its discs into your mailbox constantly. you you just have the stack of of leftover. AOL desks that. I'm sure a lot of people remember that You know mail mail literally and all this the the especially the chaos of the impeachment and that that kind of whirling dervish. A new cycle afternoon cycle after news cycle around leads us into the Bush presidency the second Bush presidency.

Hillary Clinton America Newt Gingrich George H W Bush Bill Clinton president Al Gore Republican Party The Clinton administration Vice President AOL CNN Monica Lewinsky Atlanta Oklahoma City Waco David
"four decades" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"For more than four decades at six forty two time for trump thanks a lot Steve so in Delaware County the ramp for seventy six south in ninety five south that's currently locked jump off that make the Boulevard you're traveling south on the blue route ninety five itself southbound remains Jim from route for twenty two the approach for seventy six from the accident at all lanes are open on ninety five north bound there is a little bit of the gate for delay between the Commodore Barry bridge in four seventy six new have Sixers volume in both directions slowing you down approaching a ranch for Broad Street leopards eastbound little bit slow on the down side heading into South Philadelphia at the game traffic seventy six east bound pocket the volume between the contract curve to Belmont slows down again for Montgomery drive to the approach South Street leaving town problems the westbound side from the vine all the way up to two in Bensalem is jam traffic on street road in both directions near the casino that's the to a crash no problems on the Delaware River bridges the Jersey still moving at highway speed on forty two freeway to ninety five the turnpike and route fifty five mass transit is on a close to schedule I'm just dropping any cable W. twenty four hour traffic center this weather forecast here C. B. S. threes capon snow continuing to fall especially north and east of the city could lead to slow downs on the roads across portions of Bucks county Burlington county New Jersey ocean county and up into the eastern Poconos tonight snow will taper off after midnight could leave behind some late accumulations north and east of Philadelphia not expecting much of anything more for the city and points west so scattered snow showers in areas of snow ending after midnight breezy tonight the low around thirty watch for some icy spots on the roads for the morning commute tomorrow tomorrow is mostly sunny windy and cold at forty one degrees Wednesday partly sunny with a late day flurry or sprinkle and high of forty four Thursday is mostly sunny and breezy with a.

Steve Delaware County Commodore Barry bridge Philadelphia Bensalem Delaware River trump Sixers Bucks county Burlington county forty one degrees twenty four hour four decades
"four decades" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"At most were added to the average human lifespan over many melania but somehow we've added an additional four decades to human life expectancy over the last two centuries why of course there are many reasons and public health advancements were likely the most critical proximate cause why did those advancements only occur so recent what was the old to me because I believe that there were two major automate because first and foremost the dramatic expansion of individual liberty and property rights in the first half of the nineteenth century expanded individual liberty and property rights were placed mercantilist a system where kings queens governments tightly controlled the granting of corporate charters to only the wealthy connected in favor mercantilism was replaced with a system where citizens can more freely and equally engage in commerce this new found freedom all the least human enterprise innovation and creativity like never before most famously in the rapid spread of the scheme hi near the previous century by Thomas Newcomen James Watt water pumps textile machinery traits for the first time in human history the standard of living of the average person to get a consistently and by now has increased in the developed world by roughly twenty five fold since eighteen for ten for global Jim it's not only double their life expectancy also became dramatically wealthier and for your you're all quite lucky to be living today and not two hundred years ago for economic.

proximate cause Thomas Newcomen James Watt Jim it two hundred years two centuries four decades
"four decades" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

Hacking Your Leadership

10:23 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on Hacking Your Leadership

"Rain. Share four decades of combined experience to help you become a more effective leader, we've never really as a workforce, spent a lot of time on making sure developing good leaders will be able to share stories experience of stakes of failures successes packing your leadership. Welcome to hacking your leadership. I'm Chris in Lorenzo and Lorenzo on this episode. I wanna talk about burnout, okay? But before we do I want to address something that has never happened before in the history of hacking your leadership. We are recording this episode in the same room five feet from each other. It is kinda weird not doing this over the internet and via video chat. It is it is I had to put clothes on. Both of us. No. This is cool. I mean, I took my family to Orlando to Walt Disney World for few days. And we decided why not record an episode of packing leadership, while I was out here. And for those of you who don't didn't know this already every episode of hacking your leadership up before this one hundred and seventy something of them. Lorenzo has recorded his audio in Orlando and I recorded mine, just outside of Los Angeles. And then we just put them together, and it sounds like we're in the same room but we are not. But this time for the first time we are in the same room. Yes, we are welcome the studio studio studio. Let's talk about his burn out, man. All right. So I saw an article in USA today, a few days ago that was a little a little quick Beatty, but I wanted to click on it and read what it was. And the Tel the article was burnout is officially a medical condition, according to the World Health Organization. So my first thought was my initial reaction before reading the article at all. Was wait a minute. So you're happy your job. And now you want someone to diagnose you with a problem as opposed to just like finding a different job. Yeah. So, but I, but I read the article, and it started to list off some symptoms of what, what they consider burn out and how it differentiates burnt out from just regular stress work stress. And so, I wanna I wanna read you the three symptoms that, according to the World, Health Organization are guidelines for determining whether a person is just stressed out about work or whether they're burning out. And I'm wondering your thoughts about it. Okay. I got. So the first one is feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion. Okay. The second one is reduced professional efficacy. And the third one is increased mental distance from one's job or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job. And so the question I have for you is have you ever worked at a job where you felt any of these and did you consider yourself burnt out? It depends on the day of the week probably with any job. I mean, honestly, you know, like you're going to you going to have a lot of really good days, especially if you're in a career, or a job that you really just enjoyed the work, right? So I think we talk a lot about leadership on here. We talk about, you know, a lot of times retail leadership. And you actually have to have a certain kind of attraction or feeling of wanting to work with people in all that comes along with that. So like it silly to me when I hear a lot of times, you know, specifically retail leaders be like, oh my God. I can't believe this crazy person did this, or can you believe this and it's stressing me out, and it's kind of like, well what did you sign up for like, what did you think this was going to be Shirley? No. Like you're, you're dealing with people on a daily basis. Your team small team big team you dealing with the general public if it's a retailer and the people are shopping. So, like you just going to get these these days and times when you're gonna feel any one of those three things have I felt more. Tired, have I felt more? Like I need a break. And he absolutely. And so, like, I guess, if you want, technically call that burnout. Sure. But at the end of the day, I think what you said to sort off the show, which is if you're just not getting energy from this job, if you're not getting any joy at all if you're not finding the milestones of things that you're doing that. You really liking or you'll be happy with, then what are you doing in that job? You know, I don't think that being like so what's the diagnosed for burn out. And then what, what do they do for you? You're exactly right. Yeah, what do you go to work, right? Well, I guess if it's if it's a diagnosis medical condition, I guess, what it means is that you should be able to go on medical leave for that. It becomes a. You know, people on medical leave for cancer, and for, you know, for a lot of very serious medical conditions. If burnout is now considered to be on par with that does that mean that people can go on medical leave because they just feel tired and sin cynical about their job. I guess the if you don't want to be at work than just quit. I don't understand. I guess it's just four into me to think like it would be something like the job doesn't change lace out. Right. You go away from the job under burn out. You get some type of medical help. And then when you come back, the jobs completely different now, like it's all the same stuff. So really what I believe, is that the work that you would do to get into a better place is actually more about you getting yourself in a better place than it is the job because that doesn't change if you work at the mall like you're still going back to the mall when you're not on leave anymore, right? Like doesn't change it. All right. So what you're saying. Get get yourself a better place. You mean maybe not just mentally you mean physically. You Might might. have to go to a different place, literally literally a different place. Even if the, the doors next to mine like they have to go there now going forward. But I'm just gonna I was gonna throw it out there. If you just make that little of a change that I, I'm going to say it's probably similar work is probably saying things, they may drive you crazy one place. When the industries, and when the jobs are that close. So I just I, I think it's silly that we would define that as a medical thing. I understand it in concept and theory. And I felt that way myself about certain jobs at certain times in my career, but to take a medical diagnosis that I don't understand. I guess what do you do to either reduce it or curate Cherno? I think that that's not gonna be any type of work that has to do with the actual job, right? Would be my guess. Right. Well, I mean, it makes sense that if you it's like let's take, let's take something more serious. Let's take, let's say somebody gets diagnosed with cancer. Okay. And they're a smoker. All right. So the dock. Says what we have to cure the cancer. So let's say they're able to do that. You're able to take a leave of work. You get cured of the cancer. And then you start smoking again or right, right? So the, the, the whole idea of you change the things about your life, that led to the problem is the part that is that is not addressed with this, you know. So taking a leave of work, because you feel burnt out might help for that time, you're not working, but it's just gonna come right back again, unless you actually take long term steps to change the situation that you're in. I want to talk about a two of these three symptoms because I think we really have to separate the two the first one of feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion. I have felt that before in jobs that I truly loved going to. And I don't think that's a bad thing. I think sometimes when you are passionate about something that you love doing and you work hard for it. You can find yourself sacrificing other. Things in your life and having less of a balance, because you're trying to either get ahead or make a name for yourself or there's a, a project that lasted longer than you thought it was going to, but it was temporary. And at the end of it, you feel like you're exhausted. And you feel like you just need to break vacation. But you're not thinking about quitting. You're not thinking that you don't wanna go back. It's just I need a change of pace for a minute, or I need to go to Cancun for a week or whatever it is the, the, the last one where it talks about increased mental distance from job or feelings of negativism, or cynicism related to one's job to me. That's a very, very big difference, because I've worked at jobs where I been completely exhausted. But I did not feel any cynicism or negativism or distance from the job. I felt very connected to it and, you know, very positive about it, it was just really exhausting me because of the work, I was doing at the time and I look back on those, maybe it's hard to do when you're in the moment, it's just hard to anything but exhausted, but I can. Look back on those times of my career as some of the best times of my career, you don't remember the individual elements that exhausted. You, you remember the whole of what it did for you in terms of a career, steppingstone, or making it opening up doors or windows to better and bigger positions, or more responsibility. That's kind of what I look back on those times as but if I pick it, yet it was exhausting hard work. And so I wanna make sure we separate those two because they aren't necessary just because you feel really tired and exhausted. And you need a break. It doesn't mean that that's not the right job for you. Well, it's funny because as you were talking through that I think a many times, the same people that would potentially say, I'm burned out or this is exhausting or like I'm just overwhelmed. The whole deal will also in the next sentence. Tell you, I need a break so that I can go and do my own thing. I want I want to be entrepreneur. I want to be creative. I wanna go and do this. And it's like, well, what do you think that actually is like, like if you think that? Coming to a job every day where you're paid to show up and then expected to do something is like, if that stressing you're out, what happens when you have to pay your bills nights, given that you don't live at home with your mom. But like you actually have responsibilities and bills and things that you've got to get done. What has now all of a sudden, when your arts or your hustle, or your business is the prime thing that drives your income to take care of those other responsibilities out there that result in not great things if you don't pay your bills and that type of thing as well. So I think that's, that's a that to me is a little bit of a thing that I see is somewhat silly. Well, I think it depends on what your DNA is if DNA is such that you would rather. I'll, I'll quote, I'll butcher it, but I'm going to pull something right from from Gary inner Chuck here. If your DNA is such that you would rather eat dog food on a friend's futons in a basement for three years than ever have than ever. Sign up to have another company pay you away for something that's just. So much a part of you, then, then, obviously that sleeping on the French who taunted abasement will not.

cancer Lorenzo Orlando World Health Organization Walt Disney World USA Chris Los Angeles Cancun Shirley Beatty abasement Gary Chuck four decades three years five feet
"four decades" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on Exponent

"Ventures there are just to completely rethink how computer works and make it so much more approachable and lay the groundwork for all of computing for the next four decades it's an incredible incredible product right and and what happened microsoft ate apples lunch why because the mac was a sustaining innovation again this doesn't make it a less valuable innovation if it was to society broadly historically speaking but from a business sense and money making sense it absolutely makes it a less valuable invention microsoft just copied it they copied it and attached it to the existing business model that they had based on the ibm pc and dos which predated the mac and we've talked with us before right the reason the mac failed is not because windows beat the matters windows open the mac was close the reason the mac failed is because windows already had the business model in place because dos came first dos was already established and widespread before the matt came out like they had a three or four year head start and so when that came out it was amazing and incredible but it didn't build built a nice business but it didn't build a transformative business because it was able to adopt it and plug it into their existing business model it didn't change the business model it's it's such a good point and most of the most of the innovation that happens in society today ends up being sustaining innovation which is fine.

microsoft four decades four year
"four decades" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on Exponent

"Ventures there are just to completely rethink how computer works and make it so much more approachable and lay the groundwork for all of computing for the next four decades it's an incredible incredible product right and and what happened microsoft ate apples lunch why because the mac was a sustaining innovation again this doesn't make it a less valuable innovation if it was to society broadly historically speaking but from a business sense and money making sense it absolutely makes it a less valuable invention microsoft just copied it they copied it and attached it to the existing business model that they had based on the ibm pc and dos which predated the mac and we've talked with us before right the reason the mac failed is not because windows beat the matters windows open the mac was close the reason the mac failed is because windows already had the business model in place because dos came first dos was already established and widespread before the matt came out like they had a three or four year head start and so when that came out it was amazing and incredible but it didn't build built a nice business but it didn't build a transformative business because it was able to adopt it and plug it into their existing business model it didn't change the business model it's it's such a good point and most of the most of the innovation that happens in society today ends up being sustaining innovation which is fine.

microsoft four decades four year
"four decades" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on WTMA

"I say that except for the fact that we have been fighting disinflationary pressure for the past decade whether it's because of technology whether it's because of you know still lingering from the great recession the fact of the matter is that there is no inflation we haven't had less we haven't had inflation and four decades okay go back to the reagan volcker disinflation which was completed by eighty two or eighty three we have been roughly around two percent gentlemen right for i don't know is that forty years eighty three yeah so why now i mean globally there's no inflation is i'm gonna ask you with spectrum jay powell new fed chair ken po carey so i don't think he's gonna act precipitously to show off the economy in the face of virtually nonexistent and look at gold gold hasn't moved years basically do i don't think he's going to be i don't think he's going to be hawkish i think he's going to remain just on the road that the market expects and that kind of gradual methodical move because in fact we do have to normalize and rates at one and a half percent are not normal right we've got to get back up to that three percent range for rates to be normal for the market then to function on its own and so can we get there's going to be the question and i i think we can but i also think that i don't think he's going to become hawkish and start raising rates faster all i actually think he's gonna be he's gonna tend to be in the middle and if anything maybe more dovish until we get there you know that's a good point look i think the funds rate ends this year too and next year.

reagan volcker jay powell fed ken po three percent four decades forty years two percent
"four decades" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Uh they knew what rob porter had done and they didn't care because they figured he could do the job that they wanted them to do but joined heilmann in this morning's post also there's a quote here from general john allen retired fourstar marine corps general talking about john kelly his friend of four decades and he says he says this is a man who across the court for forty years was considered to be the exemplary of moral principle integrity he was a selfless servant in every possible way a lot of personal courage moral courage do the right thing his values were very powerfully formed in this difficult for me to find in my memory of my service with him a flaw and yet here we are today this morning and have been for several days wondering what is wrong with general kelly is of of a moment of reckoning i think for people like the general who have known him for a long time and are wondering whether he has changed in some profound way or whether this is something that perhaps has been there all along a blind spot an element of moral to snus in some cases elements of course and this when it comes to some issues related to race features a couple of days ago before we got to this story we had and talking about dreamers daca recipients as being too lazy to get authorises to file the paperwork and not the first time he said things like that since he's been the white house so i think one of the things that happens is in the context of the military obviously you were tested a million ways but it's possible that in the circumstances there are elements of general kelly's character that were not as evident in his service in the military that this environment not donald trump but the environment political environment touching on dishes now the military touches a pretty much every issue of american life but not all attacks but not politics and look i think we've said.

rob porter john allen fourstar marine corps kelly donald trump four decades forty years
"four decades" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on KOIL

"A cap on him uh four decades and today is the day they are supposed to be released some in the intelligence community still claiming and doubtless people who weren't even born are making the claim when kennedy was assassinated that when that these documents might reveal sources and methods and i find that hard to believe that 1963 sources and methods would be jeopardised by releasing documents today i don't think we have the same sources and methods saw i do find that hard i might be convince if anyone made an argument but nobody's made an argument that just say it and and then we're supposed to go along with it but what will it reveal willett at and my suspicion is this that the documents and the reason some of the fbi in the see i don't want them release the documents might be embarrassing for the fbi and the cia that like with the nine eleven hijackers that we knew all about lee harvey we knew he it was a commie we knew he was a soviet lover we knew his wife was a soviet we knew he was a pro castro guy we knew is anticapitalist antiamerican we knew he was an extremist to leftwing extremists and i think that the fbi and the cia knowing that and then he shot and killed the president i'd say it could be embarrassing even in two thousand seventeen but president trump is being attacked by the news media in a variety of ways over this issue believe it or not because if he releases all the documents there are people in the intelligence committee or angry with him because he's compromising sources of methods all right so that's what happens if he goes this way if he agrees with the intelligence community and and some of the fbi that some of the documents just some of them should be redacted or excluded from the ace then he's fuelling conspiracy theories and bowing to.

kennedy fbi cia lee harvey president trump news media willett castro four decades
"four decades" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You here one well all will be revealed later in our interview with manfred mann lead singer paul gents do stay with us for those stories lots more coming up this hour but we begin with something of a cautionary tale many of us start the new year with reflections on the conspicuous consumption of this time of year food and gifts wrapped in plastic packaging now in rubbish bins and heading for recycling centres plastic in particular is a product which embodies the throwaway culture we take for granted we're heading towards hov a trillion plastic bottles used each year alone that's well over a million bought and discarded every minute of every day millions of us are complicit and weren't earth does it all go well more than half of that plastic waste heads to china and china has had enough is introduce new restrictions on the imports of foreign waste in an effort to reduce pollution the new ban could have a significant impact on global recycling in a moment will consider the alternatives to single use plastic and ask what innovations of possible to match the nature of a product which has changed our lives but first robin brand our correspondent in shanghai reports on the chinese ban china has the recycling four decades follow yash in this grimy smelly yard by a flavor in shanghai the workers suit on the ground floor and they live in tiny apartments on the floor above and his have a look at this array of bags and this one on the left this is the biggest circuit boards a plastic powerpacked this one these are reaches this one phone pack spurned coverings in this one at the end mice computer mice la la this man has made a living out of bashing breaking up disassembling kwok law argued he's been doing it for five years it's hard work he told afp hiring but they'll not screen warriors they live and work in this concrete yard because as money innings of china needs the rule materials so much so the chinese work has hoping sorting through you'll waste shipped in from abroad without it imported seven point three million tonnes of plastic alone in 2016 but most of that is about to end.

hov china manfred mann paul robin shanghai three million tonnes four decades five years
"four decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

Chat With Traders

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on Chat With Traders

"Um is perhaps a intermediaries so how important they are i think recent tackle them iq finance has started thinking about how important rabi broker dealers or or banks how they matter in the financial system how how they can really make or break the overall financial system uh but apparently politicians helping aware of this four decades if not longer so so i think is just due to the nature of their focuses they think about problems differently and sometimes they have trouble talking to one another how come trading costs are often neglected when it comes to academic research like it's it's something that is no avoiding it in know what i mean yeah and you know maybe maybe to you and this is this is that obviously o how can you possibly nor trading causes swan the most important things butting academic research on trading causes me relegate two two one strand of research are called market microprocessor so that's that's when people study how hallmark participants trade and how they impact prices how the impact liquidity and so on but that's only one strand of acid pricing literature and aims probably nine them probably not even the biggest rice seoul crosssectional asa pricing on the other hand is another strand of research at that as much bigger so thinking about saw of size value momentum maybe profitability and other other factors that determine um average returns in a cross section in the absence of transactions costs and i think that that's just because.

financial system four decades
"four decades" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The first four decades of your life in darkness before some one turned on the lights john roberson tells us his story and when martha and i got together she was very young low key because she's been depressed most of her life being autistic was like a good complement she could say something like oh i'm really in our sad the day i can't go to work i can't do this i would ask myself some time so what would be the best thing i could do fourearned i would ask her that she would say well just leave me alone i'll be okay juice lead me the and i'll get over it and i would just say okay well i gotta go to work i'll see you later on of the day sadness didn't really rub off on may she would always say she found my autistic predictability comforting john robinson learned that he had asked for your syndrome a type of autism a few years before he met martha at the age of forty he barely fell anger sadness not even when he watched a really good movie or when he read the news and he also had difficulty feeling the good feels like happiness enjoy so thankfully john out his wife martha when we were be together i would rely on march such a look at what was happening around me and she would tell me she would uh sometimes poked me and she would say stop talking so much about trains with their health john did pretty well for himself he was a good fathertoson copy and during the day he ran his own auto body shop and he also became like a spokesperson for autism research in advocacy his books on growing up with autism have been translated into sixteen languages installed in over sixty countries but still he felt like you know 10 man people would sometimes they would described me as robotic um people will say things can't you see i'm busy can't you see i'm upset after can't you see she's upset and of course i had no clue i started to construct this fantasy in my mind that what if i could see emotions and people wouldn't that be cool but i didn't really have any idea what it might actually be lie and certainly.

martha john robinson john roberson john four decades
"four decades" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on Business Daily

"But now after almost four decades of reforms enfant sleigh such an ability as stagnated user and commentators zhang liege off the government it seems is well aware of some of these concerns away from shanghai and beijing efforts have been made to reform the system to allow migrants equal access to the smallest cities but george magnus an associate at oxford university's china center says this hasn't yet made much of a dent on the growing gulf between the urban rich in the rural poor there are he says good economic reasons for the government doing more they're trying to move the economy towards a society that small based around household consumption of goods and services so it would be really helpful if rural migrants so they're probably about two hundred fifty two hundred and seventy million if they actually all were treated as equals to the urban peers so that would mean that they would have access to welfare and education and social services their standards of living would rise they would save less this would be part of the process of strengthening the consumption base of the economy in the future given those arguments where is the resistance to reform coming from the resistance comes from local and provincial governments themselves where arguing with the central government in beijing as to who should pay for the incorporation of migrants into the welfare system in the city's strictly speaking the local governments would be on the hook to do this but they are strapped for cash strapped for revenues the second barrier to was the acceptance of hookah reform actually are urban residents themselves who know that they ultimately would be on the hook to pay for the expansion of services towards their rural brethren and this quite a lot of resistance to the dilution.

shanghai oxford university china center beijing zhang liege george magnus social services four decades
"four decades" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Conference we had in asylum sylamore california where many of the world's leading a researchers from industry and academia came where a some people said on not for hundreds of years but the median was three or four decades from now and uh that means much sooner than global warming for example i i'm optimistic myself that we can create a wonderful future with a as as long as we win this race between the growing power of the technology and the growing wisdom with which we manage it in the past move tenant the win these wisdom races by just learning from mistakes you know we'd meant that fire screwed up a bunch of times meant that the fire extinguisher reentered the cars screwed up a bunch of times in invented the seat belt in the air bag the with super intelligence we don't wanna learn from mistakes we want to plan ahead and get things right the first time because that's probably the only time we're going gonna have because of this max and his colleagues think the time to plan is now and in his latest book he this some of what he calls the aftermath scenarios these include the good in a galateri in utopia the bad a concas humanity and the ugly complete selfdestruction on the upside first of all everything i love about civilization as the product of intelligence so if we can amplify our intelligence artificial intelligence there's no reason we can't eliminate all the big problems that face us today and even help life's flourished not just on earth but beyond on the other hand no there are obviously a lot of ways it to go wrong if if this incredibly powerful intelligence is controlled by human.

california global warming seat belt artificial intelligence four decades
"four decades" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

04:45 min | 3 years ago

"four decades" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Nearest dealer and check out the chevy chimera whoa the some his but you right right bye bye rich for me withdrawal through june give free the rest of liquid added thing we looked back at affair with what it is the road to jordan like the guy they depend like the bay in game four decades and i got a fake all of us right listen gallup back balabagan yellow how the pact hello palapye palabek young hallett back come gangster yadav his wannabe federal aid can be though the gray and twenty two key fatty lilia w g committed to the front named for him bribe aleppo and teeny in between i heard on the gang i'm on the paul casey and the next game paddock teenage teted frame f a b o l o v less ron again though is well on the way could tell so that a deal flp of the boy defense i'm kim bell pat great alabanian widow gallup back hello back holl opinion pallop back young hallett back cruising top on the city's low tony set when you hit us on the radio put 1980 glow met the next on the latest hallowed nestle it a pretty dogville kit prancing benefiting jug philip got the nod at them quitting must latte though a face lift and i just bought to fully apple djalminha put paid off a billboard charts greek staff stuff brent been stomach it about the tap pulp strutted drought but no alston dental now i got the top down just a shout allah back yet holiday kalapac back in palapye pilot bank young age ellen pack back fact bill has been in a neighborhood before louis within an so louis turned his back we took the bail heating knows up called him a let them know they louis the bail is law is going to get into your phone tap all the dea's right here real ninety 92 three la's overhit bob big boys neighborhood put up your plan are r go great alberto it like a celebrity would tell people that we get guarded after they range i gotta during its going to absorb were run under scandal where where to deal with by opener by that guy i get on the ballot not interviewed by rammed that comic you'd worried about every new back.

hallett paul casey ron philip brent louis apple palapye four decades