35 Burst results for "Four Day"

NYPD: No known threats to Macy's parade, but tight security

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

NYPD: No known threats to Macy's parade, but tight security

"Police in New York say their planning tight security around the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade in the wake of mass shootings in Colorado and Virginia. Police say there is no known credible threat to the event, but they say they'll deploy additional resources to ensure the festivities across the city are safe for all. The parade comes just two days after a manager at a Walmart in Chesapeake, Virginia, shot to death 6 people, and then himself, and four days after 5 people were shot to death at a gay nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Macy's is promising that the parade will be bigger and better this year than ever before, and the event is starting at 8 45 a.m. this year instead of 9 to accommodate all the balloons, floats, marching bands, and other participants. I'm Donna water

Macy Virginia Colorado New York Chesapeake Walmart Colorado Springs Donna
EEA Devcon Debrief – Key Takeaways

Enterprise Ethereum Alliance

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

EEA Devcon Debrief – Key Takeaways

"4 p.m. Thursday, November 3rd, 2022. Key takeaways we're still buzzing from our experience at death in 6 in Bogotá last month. The Assyrian foundation's flagship event brought together thousands of Ethereum developers from all over the world for four days of informative Sessions, education, and networking. As a sponsor of the event, the EEA had a table on the show floor, where the post EA deaf and debrief key takeaways appeared first on enterprise Ethereum alliance.

Bogotá Assyrian Foundation EEA Ethereum Alliance
"four day" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:50 min | 4 d ago

"four day" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"From the room right up here, please. Thank you, hi. Henry, based on Manila. I run an educational company there. But I'm also half French and we. Did implement a 35 hour working week and I was just curious what your thoughts were a on that experiment and be on the role of government legislation because in theory at the time France was, if you wait for people to come up with it, if you wait for companies, let's just say it's going to take too long. We're just going to close it with everyone else. And obviously lots of backlash, but it pushed through. So very curious what your thoughts are on legislation in general and in the French example if you have any thoughts. Thank you. That's a great example of a change that wasn't driven by productivity improvements, but a societal desire to work less with the theory that if you take 40 weeks to 35, lots more jobs will be created on the 8% unemployment rate at the time in France is going to come down. None of that happened. What happened was that everybody continued to work exactly the same amount of hours, because you're in France, though, French men have 8 weeks of vacation. So not more people got into the workforce, no more jobs were created, but people have difficulties, frankly, in France, to manage schedules that are overlapping. We have a lot of frontline people that are three or four people in the office. There's a lot of coordination between who's on vacation and who is not. So it's not to break the 35 hour work rule and getting everybody that legislated time off. So as far as the intention was concerned, it is considered to be an abject failure, actually.

France Manila Henry
The Obsolete GOP Election Model With Newt Gingrich

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 5 d ago

The Obsolete GOP Election Model With Newt Gingrich

"Speaker, can you speak a little bit to the fact that it seems as if Democrats were less worried about engaging in debates like Katie Hobbs or fetterman, but they're more interested in chasing ballots than actually convincing voters. Is it time for us to change the way we think about elections as well? Yeah, look, I think the Republican doctrine for elections is just wrong. It's obsolete. It doesn't fit the modern world. Let me start with something you said just before the break, by the way. And that is that. The win read numbers are much smaller than the democratic system. Part of that is because as much as 5 or 6 years behind in development, but part of it is that Google in particular refuses to deliver and I talked with Ron mcdaniel about this that Republican National Committee chair before the election. Routinely, the last four days of the month, Google manages to not deliver Republican emails. And so from a fundraising perspective, the largest single delivery system in the country was methodically biased against the win read and in favor of act blue. And that was a factor. The other big difference, you put your finger on exactly. And I'm trying to put together now sort of a list of things that we need to learn if we're not going to repeat this in 2024. Democrats focus on winning the election, Republicans focus on campaigning. Part of that, I think, is the way the consulting system works. Republican consultants make a lot of money out of placing TV ads. They have a big bias in favor of media, whether it's effective or not. Democrats start out with the idea that I don't care how the campaign goes. I want to know when it's over. Did I win the election? And so if you watch them, they're much more ruthlessly centered. They start they start collecting votes much earlier, which means they can tell you who on their basis already voted and who they need to focus on.

Katie Hobbs Fetterman Ron Mcdaniel Republican National Committee Google
Hong Kong leader Lee tests positive for COVID-19 after APEC

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 5 d ago

Hong Kong leader Lee tests positive for COVID-19 after APEC

"Hong Kong leader John Lee has tested positive for COVID-19 after meeting with regional leaders at the Asia Pacific economic cooperation forum in Thailand A government statement says Lee tested negative throughout his four day stay in Bangkok but his test upon his arrival at Hong Kong's airport on Sunday Night was positive Lee is now in isolation and will work from home other officials at his office who went to Thailand whitley all tested negative Lee's aim at the forum of Asia Pacific economies was to promote Hong Kong's image as a city reopened to the world after imposing severe COVID-19 restrictions for much of the pandemic I'm Charles De Ledesma

Covid Hong Kong John Lee LEE Thailand Asia Pacific Bangkok Asia Pacific Charles De Ledesma
Tatum scores 43, Celtics beat Pistons for 6th straight win

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tatum scores 43, Celtics beat Pistons for 6th straight win

"Jayson Tatum and the Celtics picked up their 6th consecutive win by getting past the pistons one 17 one O 8 Tate imported 28 of his season high 43 points in the second half and finished with ten rebounds Marcus smart added 18 points in ten assists to Boston's second win over Detroit in four days Boy and Bogdanovich scored 28 points to lead Detroit and rookie Jayden ivy edited a season high 26 Marcus Bagley the third made his season debut after missing the first 13 games with a sprained knee He finished with four points and four rebounds in 17 minutes I'm Dave ferry

Jayson Tatum Marcus Smart Bogdanovich Celtics Pistons Tate Jayden Ivy Detroit Marcus Bagley Boston Dave Ferry
Nevada count enters Day 4 with Senate, governorship on line

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nevada count enters Day 4 with Senate, governorship on line

"The Nevada ballot count is in day four with major races still undecided I Norman hall with control of the U.S. Senate on the line Nevada's ballot count ground into a fourth day as election officials tell a thousands of votes Joe Gloria had voting operations in Clark county which includes Las Vegas We're not purposely holding this process back We're doing everything in our power to move ballots forward just as quickly as we can Nevada's count has taken several days partly because the male voting system requires counties to accept ballots postmarked by election day if they arrive up to four days later ballots with clerical problems can be fixed by the end of the day on Monday I Norman hall

Norman Hall Nevada Joe Gloria U.S. Senate Clark County Las Vegas
Kash Patel: Nevada Has Mail-In Ballots but No Voter ID Laws

The Dan Bongino Show

01:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Kash Patel: Nevada Has Mail-In Ballots but No Voter ID Laws

"If you're just tuning in I've got cash Patel who has been working closely with the Adam blacks out campaign I'm Lisa booth filling in for Dan bongino Cash what are the problems is Nevada recently codified and voted to make universal mail in ballot permanent How is that sort of change that a dynamics of this election as well And I know we've been talking about mail in balloting but just the mass amount Absolutely Here's the thing that Nevada also does that We don't have voter ID We have no voter ID laws out here And I'm not saying we shouldn't have mail in balloting Again go to Florida somewhere else They have a two week window for mail in ballots That window happens to close a week or so before the election so they can count everything and do it properly So there's a right way to do it where everybody who has access and needs mail in ballot can do so But Nevada for some reason get this allows you to mail in ballot And your vote can still come in as late as tomorrow Four days after election day and be counted by the mail in ballot process And then there's a signature Turing process which is a whole nother deal that they have out here

Lisa Booth Dan Bongino Nevada Patel Adam Florida
Bill Melugin Describes the Reality of a Democrat-Controlled Border

The Dan Bongino Show

01:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Bill Melugin Describes the Reality of a Democrat-Controlled Border

"To Bill maludin described the situation on the border You can put a stop to today get out and vote check this out Bill here in Normandy Texas a tiny little town on the north side of Eagle Pass And as you can see behind me we have another group of several hundred migrants crossing illegally here This is the third time in the last four days we have seen this during these early morning hours This is going to be a group of several hundred All right so we're getting a lot of Dominican Republic Okay So this is the first little batch that has come through We've still got a lot more people walking up and if you can pan over to the left right here we still have several hundred more walking up But as you can see almost all of these people are single adults Once they cross the river border patrol escorts them into this processing area They've only got one bus right here right now which isn't going to cut it And most of these people they're showing up here to turn themselves in because they know they will be released into the U.S. after a processing That is why they are surrendering themselves Of course they'll be released in the year That's the point Malusha knows that's the point The whole point is to get the bus to release them into the U.S. You want more of this You can vote on this Remember consent to the government matters This is still a constitutional republic Revoke your consent today Go and vote I really I sincerely don't care if you're voting against Biden or for the GOP I'm not going to argue with you that a lot of people in the GOP are not going to do a lot to solve your problems Some are but I'm telling you the cause of all your problems right now are the Democrats

Bill Maludin Normandy Dominican Republic Malusha Texas Bill U.S. GOP Biden
Thousands pack Bahrain national stadium for pope's main Mass

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

Thousands pack Bahrain national stadium for pope's main Mass

"Thousands of Christians arrived in Bahrain from around the gulf to attend a large mass with Pope Francis Crowds cheered as Pope Francis looped around back when sports stadium before taking part in a mass with an audience of about 30,000 people The pontus four day visit was mainly to attend an interfaith conference but he shifted gear to focus on the region's Catholic community The liturgy was in English as most of the worshippers were South Asian migrant workers he traveled from across the gulf to attend be joy Joseph and Indian living in Saudi Arabia was thrilled to be there The Pope urged his audience to strive for peace If anyone strikes you on the right cheek turned him to the other also that is what the lord asked for bus I am Karen Chammas

Pope Francis Crowds Pope Francis Bahrain Saudi Arabia Joseph Karen Chammas
Abortion clinic that opened days after Roe fell is inundated

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 weeks ago

Abortion clinic that opened days after Roe fell is inundated

"A new Planned Parenthood clinic in Kansas finds it as overwhelmed with demand from other states Just four days before a Kansas City Kansas abortion clinic opened its doors this past June the Supreme Court overturned roe versus wade The facility was planned as a place for women to get healthcare in a medically underserved working class neighborhood but now the clinic has been inundated with patients from other states that have restricted abortion like Missouri Arkansas Oklahoma Texas and Louisiana The three Planned Parenthood centers in Kansas say they are only able to take about ten to 15% of the patients seeking abortions Those turned away are advised to take appointments in Colorado or New Mexico if they can get one It can take two weeks to get an appointment for a day after pill thousands of patients likely aren't getting appointments at all Few predicted Kansas would take on this role although in August voters rejected an amendment that would have cleared the way for tougher restrictions Emily Wales the president of Planned Parenthood great plains says the ecosystem is not even fragile it's broken I'm Jennifer King

Planned Parenthood Clinic Kansas Roe Versus Wade Kansas City Supreme Court Arkansas Missouri Louisiana Oklahoma Texas New Mexico Colorado Emily Wales Planned Parenthood Great Plain Jennifer King
Matthew Perry Is Still Using

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Matthew Perry Is Still Using

"So I'm watching the show the view to see how Matthew Perry sounded and appeared to me because he was on the view the other day and this would be the third time I saw him since the Diane Sawyer interview. And some of you people on the free show don't know that I said, I think he's still using. I don't think this is a good ending. I can feel he's not being honest with us. I said that. About a week ago, maybe four days ago. And I said, I don't care what anybody else thinks. This is what I think about being around addicts, my whole life. I know they talk. I know their answers. I know the way they think. I don't believe him. He's trying hard, but I don't think he's straight. Sorry. And I'm going to hold hold firm on that. So today, I get an email from one of my patrons, and it goes AJ based on your recommendation. My wife and I watched the Diane Sawyer interview with Matthew Perry. My wife is a 30 year substance abuse nurse with a master's degree, she lost a child to addiction. But she's worked in several hospitals and built several hospitals in multiple states. So this is not just somebody who dabbled. It is what this woman knows. I say all this to inform you of her breath of experience and knowledge. As we watch the show, no less than every 5 minutes she told me to pause the TV so that she can let me know that all of Matt's mannerisms, speech patterns, words, stumbles, and chubby fingers. Hands, yes, they are 100% indicative of a non sober person. He said, we have no doubt that Matt is currently using and my personal prediction is that he will over those before New Year's Day 2023. Well, let's not. I hope not. And he closed by saying you did excellent reporting back when he was in the hospital. Better than Diane Sawyer did on that interview. That's good. Yeah, it's the way I feel. I'm happy to have somebody with so much knowledge in this field back me up, but those of you who have been with me for 5 years on the Patreon show know that I stick my neck out, I go out on limbs and I'm often right.

Diane Sawyer Matthew Perry Matt
Devin Nunes: Merrick Garland Is an Old, Bitter Avatar

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | Last month

Devin Nunes: Merrick Garland Is an Old, Bitter Avatar

"Looks like now that they are beginning to be people who just look, say, look, this is going way too far. And now you've had Merrick Garland actually say, you know, everything has to go through ledge of flares, nobody can talk to Congress. I mean, it seems like they're holding it together with country time spitting Bailey wire. I mean, 'cause they went so far that even some who will be sympathetic quote company people are saying, wait, wait, wait, there's got to be some balance here. Yeah, Garland, I think, is just an avatar, old guy, old, bitter guy, luckily we were able to stop them from ever becoming appointed to the Supreme Court. Because the Democrats knew exactly what they had on this guy. They knew exactly what he was going to be. He was going to be swayed very, very easily. And that always makes me wonder as to what they have on some of these guys to where the Democrats knew exactly what to do. They put up this guy that was kind of a phony Republican and said, get them, let's get them approved. And luckily, we know he was stopped by the Republican Senate at the time. Now he's just a bitter old man who's not in charge. And I say that he's not in charge because it's clear just by this latest raid where he had stories that say, oh my God, he was in turmoil for two months, not knowing what to do. Well, that's weird because we were told it's nuclear secrets, classified information. Like, what? This is wild that he that he toiled over this for months. Whatever part of that is true, but what we do know is true is that the rate occurred, everybody from at least the right to the center, whatever mainstream media is left that has any sort of moral compass, was saying, what is going on here? We need to hear from the attorney general. Well, he waited and waited a wait at what four days goes out and does a press conference, my guess is that he waited because he was waiting for the corrupt DoJ and FBI people to come with the goods of which they didn't get any goods. We know we know that now because we just saw in recent days they sprinkled out some classified looking documents all over and took a picture on the carpet,

Merrick Garland Republican Senate Garland Bailey Congress Supreme Court DOJ FBI
Gordon Chang and Sebastian 'Red Team' a Hypothetical Cold War II

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:56 min | Last month

Gordon Chang and Sebastian 'Red Team' a Hypothetical Cold War II

"Red team. So that U.S. Army concept where you're trying to think like the enemy. When the war kicks off and some nations decide to robustly support the Ukraine, especially the British, the Baltic states and Poland, and Poland says we have Soviet era equipment. We have MiG 29s at the Ukrainians know how to fly. We are happy to quote donate them to Ukraine. If America backfills and replaces them with the F-16. First noise is out of the Department of Defense. Oh, absolutely will do that. And within four days, the Biden administration, the State Department with the arrogance of almost post colonial sense, say we don't think the Ukrainians need those. So we know better than the people who are actually fighting what they need and they renege on the deal with Poland. In terms of quote unquote, American leadership, how does Beijing look at that 72 hours? You know, and it was not only The Pentagon. It was, I remember blinken, the Secretary of State, actually said, yes, this is something we're going to do. I think they look at it at Biden and say, Biden was intimidated by the nuclear threats of Putin. And so therefore Beijing worked. It worked. So that's really been a bad deterrence message. When Biden took nukes off the table, then Putin said, of course I'm going to invade. And that has been the lesson for China. The other lesson that China got from this is that the sanctions, yes, they've hurt Russia, but they haven't stopped Russia. And China is thinking, western sanctions, even if they dare to impose it on great China, they're not going to stop me from doing whatever I want to do. So I think those are the lessons that China has taken away from the war. They're not the lessons that we want them to take away, but it's the lessons that, in fact, they have taken away. It's not what you want. It's the facts on the ground, and that's why we listen to Gordon.

Poland Biden Administration Ukraine Biden Baltic States Blinken U.S. Army Beijing Department Of Defense Putin China State Department Pentagon America Russia Gordon
If You're a Fringe Miner, You're in Deep Trouble

HASHR8

01:05 min | Last month

If You're a Fringe Miner, You're in Deep Trouble

"Let's not talk about Dogecoin. Let's talk about Bitcoin mining, which is probably the most depressing subject right now. The increase about to happen give us the load down. Well, we're about four days out expected from another difficulty adjustment and it looks like we're going to go up over 12% as of right now. So if you're sort of a fringe minor right now, you're in deep trouble. We talked last week about how there was like a sort of the last difficulty adjustment was a small 2% downward. And that we likely thought that this was a temporary thing. And it turns out to be true. And I got right here, I looked it up a lot of the Q three numbers are out now for the public list and miners. Clean spark up, of course, scientific riot up bit forms up. And it's not just necessarily a small amount. Like clean spark, which we know, just acquired a new place in Georgia, right? So that's expected, but month over month, like 20% is huge.

Georgia
Taiwan to end quarantine for arrivals starting Oct. 13

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Taiwan to end quarantine for arrivals starting Oct. 13

"Taiwan will end mandatory COVID-19 quarantines For people arriving from overseas beginning on October 13 The central epidemic command center in Taiwan has announced the previous week thong requirement will be replaced by a 7 day self monitoring period a rapid antigen test will still be required upon arrival but those showing no symptoms will be allowed to take public transportation Taiwan has been one of the few places in the world that's held onto a quarantine for arrivals throughout the course of the pandemic in recent months It's relaxed its measures and currently requires travelers to isolate in a hotel for three days followed by four days at a private residence I'm Charles De Ledesma

Taiwan Central Epidemic Command Cente Charles De Ledesma
Queen Elizabeth II mourned by Britain and world at funeral

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Queen Elizabeth II mourned by Britain and world at funeral

"On a tree lined avenue leading up to Buckingham Palace mourners from all over Britain and the worlds came together in their thousands to pay their respects to the late monarch As a radio broadcast of the funeral plays out live to well wishers along the boulevard many listen in respectful silence I spoke earlier to royal fans Ian namari Talbot who came from Ontario in Canada to be part of this historic event We arrived yesterday morning and we're flying out on Monday So very four days very quick Especially for the Queen Especially for the Queen American Rebecca Morris made a special pilgrimage from Maryland to London to honor her late mother's memory I wanted to see history And it was something that my mom and I wanted to do together My mom passed away last year So I wanted to come To honor the queen and honor her Karen Chammas London

Ian Namari Talbot Buckingham Palace Rebecca Morris Britain Ontario Canada Maryland London Karen Chammas
How to watch the procession of the queen's coffin through London today

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

How to watch the procession of the queen's coffin through London today

"Horses from the royal stables have been getting special training for the big procession Horses troops and military bands performed a full dress rehearsal before daybreak for the procession that will take Queen Elizabeth II's coffin from Buckingham Palace to parliament's Westminster square officials say the horse is taking part of undergone special training including how to handle mourners and flowers and flags being thrown towards the procession The procession features King Charles the third and other royals walking behind the queen's coffin to parliament the queen's coffin will lie in state for four days for people to pay their respects Charles De Ledesma

Westminster Square Queen Elizabeth Ii Buckingham Palace King Charles Parliament Charles De Ledesma
 "History": Thousands come for last glimpse of queen

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

"History": Thousands come for last glimpse of queen

"Thousands of people are coming for a last glimpse of Britain's Queen Queen Elizabeth's casket will be taken by horse drawn gun carriage From Buckingham Palace to the houses of parliament to lie in state for four days before Monday's funeral at Westminster Abbey many are already queuing up to pay their last respects erecting tents and preparing for hours even days of waiting thousands have already come to the park adjacent to the palace to pay their respects with flowers and written notes for the queen One reads we have loved you as you have loved us

Queen Queen Elizabeth Buckingham Palace Britain Westminster Abbey Parliament
"four day" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"four day" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"All right. Just pulled up at the spot. Looks like the tide's coming in. Currents moving. That was Austin schofield and one recent Monday while most of us were at work, Austin, went fishing. Feels like a very fishy spot. Oh, fish just jumped. Like he's been doing basically every Monday for the last two years, ever since his employer, a company called the wanderlust group, switch from a 5 day work week, down to four. It's been really nice from a fishing perspective because everyone else is busy, so I can go to all the spots and there's not boaters or anglers everywhere. And it just allows you to decompress and not have that dread of the upcoming workday. Even though I have worked tomorrow, I'm not stressed out about it at all, really. I am absolutely in love with the four day work week. I don't think I could go back to a 5 day work week. More and more companies are making the switch and in California, there's even talk of making a 32 hour workweek the law. Oh, I would think that would be amazing. Three days weekends, I think a lot of people would appreciate having that break. But some people aren't so sure. I don't foresee that being a possibility in my line of work. I just don't see it being something that is feasible for my lifestyle and the amount of work that I usually have to do. One of the biggest skeptics of the idea, me. I'm Gustav ariano. You're listening to the times, daily news from the LA times. It's Monday, may 9th, 2022. Today, my colleague Haley Smith talks about a new bill in the California legislature that might one day legally shorten the work week from 40 hours to 32, and we talk to people at companies that already have done that. And guess what? Work of.

Austin schofield Austin Gustav ariano California Haley Smith California legislature LA times
"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:13 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm sure an idea like this would have some opposition. Are people afraid that this will make every American worker one 5th less productive for our capitalism? Sure. So that's a worry that is natural for people to have. And actually this was studied. There was a big study in Iceland where a whole swath of workers had their hours cut by a few hours each week. I think they did they did a 36 hour work week. And the study has found that by and large productivity either stayed the same or it actually went up. So people were getting more done. In fact. And then, of course, there were all these other benefits, right? People were happier. They were spending more time with their families. They had better social lives. In the study, there was like a dad being quoted saying my kids are so excited when it's my half day 'cause they know that we're gonna get to hang out. It's just like really sweet. That's nice. And actually, since the studies came out, Iceland decided to, in large part, make this permanent. So now 86% of the population is either already working a shorter work week or they have a contract that guarantees them that shorter work week in the future. So this dream is going to be a reality there. Why do they think that people become more productive when they work less? I think there's a couple things here. One is, I mean, and if you work in an office, I think this will resonate with you or if you used to work in an office before the pandemic. I think this will resonate, which is that some of our time at work is just wasted. We have a lot of meetings to go to some of those meetings could probably be an email. Some of those meetings go on too long. There's also research showing that after a certain amount of work we just lose our ability to do work, like not completely, but we get worse at working. So anyone who has just worked a super long week has felt this, you get burned out. You get tired. You're not as efficient you make more mistakes. So a shorter work week avoid some of those problems. Is this just another way for white collar workers to end up with another benefit though? And they'd have one more day off where potentially service industry workers in restaurants or movie theaters or big box stores would wind up with even more work to do, tending to all these people. I think that's a real worry. And one thing that was really interesting to me about the Iceland research is that it wasn't just office workers who were part of the research. It was also like I think law enforcement officers and folks who worked in child care or also elder care. So especially some of these care work jobs, it's not like you're spending that much time in meetings when you're caring for toddlers. I know because I have a toddler. Those are labor intensive jobs. And when you're on your on, but they still found ways, whether it was maybe the day care center hires more people. Maybe it adjusted hours slightly. They still found ways to make these shorter work weeks work. So I think really the key if we were going to do something like this would be making sure that exactly what you're talking about. It's not just a benefit for white collar workers. This is like a real shift across the economy. And that it's coupled with making sure that people who have really unpredictable schedules are not enough hours have enough, that they actually have enough work or enough benefits they can live on them. And for all the people who think this is just like a pie in the sky idea, it's worth remembering, right? That so was UBI until during the pandemic, the former president and the current one just decided to give people fair sums of money, right? Do you think because of that, we're a little bit closer to ideas like this than we were, say, before the pandemic? Yeah, I mean, we've seen so many things policy wise that I thought we'd never see, you know, whether that's the child tax credit, whether it's the stimulus, whether it's some of the stuff in the American rescue plan. I think there's been this acknowledgment of people's basic needs in a way that there really wasn't before. And I've just started to see a kind of cultural change. Maybe this is too optimistic, but it used to be that whenever you talked about work and people work too much. People would kind of roll their eyes and especially in media or if you talk to white collar professionals, everyone would be like, of course we work too much, but no we're never going to do anything about it. That'd be ridiculous. And I just feel like it's different now. I feel like frankly, America's traumatized from the pandemic, even those who are kind of relatively insulated. I think there's this serious sense of meaning to change. There's a serious sense that work is broken. And for the first time when you say people work too much, everyone kind of perks up on listens. And I'm hoping that that means maybe there's appetite for changing this and not just going back to the way it was before. And a north enjoy your weekend. Thanks so much, you too. Anna north. She's a full-time senior correspondent vox, who also somehow managed to write a very good book while working here. It's called outlawed. It's a western, you can find it wherever you find your books. Today's show was produced by will read. I don't believe he's written a book yet, but his future is bright. The rest of the team includes Victoria Chamberlain, haidi Milwaukee, miles Brian and halima Shah, a theme Shapiro's our engineer, Matthew Collett's our editor, Amanda Al Saudis our MVP Liz Kelly Nelson is vox's veep of audio. Jillian weinberger is the deputy music from breakmaster cylinder and Noam hasn't felt facts are checked by Laura bullard. Just reminder before we go, we're off for the next few days for the Christmas holiday. Take care. Once again, the weekend..

Iceland Anna north Victoria Chamberlain miles Brian halima Shah America Matthew Collett Amanda Al Saudis Liz Kelly Nelson Jillian weinberger Shapiro Milwaukee Laura bullard Noam
"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"In a minute, we humor a very un American idea. Maybe we should all be working. A little less. It should explain..

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Then we have the erosion of unions. So workers have less power to bargain for their conditions. And things just kind of get crappier and crappier for lack of a better word. Pensions become less common in favor of four-o-one-ks and retirement accounts that rely way more on the worker to be putting away money versus somebody putting away money for you. The rate of people who have health insurance through their job goes down, wage growth stagnates. There's lots of factors we can point to, but basically over time your 1950s job that's kind of providing all your needs. It just becomes less and less common. Fewer and fewer people have that kind of job. And even the people who do have jobs that are providing for all their needs, it feels like those people might be working more now than ever before. Right, so the other thing we've seen is that, you know, white collar work sort of professional work. Those work weeks and those work days have just gotten really long. And I think something that we've seen written about this elsewhere is just a general worsening of people's schedules over time. So there's been sort of a weakening of the overtime rules in the fair labor standards act, so more and more people are exempt, more and more people are in this category where you actually can be asked to work more than 40 hours a week and you don't have to be paid over time. So then your hours can balloon to whatever your boss feels like. There's also been a rise in what Derek Thompson at the Atlantic calls working, which is this idea that work should really be the centerpiece of your life and your identity. It should be really important. You should really be giving all of yourself to work. It sounds unhealthy. Sure, and it is, but at the same time, that attitude is incredibly common. It's super common in our industry. You know, I felt that way from time to time, you probably have to, I think a lot of quote unquote knowledge workers are kind of encouraged to embrace this work as and it's also great for our bosses, right? Not to be subversive or whatever, but it's good for capitalism, the more that we feel like work is our religion. So all this stuff contributes to folks who maybe their job does provide them health insurance, maybe they have a 401k, their job might still be making their life kind of bad because they're at work all the time. Then you have service workers who have a rise in what's called just in time scheduling, which means their schedules can be super unpredictable. Who's been at Starbucks 8 years, says she's seen the advent of optimal scheduling. When I was hired managers would be fired if they weren't putting schedules out three weeks in advance. But now it's every week and I believe it's the new automatic system only allows them to do a week in advance. But we're required to give 6 months in advance of availability of when we're available to work. So even if they're not working really, really long hours, maybe they have no idea what their hours are going to be week to week, they have to be on call constantly, sometimes they're doing cloning quote unquote, which is like where you close the store and then you open the store 6 hours later. Welcome back to my channel today. I'm gonna give you tips on how to survive the dreaded. I do a coping once a week, which is I close on one day and then open the very next day. And these are my tips to help you survive a late night followed by an early morning. So it can be almost like having a 50 hour 80 hour work week just because you never know when someone's going to call you. So just generally scheduling has become this huge problem and we're all at the mercy of our work, I think, in a way that labor reformers in the middle of the last century never never intended us to be. Not to mention a lot of the people in the service industry and the people who may have been clopping lost their jobs during the pandemic. Right, so I think the pandemic just made all of this worse and so many different ways that we can talk about. But one big thing it did is wipe away people's jobs. You know, millions of people lost their jobs last year. Disproportionately, people in the service industry, disproportionately low wage jobs where people didn't have a lot of savings. They couldn't afford to lose a job. And, you know, if your job was just providing you the minimum level of security before, now there's nothing. So I think that was the first step of being really disillusioned with jobs and employment in America. Okay, so to recap, just some of what you said, we're losing a lot of our worker protections. Other people are choosing to work more than ever, then there's people who are being abused in their work situations. A lot of those people have lost their jobs and then there's millions of people who are quitting their jobs. Where do we go from here? That all sounds really dark, Sean, but I think that we're seeing some interesting cultural changes right now. And the biggest thing that we've seen is that I think the pandemic has kind of led to this collapse in the meaning of work for a lot of people. So even over and above money and security health insurance, all the things we just talked about, you know, I think there's been the sense that we're provided a sense of purpose for people. It provided the sense of camaraderie, together with your coworkers. The pandemic really wiped a lot of that away. You know, suddenly office workers were working out of our houses where on Zoom. And I think that sense of purpose, like people are reevaluating their sense of purpose right now. They're questioning, this is a time of trauma. This is a time when people lost their lives. What's really important. And I think all that reevaluation, part of what it's leading to is people leaving their jobs. Switching jobs is now easier than ever for a lot of people. There are more companies going remote. Maybe these are people who have saved some money over the past year. And so they're looking at their lives and saying, why am I living like this? Why am I not doing something I'm passionate about? And, you know, we're seeing it not just in people who you might think financially, they have a lot of choices, lawyers, quitting, to have a better work life balance, but we see it in service workers who aren't making a ton of money, maybe they don't have a ton of money saved up, but they don't want to be in danger for a minimum wage anymore. So I think across the economy, we're kind of seeing something really change..

Derek Thompson Atlantic Starbucks Sean America
"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"We thought we'd use the occasion to revisit a show from earlier this year we made about exactly this kind of work week. It's called the four day workweek. We ran it just before it Labor Day. This episode and your response to it actually inspired us to bring you an entire series on the future of work, which you can revisit on your own time by scrolling back and your today explain feeds. In the meantime, here's how it all started. Welcome back to today explain thanks for joining us again this coming Monday is Labor Day so we're gonna take the day off and have a four day work week, but the company we work for vox media went ahead and gave us another day off this coming Friday AKA tomorrow, so we're feeling extra lucky to have two four day workweeks in a row. Now, I usually don't question extra days off but on the show today we're gonna talk about how our changing attitudes around work might actually change how we work. So I had to inquire about the extra Friday off this morning. I hit up my boss's boss's boss's boss, my great, great grand boss. You know, Sean, I think I just call us coworkers. Jim bankoff, CEO, vox media. Why'd you give us all another day off? Well, it starts with the fact that we have all been working our tails off through a pandemic. And we want to enable and empower our managers to encourage people to take more time. But what we also found is that it sometimes hard to do that because we have things to do and the things that we have to do not only revolve around our own schedules, but revolve around our coworker schedules and revolve around schedules of people outside of the company too. So we figured by having a day that everyone has off that would allow people to not feel the pressure of having to be there for their coworkers when they were collaborating on a project. So for all those reasons it all added up to like, yeah, let's do this. And we're happy that we did. Okay, as my colleague Jim mentioned, working through the pandemic has changed things. This isn't just a theory at this point. It's a game changing reality. My other colleague and a north wrote about it for vox in an article provocatively titled the death of the job. Yeah, I mean, I was really inspired by this sort of idea of the so called great resignation. People are quitting their jobs in droves in what's been dubbed the great resignation, pushing job vacancies to all time highs and a new survey from productivity from lattice found that 54% of respondents are looking to change jobs and 43% say their career paths have stalled or quote slowed to a crawl for context 4 million people quit their jobs in April alone. Dang. So to be clear, that's not like in a year that's in a month. It's a huge, huge number. It's a record. And so really kind of wanting to look into why and what the pandemic has done to jobs and work just got traumatic difficult and stressful in new ways. But I think the sort of flip side of that is that it has opened up this door to talk about what should the role of work be in people's lives. And I think that can actually be an interesting conversation that maybe can open the door to making our lives a little better. And I want to get to all the changes and what could come of them eventually. But in your piece, you talk a lot about the history of the American job. What did you discover when you looked into the background? Right, so a lot of the things that we sort of think of as mainstays of jobs today for better or for worse, they didn't come about by magic. They came about because labor activists fought for them. So for example, people in factories used to work 6 day weeks, 7 day weeks, incredibly long work weeks before labor organizers started working on this issue. Worked on it for a long time and then during the 1930s with the new deal we start to see these labor reforms getting enshrined into law. After many requests on my part, the Congress passed a fair labor standards act. What we call the wages and hours Bill. So we see the fair labor standards act, which means if you work over 40 hours a week, you're supposed to get over time. It is the most far reaching program, the most far sighted program to the benefit of workers that has ever been adopted. Here, or in any other country. And labor organizers are kind of pushing for other things to they don't always get them. A lot of folks wanted universal healthcare, for example, back in the 1930s, we think of this as something that we're arguing about today, but this was an argument back then. Well, how about the theory that the community can afford with the individual can't? Oh, so you've been bitten by that bug, Andy. The people of park is filled with a ten cents each a week. They could give him a medical service. That's a very beautiful idea. And maybe in 1960 a practical one, but it just won't work. They wanted a kind of universal retirement system, some things to really take care of people when they're too old to work. They didn't really get either of those things. And so in some cases, what they kind of settled for were some benefits that were tied to your job. So for example, health insurance tied to your job or pensions that were tied to your job where if you work a certain number of years at a certain company, then they'll kind of take care of your retirement. So instead of saying we're gonna have this social safety net that takes care of everybody, then we kind of get this conception where your job is sort of what takes care of you. What is like the ideal version of your job is supposed to take care of you and when does that sort of peak? Yeah, so we kind of get to this idea in the late 40s, the 1950s. 10,000s of homes, vigorous workmen rise to meet a new day and a new opportunity. The morning sun stirs the nation's workmen. Prompting them to their posts of daily service. You know, there's a certain category of job, often these are manufacturing jobs. These are jobs that are typically held by white men. Fred's a shop steward for the union which has an agreement with the mill. He represents the workers on the plant's labor management committee. These days, they're discussing production problems. You know, but these are jobs that thanks to the fair labor standards act. They're supposed to be 40 hours a week, or you get overtime. They pay you a certain amount, you know, sometimes they pay you enough that it doesn't just take care of your needs. It takes care of your kids and it takes care of, you know, you have a partner who may be able to stay home and take care of those kids. You know, it's the sort of what they call the quote unquote family wage. And then you get benefits out of that job, right? You get healthcare. And you had a pension at some point. So when you no longer are able to work or you're no longer want to work, you actually get paid. And you can take time and you can rest and play with your grandchildren. This is the sort of quote unquote American Dream ideal. And we're talking ideals, but this ideal was only ideal for segment of the population. Right. I think we have this ideal of how jobs used to be and the reality is that these kinds of jobs were only ever for certain people. For starters, there were lots of people who were left out of the fair labor standards act. So that includes domestic workers and agricultural workers who were disproportionately likely to be black or a LatinX or other people of color. And then it's also the case that there were big sectors of the economy that never had these kind of quote unquote good jobs. So if you worked in a customer service job, you worked in retail. Other service sector type jobs, they didn't really experience the same kind of 1950s peak. So one labor historian I talked to pointed out a lot of retail jobs were just considered women's jobs. So the idea is if you became a salesperson, you know, like a sales girl, quote unquote, for example, that people your employer would assume you don't actually need enough money to support a family because you're only a woman. You just need quote unquote pin money, which is like.

vox media Jim bankoff Sean Jim labor management committee Congress Andy Bill Fred
"four day" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

Hello Monday by LinkedIn

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Hello Monday by LinkedIn

"You got to create that space for long term thinking. Well, so there's one big question I just can't put out of my mind. Won't people in a four day work week just end up working on their three days off? I mean, just to keep up. Here's how Ryan sees it. Well, the prior problem was that that was happening on weekends. So people would tell me, I'm catching up on Sundays. We're always catching up on Sundays. It's like, okay, so you're exhausted for meetings Monday through Friday. And then you're like doing household errands are trying to take care of your family on Saturdays and you're catching up on Sundays. It's like no wonder you're burning out. And so at least we say no collaborative work Friday through Sunday. If you need to do some catch up work, that's great. But I much rather someone have a fully clear Friday do some catch up work then and have half a Friday and Saturday Sunday to them and their family, then the prior model where they're catching up on Sundays. Ryan is deeply committed to his workplace culture and to the conscious leadership he espouses. I asked Ryan what else he thinks his employees need from him? Employees want to be challenged, good employees. They want to be challenged. They want to grow. They want you to hold a high bar for them. And they want you to acknowledge and praise them when they achieve. And they want you to be honest with them when they don't. And so it's pretty simple. If you're a player on a sports team, you want your coach to recognize when you do well. But you lose trust in your coach if they don't give you real feedback when you're not doing well or they just put you on a bench and don't talk to you anymore. We have a lot of that in the workplace. I put the person on the bench and isolate them and give them some makeshift work. And we try to keep it real. That's kind of the theme. It's like be honest with your team care about the person, but don't pamper them, give them the real honest feedback and a kind and compassionate way and care about that person's success. So as you move forward with the four day structure in place, how do you envision tweaking it or experimenting with it in the future? I don't think we're going to tweak it that much. Now there's plenty that we're tweaking from a conscious culture standpoint. And so this is how we do meetings, how we write over talk. And those types of things are always being experimented with. Well, tell us about them. I'm very motivated to help create new norms in society. And our team is equally motivated. That's our culture. And we also are building a culture of courage, which is much needed in society today. And we're also being rewarded because everybody wants to join the company that has courage and is redefining norms. And so selfishly, it's a great thing for us to do. And so the norms will be more in favor of employees, but it's not going to be a pampering. Because that's what Google and Facebook tried to do. And there's also there's a lot of weirdness around that too. What do you mean by pampering? Is that the free lunch and we'll give you massages? Yeah, exactly. I don't think that's what human beings want. They want a rewarding enriching work environment where they get to have impact and they're treated well. And so and the company operates ethically. And when they get to be a part of a mission, that resonates with them. I want to come back to the four day workweek. If there's any roadblock for you on this in the future, what do you envision that it might be? It's that we haven't continued to uphold a high bar for performance and execution. Right? And we've overcorrected. And so the four day work week done right is where you have a high standard for execution and performance. And you're allowing people to do it with an accomplished that with less distractions. The fail case is where people are just working less and are still not performing, and so that's what you want to avoid. That was bolt CEO Ryan breslow, talking with us about his vision for a four day work week. And now I want to hear from you about what you have to say about all of this. If you could restructure your work life to actually fit your life life, what would it be like? Would you do for ten hour days, two days on, two days off all the time? Or maybe something else entirely. Build your case for your ideal work schedule and then come talk about it with me and Sarah storm, our producer this week on hello Monday office hours. We'll go live like we always do at 3 p.m. on Wednesday. That's eastern standard time. And we'll see what our community has to say. So to join the conversation, meet us on the LinkedIn news page or send us an email at hello Monday at LinkedIn dot com and we'll send you the link. And if you like the show, please rate and review us. It genuinely helps us so much. You know, every so often I like to share a review on the show. Now, if it's yours, drop me an email at hello Monday at LinkedIn dot com and let's have a chat, a virtual coffee. Anyhow, here's our producer, Sarah storm with this week's review. Hey Sarah. Hey, Jesse. So who do we have today? This week's review comes from Eileen's front porch, great name, by the way. They say Jesse has such a great speaking voice. True. You can tell she was a reporter as she asks very thought provoking and meaningful questions of her guests. I never miss an episode. Sarah, can you see me blushing over here? You are, you're a little pink. I love reading the reviews for this reason. I also can't stand it a little bit. Anyways, thank you, Eileen's front porch. Yes, the reporting training will do that to you. It's a real pain in the butt at a dinner party. Thanks for listening to the show and drop me an email at hello Monday at LinkedIn dot com. Let's get together. Hello Monday is a production of LinkedIn, the show is produced by Sarah storm with help from taisha Henry. JoJo Georgie mixture show. Florenzi aroundo is head of original audio and video. Dave pan is our technical director. Mikayla Greer and Victoria Taylor embody conscious leadership to us are music was composed just for us by the mysterious breakmaster cylinder. Dan Roth is the editor in chief of LinkedIn. I'm.

Ryan Sarah storm Ryan breslow LinkedIn Facebook Google Jesse Eileen Sarah taisha Henry JoJo Georgie Dave pan Mikayla Greer Victoria Taylor Dan Roth
"four day" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

The Small Business Radio Show

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on The Small Business Radio Show

"I don't know if you need to go that far. I know with Lenovo, one of the things that surprised me was I think was just how productive we remained. It's really about getting the task done, getting the work done. And as long as that continues, whether it's a home or in the office, I think, you know, people will trust their employees to get their stuff done. Yeah, and that's the thing. If you can't trust your employees, get things done, they probably shouldn't be on your team. And I think that now more than ever, we really have to shift our focus to that working is not about time, but it's about what you get done. The whole concept of results oriented work. Yeah, I don't think there's any question about that. I think of an example, you know, my daughter goes to a very we live in a small town, south of Raleigh. And there's a small dance studio. You know, it's run by a dance instructor that I think she has maybe 60 maybe 70 students at the most. And then when the pandemic hit, you know, the kids couldn't go into practice dance. So what we see to do, and basically, that's where everybody, you know, my daughter would take her laptop out to the garage and turn on her camera and they had access I think they were using teams. Microsoft Teams. And they would have their class virtually. Which was I thought was an amazing solution. Not as good as being altogether. But at the same time, the teacher could watch their steps, the cameras were kind of on their feet. This was a clog in class, so they watched their feet. And gave the feedback. Yeah, I mean, it's certainly opens it up to if you can't make it to a physical location that you can still do it online. My wife teaches yoga. I mean, she's still doing it online on person. Not as good, but at least it's a substitute for not doing anything at all. Yeah, absolutely..

Lenovo Raleigh Microsoft
"four day" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on The Signal

"Wartime. So if this is something that's being considered in lots of places and that's at least partly because.

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"I'm sure an idea like this would have some opposition. Are people afraid that this will make every american worker. You know one. V less productive for our capitalism. Sure so that's a worry that is natural for people to have and actually this was studied. There was a big study in iceland. Where a whole swath of workers had their hours cut by a few hours each week. I think they did. They did a thirty six hour. Workweek and the studies found that by and large productivity. Either stay the same or actually went up So people were getting more done in fact and then of course there are all these. Other benefits rate. People were happier. They were spending more time with their families. They had better social lives. You know in the study there was like a dad being quoted saying my kids are so excited when it's my half day because they know that we're going to hang out and she's like really sweet that's nice and actually since the studies came out. Iceland decided to enlarge part. Make this permanent so now. Eighty six percent of the population is either already working a shorter workweek or they have a contract that guarantees them that shorter workweek in the future. So this dream is going to be a reality there. Why do they think that people become more productive when they work less. I think there's a couple of things here. One is i mean and if you work in an office i think this will resonate with you or if you used to work in an office before the pandemic i think the resonate which is that. Some of our time at work is wasted. We have a lot of meetings to go to. Some of those meetings could probably be an email. Some of those meetings go on too long. There's also research showing that like after a certain amount of work. We just lose our ability to do work like not completely but we get worse that working so anyone who's just worked a super long week has felt this. You get burnt out. You get tired. you're not as efficient. You make more mistakes so a shorter workweek You know. Avoid some of those problems. Is this just another way for for white collar workers to end up with another benefit though and they'd have one more day off where potentially service industry workers in restaurants or movie theaters or big box stores would wind up with even more work to do tending to all these people. I think that's a real worry. And one thing that was really interesting to me about the iceland. Research is that it wasn't just office workers who were part of the research. It was also like i think law enforcement officers and folks who worked in childcare or also elder care so especially some of these care work jobs. It's not like you're spending that much time in meetings. When you're caring for toddlers i know because they have a toddler. Those are labor intensive jobs. And when you're on your on but they still found ways whether it was maybe the daycare center hires more people you know. Maybe it adjusts our slightly. They still found ways to make. These shorter workweeks work. So i think really the key if we're going to do something like this would be making sure that exactly what you're talking about. It's not just a benefit for white collar workers this is like a real shift across the economy and that it's coupled with making sure that people who have really unpredictable schedules or not enough hours have enough that they actually have enough work or enough benefits. They can live on them and for all the people who think this is just like a pie in the sky idea. I it's worth remembering right that that's so was you. Bi until during the pandemic the former president and the current. One just decided to give people fair sums of money right. Do you think because of that were a little bit closer to ideas like this than we were. Say before the pandey. Yeah i mean. We've seen so many things policy-wise that i thought we'd never see you know whether that's the child tax credit whether it's the stimulus whether it some of the stuff in the american rescue plan I think there's been this acknowledgement of people's basic needs in a way that there really wasn't before and i've just started to see a kind of cultural change. Maybe this is too optimistic but it used to be that whenever you talked about work and people work too much like people would kind of roll their eyes and especially you know in media or if you talked to like white collar professionals everyone would be like of course. We were too much but no. We're never going to do anything about it. That'd be ridiculous. And i just feel like it's different now. I feel like frankly. America's traumatized from the pandemic. Even those who are kind of relatively insulated I think there's a serious epsom needs a change there's a serious onslaught work is broken and for the first time when you say people work too much everyone kind of perks up listens and i'm hoping that that means maybe there's appetite for changing this not just going back to the way it was and north. Enjoy your weekend. Thanks so much. You do north. She's a full-time senior correspondent. Vox who also somehow managed to write a very good book while working here. It's called outlawed. it's a western. You can find it wherever you find your books. Today's show was produced by will read. I don't believe he's written a book yet but his future is bright. The rest of the team includes victoria chamberlain. Hiding mowatt be miles. Brian and halima shot a theme. Shapiro's our engineer matthew collects our editor. Ana saudis are mvp. Liz kelly nelson is. Fox's veep of audio jillian weinberger's the deputy music from brake master cylinder and noam hasn't felt facts are checked by laura bullard. I'm sean rama's firm. And i'm looking for a co host seriously. This episode has inspired me to work less. Maybe write a western one day. If you or someone you know is interested in partnering up with me you can find a job. Posting for co host of the day explained at the box media careers page. It's also hinted to the top of my twitter. I'm at rama's firm just reminder before we go were off in the next few days for labor day back tuesday september seventh. Take care once again the weekend..

iceland Iceland victoria chamberlain mowatt halima Liz kelly nelson jillian weinberger laura bullard sean rama America Shapiro Ana Brian matthew Fox rama twitter
"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"And we're seeing it not just in people who you might think financially. They have a lot of choices. You know lawyers quitting to have a better work life balance but we see it in service workers who aren't making a ton of money. Maybe they don't have a ton of money saved up but they don't wanna be endanger for minimum wage anymore. So i think across the economy. We're kind of seeing something really change.

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Literally or like jewelry and the thing yes money. Yes by check every two weeks. A bank account have a bank account. Okay so it's like there's this sort of idea of like you know maybe the man in the suit going off to the office or maybe the man in the jumpsuit. Going off to the factory but that was never every worker. There's always been lots and lots of workers who weren't going to the office and they weren't going to the factory and those folks never really had access to the kind of quote unquote good job that we think of as kind of formulating the american dream and what happens between then and now then we got this situation where there's fewer and fewer of the good jobs and more and more of the bad jobs manufacturing for example they've really eroded in the. Us service has really exploded. There's lots more service jobs. This was an industry that never had the same kind of norms ray. These weren't good jobs. They didn't have good wages. They didn't have hours all this kind of stuff. Then we have the erosion of unions so workers have less power to bargain for their conditions. And things just kind of get crappier and crappier for lack of a better word. Pensions become less. Common in favor of sort of 401k's and retirement accounts that rely way more on the worker to be putting away money versus somebody. Kinda putting away money for you. The rate of people who have health insurance through their job goes down. Wage growth stagnates. There's lots of actors. We can point to but basically overtime. You're nineteen fifties job. That's kind of providing all your needs it just just becomes less and less common fewer and fewer people have that kind of job and even the people who do have jobs that are providing for all their needs. It feels like those people might be working more now than ever before rates. So the other thing we've seen is that you know white collar work sort of professional work you know those workweeks and those work days of just gotten really long and i think something that we've seen a written about. This elsewhere is just a general worsening of people's schedules over time so there's been sort of a weakening of the overtime rules in the fair labor standards act some more and more people are exempt more and more people are in this category where you actually can be asked to work more than forty hours a week and you don't have to be paid overtime so then you're hours can balloon to whatever your boss feels like. There's also been a rise in what derek thompson at the atlantic calls work. Ism which is this idea that you work should really be the centerpiece of your life and your identity. It should be really important. You should really give be giving all of yourself to work. It sounds unhealthy. Sure and it is but at the same time like that. Attitudes incredibly common. It's super common in our industry. You know. I felt that way from time to time. You probably have to think a lot of quote unquote knowledge workers or kind of encouraged to embrace this work. As i'm an is also great for our bosses right not to be you know like subversive or whatever but it's good for capitalism the more than we feel like work as our religion so all this stuff contributes to folks who maybe their job does provide them health insurance maybe they have a 401k. Their job might still be making their life kind of bad because they're at work all the time. Then you have service workers who have a rise in what's called just in time scheduling. Which means their schedules can be. Super unpredictable walks. Who's been at starbucks. Eight years says she sees the advent of optimal scheduling. When i was hired managers would be fired if they weren't putting schedules out. Three weeks in advance But now it's every week. And i believe it's the new automatic system only allows them to do a week in advance. But we're required to give six months in advance of availability of when we're available to work so like even if they're not working really really long hours maybe they have no idea what hours are going to be week to week. They have to be on call constantly. You know sometimes they're doing claw opening quote unquote which is like where you close the store and then you open the store. Six hours later tie channel today. I'm gonna give you tips on how to survive the dreaded khlopin. I do a coffin once a week which is closed on one day and that opened the very next day and these are my tips to help you survive a late night followed by an early morning so it can be almost like having a fifty our eighty hour work week just because you never know when someone's going to call you so just generally scheduling has become this huge problem and we're all sort of at the mercy of our work. I think in a way that labor reformers in the middle of the last century never never intended us to be not to mention a lot of people in the service industry in the people who may have been close opening. Lost their jobs during the pandemic right so you know. I think that the pendulum just made all this worse in so many different ways that we can talk about but one big thing it did is wipe away people's jobs. Millions of people lost their jobs last year. Disproportionately people in the service industry. Disproportionately low wage jobs or people didn't have a lot of savings they couldn't afford to lose a job. And if your job was just providing you the minimum level of security before now. There's nothing so. I think that was like the first step of being really disillusioned with jobs and employment in america. Okay so to recap just some of what you said. We're losing a lot of our worker. Protections other people are choosing to work more than ever. then there's people who are being abused in their work situations. A lot of those people have lost their jobs and then there's millions of people who are quitting their jobs. Where do we go from here. That ha- sounds really dark. Sean but i think that we're seeing some interesting cultural changes right now and like the biggest thing that we've seen is that i think the pandemic has kind of led to this collapse in the meaning of work for a lot of people so you know even over and above you know sort of money and security health insurance all the things we just talked about you know. I think there's been the sense that work provided a sense of purpose for people it provided the sense of camaraderie. You know you're together with your co workers. The pandemic really wiped a lot of that away. You know suddenly office workers rate. We're working out of our houses. Were on zoom. And i think that sense of purpose like people are reevaluating their sense of purpose right. Now they're questioning. you know. this is a time of trauma. This is a time when people lost their lives. Like what's really important. And i think all that reevaluation part of what. It's leading to his people leaving their jobs. Switching jobs is now easier than ever for a lot of people that are more companies going remote. Maybe these are people who have saved some money over the past year and so they're looking at their lives and saying why am i living like this. Why am i not doing something. I'm passionate about.

derek thompson atlantic america starbucks Sean
"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Today explained. Thanks for joining us again. this coming. Monday is labor days. We're gonna take the day off and have a four day workweek but the company we work for vox. Media went ahead and gave us another day off this coming friday aka tomorrow so we're feeling extra lucky to have two four day workweeks in a row. Now i usually don't question extra days off and on the show today we're gonna talk about how are changing attitudes around work. Might actually change how we work. So i had to inquire about the extra friday off this morning. I hit up my boss's boss's boss's boss my great great grand boss. Sean i think just call us co workers. Jim bank off c. o. Vox media. why did you give us all another day off. Well it starts with the fact that we have all been working our tails off through a pandemic and we wanted to enable and empower our managers to encourage people to take more time but what we also found is that. It's sometimes hard to do that because we have things to do and the things that we have to do not only revolve around our own schedules but revolve around our coworkers schedules and revolve around schedules of people outside of the company to so we figured by having a day that everyone has off that would allow people to not feel the pressure of having to be there for their co workers When they were collaborating on a project you know so for all those reasons it all added up to like yeah. Let's do this and we're happy that we did okay. As my colleague. Jim mentioned working through the pandemic has changed things. This isn't just a theory at this point. It's a game changing reality. My other colleague anna north wrote about it for vox in an article provocatively titled the death of the job. Yeah i mean. I was really inspired. By the sort of idea of the so-called great resignation people are quitting their jobs in droves. And what's been dubbed the great resignation pushing job vacancies to all-time highs and a new survey from productivity for laddis found that fifty four percent of respondents are looking to change jobs and forty three percent. Say they're queer passive stalled or quote slowed to a crawl for context. Four million people quit their jobs in april alone danes so to be clear that's not like in a year that's in a month. It's a huge huge number. It's a record. And so it really kind of wanting to look into why and what the pandemic has done to jobs and you know work just got traumatic difficult and stressful in in new ways. But i think the sort of flip side of that is that it has opened up this door to talk about what should the role of work be in people's lives. And i think that can actually be an interesting conversation that maybe can open the door to making our lives a little better and i want to get to all the changes and what could come of them eventually but in your piece you talk a lot about the history of the american job. What did you discover when you looked into the background right so a lot of the things that we sort of think of as mainstays of jobs today for better for worse. They didn't come about by magic. They came about because labor activists fought for them so for example people in factories used to work six day week seven day weeks. You know incredibly long work. Weeks before labor organizers sort of started working on this issue worked on it for a long time and then during the nineteen thirties with the new deal. We start to see these labor reforms getting enshrine into law after money. Requests my papa. Congress passed a found labor standards but what we call the wages hours bill so we see the fair labor standards act which means if you work over forty hours a week. You're supposed to get overtime far reaching program. The most boss cited grow the benefit of work that has been adopted here or in any other. Country and labor organizers are kinda pushing for other things too. they don't always get them. A lot of folks. Wanted universal health care for example back in the nineteen thirties. We think of this is something that were arguing today. But this was an argument back then. How about the theory that the community can afford with the individual. Can't oh so you've been bitten by that boga. The people have pockets. Bill pay ten cents each week could give him a medical service very beautiful idea. And maybe in nineteen sixty practical one but it just won't work. They wanted a kind of universal retirement system. You know something to really take care of people when they're to work they didn't really get either of those things. And so in some cases what they kind of settled for. Were some benefits that were tied to your job so for example health insurance tied to your job or pensions. That were tied to your job. Where if you work a certain number of years at a certain company then they'll kind of take care of your retirement so instead of saying we're going to have the social safety net that takes care of everybody then we kind of get this conception where your job is sort of what takes care of you. What is like the ideal version of your job is supposed to take care of you. And when does that sort of peak. Yes so we kind of get to this idea. And the the late forties the nineteen fifties in of home vigorous workman rise to meet a new day and a new opportunity. No morning none. The nation's workman prompting them to their daily service. There's a certain category of job often. These are manufacturing jobs. These are jobs that are typically held by white men prejudice shop steward for the union which has an agreement with a mill. He represents the workers on the plants labor management committee these days. They're discussing production problems because these are jobs that thanks to the fair labor standards act. There's supposed to be forty hours a week or you get overtime. They pay you a certain amount you know. Sometimes they pay you enough that it doesn't just take care of your needs. It takes care of your kids and it takes care of you know you have a partner who may be able to stay home and take care of those kids you know. It's the sort of what they call the quote unquote family wage. And then you get benefits out of that job right you get healthcare and you had a pension at some point so when you no longer are able to work or you're no longer want to work you actually get paid and you can take time and you can rest and play with your grandchildren. This is the sort of you know. Quote unquote american dream ideal. And we're talking ideals but this ideal was only ideal for a segment of the population right. I think we have this ideal of how jobs used to be and the reality. Is that these kinds of jobs. Were only ever for certain people for starters. There were lots of people who are left out of the fairly rare standards so that includes domestic workers and agricultural workers who were disproportionately likely to be black or a latin acts or other people of color and then it's also the case that there were big sectors of the economy that never had these kind of quote unquote good jobs so if you worked in a customer service job you worked in retail other service sector type jobs. They didn't really experience the same kind of nineteen fifties peak so one labor historian. I talked to pointed out a lot of retail jobs. Were just considered women's jobs so the idea is if you like became a salesperson a sales girl quote unquote for example that people your employer would assume you don't actually need enough money to support a family because you're only a woman you just need quote unquote pin money. Which is like money to buy pens.

Jim bank anna north laddis Sean Jim Congress workman Bill
"four day" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on 1A

"The thing that i learned the most was that working smarter as really to pause for a second and be really intentional. What am i doing right now. Am i interrupting myself. One of the things. That really blew my mind in cal. Newport's book deep work. Was he talks a lot about how much we waste. Our time. In things that we think is really productive like checking email frequently throughout the day. And if you just cut back that email checking right that reaction that addiction that we have to like reacting to something if you cut down that to check in twice a day over sudden your day gets much shorter because you can sit down and for those two hours. Just do really meaning for working. I i frequently will write a list of like. What's the most important thing i need to do this week. One or two things. And if i'm really focused can get them done by tuesday. And then it's you looking at wednesday and thursday and saying What what else can i do. And should i do anything else. I think really in all of these comments that i've heard from from your listeners. Especially i think there's this thing that we're not we have to think about is. What are we working on. What's enough like what's the thing that's actually going to move. Our business forward our company forward and if we prioritize that then you get this really you are maybe working less. But you're not. You're producing more better work. And i think that's really. That's what we saw in the last four years is. We're just so much more intentional with what we're doing and why we're doing those things and really cutting down on kinda fluff. You know the the the random things that distract but feel really good. They feel like progress but they're not actually progressed. Well it's not just a four day work week we're talking about. It's also a three day weekend. And here's part of what matt in. Florida left in our inbox. Having that extra day off is very helpful. Getting things done to where. I wouldn't have to take a day off or like doctors appointments and stuff like that professor honeycutt growing interest in in the four day workweek is happening at the same time as. We're seeing a shift away from materialism and towards the so called experience economy. Meaning people are spending less money on things and more on things to do. What linked to uc between the two trends. The experience economy is booming with the ending of the pandemic people now are making a rush to To those experiences The economy is moving in that direction. People especially younger folks. The millennial millennial generation's are buying more experiences than tangible goods and services and buying goes experiences require time The demand for additional. Free time. I think it will increase it. Looks like it with things likely afford a week three day weekend on an expanding market they are for experienced designers I i really think that It's a thriving opportunity. A golden opportunity for the entrepreneur to design experiences for that marketplace for the millennial generation leisure and work. Both changing. Work is as you said at the beginning of pro. We think the five day week is something that comes down from from heaven or something. There's always been there was not work. Itself is changing a leisure is changing. And the experience economy i think is at the forefront of that change making the changes occur or causing the changes with the with the demand from your experiences Comes the demand for more time to to to buy those experiences. I wanna make sure we addressed the question. We got from Louisa who emailed us at her her ten year old son wanted to know if a four day workweek will apply to the school week as well. And that's not the only young listener who had that question. I mean alex is there. Is that a possibility. I mean we know we saw during the pandemic how closely linked childcare and the school day are in when kids are out of school things get really tricky for parent. Is there any link. There are school systems. That have moved to four day weeks though mainly they've done so either as a way of recruiting and retaining teachers so they're places that are underfunded or in rural areas or they've had to do it for because of budget cuts so the evidence. Is that students who move to four day weeks of do not lose out in terms of reading comprehension or test scores but it really does illustrate that the degree to which like all of society in the economy depends on schools operating in a reliable fashion. And so i think in order for this really to take off it would be necessary to solve the problem of. What do you do with with with the child on the fifth day. And so you know. I think until we get more widespread adoption of the four day week in industry You know that's always going to be doing it for. Schools is going to continue to be a struggle. Natalie we have just about a minute here. And i just want to hear from you what advice you have for. People who who want to encourage their workplaces to adopt a day workweek. What key questions should they be asking themselves. I think the question that i think is most important is to figure out a way to define together with your boss with your team. What enough is this whole conversation. All i kept thinking is like the problem with technology. Making things better is that we just fill that time with more work. You know like oh you can do it faster. Let's add another stop to your route. We have to get back to this place. What i what. I usually tell folks go to your boss and ask what enough is. What's the project that needs to be done. Not the number of hours have to spend on that project or not the number. You know the time that it's gonna take to do it and then see how long it takes to get there because if we can prove to each other that we can get the same high quality work done in less time because we're more focused because we're more intentional. We can prove that you can get the same output the same results by working less. That's natalie nagel the co founder and ceo of the software company. Wild bit also with us. Today alex.

professor honeycutt Newport uc matt Florida Louisa alex Natalie natalie nagel
"four day" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on 1A

"The forgotten american dream of from working women in massachusetts who who talked about having an extra two hours a day what meant to them and looking forward to their children and grandchildren and hoping this gradual decrease in working hours would make possible a larger fuller life for everyone including the working classes especially the working classes. Who would have an opportunity to develop their own culture to live. There is really more and more outside of the marketplace. Alex where does the movement for four day. Workweek stand in other countries like iceland iceland. Actually a a has moved its public sector workers. So that's more than twenty thousand people about fifteen percent of the workforce to shorter workweek so somewhere between thirty and thirty five hours depending on whether you're night shift or or or you'll working during the day and then in other countries we're seeing it in mainly in the private sector but it's you know not just like nordic countries or places where would work rules are a little more relaxed but also in korea and japan to countries that have had to invent words for working yourself to death so it is a surprisingly international movement in across the developed world at professor honeycutt. We're getting lots of people when he to explain a little bit more about the role. Labor unions had and shortening the work day and the workweek. Is that something you can speak about. Of course well. They lead the way organized. Labor certainly I'm not sure you're familiar with a bumper sticker that advertises the afl. The folks who gave us the weekend familiar to me. But they brag about the fact that the that organized labor elsa cio were in the forefront of the real reduction of working hours at least until mid century the mid twentieth century they were certainly at the forefront leading the way i think as they led the way a lot of people followed and the gradual drawing. Down working hours had was was largely Free market phenomenon not necessarily caused exclusively by labor as i say. Labor leads the way but the rest of the marketplace follows. We'll continue our conversation on the movement toward a four day workweek in just a moment this message comes from. Npr sponsor pay comb according to new one poll research shared by pay com. Employees are so frustrated with its heck. They use at work. That sixty seven percent said. They're willing to take a pay cut for something better. Ouch only pay calms. Comprehensive technology. Automates their hr and payroll tasks in a single software. That's easy to use and for employers automatically measures the roi that results learn. How the right. Hr tech can help by visiting pay com dot com slash frustrations support for npr and the following message. Come from better help. Offering online counseling. Better help their taboo. Joe knows that lockdown has been hard on us as humans. We as people are hardwired to connect with others. Which is why this whole time is so difficult. Now let's get back to our conversation about the growing movement for a four day. Workweek bill in tennessee wanted to weigh in. He runs a business with four employees who all have cans during cobra. We went to four days a week since cova lesser concern. We have gone to four and a half days. I still pay five days. And it's made a huge difference in our environment distress of family back and forth and going to this go into that seems to have been lessened somewhat still during the week. Come and go as you please. Same thing to me or explained to take your work etcetera but anyways working out great for us. It'd be very easy to do for everybody bill. Thanks for that message now. Alex what we've been talking about so far really is built on this idea that people are are working as a part of a company. But what does this mean for. People who are self-employed. Well i think that the people who are self-employed. Yes they do. Have the have a challenge of incentives worries about about turning down work and of reducing their working hours. I think that it does illustrate that. The reduction of working hours you know we often think of efficiency and productivity is like completely personal things. But they're really there's really an important organizational dimension to and one of the reasons that places like wild bit have been able to successfully moved afford a week is that you've got the reinforcement of working with other people who have that same goal and who are trying to do it with you so but i think that the more companies moved to four day weeks the more that standard will be something that people who were freelancers or who were solo preneurs can adopt for themselves. Because you know their partners working for day weeks will make it easier for them to do so as well. We also got this tweet from gavin. Who says we implemented a four day week a little over a year ago at our company. T. w. studio in rochester new york increase in happiness productivity creativity and revenue across the board. Hope those who are able to consider the move do some natalie. I'm curious about a possible tension between working smarter and working last so trying to get the same amount of work done in less time by doing that. Deep work but also this idea that we should be working less. Did you find any tension in those two ideas. You were making this transition at your company you know. I think i was thinking about kind of alec said too. I think there's a there's the the most beautiful thing that we found that i think kind of pushes back against that tension is that we end up spending most of our days not actually doing the right work or the the the work. That's gonna push everything forward. Even further solo preneurs right..

iceland elsa cio Npr Alex massachusetts afl korea japan cova tennessee Joe gavin rochester natalie new york alec
"four day" Discussed on 1A

1A

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on 1A

"Wanted to join. The conversation to my company has embraced the four day workweek in a sort of way. We have adleman fridays. If all of our work done during the week and we worked thirty two hours were allowed to take fridays off if we have more work to do or if we had to take sick or vacation time earlier in the week we don't get that friday off. We need to make it up somehow. It's been great. I in most of the time. Take a day off and watch my child but it can have some hiccups to met jim. Thanks for that message. Now natalie what did it take to transition your company to afford day work week. You said you started off just shutting things down on friday. How did you move forward. We we i kinda said we can take the friday off but we can't just gonna continue business as usual so we started to reflect internally on how to maximize deep work and so that took two approaches one was looking at how we work together as a company and we asked folks to look at what meetings are sitting in or how we prioritize projects and really. Try to get really intentional with what we're working on. And why and then. We asked every individual on the team to reflect internally on in themselves on when they're most productive and a kind of coordinate their lives or their work time their work lives around that one of my favorite examples of that is where we're remote team but we're also distributed team in many different time zones and so we had asked the team for week to sit down and write down for a couple of weeks to write down when they were in deep work and when they were not deep work not to get in trouble but to really reflect and say like what is distracting them or pulling them away from deep work after there's four weeks of recording the weekly deep deport time everybody was able to look back and say where maybe a meeting could be moved. Let's say an hour so that their deep work time wasn't interrupted by meeting was Collaborating around the rest of their teammates. So we really just were able to adjust and constantly evolved so that we can really just continuously maximized deep work because the more you can get those four solid hours a day. You got so much done that. You're you're basically done for the day. What we prioritize and so is your company open just four days a week. Do you have people working on a rotating basis. How does that work functionally. We have a customer success team. That alternates fridays and mondays. So we had an extra cost to what if workweek cost. It's just kind of beefing that team. They alternate fridays and mondays so that our customers get full five days of support but the teams make the team members themselves get three consecutive days off so we just kind of buffered that way but everybody else is often fridays. Have there been any drawbacks from a change. I think in the beginning the the hardest part of transitioning to this was kind of a self-inflicted worry over whether or not we were gonna do enough. We were so early in this that the fear was our competitors. Going to outpace us. Or we're not gonna get enough done. What if we're not getting enough of the code written you know where software company so we're not writing enough code or or we're not shipping as many features that quickly faded when we spent time reflecting. Are we adding too much on our plate or are we creating too many arbitrary deadlines that are unnecessary. I think now the biggest challenge really is that. We're all really committed to our fridays offer. V day off so sometimes if you have to work a friday it feels a little bit like. Oh i'm i'm getting robbed a little bit. You know But other than it's really just been wonderful well. It feels like america's in from the the country's inception this hard work above all has been one of the the core ideals but some of the great speakers at the seventeen eighteen hundreds of poet. Walt whitman preacher. Jonathan edwards believed. We should be working less. Not more english economist. John maynard qian's not so to professor honeycutt. what was the philosophy around work and leisure during that time period. Well as saying try to write about in free time. The forgotten american dream shorter hours and higher wages together constituted the american dream in the nineteenth and early part of the twentieth century. People like john maynard. Keynes expected the process to continue of short hours He predicted two and a half hours. A day on By nine thousand. Nine hundred eighty so the expectation was that We take care of business would get work done. The machine technology would allow us to do more and more and less and less time and so gradually we would claim the realm of freedom. We would get graduate from work into this realm of freedom where we live our lives freely together as walt whitman talk about higher progress not progress just in material terms in our wealth but progress in our humanity and there was a slew of people in the nineteenth century. Who wrote about of this. This possibility the opening realm of freedom made possible by the gradual drawdown of working hours and was was the i that i deal was it extended to. Everyone was it or was it for for certain for certain people that you'd be able to work less and have more leisure time. No no it. It it originates. What are they most important places whereas you nation of this idea of higher progress was in the working was in the labor movement and working class people in massachusetts form the first union the causal the awakening of the american labor movement was shorter hours accompanied by this dream. Some of my favorite passages in.

adleman natalie jim John maynard qian walt whitman john maynard Jonathan edwards honeycutt Keynes america american labor movement massachusetts
"four day" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"four day" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Ground proposal representativity you've been in the trenches trying to to work this out and make some sort of a deal happened. Can you just give us the latest. I know all the details are there yet. But what would this plan. Look like if it were by. Well the latest been mad we now see on the senate side that roughly mirrors a lot of what we negotiated in the problem solvers caucus in the house of the problem solvers caucus is twenty nine democrats twenty nine republicans. We a couple weeks ago. Put forward our proposal building bridges about one point two five trillion our now seeing movement in the senate with twenty one senators ten democrats and republicans approximately a trillion dollar package. A so now. We're seeing some movement in the senate so making us optimistic that we can't get a bipartisan. Deal package representativity. What have you heard from from the leadership. Both in the house and in the senate. Because i think that's been a big question to every time you have more republicans who come on board. There's the threat that you'll lose some of the progressive democrats. Where where does the leadership stand. Listen i think that in this package. There's nothing more bipartisan than infrastructure. I think we can all agree. We have crumbling roads and bridges across this country waterway. Our waterways are ports. There's definitely on a consensus that we need to invest in infrastructure. And certainly a lot of this is gonna be the devils in the details especially in the wars you know. We made a concerted efforts. I talk about the size than look at the scope. That's exactly what we're doing. This very complicated. I think that we're seeing movement in their certainly an appetite to get something done the pay for us have to be the trickiest. Part of all of this is going to come. You think with with taxes being raised. Because that's been a sticking point for at least the republican leadership. Yeah i mean first of all. There's a slew of proposals on the pay for. I think the most important is closing the tax gap i ins and also looking at some partnerships public private partnerships. So obviously this is gonna be the the big negotiating. Part of this package is how we pay for all of this. But what we're seeing in the package that came out of the senate is five hundred. Seventy nine billion dollars of new spending. I think that's a sign that we're moving in the right direction governor hogan. How important is this from maryland. What do you need in terms of infrastructure right now in your state. Well i would say all governors some both sides of the aisle really believed this is a top priority. And we're pleased that we're finally making progress. This really isn't a republican or democratic issue. I think the leadership on both sides. You know didn't wanna go big enough. The democrats want to too big that include a lot of things that had nothing to do with infrastructure. And i take my hat off to our group the problem solvers caucus which is part of no labels and the group of the g. Twenty group of bipartisan senators in senate for getting us where we are and we had very encouraging news out of the white house the president sounding like he does want to continue on in a bipartisan. Way it means it means a lot of means jobs as coming out of this pandemic trying to grow our economy and put people to work and it's critically important. It also i think is is the administration's to show that they are willing to work in a bipartisan way. As as go biden on talked about in his inauguration representative leave out a all ask one more time just in terms of what you hear from the leadership. What is nancy pelosi. Signaled what has schumer signaled or are they waiting to see what president biden signals. I definitely we're expecting hear back from the white house today on this proposal of the senate on. I think that that's going to be an indication of where we're heading. I mean i. I know that there's a definitely an appetite to get this done on a bipartisan manner. This part of the package. Obviously looking to conciliation as well listen. This is the biggest investment infrastructure that we've ever seen so clearly. It's complicated taking some time. I think most importantly the leadership wants us to get a package done. And and so. I'm looking forward to hearing what the white house has to say today. In response to the senate plan if the white house scuttled at this point is that is that. Is that game over legit. I don't think the white house is going to scuttle it. I definitely been in contact with all of us both house side in senate side as we walked through these steps in trying to get to this package of the president has made it clear he does not wanna raise taxes on individuals. Earning under four hundred thousand dollars In obviously we have to. There's gonna be some serious negotiations on. And they take time. I think we need to look at all of this in a holistic manner on and so. I think that we're going to see the step by step forward. That would preclude. If you don't want to raise taxes on anyone under for making under four hundred thousand dollars that would preclude raising the gas tax. Which is something that some democratic senators have kind of been in favor of to correct. Yes i you know. I think the president has been very clear that he does not wanna raise taxes on those making under four hundred thousand dollars. Guest certainly would be that and again. I think we have to look at all. These pay for says a package i. You can't work at one of them in a vacuum and so And again is gonna be the hardest part of these. Negotiations is how we pay for this. Governor are there any taxes or any pay for is that you would be opposed to or is it just more important for you to to see some sort of deal come together and some sort of infrastructure spending get put into place whereas representative lisa reaching the spending number. It was the was the big first step to go from two point. Three trillion down to one trillion. So that's that's the we're all the effort has been But i think we can really do this without raising taxes. And the smith different proposals from the house problem solvers. And from some of the senator you know there's there's going to be pushed back from both sides about raising taxes. I'm not sure. That's what america wants but private sector of public private partnerships is a big part of it. Unspent money on other things and shifting around some priorities and where we're spending money now can get pretty close and you know we've got to figure out the last Last few miles to go On how we're going to come up with bay force clever last few miles for the infrastructure. Bill governor representative wanna thank you both for being with us today. Thank you will be next. Unsquashed pod long weekends forever. The atlantic's joe pinsker on companies that are successfully experimenting with a four day. Workweek meyer given is much more about giving workers more time outside of work to do things that they care about to rest from works that they return more focused a three day weekend in that context seems to really help rejuvenate people our same pay same work more weekend right after this. I'll steer means. Pj navigates market volatility with an active investment approach designed to capture opportunities globally. Join the pursuit of outperformance at p. Jim dot com. That's pg i m dot com..

Three trillion one trillion nancy pelosi five hundred three day Bill Both Seventy nine billion dollars both today republican america both sides twenty one senators approximately a trillion dolla Twenty group two point four day ten one point