35 Burst results for "Founding Member"

TripWire CEO Steps Down After Supporting Texas Abortion Law

Giant Bombcast

01:49 min | Last month

TripWire CEO Steps Down After Supporting Texas Abortion Law

"Ceo of tripwire interactive got out on twitter and tweeted his support for the antiabortion laws and bounty stuff in texas which seems like a pretty grotesque law in a lot of ways and said he was proud of the supreme court for affirming the texas law banning abortion for babies with harvey bubble This lead to immediate Like whoa whoa. What from ship right studios. Which is another georgia based developer That appears to be like a developer for higher that does do some contract work for a number different companies trip wire was one of those companies they got out there and said like with this is not us. We are looking to cancel contracts immediately because we do not want to do business with with someone out there and then yesterday's sixth one day later Tripwire officially got out there and said the comments given by john gibson are of his own opinion and do not reflect those of tripwire interactive as a company. His comments disregarded the values of our whole team our partners and much of our broader community. Our leadership team tripwire are deeply sorry and our unified in our commitment to take swift action and to foster a more positive environment effective immediately. John gibson step down a ceo of tripwire interactive co founding member and current. Vice president alan wilson will take over as interim ceo and then there's some ongoing stuff about you know alan having been with the company for a good long time And that they are taking steps to with employees and partners to address their concerns including executing company-wide townhall meeting and promoting open dialogue with leadership and all employees. His understanding of both the company's culture and the creative vision of our games will carry the team through this transition with full support from other tripwire. The other tripwire

Tripwire Interactive Texas Harvey John Gibson Supreme Court Tripwire Interactive Co Twitter Vice President Alan Wilson Georgia Alan
"founding member" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:07 min | Last month

"founding member" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"And one of the largest nonprofit medicare advantage plans in the country he led scans expansion into seven additional california counties and as well as its first out of state expansion to arizona or hank then served as president of scan health plan arizona and scan long-term care he also led the organization strategic planning efforts and initiated an innovation development regimen to seek improvements in care coordination practices and future care outcome protocols. He's a frequent speaker on critical issues facing medicare and medicaid programs. In in twenty eleven hank address the managed medicaid congress about principles for structuring effective long-term care programs as well as the medicare market innovations conference about opportunities for strengthening up plans. Five star quality rating is reviews on some of the challenges facing the healthcare industry were published earlier this year in payers and providers. So as you can imagine. He is a wealth of knowledge in this space hank so privileged to have you here with us. Thanks for joining now. It's my honor. Thank you very much forever me absolutely now you know. Is there anything that i left out of that bio you've done so much and i know that like we could probably have a five hour long. Podcast talking about that but anything you want to add. I don't think so salty. The opportunities that i have been fortunate to have especially recently is we kinda shifted in the early years of our firm you would have known all of our clients. They were national names. They were large healthcare providers systems moving into the healthcare health plan space in the last four years probably would have heard of almost none of our clients as we are moving rapidly into the venture capital and private equity market says. They are launching into healthcare. So it's a very interesting dynamic. Kind of change is fascinating and interesting and so from knowing all of them to not knowing all of them the markets big and it's dynamic soli is yeah and it's shifting the way you know. The players are shifting from where the dollars are coming from. And who's playing so. I'm very intrigued with your perspective. So hank what what would you say is what moves you. Why did you pick healthcare healthcare. Probably picked me almost by serendipity. But i've loved the work i have grown up in business as a developer. I've started health plans for the last thirty years and i just absolutely lucked into the healthcare space. At a time when it was morphing from sort of a fee for service model to more of a manager model i had the opportunity back then to be part of the strategic leadership of a couple of plans thinking about how healthcare had to change in order for us to improve quality for members to obtain some real deficiencies in the way. We ran our business so it really found me. I didn't find it nice. Well that's fantastic hank and You know what it found you and you answered the call and you've done a lot of great things so talk to us about the work that you're doing at strategic health group. What exactly you guys do in. How are you offering value to the healthcare ecosystem. That's an interesting question. We start from the framework that we are healthcare consumers first before we are advisers and so we take our knowledge of the infrastructure of the ecosystem and look crew ways to find new solutions to higher quality to more member engagement meeting their particular needs finding new solutions to some of the challenges of healthcare one of the ways. I think we bring significant value to to this is that we are not afraid. Even though we we've grown up in the healthcare system unafraid to challenge some of the status club when not afraid to look at new tech solutions. I've always been. I think regarded as a somewhat of a risk taker. I'd like to think it was as an intelligent risk taker. Just risk for risk sake but thinking through how we can challenge the norms and improve the system for those patients for those members who require healthcare services particularly those who are the most vulnerable. Some of our long-term care patients those with severe chronic illnesses. This so much more that we can do. And i think we help challenge some of those part of the way we've done this. We've started a dozen health plans in the last ten years and match of the work with the plans who were starting out. As ben round new people who are coming to the market with new ideas they are challenging conventional wisdom they are challenging what we have always thought of as healthcare infrastructure and how to approach it. And i think we're able to help them. As strategic advisors to implement and focus on some markets where they can expand those concepts into the marketplace. That's very interesting. You know you guys have have started many health plans so doing this. You're very familiar with the operations with the laborer with the markets. What would you say makes what you do different. And maybe better than what's available today. There's a ton of you know agencies out there that wanna help. So what is it that you would say is the difference maker of what you guys offer one of the things that i think that is most important is we bring only individuals to the table who have had cease. We'd experience so everybody on our team has been a member of the cease week. Ceo president chief medical officer chief compliance officer. So that's the level of talent that we're bringing in. I'm not trying to downgrade those organizations. Some really good consulting firms around the country but many of them during in untested unexperienced individuals to the table. And they're helping to learn not very bright but they haven't had the sort of the scars of mistakes and we have certainly made our share over the years as executives and our goal is to make sure that our clients don't make the same mistakes. It's a big difference maker. If you've been there and done that you likely have the scars to show for it and are able to help you know if somebody with an mba somewhere. That hasn't been in that seat. They likely can't tell you those little intricacies those those distinctions that your team probably has right even have to make tough decisions as a member of that cease week whether it's a clinical decision or a business decision strategy. And unless you've been there and done that it's tough to always assume that you know what you learn in a textbook is going to work in the real world i again. I'm not trying to downgrade or disrespect what those individuals bring to the table but for an organization who wants tested leadership. I think that's the key difference for us. Yeah and it makes a difference if you're going to do something. Learn from the best learn from the people that have been there done that. So i'm really curious. Thank you know you had this at the very beginning scan health plan a near death experience and you guys turn it around. I mean give me the high level on that because like i'm just really curious about what you believe was the problem and then how you put it together to to make it skyrocket so the situation at the time that a new leadership team came in and david schmidt was the new. Ceo who came in the organization was under voluntary supervision with the state regulatory authorities. It had i think they had taken their high audible in terms of managing the risk that they were taking that said dave brought in a completely mostly new leadership team..

hank medicare arizona medicaid congress california ben david schmidt dave
Joey Jordison, A Founding Member Of The Band Slipknot, Has Died At Age 46

Charlie Parker

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Joey Jordison, A Founding Member Of The Band Slipknot, Has Died At Age 46

"That would be Joey. Georgeson, founding drummer of Slip Knot. Edit 46. Co rider original founder many of their biggest hits, died Monday. Rep for his family city died peacefully in his sleep. Right now. They did not specify a cause of death. From the Georgeson family. Joey's death has left us with empty hearts and feelings of indescribable sorrow. He was the motor that kept slip notch music running in their early days. Instrumental to their songwriting. Great drummer, crucial ingredient to the band's success. He was playing with a group of Des Moines, Iowa Metal heads who call themselves the pale ones and later changed their name to meld when he suggested they changed their name to slip night back in 1995. And within just a couple of years, the bands lined up expanded the nine

Georgeson Joey Des Moines Iowa
Robby Steinhardt, Violinist and Co-Lead Vocalist of Kansas, Dead at 71

Mornings on Maine Street

02:58 min | 3 months ago

Robby Steinhardt, Violinist and Co-Lead Vocalist of Kansas, Dead at 71

"Guess this is this is partly personal. But I have a feeling that I'm not the only one who is interested in this story. So I'll share it with my fellow fans of rock music. And especially back when I was really, you know, getting into it back in the seventies. And I've been I've been a radio listener as a kid from Cali. I can't remember 56 years old, uh, listen to a lot of great music of big fan of top 40 radio back in the late sixties. The Motown sound. Then, as we got in the early seventies, I got my little transistor radio and got into more of the Beatles. The Eagles as they came on in the mid late seventies, especially but also, uh, Kearney and wings and triumph and yellow yellow was probably one of my favorites. But this band also held the spot. The band's Kansas. You probably remember this song dust in the wind, Give a listen to this violent solar. Really quick man who did that Robby Steinhardt. The original violinist for Kansas, Also, a co lead vocalists actually sings Believe vocal on this song as well. Backup vocal Well, we lost Robbie over the weekend, he died from acute pancreatitis. The founding member of the band and a rarity. I mean, a violin player in a rock band. How did that all come about? My parents asked me to play the violin, I guess made me play as of island would be more accurate. I was the first chair in my high school orchestra. My junior high school orchestra in my grade school orchestra. Remember when Philly heart call me and he said, I heard you play and I wanted to find out if you wanted to get together and form a band. I remember being in Lawrence, Kansas and seeing him playing and singing, and I just thought that is a guy that I need to be in a band with. I've never seen anybody else like that guy. I've never heard anybody play like that guy and I've never heard anybody sing that way, Robbie said. Do you guys have a tape? So I sent him a reel to reel and he called back. He said. Awesome. I'm in that piece Audio from the documentary Kansas Miracles out of nowhere. Robby Steinhardt was unusual. He played the violin. Yeah, we have fiddle players. But this guy was a true classical violin player in a rock band and just totally helped to, you know to to forge a new sound, of course. As we mentioned dust in the wind, but carry on my wayward son, another favorite of theirs that I love playing the game tonight like that one as well point of no return. So the list goes on and on just some great music. Romney Robby Steinhardt dead at the age of 71 from pancreatitis, So it's a little sad news there for you, and I'm like I say, partly personal. I wanted to put that on the air, but I'm sure that I'm not the only one Alan checking in with me saying Thank you. You're welcome, Ellen. I just Couldn't let let that go by

Robby Steinhardt Kansas Robbie Cali Kearney Acute Pancreatitis Eagles Lawrence Romney Robby Steinhardt Pancreatitis Alan Ellen
"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:08 min | 3 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

"New live album. From tower of power was recorded at the fox theater in oakland back. In two thousand eighteen to celebrate fifty years of tower of power. There was a tv special for pbs. It's big production. What did that mean to you to get to play this fiftieth anniversary. Show in oakland where it started very important for us. You know one of the things that happened with us. When we first started out. I got signed to bill. Graham signed a record deal with san francisco records. Do the album east bay grease and We're talking about the cover and this guy that did artwork for most of our records throughout our career. Bruce steinberg he says. I wanna put a map of oakland on the cover. And then i'm gonna take your logo and i'm going to have the bottom point right to oakland and We're like a map of oakland. We're kind of cover his dad you know he was listening to me. He says you know the bear is famous for the stanford cisco salad and you're nothing about the stanford cisco sound east bay all the way you know. You're oh you live in oakland ca party in oakland. You make music in oakland. You need to promote yourselves as an oakland band and that proved to be a really smart assistant. Because ever since we've been all over the world you know we say you know oakland zone tower power bringing the oakland soul sound in so now fifty years later to go back and the city declared tower of power day at the mayor. Give all news awards. It was wonderful. I am speaking with. Tower power's emilio. Castio unrolled cafe to close out. We're going to hear the live performance of what is hip slash sole power from the new album from the fiftieth anniversary. Show what is hip became out in the early seventies. So you've probably played it more times than you can count. And i know you rehearse a ton when you listen to this performance it still has a feeling of spontaneity to it. There's like this energy where you can't quite tell when someone is revising or where the song might go what goes into keeping a song sounding so fresh. How do you keep that. We live after fifty years of playing song. you know. we're always creating every night. i mean. sometimes you'll get under right out. You know david will change up the beedon guitar player go and catch the catch a little accidents that he added next thing you know or shouting something that goes with that it just continues to evolve all the time and even a sound like you're still young man which is the first one we ever wrote. It has one of the famous parts is right in the middle work. The music stops in the vocals. Don't waste your time and your over the years at changed to go long. You know some things change and evolve but that particular night we got two extra extra singers. We've got violins. We got a completely sold out crowd. That's gone crazy so it wasn't hard to get excited for. The game are to go out on this one emilio. It has been so great.

oakland Bruce steinberg fox theater Tower power pbs Graham san francisco emilio cisco david
"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

"Well i didn't have very good time sessions because when it was not being a good boy and i was paying the price for it but there was another son of there and i'm not even sure it was on the album or just a beast of a single but it was called stinker and that horn arrangement that greg adams trembled bear wrote with the novel. I was just into it recently. Doing discography stinker was killer. And i remember we quarter for like three days and after a couple of days the producer came to see us play live at the roxy and we had a fabulous be three blair need chester thompson. And that lady said. Can you come into the studio tomorrow on put on some oregon and so chester on upcoming over there and plan on a couple jackson Stinker he really stakes out really nice now i have to play stinker so here it is mrs stinker elton john featuring tower of power of oh cafe loose and out and john tower of power. That was stinker. I am joined today by dour hours. Emilio custodio the.

greg adams chester thompson jackson Stinker mrs stinker elton john chester lady oregon john tower Emilio custodio
"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

04:34 min | 3 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

"On that song but it's a big band tower of power so when you write a song and you bring it to the band. What is the process. How does the band approach it. Well i'm the band leader. And i'm gonna the producer of the band produced the records. I'm the one that has the ability to take a song to the ban dock. We write the songs together. Then he's out. You know so i take it to the band and play it for them and singing and and i tell them by vision for. I have a very clear vision of what i wanted to be like. But then you've got all these guys that are super talented and very creative. You know and it was a very creative time. Also you know so. I'm getting all these. You know we could do this. Or what if we added to beat you know what if we change the beat on the be six to getting all these suggestions and i'm like the filter at some point. I gotta go okay. I like this. This is what we're doing on the b section like this. This is what we're doing on the e. section where we get to the chorus. I needed to do this. And then we all fall in and we start. Whittling away cool. Okay well i'm gonna. I'm gonna play so very hard to go right now. We're gonna listen to that. Oh come right back. This is tower of power cafe. If it made burn album s saw dole very hard to go from tower of power self titled nine hundred seventy three album i'm joined by tower of power's emilio custodio. Today amelio mu. And doc are the only two musicians have been of tower of power consistently from the very beginning at least if my research is correct but over the last fifty years there have been at least fifty other members of the band both current and past. You've also collaborated a lot. You've played with everyone from bonnie raitt to elton john aerosmith santana. There are too many for me to list right now. Is there one collaboration for you. That stands out in your mind. Maybe where it was happening. And you're thinking to yourself. I can't believe i'm here. This is happening right now. Well a lot of people talk about the work we did was. We played most of their albums in studio but after We had done about. I think four the recordings if they were around. You know we'd go sit in one of the to be did with them with spanish moon and we will go play. Spanish got off on big time. You know and so. They decided they were going to do a live said. Would you guys consider doing the live record with us and we said yeah you know and and so we could horn parts to several of their songs and we went to washington. Dc and we did three nights there and then we went to london did three nights at the rainbow and that albums called a waiting for columbus and that was kind of the pinnacle of their career when that record came out there on the cover of people magazine and they really hit it really big after that. and so. that's one of the most famous recordings and we as two bands. We really saw on musically ice to total you guys are the masters of slow funk where the masters of fast pont and So yeah it was like you know doing that. Recording waiting for columbus being onstage london rainbow theatre. The crowd's going crazy. Now's a real high moment. Germs creativity. Let's them right now. Little feet with of power bro. That was tower power playing with little feat right now. I'm speaking.

emilio custodio amelio elton john aerosmith santana dole bonnie raitt columbus washington london london rainbow theatre
"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

03:05 min | 3 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

"Urge from tower powers. Nineteen seventy two album bump city. That was you're still a young man. I ran chatting with emilio castillo of dour power today on world cafe. You wrote that song with doc when you first got the motown's together i've read that you changed your band named because you of playing bill graham's fillmore auditorium in san francisco but you would never get in with a name like the motown's why would that be an issue. Well who we were at the time. You know that you know the whole hippie thing started happening you know ended the grateful dead and quicksilver messenger service and all that the place to be was to fillmore west. And so you know. We're like we need to get in there and we're thinking you know we had short. Haircuts razor cuts were sued and did staps and you know and it's like the hippies. They had long hair and world is wild clothing so we decided we're gonna you know we're we're going to get with the times you know. We grew our hair out. We said the motown so that that ain't gonna fly in the film you know. And so we're looking for a name and we're doing a recording project. And i'm sitting at the desk and there's this paper with a list of banned names nerves like three sheets in. It was all weird band names from us bander snatch and lothar and the hand people but i got to like the second the end of the second page. I saw tower power. I gotta go. hey guys. what about tower of power. Yeah yeah that's us. We were are ever since it just fit and you ended up signing with bill. Graham's record label not even just playing the fillmore signing with his record label to my shock and surprise yes. And i guess after after that i feel like things really kind of sped up things started to get pretty big started getting radio play in san francisco which that was a pretty big deal. Do you remember the first time you heard tower of power on the radio. What was that like. i remember very clearly. By that time. I had moved for doc auditioned. I was living in a suburb fremont california. That's where i went to high school but as soon as i graduated. I moved. oakland Moved in together and you know by. Then it's like hippy. You throw a mattress on the floor and you hang some beads. And he's in one bedroom the other wall between us you know and we always we slept with the radio and one morning. I wake up like six in the morning. I wake up. Because i hear the flute on a ballot that we did go sparkling in the sand as bacon on the wall docking. They're playing. They're playing back. And i call him steve stain. They're playing our song. You know it was so exciting. Let's hear a little bit of sparkling in.

emilio castillo fillmore auditorium bill graham bander motown san francisco fillmore lothar Graham fremont doc oakland california steve stain
"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

06:11 min | 3 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on World Cafe

"My name is rena. Dora's today my guest is one of the founders of tower of power he plays saxophone some dicey sings to its milio custodio. Emilio welcome to the world cafe. Good to be here. It's great to have you. Your new live album celebrates fifty years of tower powers. so first. congratulations. You made it. The album was recorded a live. Show in oakland california where the ban got their start. But first let's let's go back a little bit. Take us back to how you got your start. What was it that got you to. I pick up the saxophone when you were a kid. I got caught stealing the t shirt and a really short crime. Career won t shirt got caught. That was not a content crook. You're so you know. My dad said he gave me a notebook. I made me apologize to the shop. And then he gave me a notebook and he said with the reason why you're never gonna steal again while you're in your bedroom. Think of something. That's going to keep you occupied in trouble this summer. You never come out of there. And the beatles just come out and my friend just got a guitar and we said we want to blame music dad and he goes Get in car is me and my brother. We both got caught. So we get into the car and takes us to the ministrations. Anything you want and obvious misrouted though the wall you know. And i pointed to the sax my brother pointed to the drums. I had a band the first day we didn't like practice our instruments for years and years and enjoy a band. We started the band and then we learned how to play. We did it completely backwards. So i've had a band ever since that day. Why was it the saxophone that you pointed to. My dad was a bartender at this place at that time called niro snuck it was at the cabana In palo alto which is kind like caesar's palace very nice and it was a what they call a show bar with these bands called show being on the big beach in the swinging. Lads and sometimes we would go there to pick my data from work and those bands be rehearsing and they were really good. They had a bunch of horns. You're very good players. And i always thought the sax player was the coolest guy in my brother was. The drummer was the coolest guy. So you're born in detroit And then the band you know. It started in california. How did you get from detroit to california. Why did that move happen. When i was eleven years old. My dad lost his job. He worked at a place called pinkas in detroit right downtown west grand boulevard and he got fired and the always wanted to go to the west coast His mentor this guy that taught him at a tin bar and actually had a steel as a bartender. Bartender stole and he had moved out to san francisco. And he said you. Jackie need to come out here and So my dad. I guess he figured do not can be just as broken. San francisco's they can in detroit and we went through. You know route route sixty six all that we did the grand canyon. The painted desert. You know everything you know. And it was a great trip out in california people ever since. Yeah i mean you brought a little bit of detroit with you by starting a band called the motown's you start that band with baritone sax players stephen doc kuka. When did you discover that. You and i had a great songwriting chemistry covered that we both had this huge affinity for soul music and he was passionate about it in the you never met nobody more passionate about music than me you know and so we hit it off right away and Back then. I used to do this thing with the songs where i didn't like to do. All the soul tunes at everybody else you know. Knock on wood and hold on. I'm coming in. So i tried to do obscure soul songs from the albums and one day dot comes to me in. He says you know it's so great what you're doing with these songs. But why are we doing everybody. Else's psalm one. Are we right around. And i always tell people. I don't know if that thought ever would have come to be totally happy. What i was doing you know and i go. We can try that you know and you know a couple of days later went over this department. We wrote over for song and still today. It's gonna remove spain the socks you're still young. Man i tell people the clinics say it's been downhill ever since you're still a young man. I've heard that it draws for some of your own personal experience. We're going to listen to it next. I have to ask. Are you the young man in the song. What's going on here. yes. I am actually. It's a young man. Pleading with an older woman. I was in love with this guy was eighteen. She was twenty six and we had broken up and then we got back together and every time we break up. She'd say you know you need to be was some grocer on age. You know than. I'd say you wanna be with you you know. And so when we sat down to write the tune will what be right about. You know and i said well what about if we Read about a young guy. That's love with an older girl and she's telling him you're too young to being these toner. No no no you know. And i came up with the chorus. You're still a young man baby. And then we destroyed story to meet the courts. Let's hear it right now. You're still young man. power Ought.

milio custodio detroit california caesar's palace rena pinkas Emilio Dora stephen doc kuka oakland niro palo alto west coast grand canyon Jackie san francisco San francisco spain
Chrissy Teigen Talks Depression and Cancel Club

Daily Pop

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Chrissy Teigen Talks Depression and Cancel Club

"Teigen is getting real about being a member of the cancel club. Founding member probably not wrote. I feel lost in need to find my place again. Anita snap out of this. I desperately want to communicate with you guys instead of pretending everything is okay. Cancel club is a fascinating thing. And i have learned a whole lot. There is no winning. I'm just tired of being sick with myself all day. Snooze in lami snooze in a okay you start buying what do you want to hear from the rich lady. I know you're gonna take. This is what i think. First of all. I'm going to take with me. we are both. We've set at a million times on the show. We are against cancel culture. I genuinely believe people make mistakes when they are different. People i think people go through seasons. They shed different qualities about themselves. I think she made a really bad mistake. I think she feels terrible about it. I don't think she gives herself any slack when she says i have crushing weight on me every day. I believe that's genuine. She's like damn chrissy. Like why did. I tweet something so stupid for this to come haunt me however many years later I will say though as well that she apologized. And some people forgiven her. Some people not forgiving her for her to come out and say this. I mean i read the whole article and i was a little stress. Because i'm like. I still don't have my full form opinion. i think in the old school pr scheme in hollywood. You make a mistake you gotta go away for a little bit. it's just unfortunately the ticket you're given. It's not pleasant. I'm sure it's very traumatizing. I'm sure she's not integrate mental state. And i think the normal chrissy pre tweets would be able to communicate that everyone would rally. I think unfortunately right now. The smartest thing for her to do is just take her medicine a little bit and just let us forget for four months and come

Teigen Cancel Club Anita Chrissy Hollywood
The Most Notorious Marxist Extremists Were Similarly Aged as College Millennials

Mark Levin

01:43 min | 3 months ago

The Most Notorious Marxist Extremists Were Similarly Aged as College Millennials

"So I point out, it is unsurprising that the world's most renowned and notorious Marxist revolutionaries. Of the same mindset and also Went to college. They were millennials. Vladimir I mean, excuse me, Lenin. His biography includes that he was born in a well educated family excelled at school and went on to study law at the university was exposed to radical thinking. His views were influenced by the execution of his older brother. Remember the Revolutionary group. Expelled from the university for his radical policies. Lenin completed his law degree is an external student in 18 91. And then he moved to ST Petersburg and became a professional revolutionary. Although mall was born in a peasant family, his biography explains that he trained as a teacher and he traveled to Beijing We worked in the university library is During this time he began to read Marxist literature in 1921. He became a founding member, the Chinese Communist Party. Cambodia's Pol Pot came from a relatively prosperous families, biography states that he was educated in a series of French speaking schools in 1949. He won a scholarship to study in Paris where he became involved in communist politics and I could go on. I can go on about Castro. Another one. Fairly well to do family. His father owned a farm. He went to law school. Hugo Chavez. Recently. Well to do was in the military overthrew the government. Not a perfect model, but it is a overwhelmingly accurate model.

Lenin Vladimir Chinese Communist Party St Petersburg Beijing Cambodia Paris Castro Hugo Chavez Government
Dane Cardiel joins Gumball

podnews

00:17 sec | 4 months ago

Dane Cardiel joins Gumball

"Dane county jail has joined head gum and gumbel to become vice president of business development. He was a founding member of simple costs which was purchased by sirius. Xm twelve months ago. It's one of a series of high profile management changes in the industry with more tomorrow

Dane County Gumbel
JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

Can We Talk?

02:49 min | 4 months ago

JIMENA: Mizrahi and Sephardi Voices

"Ovid is a dancer and choreographer from aden yemen. She moved to israel as a girl in nineteen forty nine and became a founding member of the inbal dance. Company marguerite recorded her oral history for the gemina oral history project. In two thousand eleven gimenez stands for jews indigenous to the middle east and north africa region that jewish communities thrive in for over two thousand years until the twentieth century. When a million mizraki sephardi jews fled and were forced out of the land of their ancestors. The san francisco based gemina is working to preserve that rich heritage and history producer. Asala sunny poor recently sat down with sarah levin gimenez executive director to talk about some of the stories in the archive as well as their own family histories. A saw worked with sarah on the archives many years ago sayre you and i worked really closely together while i was in college My very first internship ever was with jim messina and working on this oral history project. I like to think that it's what really launched my love of storytelling. I wanted to start by asking you. Why do you think it's important to preserve these stories as told in the words of those who lived it. So i am so happy to be doing this with you a saul. I think that judaism as grounded and stories like that is the legacy of our people. That's the foundation of haha. That's the foundation of what it means to be jewish as passing on stories Were the combination of thousands of years of stories and in regards to gimenez oral history project We collected stories of communities of people who who hadn't been given a platform to share. They hadn't been given a microphone. They hadn't been given an opportunity to talk about what happened to them when they lived and fled countries throughout the middle east. North africa and their stories are an incredibly critical part of contemporary jewish history. And where we are. Today with establishment of the state of israel nineteen forty eight posts showa post arab nationalism and uprisings in the middle east and north africa there was a major disruption of over two thousand years of continuous jewish life in the middle east north africa. Kinda came to an end and that is a huge part of the jewish story. And we have this very unique opportunity to collect the stories from the people who lived through this historical moment in time and it was an honor to collect these stories and hopefully add them to the record of jewish

Gimenez Aden Yemen Gemina Sarah Levin Gimenez Ovid Middle East North Africa Marguerite Foundation Of Haha Jim Messina Sayre Israel San Francisco Sarah Middle East North Africa
Interview With Ian Freed CEO of Bamboo Learning

The Voicebot Podcast

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Ian Freed CEO of Bamboo Learning

"In freed. Welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks so much bread. It's great to be here. thanks for having me on. This is long. I think we talked about two and a half years ago and just for one reason or another it just like the timing never worked out probably mostly my fault but like i know you had different things going on at the time. So long overdue. But there's no timing like the president because there's lots of talk about you've recent announcements with bamboo. You just had another award. I think you guys racked up. We've racked up a lot of those over the years And you're mentioned brad. Stones new book so we can get all of that If if we have time we'll talk about the amazon stuff. But i think we should talk about bamboo. I just listeners. Don't know like in will tell you that. He he worked to amazon for a long time. Was one of the founding members leaders in the alexa team so he had some specific knowledge. There that i think a lot of people like from historical perspective because voiced by listeners. They really loved that history. We've done a lot over the years. But i want to talk about education so in any event you can set it up. Tell people who you are. And let's let's give him an introduction bamboo learning and what it's doing for education and the That's great absolutely and it is great that we finally got together to To have a podcast. The other so I'm an freed co founder and ceo of bamboo learning and family learning is a company completely dedicated to educating kids Really in the age range of five through eleven to learn using their voice and we've dedicated the entire company to do that We were founded about three years ago. And we've developed a number of alexa skills. I think we're up to seven now Covering different subjects that kids learn in school and even some that maybe they don't learn in school

Amazon Brad Alexa Bamboo Learning
The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

02:08 min | 5 months ago

The Family's Role in Addiction and Recovery.

"Alright let's jump right in. Because i have a hot topic today that i haven't talked about for awhile and that is families and recovery. Wow this is a big big big topic so many of us. The addicted people have difficulty with our families. Some don't but the majority of us do in that sense given that the family thinks it's all our business right. As soon as the problem becomes obvious out there in front of the whole family it becomes the problem of the person who's addicted to get. Fixed no bueno from this therapist. We're gonna talk today about the long held notion. That addiction is the person's problem and get more realistic and talk about why. It's a family issue. No matter no matter what kind of family. You have the researcher. I'm going to use for today's podcast. Is stephanie brown phd. She's a clinician researcher and consultant in the field of addiction and she founded the alcohol clinic at stanford university medical center in nineteen seventy seven and served as its director for eight years developing the dynamic model of alcoholism recovery and its application to the long term treatment of all members of the alcoholic family. Yep old language but yes. I'm reading from her websites amusing her language. Dr brown served on the california state. Alcoholism advisory board and was a founding member of the national association for children of alcoholics. Now the national association for children of addiction in a cola child of addiction

Bueno Stephanie Brown Stanford University Medical Ce Nineteen Dr Brown National Association For Child California National Association For Child Cola
Are Banks Getting Nervous About Competition From DeFi?

The Breakdown with NLW

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Are Banks Getting Nervous About Competition From DeFi?

"What's going on guys. It is thursday may sixth and today we are asking whether banks are getting nervous about competition from defy first step however. Let's do the brief. I on the brief today makoto. Lebron is the latest company to add bitcoin to its balance sheet. This is a massive latin-american e commerce and fintech company. You may remember them for being one of the founding members of the libra association and then leaving that association a few months later. It's a company that is based in argentina but listed on nasdaq they announce as part of their q one reporting the they had added seven point. Eight million dollars worth of bitcoin to their balance sheet now in some ways. This isn't that surprising. Ricardo libra has a long history of interaction with bitcoin. In two thousand fifteen the integrated. Bitcoin is a payment option on their makoto. Pago platform just last week. The company announced a real estate platform exclusively for properties available for sale and bitcoin launching with seventy five initial properties. Some on twitter pointed out that a latin american company investing in bitcoin to protect itself from currency devaluation was even more poignant than some of its american counterparts given how frequently bouts of inflation have destroyed savers in places like mocatta libraries home of argentina and speaking of latin american unicorns. The mexico based crypto exchange. Bit so has just raised a new round of funding that values at two point. Two billion dollars making it. The first latin american crypto unicorn. Next up on the brief today a digital has bought bit go for one point two billion dollars one of the key things. We've been watching here at the break. Down is crypto emanate. Emanate can tell us a lot about wearing. Industry is when times are tough as a survival strategy for companies that might otherwise go under when times are good as often. Something very different. This time around. There are two broad categories. I'm seeing. I is a joining of forces not because one party is at risk of dying but because together they see more chance to win important category

Bitcoin Libra Association Ricardo Libra Makoto Argentina Lebron Twitter Mexico
A Civil Rights History Lesson

In The Thick

02:14 min | 5 months ago

A Civil Rights History Lesson

"Today we have a very special guest joining us from brooklyn. New york is gene. Theo harris distinguished professor of political science at brooklyn college a historian and author of the rebellious life of mrs rosa parks. She's co editor of the new book. Julian bonds time to teach the history of the southern civil rights movement gene. Welcome to the show. Thanks for having me so today. We're going to honor one of the leaders of the civil rights movement and i. I actually met julian bond. I just can't remember where it's going to say that you probably did. I did meet him. And now i'm like you know i think it was before we had cameras in our phones. I mean bond is just a hero and a giant in the civil rights movement. He was an incredible human bean with. I mean his humanity just should out. He was an activist. He was an an educator he did. Pass away in two thousand fifteen. He was a founding member of the student. Nonviolent coordinating committee snake He had a political career. He served in the georgia house of representatives. He had to fight for his seat because of his opposition to the vietnam war and he was the first african american to be nominated as vice president though he withdrew his name and julian bond was an outspoken activist who fought his entire life whether it was civil rights to beaten way out of other people on the question of lgbtq rights all the way to protesting to shut down the keystone pipeline. Let's listen to julian bond in his own words to start off this show. This is from two thousand and two interview that julian did with phyllis leffler of the explorations in black leadership project at the university of virginia. Everything my parents. I told me about responsibility to others everything. I've learned that. The george school about speaking truth to power everything i learned about daring to stand up to powerful people and say no to them. Whatever the consequences. All of that came together when lonnie king came up to me and asked me if i would join this Movement

Julian Bond Theo Harris Mrs Rosa Parks Brooklyn College Georgia House Of Representativ Brooklyn Julian New York Phyllis Leffler Vietnam University Of Virginia George School Lonnie King
"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

07:37 min | 6 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"Piece of advice. Actually if you did that never mind. I'll know by myself. I love it. I love it aright this. This last question damaged my best friend's laptop on her birthday. I accidentally spilled a bit of drink on the laptop that uses for online classes while i was cleaning up. I didn't tell her about it now. She has to pay for a new motherboard. should i tell her. Of course usua- deli visa. Hit what what kind of friend are you killed your cat. But i'm not gonna delhi. No you do something like that to someone that you must tell them. This is girl needs a new friend. I know this girl she go to the crazy girl with crazy girlfriend amid for each other that give the greater the guy's number 'cause they're made for each other that's beautiful and then you get each other nice promise ring. Hopefully no-one breaks it because then you'll never physically from buying laptop ha amazing well. Now that we're all advice doubt steve. I just wanted to give you a huge. Thank you for coming on the pod talking about yourself and giving some advice. I actually had a great time and i fell. I fell asleep at three thirty time. And i woke up like that's why i'm breaking golfing because i don. I'm one of those people. Somebody will take a nap. And they wake up refreshed. I wake up like a corpse. You know i i i had. I had a wake up that but before we go. We must tell everyone that. My new book is called point of pines and it's available on amazon dot com kendall and i tunes in my other book you go to my website. St blue stein dot biz forward slash books. See stein dot biz or Visit a page. Click on the book you want ended up. Just take you to get it. That's beautiful and they won't even have to type it in because it's going to be in the show notes so they can just go there and click when they hear the go right that you have seven. I've got mom dad and my brothers. So so that's bull brothers do you have. I have two brothers and two sisters wow catholic. Yes exactly exact- see. I'm an only child and you know what did i learn. What's an only child. And i just will. That makes perfect sense. you know. only children are special You could put me in solitary confinement for thirty five years. I'd be fine. I find bugs. I play with them. I color on the walls i. I seldom detained myself. I don't i don't do well in groups Somebody told me. Oh salma strata. Who's a broadway actor. Friend of sal is an only child. Makes perfect sense is makes perfect sense. I've seen him in a group of people ended. Its own little world. That's so funny. Meanwhile i'm creating a podcast just for the excuse to talk with people so i I had i had it beforehand. But my i actually had it with two of my brothers my two brothers and then they stopped because they were bored and sick of me. That's what i always say you. You'd see pretty normal. But when i say with a jew goes bad you can always fix the but when a catholic goes bed sankoh bad in ways i have never seen in my life. They they are so crazy things like they do things like. I just go what i said. I've never done shit like that for my god. That is very accurate. I think i've been. I've gone a little bad. But nothing crazy but i had some friends in the catholic guilt is nothing at the jewish guilt What's a piece of cake compared to catholic. You'll oh my god. I know i mean we have. I remember growing up we had the crucifixes constant reminder of some guy dying hanging on a cross saying i died for you so you better be good we killed it and we don't even get god i if i had a jesus eating a cheeseburger above the door. That'd be a nice reminder of like. Hey good guy god anyway anyway. Well thank you again. So much steve me no. It's it listen. I've really enjoyed this in and you call me up anytime. I'd be happy to come back. Oh thank you so much and you're welcome back anytime. I may you know a couple months a year. We'll have the reunion. We'll chat again awesome. Well thank you so much. Steve and i hope you have a good severe evening. You to wait a minute alexis. What is it alexa. Do you have a message. it's your tesla. please drive me. 'let ear The goldman junkie. Lovely anymore fleas. Come back to back. Other people are driving their cards. Well steve. This is an absolute blast. Thank you again. thanks for having me. Can you tell. And that ladies and gentlemen was steve blue stein man oh man or womb and it was amazing. I had a great time. Hope he did as well. I really hope you did if you're listening to this park because this is the very end so if it was excruciatingly painful. I hope you would've stopped unless you are a masochist. So anyway if you are a mass kisser not please fall fall. Oh support steve and following support made lakes. They're all in the show notes. Follow me on instagram. Add comedy advice. podcast lee the review subscribe. Tell your friends tell your mother's tell your father's i'm great with parents. That's the target demographic to be honest with you so get as many parents in as you can love. You is thank you for everything you do for me. It's truly truly special. Big old beige does botchy basis kisses..

Steve two seven thirty five years two sisters steve blue stein amazon dot com instagram sal two brothers salma strata jesus stein dot biz jew three thirty time dot biz one jewish steve months
"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

07:56 min | 6 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"His ego wants to get their stuff in the script. Yeah that's gotta be. It's really interesting too when you tear apart comedy and your building and making jokes and then trying to run them by people. It's hard enough if it's just missing that one little thing also within the eleven times by the eleventh time thinks it's funny. Yeah yeah it's it. It's that element of surprise for the first time that gets the lap. But if you keep going over and over and over over nobody laughs. As a matter of fact shared show when they were running cameras november blocking and they were script. Day would go blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. And then i walked into blah blah blah blah blah. Because they wanna give the punch lines to the crew so that they get the laugh for the crew as well. Oh interesting because you can't you give your song twelve times. would you can only hear a joke. Once or twice he s. Exactly i think you nailed it with that. Surprise being that crucial element for the laugh. Because once you go you went here my favorite joke with just again. The year ago women into women walks into a pharmacy and she says the pharmacist. I want cyanide to kill my husbands and the pharmacist is. I can't give you cyanide to kill your husband. She reaches into a person she pulls out a photo and she ends the photo to the pharmacist. She says that's my husband with your wife in the farthest and says well you tell me ahead of prescription. That's great joke. That's my favorite joke. That is amazing did you. Did you write that. No roberta me that joe. She called me. Do you want to hear the best joke. And i said church. She she told me I followed and i laugh at nothing. You know i love. Nut is the matter. I add the most inappropriate sense of humor. Because i said a funeral of a friend's father guy's father was like my father was. I love this man and he was in the army so they had a color guard and they haven't american flag and they were folding the american flag their folding folding it and it took them twenty minutes to fold the the flag in the you know and i just said to know that's how i volt might sheets and the whole place broke up in the my friend steven was his name is also steve journey. That's hilarious and i had heard somewhere that you all you like to take those dark maybe macabre or kind of dark moments and make humor out of it which i think it really school. That's all my lays. I have a play about death. I have a play about suicide. I play about alzheimer's every play about cancer. I of lick and they're all comedies. I love to take dark subjects and treat them like my book. Take my prostate. Please clear that is. That's a book about prostate cancer. And all i did was i. I had i had gone through that and all i did was. I got home every night. After i would go ahead to do that day. I would just chronicle what happened that day and it turns out it was third out to be very funny because i just see the world different than most people. That's so funny. And i think it takes such it takes skill to write comedy and be funny in general but then also taking such dark moments that a lot of people when they first hear about death cancer. Anything like that. They can trigger an emotion for that to be able to flip it and make it funny is leveling up from just unbelievable stuff you under the truth. Writing comedy is the easiest they might do. Truly walking into a room full of strangers. That's l. but sitting down. Underwriting comedy is it's second nature and years is an interesting story. I'm gonna tell you please. I have a russia as opposed to all this crap. I've been talking I have a russian travelagent. And i said to him you know my whole family was from the ussr and he said where i said well edessa and he said to me. Well then you must have a good sense of humor. I said what are you talking about. Is it odessa's are known for their sense of humor and there's a festival that goes back centuries that started in odessa and i said would you know what i do said no and i told him he's will. That makes perfect sense end. The funny thing is the blue stein side of my family. The blue stein said we all have the same sense of humor. My cousin bobby. Micheals didi my aunt. Easy my uncle. My my cousin di di. We all have the same sense of humor. It's really a larry. I'm the only one that you know when as a as a career the cash in on that sense of humor my father owned. My father had the same sense. If you my father could do voices could yeah. He was it was real but he he worked with my uncle. Noah actually my father. You know the comedian ben. Blue ben blue that he was an old from the forties recognized my father's talent and wanted to take my father on the road but y grandfather said no and so that is actually the model i used when my mother was so against my being joe business i said you know i can either go after my green or end up working into stationery store which is what my father and i decided i was going to go after my jury and my mother was bitch she just truly was in thirty five years she never gave away single joe not want me said to a friend what did he write a book for. Nobody cares about his life literally. So what i know i know so. That's what the point of pines really deals with that a lot. You know how that negatively was funneled. At how i lived within what happened to me because of it so a the funny thing is even though i living in this mansion and.

eleventh time twelve times steven thirty five years twenty minutes eleven times steve journey twice first time Once third second nature edessa first russian one little thing stein ben russia american
"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

06:44 min | 6 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"Automaker do now all right. I'll write a book literally. I'm stuck in the house with nothing to do. I would get up every morning at about six. Am might right for three hours then. I rewrite the afternoon it took me about two months in. Got it all down. So i think it's think it's forty nine thousand words so on and it was. It was really cathartic sending unwanted into. I wanted to honor those people. Because i love them. They're all going now but i loved. Overlap beautiful yeah. And i also i also thought admit isn't movie but i said absented around and got a really wonderful feedback but you know the businesses so insane anymore. It's just i. I give i give you win. I'm sick of banging my head against the wall. Thank you you know when i have all this to fall back on all this back year That that's incredible. I thought it was a virtual background at first or no this is this is a show. I did with the lane booze. Lert earned american cancer society. This is a production of one of my place This is I wrote for shoe the The comic strip shoe. This is one of my. Liz is the the billboard. It's easiest. Alice with my name on it. This is who this is another show. I did this. This is production from delaware of a. What the hell was the name of that blades. I can't remember the name of my own play. Anyway that's production of when my plays. So that's what this is. The memory will win the loud bradford's as you can see. This is my memory wall too because it's very bland. Got nothing except coming coming attractions gumming soon and accomplishment. Open credits coming soon. Rested visas consistent recipes ally. The best i had the best experience of my life in the dallas theater or delaware delaware theatre company the most professional wonderful gorilla i ever worked with donna. Pests cow was the star from saturday night fever and she and i have become like really good friends and so was it was worth it was. It was the most wonderful experience of my life. That particular production. Gosh or other productions. Not fun. I i was gonna ask just because i. I know you've mentioned that you stand up also have written for tv. Shows plays movies. The whole the whole gamut of entertainment. And where did the writing start. Did it start when you wanted to be a singer where you writing songs. Were you writing before that you know where it started. There was this woman in in los angeles by the name of carole. Gordon moore era. Mora was married to buddy. Mora buddy moore was robin williams. Robert klein billy crystal's manager along with every other every other huge community well. She had a class a writing class. And when i had when. I finished my last tv. Show and i was sitting around the house. Mary willard god rest or so nothing. I'm looking for something to do. She said iota joined carroll. Moore's writing class. And that's what i did. I thought oh what a great idea a workshop. And i i was in networks up to twenty years for left. La and rested pieces was written in there. This one was written there. Might books were written there and it's just a a safe place where you get criticized but with love you know so courage in space. And that's exactly what i needed. And i adore cow carols like family. Oh that's so cool. And i've been as i've been talking with writers. It seems like a group or people in a safe space with people you trust can give you constructive criticism and things like that is really important as you're creating these masterpieces beautiful as unless you're not with a group of eagle maniacs who never because britain on shows where seven right. Is it around to room in fight for for hours over one joke. And what they're right. They're fighting for is to get their joke in the script. That's not funny business. That can be a night. I had that happen. When i was writing for norman lear. I was in a room with about six writers and we literally with stuck on one joke for six hours. And i said i said would you excuse me for a minute and i went up to the office. That went up to my office. I wrote thirty jokes on a on a piece of paper..

Robert klein six hours thirty jokes three hours Mora moore Moore Gordon moore Mary willard one joke robin dallas theater los angeles carole saturday night one forty nine thousand words about two months Alice Liz
"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

08:12 min | 6 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on Hyperbrole: A Comedy Advice Podcast

"Its cultural and every but after that it's just spend the rest of your life looking for in our. Yeah i i think this is definitely not my joke but somebody said all the movies about boston are about people trying to get out of it so through any the lower class boston. And that's where i grew up in a city called chelsea mass. Which you know the hub of the pandemic in boston right now. It was the kind of town that either it bonded you forever or a bar margin forever for me it funded me tomorrow. I was like. I have lots of friends. There who. I adore to this day on like family could wait to get out. I could not wait to get out of the you know. The funny thing is when i went to emerson sopa three years. I learned how to lose my boston accent. And i go home and unhoped fifteen minutes. I mean fifteen minutes and it's like hey molly how are ya. Ue fad is over here with talking on the phone. Yeah come on sit down. It's and fred willard's wife. Mary should she was also boston and we used to joke because she said she was in boston. She got off the plane and she heard the the following conversation she said. I didn't say you were an asshole. I said father wasn't aweso. That's hilarious edits. I was going to ask you about the accent. Because you're everything i've seen you on. Your accent is so neutral. It sounds like your california third that i learned that emmer such general american speech But then. I had a really thick boston lower income accident and it took me year of saying how now brown car o over up car and using your overly open voice After wild it. And they said it would take about three years and then it would just become subconscious. You would just do it without even thinking about it because when you're trying to change the accent you're constantly thinking about it ober over the years suddenly just begun natural in a new no longer but now when i hear i mean i never heard the accent before but now when i hear it it's like oh that's that sell funny. I miss it. I the necessarily the boston accent. But the new york and new jersey accents like crowded polluted music to my ears. I love hearing be. Comedians are like sponges. You know we we just suck up. Everything and i was in new york and i was talking like this about twenty minutes rope talk. You know my friends. They would make fun of me for the way that i said water. Because everybody says water. Over jerseys i started saying then. They finally starting to catch on. And so it's it's water and in boston it's water. What is what are my gosh. I love it. But i i was gonna ask. I mean well first off. Hello everybody listening. This is a comedy advice. Podcast with me stephens. Itani and special guest steve. Blue stein that. You've been hearing interchange between boston. New york and the neutral american accent steve. It's a pleasure to have you on the podcast first off. Oh it's a pleasure to be at this stage. I'll go to a supermarket opening. I'm not proud. And i mean you have been funny for more years than i've probably been alive. I mean you go after. I said i was like. I don't know if that's a coupla but very young. I'm only seventeen years old so it's okay but i no no just turned eighteen last month. No i'm kidding. I'm kidding i i'm thirty two all right all right. Yeah so so. Very badly is up the pandemic air. It is yes. I had it very nice. I usually have it shaved on the sides and then a little much shorter. But a nice little cleaned up very seventies. So it's it's it's very in you know and i had mine got really short and it's growing now and i'm just a i used to have somebody come to the house to cover here but i'm afraid you know that. Have anyone come to the house. Now see that's me too. And i remember i was watching one of your clips. I think it was on the norm crosby show and i was looking at the audience and i was looking. I was like oh. I got to look like those guys. All i need is the moustache. That was the seventies or the eighties. I guess it was more like the. Yeah yeah just lost more. He was a wonderful man. I was going to ask too. I had read that you had started to get into comedy the bug bitchy a- after college in boston when you went to new york and getting into improv. No i'm wrong so i went i. This is what happened. I went from college to new york city to become a singer. Become a singer. And i was working in the village doing open night. Mike's in the village. And then you know i did starving so i had to get a job. So i went to alexander's department store as to get a job as a salesman and they kept promoting me his assistant manager than was manager. That was divisional manager than i ended up in the buying office. I never wanted any of that. And i was miserable beyond words but i was making money so i you know and then when i went to california on a a went to california due to visit my dear friend ian sieber just as way on three months ago and he was like a brother to me and i got to visit him and i felt this is where i belong so i came out here with no job. No place to stay in. Everything just fell into in that. And then i was living in an apartment building of living living in an apartment building and i would always be making everybody laugh around the boo and date. Mad lived in the building and he was he was reuben on the partridge family. He was the manager archer. Trent and he said to you know there's a new club that just opened called the comedy store. You should go there and sitting on the other side of me. Was albert hammond and.

ian sieber Trent fred willard albert hammond steve New york three months ago Mary eighties chelsea mass tomorrow california Itani new york fifteen minutes boston new jersey three years first Mike
The Kingsmen Guitarist, Mike Mitchell, Dies at 77

Gary and Shannon

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

The Kingsmen Guitarist, Mike Mitchell, Dies at 77

"One of the founding members of the band. The King's Men, has died. He was the guitarist on their hit single Louie Louie, which was really Not their record. They stole it. Well, Richard Barry. They got their start. Portland back in 1959. Oh, six consecutive weeks at number two on the hot 100 list for billboard. Do you know what was number one while it was number two. What? I have no idea. I don't know, but he's gone. We had another

Richard Barry Louie Louie Portland
Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

01:56 min | 7 months ago

Count Down for Australia's Return to Orbit

"If all goes according to plan almost exactly a year from now. Australia will officially become a spacefaring nation. Again of course. Back in the nineteen sixties. The warmer iraq rain outback south. Australia was one of the busiest spaceport in the world. Second only to cape canaveral in florida and on october the twenty ninth nineteen sixty seven. Australia became only the fourth nation on earth to launch a satellite at built into from its own soil win the scientific spacecraft reset one blasted off from space launch complex. La eight at woomera but with a lack of foresight and vision. That would leave. Most people stunned. Australia's dimwitted politicians squabbling amongst themselves. Only ever seeing as far as the next election decided there was no future in space. And that's a direct quote now remember. This is at the very height of the space race. The satellite communications industry was already growing into a multibillion dollar giant shining and bacon on the path to the future. There's no benefit of hindsight here. It was clear to everybody at the time accept. It seems australia's elected representatives and the level of stupidity. Australia's politicians is really quite mind blowing. Not honey do they. Turn down an offer for australia to become one of the founding members of the then fledgling european space agency but the government also sold off most of the technology and infrastructure which had been painstakingly developed at woma scrap value. It's taken over. Half a century but australia is finally getting back in the settle with the creation of an official australian space agency and you space ports being developed for nasa by equatorial launch australia in the northern territories omland landing not and another company southern launch commencing missile tests slots rocket range. Niece agena and developing. Its own over. The launch complex. Whale is way mayport

Australia Cape Canaveral Iraq Florida LA European Space Agency Nasa
How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:55 min | 8 months ago

How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

"Ellen louise. Curtis was born on november fifteenth. Eighteen twenty four in schuylerville new york to henry de curtis electra. Able she was the second of eight children was a farmer and the owner of a men's hat factory family lived a comfortable life made more lively each summer by dramatic influxes of tourists. Each year notable members of society would make their way to nearby. Toga springs ellen. Later wrote that the visitors turned typically dull surroundings into places that present the spectacle of a grand reunion of wealth fashion and beauty out of doors from a young age. Ellen was interested in fashion. after graduating from school. Ellen's father helped her harness her interest into a career via women's shop of her own. The millenary shop was quite successful and after a year. Ellen moved the shop to troy new york. And then to brooklyn in eighteen. Fifty-eight ellen married william jennings demorest a thirty six year old widower with two children. The couple would also have two children of their own a son in eighteen fifty nine and a daughter in eighteen sixty five. The family moved to philadelphia where they ran an emporium. It was there that ellen's career really took off as the story goes ellen and her sister kate or working on a system of dress making when they saw their african american made cutting address pattern out of brown paper ellen was inspired by the idea to create tissue paper patterns of fashionable garments for the home sewer some historians refute that the idea originated with ellen and her maid and instead suggest it was i had by a man who had become ellen's rival ellen's family moved back to new york and began manufacturing patterns. They also opened a women's store on broadway in the fall of eighteen. Sixty ellen and her husband became selling paper patterns and publishing quarterly. Catalog called mirror of ellen. Higher journalist and women's rights advocate jane cunningham croly to work for the publication. The magazine was filled with sewing tips and tricks pictures of accessories. Sheet music poetry and fiction. Each issue included a tissue paper pattern and sewing instructions. The magazine was well timed and circulation. Grew quickly a sewing. Machines were then becoming commonplace in middle class homes the magazine also featured contributors including writers julia. Wardhaugh louisa may alcott and robert louis. Stevenson ellen frequently made strong statements in the magazine and support of women in the workplace. She also took firm stance on domestic abuse prison reform and mental health treatment among other topics as the cadillac business. Thrived ellen and williams brick and mortar store on broadway. Grew to ellen and her sister. Kate adapted foreign styles into patterns and made samples for the store. The store is fashion. Openings became major social events ellen. And william store was also notable for the couple's hiring practices. They hired african. Americans at the store on equal terms as white employees long before integrated workplaces were a norm in eighteen. Seventy six ellen became a founding member of cirrhosis. the first professional women's club in the united states throughout that decade while most businesses were failing ellen and her family continued to do well according to historians up to three million patterns. Were mailed each year but ellen success didn't last forever in the eighteen eighties. Ellen's empire began to decline ellen and william had failed to patent their paper patterns a competitor ebeneezer butterick had done so successfully at first butterick stuck to men's and children's ware but by eighteen sixty seven he'd expanded to women's patterns to ebenezer butterick company remains the center of the paper pattern industry today in eighteen. Eighty five william demerist retired to devote himself to the temperance movement. that year. He ran for lieutenant governor of new york. On the prohibition ticket a decade later in eighteen ninety five he died that same year allen suffered a stroke and was left bedridden. She moved into the hotel renaissance new york where she died of a cerebral hemorrhage on august tenth. Nine eight she was seventy three years old ellen. Louise demerist took her love of fashion and made it accessible. To the everyday woman in revolutionizing the fashion industry she also committed herself to the betterment of opportunities for both white and black women though she failed to patent patterns. Her impact is still apparent today.

Ellen Ellen Louise Schuylerville Henry De Curtis Electra Toga Springs William Jennings Demorest New York Jane Cunningham Croly Wardhaugh Louisa Robert Louis Stevenson Ellen The Magazine Curtis Williams Brick William Store Brooklyn Alcott Kate Philadelphia
Reggae Icon Bunny Wailer, Founding Member of the Wailers, Has Died at 73

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

Reggae Icon Bunny Wailer, Founding Member of the Wailers, Has Died at 73

"A reggae music giant has passed away. Today in Kingston, Jamaica, and he was a member of the original Wailers trio, along with Bob Marley and Peter Tosh and reflecting on his career a few years back, Bunny said. The Wailers are responsible for the Wailers sound, Bob Peter and myself. We are totally responsible for the Wailers sound and what the Wailers brought to the world and left as a legacy and although he left the group Relatively early on his things took a different direction. He went on to do his own prolific work, and he even won the Grammy for best reggae album three times in the nineties. But let's take it back to the roots and listen to the early vocals of

Wailers Trio Bob Peter Peter Tosh Bob Marley Kingston Jamaica Bunny Wailers
Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

Dressed: The History of Fashion

05:34 min | 8 months ago

Supreme Glamour, an Interview with Mary Wilson

"Verse seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to trust the history of fashion. A podcast where. We explore the who. What when of why we wear. We are fashion stories and your hosts abra callahan and cassidy. Zachary dresses thurs. I know that you will join april. And i when we say that we were both very sad to hear about the fact that miss mary wilson passed away last week at the age of seventy six years old. Yes i was a little heartbroken. I texted you right away. And i was like. Oh so of course miss. Mary was a founding member of the iconic american singing group. The supremes she was there at the beginning of the group in the nineteen fifties and was the last original member in the group when it officially disbanded in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven and she went on to a career as a solo performer motivational speaker author and perhaps unsuspecting archivist. Yes because miss. Mary took it upon herself to preserve the supreme sartorial legacy and her collection of the group's stunning performance ensemble served as the foundation of her two thousand nineteen book co authored with mark. Bego supreme glamour and april. I mean we feel so. Honored chose celebrated fulling episode of dressed with miss mary herself. She came on last season of course to share with us her incredible stories behind the supremes singular style she truly was an inspiring and wonderful woman whose legacy will undoubtedly live on for generations to come. Thank you for joining us stress listeners. In this listen back at our time with the one. The only miss mary wilson. We are super excited to have miss. Mary wilson with us today miss mary. Welcome to dressed. Thank you so much. And i'm glad to be with you. Yeah of this is truly an honor to have you here today. And i have to say i have not been this excited about a book in a very long time. I've i've read a lot of fashion history books and this one is is so beautifully written. It's so beautifully illustrated so many stories so much love and friendship and of course there's so much fashion in this book. It's such a beautiful mosh to your time in the supremes and the clothing. That was part in parcel to that experience. So i'm curious. What inspired you to write this wonderful book. Wow well it was fairly easy. Because i had already written books about the supreme so therefore you know it was one of the things will. My research was not as it didn't take as long because i had so much research from the other books. And you know writing about the supremes and our biography and and talking about how much we had accomplished and our career was a pleasure to actually sit down now and do something not just write about the book but do show pictures and and and the looks and what was behind the singing which was more fashion so it was really a lot of fun. Sort of demonstrating what we did in not just on recording and the music but how we look at how he felt when we were certain count and so was all about the gallons per gallon down to just like we were onto all those years and many of them are in your personal collection cracked. Have i think in the book. There's over twenty four sets of matching onstage on sambas so not just one of the dresses but all three of the dresses. How did you go about comprising this collection. Well First of all we supreme florence ballard diana ross and i would always travel and when we came home from the road we'd have to store the gown and then of course by new gowns or designers with bring us new gowns and some of the old account that we made perhaps worn on television We went to store them. And they accumulated who Throughout all the years right And as you know florence was no longer mcgrew. Diane was no longer in the group. And then we had the seventies supremes And i became sort of like the keeper of of everything and the manager of the trains and all those different things. So i accumulated the gown because of that and whenever anyone would leave As you know a couple of them. Did i ended up with all these counts because no one can take the guy. No one can take the gal with them. You know we the supremes as a group paid for them. And that's how. I ended up with the majority of the gals. Now all other gallons should be in my possession but The reason that i can't tell you how many i have is because many have been not just lost and i won't say stolen you know things have just disappeared. And then some of the places we have them stored you know. I don't i couldn't figure out where everything was stored inside. All these years asked the supreme i have just been Trying to recover those downs that are not in my collection but it really is my collection. Because as i said when i left everything was left to me also should say that even though they were left to me and i had bare instead of three Sometimes i ended up with just one but all three gowns were overset were supposedly with me.

Mary Wilson Abra Callahan Iconic American Singing Group Mary Zachary Cassidy Miss Mary Ballard Diana Ross Mark Mcgrew Diane
Mary Wilson, a founding member of "The Supremes," has died

Mornings With Gail - 1310 KFKA

00:15 sec | 8 months ago

Mary Wilson, a founding member of "The Supremes," has died

"Mary. Wilson founding member of the supremes up passed away at age. Seventy six passing away. Suddenly monday evening at her home in henderson nevada. No cause of death was immediately

Wilson Mary Henderson Nevada
"founding member" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:43 min | 8 months ago

"founding member" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Wilson, a founding member of the legendary Motown Frio, the Supremes, has died. Wilson was 76 years old. You're listening to the latest from NBC News radio. Georgia officials are looking at the former president Trump's attempt to reverse the state's election results. The office of Georgia's secretary of state Brad Raft, and Seeberger announced the investigation Monday. The probe will also look into Trump's phone call to the secretary of state, during which he attempted to persuade Rapids Burger find enough votes to declare Trump the winner. A statement from the secretary's office says An investigation is standard practice. When complaints are made regarding elections. I'm Brian showed the people who own and run America, Small businesses are growing less optimistic for small business Optimism Index for January belt nearly a point from December, the net percentage of owners who expect better business conditions is down 55 points over the past four months. Economists blame the pessimism on the cove in 19 pandemic. Continues to dictate how small businesses operate. One of the stars of the Discovery networks Alaskan Bush people is dead. Billy Brown appeared in 12 seasons of the reality show about people who live in the Bush, his family said. The 68 year old Brown died Sunday after suffering a seizure. The show began in 2014 and focused on Brown and his extended family as they lived off the grid in Alaska. It followed them when they relocated to Washington state for medical reasons. At least two of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers winning Super Bowl players are heading to Disney World in Florida is, the official said Rob Gronkowski would visit the parks on Monday, and quarterback Tom Brady is also planning a trip. Disney has not released official details of where the players will appear, or if they'll be able to greet visitors. Disney announced last week that is traditional Super Bowl parade would not take place this year due to the pandemic. I'm Rick Oh Shal Burger King plans to test a loyalty program in several U. S Markets, Restaurant Brands International said in a statement. It has been working on its Royal Perks program for a while The program will be offered to customers in Los Angeles, Miami and New York City area will earn points for every dollar they spend. From Robert's NBC News radio. He, she and virtual hugs to all we had. Casey, the Zuni connection are 10 employees and hundreds of Pueblo artists would like to thank you wholeheartedly. For 39 years of appreciation and support. Sunni Pueblo is a community which is trea, graphically and culturally splendid. Yet isolated, Part original and continuing cooperative mission is to be a bridge for Zoonie creativity to the broader world. In light of a covert 19 crisis We have elected to temporarily halt General walk in traffic until further notice..

Trump Disney Billy Brown Georgia Wilson Sunni Pueblo NBC Motown Frio Brad Raft secretary Supremes Tampa Bay Buccaneers Robert founding member official Seeberger Rob Gronkowski
Mary Wilson, founding member of The Supremes, dies at 76

First Morning News

00:29 sec | 8 months ago

Mary Wilson, founding member of The Supremes, dies at 76

"Getting word that Mary Wilson, founding member of the legendary Motown Trail, the Supremes has died. She died suddenly at her home in Las Vegas last night 76 years old. Very well. She was only 15. When she, Diana Ross, Florence Ballard and Betty McCloughan formed a quartet that they called the primates. The Motown Records founder Barry Gordy said they pressured him to sign a recording contract. And he did that in 1961 on Lee because they changed their name to the Supremes, Mary Wilson. At the age of 76.

Mary Wilson Florence Ballard Betty Mccloughan Barry Gordy Diana Ross Las Vegas Motown Records LEE
"founding member" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"founding member" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Broom head show. On our news, 92 3 FM and the news after Hey, Thanks for being here this morning. Appreciate you spending some time with us. Ah, good. Ask for your indulgence for just Ah moment or two. Really hard news Last week, I found out that a friend had passed away and I didn't even know that she was sick, and I was so taken aback by it that I didn't get a chance to say goodbye to her or have any conversation with her family. It is such a strange thing because it's not someone that I saw very often. I would see a couple of times a year at events and but they had this family had made such an impact on me. Her name is Julie Brady. And she passed away and had been sick for a while and then and I had no idea she was even sick. Because she was still doing her volunteer work. She was still doing the things that should Sunday school teacher in the LDS Church Cub Scout leader she was the founding member of the Cowgirl Historical Foundation. And this is an equestrian group, and it's to keep. It's to keep the history of the cowboy and the history of the West out there, but it was also a way for them to do charity work. Every year. I've been honored to be the emcee at the Veterans Medical Leadership Council's luncheon. And the Cowgirls come every year as a voluntary group, and they're dressed up in the most beautiful outfits, and they sell raffle tickets for the event, and they do charity work all over Arizona and She led this organization for so long, and she was just one of those people that made you want to be better. She made you just feel loved When you're around her. She was just a kind ist Always in a good mood, always with a smile on her face, always encouraging, always asking what she could do for you or for other people. It was just such an impressive life that she led by that example in all of the girls in the foundation. That's really what I knew them for. Kind of took her lead. These were just some of the nicest people I've ever met, and they've suffered such a tough loss. Her Children teach us 21 grand Children, and it was just such a light to people and I don't know if this makes sense to you. But there are times you hear of a passing of someone. And you're surprised at how hard it hit you when it happens because you really hadn't contemplated how much that person meant to you because you didn't see them very often. But this family has made in her daughter and family members that I've met. And the girls in the Cowgirl Historical Foundation have made such an impression on me over the years that when I found out that Julian passed away, I was so sad that I never I didn't get a chance to say goodbye. And it struck me how much That organization is meant to me and how much her leadership has meant in the community. But she was just such a quiet, graceful person. She never asked for accolades. I imagine she'd be very embarrassed. I was even talking about it right now, but just such a good person, and it's such a sad loss for her family. And I'm happy that she's no longer in any pain but obviously saddened for family who are missile, Mr Dearly. And what in true fashion of what she would do? She's asked people instead of sending flowers to the people that knew her asked them to do a good deed. They call it a jeweled deed instead of Julie, like a jeweled D do a good deed give to a cause for first responders are veterans. To do something like that, which I thought was probably the most fitting tribute to her, because that's exactly what she would have wanted is not to be anybody to pay attention to her, but to do something for someone else. So I think that really tells you the story of who who she is, and I was very honored years ago. They asked me if I would narrate. They did a routine at rodeos around the country around the state. And Ah, I narrated this routine for them, and it really was a joy to do, And some people had mentioned that they had heard it and watching them was so impressive and all the practice that they did, and all the charitable things they did was all volunteer work out of just out of the goodness of their hearts. And that heartbeat really was her. She was the the the heartbeat of that organization, so she will be sorely missed by those who loved her. And I just wanted to say a formal goodbye. I wasn't able to to her family, or I was certainly wasn't able to say goodbye to Julie. But what a loss for her family and people that loved her. And such a, You know, a big a big part of the community, So I just wish I could've been there and said good bye in person and what? Ah What a tough loss for that family. It kind of puts things in perspective. I guess for me, I get so caught up in in all of these things that are going on in the world right now, and I'm like you. I get immersed in them. I get immersed in the news of the day. I want schools open and having that battle with Let's get the school's opening businesses and And the elections coming up in all of these kind of either adversarial things, but they're kind of consuming were so I guess I get to have blinders on where I only see what's right in front of me. And something like this happens, and it forces you to open your eyes to the bigger picture, And I think more than anything else that was my thought this morning.

Julie Brady Cowgirl Historical Foundation founding member Veterans Medical Leadership Co Mr Dearly Cowgirls grand Children LDS Church Cub Scout school teacher Arizona Julian
"founding member" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"founding member" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"The entertainment capital of the world Las Vegas and the legendary later Italian bistro on the South Street it's Breakin bread so now let's wine and dine with Dennis said today's special guest from celebrity table thirty Hughes dead as Boko hi I'm Dennis bono and welcome back to another episode of breaking bread with bono from celebrity table thirty the legendary bootlegger Italian bistro in the entertainment capital of the world Las Vegas today this is a very very special because we are talking about one of the great ladies of song and we're gonna go on this journey with this remarkable singer who's still performing today and still is beautiful and elegant as always and one of the founding members of the supreme I'm speaking of none of these legendary it is nice to be here with you to in a while it has been well I'm so thrilled that you're joining us thank you and you know I get a little bit of the background but all you have to do is say merry Wilson all you have to do is say the Supremes and everybody has grown up with those those songs the group left imprinted on our souls and you know I always ask my special guest how on earth did this all start for me for you when and what he'd like to come from a musical family were you born did you grow up with music in church how did this start I have Alzheimer's Alzheimer's he had no money to okay it is amazing because personal use I'm happy you said one of the founding members because a lot of people say the founding members a member of the supreme council for Diana and I are first timers I noticed a Diane Diane and I started singing at the age of being Diane and I were like thirteen and a half hello was fourteen something like that this was the days when they had a record hops because we all of the millennium is whoever they are they won't know what reconcile record house no I do well we we are of that age group and so is amazing because we we started singing not for money not fame not trying to become stars we've started singing because we just enjoyed it and we came on the do what days you no harmony even before we get to to.

Las Vegas Dennis bono Wilson Supremes Alzheimer Diana Diane Diane Hughes
"founding member" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

13:25 min | 1 year ago

"founding member" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Dale ash joins us Dana last one of the founding members of the blaze and blaze TV is joining stashed got a new book out called grace canceled our outrage is destroying our lives ending debate and endangering democracy she should know a little bit about this as she has probably received less grace than anybody in the media and and in quite some time welcome to the program Dana how are you I'm doing well glad to talk with you in a while I know I know good to have you good to have you on the program I know you're from home are you quarantine now self quarantine at home are you an introvert so I am living in paradise right now I can look at it like I'm a hobbit and my hobbit hole and I am I am grateful that I have a home studio and I'm able to do everything from my house so I'm looking right right and you you're going to church digitally and warm just kind of home schooling the kids again sort of going to church is the way is a new one for me that that one took a little bit getting used to air first digital further last Monday became the art there my youngest started kind of work at home stuff tomorrow and I I mean I know that their parents out there that haven't heard talking about your kid clean out the garage I know their parents out there that are doing stuff with their kids on and off I mean we're we don't even know what it is right now the scheduled all the front desk but raising it's quite yeah it is yeah we've it's not we've gone from from Tonya driving the kids around to you know play practice and and this the you know school and that they advance in all the time it's like she was a shuttle service and knitted to nothing like the kids are home and it's like well the who is this creature in the other room I I don't recognize them they're my children it's weird how fast things stopped thank god and I kind of I like that the home of my older went off to college for the evening our freshman year what the all the fun all right so that was that was awful and I'm actually the phone the phone very bad but I'm actually kind of grateful for the time I feel like you know we get a little bit of extra time because I'm sure the world going to ship back into high gear Europe then but I'm you know I'm happy that we can have the gold I just I am with all of them awfulness that happening when the virus and everything I just I feel like we're supposed to kind of take the time together and we are a family and and do stuff and we play every play all kinds of stuff with the games and yeah I do my stuff and then we have the first nine we play hide and go seek acceptance a new version is called hide hi okay and then you're going to find us nope just go hide so your your your book is about grace which is seems really timely especially with there's there's absolutely no grace extended to people anymore there's no grace especially extended to this president everything he does he's ahead of the rest of the world and he'll get bashed for it and then you know when Europe today they're making all kinds of announcements that Europe is closing all of the borders and they're canceling all flights and you can't if you're you're being called home late that's what he did and he was called all kinds of names for it now with the rest the world is doing it they're brilliant they're all brilliant we should be more like them well we work last week yeah what we gotta talk to me a little bit about grace in this in this time period well I and I and and I think that's right it's not just great that that has nothing at all so the ability for society to for gas there is a cancellation of forgiveness and an outright refusal of redemption and I think I mean that I can't believe that work were even doing there during a pandemic I mean that seems to me that that would be the time that you would exhibit I'm afraid your fellow man that you would try to do the best you could to be a good steward and instead of a very plain politics and they're really worried about what communist China as it relates to their responsibility in writing a pandemic but it isn't it I hate when I started writing this book and there were a couple of things that contributed to the idea of it the person was the way my kids reacted to the parkland town hall and the second thing was a norm macdonald interview because he I absolute median of all time I think he's one of the smart media Dr Eric all and he had made a good point that you wouldn't be spending more than bars he was saying okay she did something wrong and she apologized and she can try and where is the forgiveness isn't that kind of how the closing the company wants to apologize anymore because nobody wants to forgive anybody I thought that's exactly right and that it contributes to the whole of tribal invasion because it's not about persuading people to vote early destroying then it's more of an act politics now is more of an exercise in ego then it is actually trying to move the ball down the field and advocate for one issue and sell back that's how the book started and I I get it all they talk about the death of you want how political conversation is incredibly stupid now and of course they're being looked at that and rage mob chapter and I get into the media's role as well so if there there's a lot in it and I usually I didn't want to write it but I ended up writing I if it was something that I think is that I came up with and I regretted it like you know two thirds of the way and by all the promises being tested and I was mad about it I didn't want to write I will I will I actually and a couple of different points consider Jack burning it all down and I wanted to write a ridiculous hello all and shoot it all into the stratosphere and just let the fire burn burning bridges by my path that's all I wanted to go we need a lot at the rate this book all the more yeah it's really it's really hard because you all you want to do is pay people back really all really yeah you give me the thought that was funny I thought that was funny mmhm now you're sitting in a hot speed off the hot seat look what's coming your way it you just want to pay people back but it's not good when you do now you know that as well as I do how great for people can be and how relentlessly gracefully they can be and I I you know and I think that that it can it's a choice I mean to give grace the someone and I think that there are some people who are like minded that think it is I thank them or that it is complicity or it is just you're just going to go along with it you're going to accept that that's not a great this operation simply on merit I know and the people who deserve it the least and in fact when you really need to take it and again tomorrow and but it is a choice and it's not my first choice I mean for crying out loud you know me I mean come on let's not not no no no this is not anybody's first choice right I mean come on it is but it's really not anybody's first choice it is I mean it goes against what I would call the natural man the natural man defends himself the natural man swings back you swing at me my instinct is to swing harder and and you know the natural man is an enemy of his enemy is an enemy of god my we are supposed to rise above that animal exactly where and and and that's it really and some of the way that that that it's a form of what and I have to say that I feel that in terms of First Lady because you know I've asked myself too especially as my kids started getting older my older son now wanted on a constitutional law he did the baking he get a hall all over it and I was actually kind of discouraging him from five hundred and a great parenting but I did not want him to think that yeah the only acceptable way to respond or handle discussion in the country and in culture wise you have to be so it'll work so hard for and be completely emotionless and I believe that any kind of empathy or any kind of you know anything if the volatility graces in a vulnerability and I you know I really was was very cognizant of that and I I I realize if if I get anything I need to model it for him better than expected the political culture care because that's not what happened so at least you know if you see me modeling it for and then you know maybe that's at least something that the FIFA point that you know that and then I'll be happy but I I really think this is a very hard and I know that him and his friends is that really a lot operating for them than it was for me when I was their age and I I really wanted them to have that I know that was highly important for so let's go back in and talk a little bit about the the media and the way they're and doing all of this what do you see coming you know we're we're sitting in a time where the media has so discredited themselves that because everything has been a way to get Donald Trump on our side of the aisle or or less willing to accept that corona virus is a big deal and it it is a big deal it's not that we're all gonna die it's just that we all have to do what we're all supposed to do and you know there was an article where was it maybe in the new York times a camera where it was it was in a lefty paper in it and it was talking about how there will be more conservatives that die from this than liberals don't know if that's true or any way to even prove that however their point was because liberals are taking this seriously but I think this is because of the press if the roles were reversed the exact same thing would be happening in the opposite yeah do you agree or disagree I think that's something that I mean I I think that they have made it the waiter came over and over and then I have I'm not surprised that they've done it by I don't know that and I'm at the point where I don't think I could ever it universally speaking I don't think I could ever recover my respect for so many and that industry I think it's I think it's it's just something that the level of all time and the way that they have banned so gleefully warning and then a medium between what China is is in fifteen they're they're trying to they're engaging in a propaganda war we have people in the media that are actually in them with that I thought headline thank you for mac yeah and they were they were going after the United States Senate no they they will help organizations without calling it the Chinese qualifier Republic of pulling back the Republicans including a pregnant with me yeah well you know what China also bans the World Health Organization over a barrel and that the date for Taiwan from international meetings about a pandemic and and they also had the World Health Organization praising and just at the end of January for everything that they've done really essentially the help desk so I'm really not going to take in the tourism authority on that and it's insane to me there are cracks you should just be watching out for the best interest of the voter are instead actually walking up at the entrance of communist China so it's like about the full the full formalization has happened now I mean what we there there there at where there were there but they've been having this entire time elated and handle it is that you're responsible and cost people to even question the question that they should have to work that it calls into question the recommendations and the guideline and back that's absolutely a responsible you're responsible reporting can get people all Dana thank you so much for being who you are and taking everybody along on the the journey Dennis does the Danish show on the radio of course you can find our online the name of the new book is a grace cancelled might be a good thing to spend and and spend the next few days while you're at home if you are at home yet you will be soon just reading and kind of taking a measure of our lives Dana lash thank you so much Dana lash dot com be back back in a minute.

Dale ash Dana
"founding member" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

13:26 min | 1 year ago

"founding member" Discussed on KTOK

"In jail ash joins us Dana last one of the founding members of the blaze and blaze TV is joining stashed got a new book out called grace canceled how outrageous destroying our lives ending debate and endangering democracy she should know a little bit about this as she has probably received less grace than anybody in the media and and in quite some time welcome to the program Dana how are you I'm doing well glad to talk with you in a while I know I know good to have you good to have you on the program I know you're from home are you quarantine now self quarantine at home are you an introvert so I am living in paradise right now I just look at it like I'm a hobbit and my hobbit hole and I am I am grateful that I have a home studio and I'm able to do everything from my house so I'm looking right right and you you're going to church digitally and warm just kind of home schooling the kids again sort of Italy is a new one for me that that one took a little bit getting used to air first digital further west on day became are there my youngest started kind of work at home stuff tomorrow and I I mean I know that their parents out there that have you were talking about your kid clean out the garage I know their parents out there that are doing that with their kids and that's awesome I mean we're we don't even know what it is right now the scheduled all different okay but raising eight yeah it is yeah we've it's not we've gone from from Tonya driving the kids around to you know play practice and and this you know school and that they advance and all the time it's like she was a shuttle service and mid two to nothing like the kids are home and it's like well the who is this creature in the other room I I don't recognize them they're my children it's weird how fast things stopped Scott and I kind of I like that the home so my older went off to college for the I mean he he the college freshmen who left the all the fun all right so that was that was awful and I'm actually the phone the phone very bad but I'm actually kind of grateful for the time I feel like you know we get a little bit of extra time because I'm sure the world going to ship them back into high gear Europe then but I'm you know I'm happy that we can have the gold I just I am with all of them Aquaman happening where the virus and everything I just I feel like we're both kind of take the time together and the family and and do stuff and we play every play all kinds of stuff with the games and guiding myself and the day and then we have the evening for my we play hide and go seek acceptance a new version is called hide hi okay and then you're going to find us nope just go hide so your your book is about grace which is seems a really timely especially with there's there's absolutely no grace extended to people anymore there's no grace especially extended to this president everything he does he's ahead of the rest of the world and he'll get bashed for it and then you know when Europe today they're making all kinds of announcements that Europe is closing all of the borders and they're canceling all flights and you can't if you're you're being called home late that's what he did and he was called all kinds of names for it now with the rest the world is doing it they're brilliant they're all brilliant we should be more like them well we were last week yeah what we talk to me a little bit about grace in this in this time period well I and I and I think that's right it's not just great that that has nothing at all so the ability for ninety two for gas there is a cancellation of forgiveness and an outright refusal of redemption and I think I mean that I can't believe that work were even doing there during a pandemic I mean that seems to me that that would be the time that you would exhibit the most great your fellow man that you would give us you could give me a good yard and incredibly playing politics and they're really worried about what communist China as it relates to their responsibility in writing a pandemic but it is it if I when I started writing this book there were a couple things that contributed to the idea of it the person was the way my kids reacted to the parkland town hall on the second day was a norm macdonald interview because he actually ever of all time I think he's one of the smart view Dr Eric all and he had made a good point that you were defending Oregon bar he was saying okay she did something wrong and she apologized and she can try and where is the forgiveness isn't that kind of how that goes into the company wants to apologize anymore because nobody wants to forget anybody I thought that's exactly right and that it contributes to the whole of privatization because it's not about persuading people to vote early destroying then it's more of an act politics now is more of an exercise in ego then it is actually trying to move the ball down the field and advocate for one issue and sell back that's how the book started and I I get it all they talk about the death of you want how political complication is incredibly stupid now and of course there's being looks like death and rage mob chapter and I get into the media's role as well so if there there's a lot in it and I usually I didn't want to write it but I ended up writing I if I do something I think is that I came up with and I regretted it like you know two thirds of the way and by all the promises being tested and I was mad about it I didn't want to write I will I will I actually I had a couple of different points consider Jack burning it all down and I wanted to write a ridiculous hello all and should all of the stratosphere and just let the fire burn burning bridges by my path that's all I wanted to go we need a lot the latest book all the more yeah it's really it's really hard because you all you want to do is pay people back really all really yeah you give me the thought that was funny I thought that was funny mmhm now you're sitting in a hot speed up hot seat bowl look what's coming your way it you just want to pay people back but it's not good when you do now you know that as well as I do how great play people can be and how relentlessly gracefully they can be and I I you know and I think that that it could control it any ingresa someone and I think that there are some people who are like minded I think it is our station or that it is complicity or it is just you're just going to go along with it you're going to accept that now graces operation simply on merit I know and the people who deserve it the least and in fact when you really need to take it and again tomorrow and but it is a choice and it's not my first choice I mean for crying out loud you know me I mean come on like life not no no no this is not anybody's first choice right I mean come on but it's really not anybody's first choice it is I mean it goes against what I would call the natural man the natural man defends himself the natural man swings back you swing at me my instinct is to swing harder and and you know the natural man is an enemy of his enemy is an enemy of god my we are supposed to rise above that animal exactly where and and and that's it really and the only way to fix that it's a form of letters that I have to say that I feel that in terms of First Lady because you know I've asked myself to especially at my kids started getting older my older son now wanted on a constitutional law he did the baking here the hall all over it and I was actually kind of discouraging him from a hundred and a great parenting but I did not want him to think that yeah the only acceptable way to respond or handle discussion in the country and in culture wise you have to be settled what so hardcore and be completely emotionless and I believe that any kind of pain or any kind of you know anything if the volatility greater than a vulnerability and I you know I really was was very cognizant of that and he I I realized if I get anything I need to model for him rather than expecting the political culture care because that's never happened at least you know every single model in that form and you know maybe definitely something that the seed planted you know that and then I'll be happy so I I I really hit the driver hard and I know that him and his friends is that really a lot operating for them than it was for me when I was their age and I I really wanted them to have that I know that was really important for so let's go back in and talk a little bit about the the media and the way they're sanderling all of this what do you see coming you know we're we're sitting in a time where the media has so discredited themselves that because everything has been a way to get Donald Trump on our side of the aisle R. or less I'm willing to accept that corona virus is a big deal and it it is a big deal it's not that we're all gonna die it's just that we all have to do what we're all supposed to do and you know there was an article where was it maybe in the New York times I can't remember what it was it was in a lefty paper in it and it was talking about how there will be more conservatives that die from this than liberals don't know if that's true or any way to even prove that however their point was because liberals are taking this seriously but I think this is because of the press if the roles were reversed the exact same thing would be happening in the opposite yeah I agree or disagree I think that's something that I I think that they have made it the way that they are handled and then I had I'm not surprised that they've done it by I don't know that I'm at the point where I don't think I could ever it universally speaking I don't think I ever will cover my respect for so many and that industry I think it's I think it's it's just something that the level of all time and the way that they have been so gleefully pointing at the intermediate between what China is in fifteen they're they're trying to they're engaging in a propaganda war we have people in the media that are actually assisting them with that I thought headline thank you for mac yeah and they were they were going after the United States Senate no they they will help organizations without calling it the tiny core buyer Republic of pulling back the Republicans including the president Whitney yeah well you know what China also bans the World Health Organization over a barrel and the date for Taiwan from international meetings about economics and and they also had the World Health Organization parading and just at the end of January for everything that they've done really especially the help desk though I'm really not going to take and that the source of the forty on that and it can change any that are cracked you should just be watching out for the best interest of the voter are instead actually walking up at the entrance of communist China so it's like the the the full the full formalization has happened now I mean what they're they're at we're there we're there but they've been having this entire time elated and handle it is that you're responsible and it cost people to even question the question that they should have to work that it calls into question the recommendations and the guideline and back that's absolutely a responsible you're responsible according to get people all Dana thank you so much for being who you are and taking everybody along on the the journey Dennis does the Danish show on the radio of course you can find our online the name of the new book is a grace cancelled might be a good thing to spend and and spend the next few days while you're at home if you are at home yet you will be soon just reading and kind of taking a measure of our lives Dana lash thank you so much Dana last dot com be back back in a minute I.

Dana
"founding member" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

13:16 min | 1 year ago

"founding member" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"That was his first phone. Call was all about this and I've heard of say one hundred times since then or more in a narrow changes right and that's the thing about him. He looks very young. He thought these things up and I had a similar kind of childhood in a way you know he was in South Africa. And even you ought to have the Internet Billboards and things like that. So we had to find our knowledge otherwise he was a veracious. Reader was a bit socially isolated. I didn't like most of my friends. Who's young skeptic myself and and built my stuff than in state and you know in my room and read I was a kid in a So-so Dhillon and so he decided early on what he wanted to do and he stuck with it. You know. There's other one that they always told me was. He wanted to change humanity from a fossil fuel consuming society to one sustainable energy and although he did out Tesla he invested in turn it into was the most valuable on motive company. World shocks me. He's literally shocked me He's a difficult guy to be around. Yeah not that. He's a bad person at all quite the opposite. He's just he's just so demanding of people around him because he needs them to be one hundred percent aligned with his vision so in my own case. That's why I parted ways with because I'm a way to Persnickety of a person and two independent So decided that early on For better for worse That if you go back in time I really truly believe in terms of industrialists the turn of last century. The turn of the twentieth century up particularly Detroit was it was a very fundamental a formative period. If you look at Henry Ford every Ford despite being a real hardcore rightwing bastard from all accounts at the sort of socialist core abandoned. Where he he wanted to change. The way of the Industrial Revolution was going to make it more accessible the average person so he created both living wage among zone. Staff of the mass production created the auto bill which would free the average Average citizen Mobility Wright. Very sort of noble goals Money that was good but he was. He was really the guy. I think. Transform the modern industrial era yet in a very positive way. And if you go back to or to You Know Louise and we beat the Germans high opinion. I need some strategic blunders. Orders of magnitude. That were horrible The real reason we beat them with a simple mass production. The German weapons of war were superior in almost every way but very inferior in number in sometimes very A cantankerous to maintain and so forth. And so you know. We put out ten German tanks for everyone of their their panzers. Sheer numbers tillable off so You know without Henry Ford the desolation we would not have had the astro capacity. Do we did. Most people. Don't realize that you know in World War. Two the government. Us GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION FOR CONSUMER GOODS and turn it all into war production. Yeah that's almost unthinkable. Today it is just it's a it's a reality. It's hard to believe but to really reverse the course of history that it was going you know this is what happened. And so so I really credit Henry Ford ironically with the saving the world in that sense and I see that as a need your positive factor so if you go back to earlier than that One of my favorite historical figures as Christopher Columbus yet Even though you knew was swear wasn't gonNA fall off the edge of it if you can imagine getting on a boat in. I've got across the Atlantic about several times. That's a long journey in get on a sailing ship and it is go where the winds take you basically in heavy faith that there's something over there that you'll run into an almost running out of food by the time you get there that that that that embodies even spirit right so so those are those are some of the folks and then of course you know the Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. I actually don't bust personally. Those guys same thing I mean. There's a spirit of exploration standing on the move being the first humans to step off the surface of the earth. You know I can't wait the next what I think will be. The most famous person in human history will be the first human born off of the Earth whether it be Luna Marzano. Now that'll happen. That goes back to you on. I think that's really where where he's going. He's now talking about millions of people to Mars yet. You know the early days used to talking about Billy rockets ourselves you know. We had a cell with that let alone. The target Mars basis needs to bring me Mars base At somebody doing in Phila- put that away. That's talking about aliens you that right now. The you know so so I go. I think the future is very interesting to see in our lifetime. How far off do you think that? Is someone being born on Mars? Oh I think it's very very much in the possibility of my lifetime. Certainly you're younger than me. I think it's even more likely your lifeblood. We do live at a fascinating time. You mentioned Columbus setting off in the ship if we were looking back on history. What is most applicable to today? Yes that spirit of adventure a spirit of of discovery in now that. That's the one thing that's always kept humanity moving ego back Depending on your view of how humanity originated But if you believe archaeology which I do you know humanity the whole sapiens emerged out of African spread. And that's Fred was simply probably to get away from your enemy But more likely it is. Carl Sagan would save the search for more fertile hunting grounds over the hill in It's that spread that there's a part of our society now that the battle was reading yesterday where so. Harvard professor thinks the best way to deal with global warming exterminate entity A yeah exactly. I don't even know how to address that so It any rate is probably the most evil thought I've ever had in my life put into my head. You know But the expansion humanities what I think brings the magic to us and Liza species we are human and we are we are wanderers. We are discoverers in a man. If we're not doing that I don't think we're alive. I just don't think we're alive. It would do do dial this planet if we don't so thinking about seeing things that others don't you mentioned you didn't see it in Eli to begin with. What did you Miss There? And then has that changed how you view new opportunities were. GonNa get into a minute about how you've gone about building certain team so I'm wondering how that pattern recognition changed over time. It's impossible to know how many billions of dollars stepped over my lifetime. I realized several of them already. But you know again. I've already established money's not the outcome for me so I guess it's okay by definition So with ally was interested in in this has been true of almost everybody I met it would be considered quote unquote. Famous includes people like Carl Sagan in some myrlie bosses who helped men on the Moon Buzz Aldrin for example Muslims. Different him. You know post event but when you meet these people And you don't know any better. They see very ordinary. There's nothing sort of magical in fact you Lon. When he first called me I thought he was a lunatic. To be honest you know the way he was talking yet so on. It wasn't tell started listening to. I said okay this guy. He's got some real ideas lately. Seem quite different than mine but the difference was he had money and I always looked at at the money again is a reflection of value creation. So so it's not that I respected money per say but I respected what it represented yet so was more than happy to listen to this net. Now that being said I've met the number of people who've made a lot of money who were opposed right in and you wouldn't necessarily want to let them make a judgment on anything distracted your life but you very smart doubt about that and You know as we talked I liked the most about him with sense of humor. And most people don't get a sense of humor I think it was very dries. Very sort of a nerd. Ish I guess if you will but that was one of the things I always liked about him in we got along well with his ideas were big and I and I love and I still do. Love the ideas and it takes me probably a lot longer to warm up to them than he did but he is. We stylish already. He's thinking about most of his life. So so but I just didn't see the guys transformative. I just did a so al. He's the guy that made a lot of money in the Internet. And he wants to do all these things. And ideally space action. Because I go back to. That success thing wasn't really joined what I was. I was really passionate about sending people Martin. I'm still not. It's just not my thing. I I think it's great. This is not what I WANNA do yet so I felt like I owed it. Do you want to not take on? The bus. Could be filled by somebody else. That could really help them. So I done by part by part was very early part where I You know brought in was the teacher you know taught him about these things and Introduced the people. Because that's what I do good in life and a Lotta people had the usually a good judgement of. Who's the right fit for him? And so on so I open the initial space x team together. You get it awesome so that that was kind of my talent yet also didn't think the SPACEX would succeed. I really did. I didn't see some historical things that had to happen for him to succeed on that. So this is really the other part of success that you have to really think about as I call it being prepared. Laki nuanced case. The shuttle retirement was nothing anywhere. Any of US saw it reality. Space X was having a real hard time getting by without The money that came from asa to help build a replacement for the shuttle which became the Falcon Nine Dragon. Which is now the workers and so on so so that was a good deal for taxpayers. Because it was a three quarters of a billion dollars to do that whereas has been trying to replace the shuttle. They spent some somewhere north of fifty billion dollars still. Don't have it so so you know from from attack reportedly was a good deal but I could see that it was impossible from you know that he would be that lucky right and so had. I know that I probably would have stayed around longer because I could actually see building something added use. They sex is actually ever billy anything. I thought it was going to be a paper exercise. Which is precisely why I left. Is I just thought okay? This is going to be a paper. Exercise Room Spend X. Amount was money's. GonNa get tired of it he's GonNa move on. That's where I was wrong. This guy never ever gives up he. He takes determination. Or racer multiplies hundred. We never ever give out the race. keep cranking on it as hard as you can never crack. Open a beer. Ads know you just you go and go until you can't go anymore. That's the auditing. He's he does at states so you've been involved with building some world class team so I'm interested. What are you looking for in early days when you're first starting to build out that team well great question I think I will tell you. Advanced to the answering. My criteria changed over time as I've learned in a to in the early days. Look for people who thought with high performers and I. You really have two axes that you're looking at performance entrust.

Henry Ford Carl Sagan Us Billy Dhillon Atlantic South Africa Tesla Detroit Christopher Columbus Neil Armstrong GOVERNMENT Buzz Aldrin Luna Marzano Wright Louise SPACEX Harvard
"founding member" Discussed on What's Good Games

What's Good Games

04:33 min | 3 years ago

"founding member" Discussed on What's Good Games

"Her time with Jade has helped to build great teams and our project underway at motive. And other studios continue unchanged were appreciative of all of her efforts. And we wish Jade all the best. She moves onto her next adventures. We are driving greater creativity to everything we do, of course EA studios. Go. Okay. So this is some interesting news. I I think it's awesome. That another p mail is taking Jade spot because we need more females in leadership roles in gamed of so that's great. That's good news. This having Jade leave is kind of a head scratcher because she was overseeing I believe. The Star Wars project that massive was working on. Right. I don't know if she was the internet. I'm pretty sure she was motives Montreal sturdily currently has an open world game in the works. Maybe I'm confusing her with I was like that doesn't sound right, then maybe confusing her with the thing that Amy was working on Amy was the one who is working on the Star Wars game. The cook can't no the visceral. Yeah. Here we go. The project would not have a title or release Wenda was pitched by three developers. Raises super-secret? So Raymond founded e motive in two thousand fifteen after departing Ubisoft with initial goal focusing on new IP in close collaboration with bio air. It's projects however was to work with this real and Amy headings cancelled Starsky. See, maybe that's yeah. See I thought that that's what she was working on. Yeah. But it's crazy. She hasn't issued a statement yet. But guess what they cancelled that project. Maybe she also was working on something else would which would make sense. But they just as history for people who maybe aren't familiar with Jade, Raymond is. And why she's important while we're talking about her? She was of course, the founding member of Ubisoft Toronto she left the company in two thousand fourteen after ten years there. Choose a producer on the original assassin's cream in later, an executive producer for assassin's creed to along with Tom Clancy's, splinter cell, blacklist and watchdogs. And it's been a long time that we got a splinter. So that was one of the rumor things we thought you'd be self was going to talk about it. He three this year, and then they didn't fun game. Yeah. I mean, we're definitely do for some splinter cell. So then she left Ubisoft to and founded as motive Montreal and lead development on the campaign for Star Wars battlefront two that's what I'm thinking of. I heard this past ally that motives. Israel, certainly currently has an open world game in the works. So. She worked on Star Wars. She's was working in an open world game. What she's doing? Now, we don't know TVD. It would be really interesting to see generally, you don't see studio leaders leave in the middle of a project unless the project may be isn't going. Well, do you think that that's what's happening? Try get on this bad way. If there's avenue Jason's. Yes. Israel woke typically, if it's an amicable leave they'll put out a statement saying I'm excited to move forward and move on do projects Android time here, blah, blah, blah. And I'm excited little, but she hasn't issued anything at least as right now, which is Thursday, the twenty fifth of October two day earlier this week earlier this thing we checked her. We checked or socials does she have leads? Well, I mean, I've never actually followed her any of these things. So I don't actually know I'm going to Google Jade, Raymond statement rate now. Oh, heck, I'm gonna all I got nothing. No statement. No. So, you know, they didn't even like put a thing in there from her which usually might do. Yeah. Amy didn't make a statement when she left either we all knew that. Probably was not amicable didn't seem to great now. So if we're going off that this would also doesn't seem super great. Yeah. That's our basis. So now, why was their reason she decided to insert said no says? With this change. She is decided to leave EA what change. That's I'm reading the statement again, easy is bringing more creative games. Okay. So this is focused on bringing more creative new games and content to players and talks about how Laura and her team have taken several steps internally to better support our game makers in his pursuits such as expanding Smith Ryan's per folio police additional studios including motive, and then they talk about some mantha cheaply, experienced gamemaker. They don't with this chance..

Jade Amy Ubisoft Raymond Starsky Israel EA studios Tom Clancy Montreal Ubisoft Toronto Wenda Google producer Laura executive producer Jason Smith Ryan founding member twenty fifth