35 Burst results for "Founding Director"

Violent crime keeps rising in Houston. Could COVID be the reason why?

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:29 min | Last week

Violent crime keeps rising in Houston. Could COVID be the reason why?

"A streak of violence in houston continued overnight. Ktar k tv reports. Three people were killed and two injured and four separate shootings in the area last night that follows a deadly domestic incident in western. Houston that left. Five people shot and at least two dead houston's murder rate and other types of crimes have been rising in recent months as the pandemic continues to stress. Nearly every part of many people's lives well houston's murder rate is higher than it's been in a decade and here in harris county the murder rate is also a thirty percent since this time last year. Our own brenda boundaries has more on. How much of a role. The pandemic and other factors play into that increase in violent crime logo. Police are reporting sharp rises in violent crime including domestic violence murder and assault. Dr howard henderson is the founding director. Just as research at texas southern university. He's says the pandemic has increased the level of inequality between those who can afford to stay home and those who can't with limited funds limited resources and no positive outlets a win the the day on a break and so the frustration. Vang self out particularly in domestic violence around this country and particularly them henderson matters the pandemic and a reason increasing calls to defend the police make it difficult to predict what is to come. He's as one solution for. Police is to be stationed at high violence hotspots instead of low crime areas which drained resources houston police. Chief recently announced a plan to target crime hotspots with additional officers.

Ktar K Houston Dr Howard Henderson Harris County Texas Southern University Vang Henderson
Camille Selvon Abrahams on the animation industry during COVID

Revision Path

03:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Camille Selvon Abrahams on the animation industry during COVID

"I am also the founding director glenn emissions do so we are continuing work work from home and i think that's what is happening a lot with animation studios. That's what i'm hearing from my international friends. Who are doing these sort of things similar to what we are doing that. We are working from holes. And i think animators maybe creative on a whole we kind of okay with that. You know we we at least from me my experience being anonymous you enjoy that into law saying you enjoy going in yourself. So working from hall is not a big deal for us so a lot of will now actually is going on from whom we doing. A lot of commercial syllabi actually. Doing outsourcing from international students from various small jobs that we actually functioning. So it's a good thing for us. We were able to adopt nice earlier on in the year. I talked to a guy are is. He has a animation studio in tokyo and he was sort of saying pretty much the same thing like they've been working from home some of them do come into the office. I think when. I talked to him. He was in the office. They were only him in like one other person but yes seems like for animation. It seems like that's actually preferable because it's so detail oriented. Yes yes actually works. I spoke to one of the big agencies that the sofa toon boom animation in canada and they said because of this shift companies are now thinking. Well okay we just continue like that. In covert or no covert will king from whole final mission and game and game. It's looking for the industry. No you founded full circle. Animation studio like several several years ago. How has the company really changed over the years quite a bit. When i returned from london i studied that. Goldsmiths mincy on i. I made a decision to come back to the caribbean. That was a big step because trinidad and tobago. We are oil and gas country. That's what economy is based on me coming back and windy creative digital type correa. Abviously was a challenge. Because that's not what we are accustomed to so coming back with. Difficulty took about previous to kind of get on my feet as far as the studio on after the ten ta gratin business now his name is jason lindsey who had a very strong business background so without sort of thumb partnership where you have decreased if any business it really really supported the studio from becoming micro stew into a relatively successful outsourcing to handy caribbean. So that's kind of how it's moved and now we are. We are considered one of the outsourcing studios in the caribbean. We've outsourced with pro. Hbo's of our. Will you know you see on each be on cotton. We've we actually have a one hundred and international productions

Glenn Emissions Goldsmiths Mincy Tokyo Hall Jason Lindsey Caribbean Tobago Correa Trinidad Canada London HBO
Harris on taking a COVID-19 vaccine: 'If Trump tells us to take it, I won't'

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:59 min | Last month

Harris on taking a COVID-19 vaccine: 'If Trump tells us to take it, I won't'

"If the doctors tell us that we should take it, I'll be the first in line to take it absolutely. But if Donald Trump tells us I should take that we should take it. I'm not taking it. WanNa. Talk about that exact moment in tonight's debate with one of the experts we turn to often doctor Irwin redlener is with US tonight pediatrics physician senior research scholar at Columbia. University's Earth Institute also happens to be the founding director of Colombia's National Center for Disaster Preparedness and Doc. It's just anecdotal but I swear she spoke for a lot of Americans tonight who don't WanNa see vaccine rushed to market for political reasons to match a date on the calendar twenty six days from now. We're fighting a growing anti vaccine movement in this country aided and abetted by the Russians on social media. It's a dicey time to get the public behind anything in a politicized pandemic. Is there reason to what she said tonight that people should doubt something pushed by the President and wait for something? That's maybe Endorsed by Dr, Fauci. Well Bryan that you're. You're absolutely right and I think the absolutely and the words that were spoken by Senator Harris were absolutely shared by undoubtedly many many Americans you know. Be. Committing twenty thousand public lies or allies over the last few years and expect people to believe you. This is a classic. You know the boy who cried wolf situation and I don't remember any time at least in my life where a President United States of either party was so dishonest and so disbelieved that somebody a US senator say. I'm not going to even begin to believe the President United States I'm going to wait for the scientists to tell me what I should be doing. So this is this is a particularly poignant moment in presidential messaging and how much it's going to matter who is giving the message Brian. Let's talk about the president of the United States and to keep you from having to say it I, know he is not your patient nor have you examined him but we know something about the meds. He is on he said tonight that he chose the medical discipline that was his own treatment. He said tonight's he's going to find a way to get his treatment for free to those who need it probably physically implausible Do you believe that the meds he's on have a way of suppressing actual illness things like temperature and changing behavior Yes Brandon. These are experimental meds and an experimental regiment that he's on. It's preposterous to think thin. The general public are a few people in the general public would be able to get the kind of care and demand the kind of care that the president did. So that's completely out of the question why he felt it necessary to say that I don't know but it's it's absolutely out of the question Brian it the other things so much about this whole story over the last week or so. That's that's really shaking has I had I can't tell you how many phone calls after many doctors without examining the president watched him climb up the stairs after getting out of the helicopter and going up to the balcony of the white. House and he got to the top of the SEPTA? He was gasping for breath he looked terrible I was inundated with calls and we all were sort of talking about this. So we don't know we don't understand and we don't believe that it's actually head-spinning here but. To say that anybody is going to be able to get what he got is out of the question nor should people nor should people get exactly what he? We don't know these are experimental drugs Brian.

President Trump President United States Brian Donald Trump Wanna Irwin Redlener Senator Harris Bryan Septa Earth Institute Columbia Fauci Senior Research Scholar United States Senator Founding Director Colombia House Wolf
A mother’s work: Women’s careers impacted by pandemic

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

06:37 min | Last month

A mother’s work: Women’s careers impacted by pandemic

"Rita Braver has been talking to working mothers who say they're in a particularly stressful bind for Clara Vasquez. Ah home health aid in the farming town of Sunnyside, Washington. Pandemic has created a new level of anxiety. I'm here Take care of people that need me who can take care of my son. I have She and her husband, Augustine, a long haul truck driver barely make ends meet with school now online they can't afford to regular sitter for seven year old Kevin And must rely on a patchwork of friends and family and one of the things that my son always stays when he goes to bed, it who's gonna want me? You were and see cats sleep because he doesn't know where he's going to be. It's happening to me because there's a cz word. I just said I'm just glad to see you as his name so I could draw it well. She fears he's falling behind in his schoolwork and yearns to be home to help financially. How hard would it be for you if you had to stop working? I just like to put more into debt, and I just can't afford to leave my job because if I do remember Mothers are in an impossible situation. They're doing their own job, their child care workers job and their Children's teachersjobs. Professor Jones see Williams is founding director of the Center for Work Life Law at the University of California's Hastings College of the Law. What's your call volume like now during the pandemic versus what it is in normal times. Absolutely unbelievable. We've had a 250% increase in people calling us Washington did provide some early relief for families. But many people were ineligible and most of that money has already run out. And while plenty of fathers are struggling A new study shows that women are almost three times more likely than men not to be working due to child care demands because of the pandemic. 57% of Mom's now report, depression and anxiety, compared to only third of Dad's 80% of Mothers now say they're doing most or all of the housework and homeschooling. It's almost like people were just holding it together. And the whole infrastructure is crumbling. Well, you know, we were already in a crazy situation in the United States. I mean, we're the on ly industrialized nation with no paid parental leave. It was a Rube Goldberg machine from the beginning, and it just broke. You may have seen the funny images of multi tasking moms. But Williams says many mothers are facing serious indifference or even hostility from employers. All of them are feeling really, really embattled right now. I was working for a fortune 50 institution. I was working as one of the leadership in that organization. Cyprus Security Department. But it all collapsed. In March, Daniel Mia's company told everyone to work from home because of covert 19. Her baby sitter could not come to the house her husband helped but has a high pressure job, too. Mia had most of the responsibility for baby Logan. How did the company react toward this circumstance that you're in? I worked in a primarily male dominated environment. You know, I started noticing comments here and there that suggested people we're not comfortable with it having the baby on a call with me, or like bringing him onto a conference line. Would make people uncomfortable. So I'm comfortable because they didn't like seeing a baby in a work environment. I just kind of received veiled questions like you know, one does he eat early this year ever sleep, and I also felt bad because I wasn't dedicating the same amount of attention and care that normally would to the staff. It's the caller to the meeting because I was preoccupied with him. It got it got tricky, very quickly. Soon she found herself left out of key meetings. And actually, someone made that comment to me of we're just not gonna invite you because you're off doing mommy duty. Did you ever talk to superiors in the company and say Look, I'm struggling here. Can you give me some relief? I did, and the response was You have to do these things or your career's in jeopardy. And that to me felt like a threat. She finally resigned. But you couldn't struggle anymore. And that's what kills me. Truly. This was a job that I had worked for. For 10 years minimum. Busted my butt to get there. I was better. I was really angry. Mia was able to find a new family friendly job at a similar salary, but not everyone is so lucky. I'm still unemployed. Been a few months and I've been looking every single week. The San Diego insurance company where we saw the Rios was an account exec switched a work at home just as her one and four year old pre school shut down. Her husband's an essential worker gone all day. She says. Her manager immediately laid down the law. He right away would say I do not want to hear. Kids on client calls didn't want to hear that. Anyone here? I'm on client calls or C. M. Wright. He would just question you know my availability, which I didn't understand because I was available all the time. She says a male colleague with Children was treated differently. But no matter how hard she tried, she says her boss would not let up. And I said, What else do you want me to do? Do you want me to lock my one year old in a room on his own? And he just responded. Fear up. So figure it out, and I was just crying on my way. So I, um Reported. The discrimination Tio HR. I'm via email. And a week later. They let me go. And I believe it is 100% retaliation for bringing this up because there's I've was doing my job, so

Daniel Mia Williams Rita Braver Sunnyside Rube Goldberg Clara Vasquez Washington Augustine United States Kevin DAD Cyprus Security Department Center For Work Life Law Founding Director Professor Jones Hastings College C. M. Wright
Berlin Film Festival Switching to Gender Neutral Acting Awards in 2021

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:11 min | 3 months ago

Berlin Film Festival Switching to Gender Neutral Acting Awards in 2021

"Organizers of the Berlin International Film Festival say they're going to stop awarding separate acting prizes to men and women beginning next year, Berlin al organizer said today the performance awards will be defined in a general neutral way at next year's festival. Organizers say the prizes for best actor and best actress will be replaced with a silver bear for best leading performance and silver Bear for best supporting performance. At the same time, the Alford Bauer prize, named after its founding director, is going to be permanently retired. Prize was suspended this year due to revelations about buyers role in the Nazi movie making

Berlin International Film Fest Prize Berlin Founding Director
"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

"Or has the conversation moved enough? That people feel Oh. I know what that really means, even if they don't know exactly what they're really means their perception. Is that yeah, I know it doesn't mean fully that, so that's do we get a tipping point where that pushes that too far? We don't know and that's. That's why you need polling. Can you tell us how your polls have gauged the effect of the pandemic on the next elections, and have you been able to test that at all? About predicting what's going to happen in that? Versus, what we actually saw in terms of moving the needle. trump got an initial bump in his approval rating in March. Because there's this rally affect, people want to be able to rally around the leader. Again this goes back to. When when there's an attack on us, and this pandemic is an attack on our security and our safety, and you want a strong leader to be able to do that. With interesting was why he got a bump got nowhere near the bump that our state governors got that other foreign leaders got in their own countries, because the opinion about trump is baked in. So what we found is there's a lot of polling out there that said. Oh older people who are more susceptible to the virus turning against trump because of his response to covid what I when I looked at the point, well known th these these differences existed before copen. What they're only doing is reinforcing. What people already thought about President trump whether you like them or dislike them. It had a reinforcing effect. Let's talk about some of the more detail aspects of pandemic and see if you've pulled for it for example, the opening of the economy versus the health risks and potential for a bump and and hospitals having more issues. Have you tested those points? Yeah, we get by about two to one margin. People are more concerned about opening too quickly because of the health impact, and they are concerned about opening too slowly because of the economic impact and that's. Pretty stable throughout this last interesting is that nationwide or is that state by state? That's nationwide. You know the impression. I think a lot of us have is that funding can affect a pulse outcome. Does it matter WHO's paying for the poll. I guess it does I mean we don't do paid poll so? It's not so much that they biased their polls. That but when you're dealing with a client, it actually comes out and the and the questions that you ask the questions that you choose not to ask. That is where I tend to see. The bias is not in the in the results themselves, but in let's avoid. This part of the issue seems to be the bigger bias. That's interesting that you said you. You don't charge for your polling so. How'd does mammoth university get its funding for this? So, mom at the university is doing this as a public service. This is one of the areas. We have a number of other research institutes. Something called the Urban Coast Institute for example that does research on the urban environment, the interaction of public policy and science. And we do that in order to take the expertise that we have inside the university and share it outside the university. So this is one of the things that mom does now. Obviously, it also helps to give monmouth..

Urban Coast Institute monmouth President
"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

05:20 min | 4 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

"When the people who actually vote are GONNA be a little up in the air. We'll be right back. On medicine, we're still practicing. Joined Dr Steven Back and Bill Kurtis, for real conversations with the medical professionals who have their finger on the pulse of healthcare in the modern world available on all your favorite pod casting platforms produced by KIRK CO media. Asia. The we're back with Patrick. Marine Monmouth University polling, institute and Ed Larson Jane.

Dr Steven Back Ed Larson Jane Bill Kurtis Marine Monmouth University Patrick Asia
"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

04:29 min | 4 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on Politics: Meet Me in the Middle

"Was that I was calling and talking to voters in Hawaii and Michigan and Wisconsin and Arkansas, and a whole post of interesting places, and asking them questions, and I realized I was pretty good at that. And I went to Rutgers University where they had one of the foremost state level polls at the time, the Eagleton poll, which started in nineteen, seventy one. And I walk over there one day and just said I'm interested in practice. Politics I'm interested in this stuff. When I read it in the academic literature got anything for me to do. And they said Yeah. We got this little project. We just need some help with if you want to do it. And that was it from that point on, and I wasn't going I was not going to be a political science professor. Who's going to be a pollster? What happened was as I progressed as upholster that experience that I had as an interviewer, talking to people understanding the interaction that you have when you're trying to get people to tell you. Their honest opinion informed me much more than any of the academic work in many ways that I did along the way how? How could you tell at the time, Patrick that you getting an honest opinion as opposed to the opinion. They thought they should give you. How do you create control for people that are not actually giving you honest dancers? When you realize that you're getting kind of load from someone because they're telling you what they think, you should be hearing rather than what they're thinking that the yeah, that's social desirability bias is important. That's one of the things that I said. You really need to develop an ear to understand that you know a a question that you ask may not be as. Innocuous as as you think I'll give you an example from poll that we just released which is before covert hit? Were you planning to take a trip for summer? Vacation seems innocuous right, yes, or no answer so we got a number sixty three percent that was in line with numbers that we had gotten from past years, and of course we ask follow up questions..

Rutgers University Eagleton Hawaii professor Wisconsin Michigan Patrick Arkansas
CBS Contributor Says White People Need To ‘Stop Denying Their Racism’

Jim Bohannon

01:21 min | 6 months ago

CBS Contributor Says White People Need To ‘Stop Denying Their Racism’

"Contributor YVR M. X. kendi said Friday that white people need to stop denying their racism in order to end white privilege it is critical for white people for people in general to stop denying their racist ideas to stop denying the ways in which policies have benefited them to stop denying their racism the heart beat of racism racism itself is the Nile and the sound of that heart beat is I am not a racist he said in early may the people protesting against the corona virus stay at home order working parable to slave owners who said that they also fought for individual freedom slave owners desire to state that wholly secured their individual freedom to enslave not to mention their freedom to disenfranchise exploited and impoverished also to demean and silence and kill the demeaned so apparently that's what anybody who is doing when they protest the growing virus that's what how he interpreted it by the way he is the founding director of the anti research and policy center at American University another fine Catholic University that is just keeping the principles of Jesus Christ alive

Yvr M. X. Kendi Founding Director American University Catholic University
The resonance of racial violence across generations

NBC Meet the Press

02:05 min | 6 months ago

The resonance of racial violence across generations

"President John. F Kennedy gave his nationally televised address civil rights. He said one hundred years of delay had passed since Abraham. Lincoln freed the slaves and that black Americans. Still we're not free. Confronted merrily with a moral issue. It is old as the scriptures, and it is clear the American constitution. That was fifty seven years ago this week. Generations have passed since and full equality has not been achieved this morning. We're GONNA bring together two generations in this fight for equal rights. lani bunches the secretary of the Smithsonian Story and the founding director of the national. Museum of African American history and culture here in Washington and Lisa Garza is one of the three women who founded the black lives. Matter Movement. Welcome to both of you, Lonnie Bunch I'll get to you in a moment. Want to begin with Lisa Garza. Let me start with this. The symbolic painting of Sixteenth Street with the yellow pain of black lives matter. And I know it's symbolism. It was on the front page of the so many newspapers on Saturday. I'm curious. From a Hashtag and twenty thirteen to now majority of Americans multiracial coalition. Rallying around a symbol right now, what does this mean and how do you take this from symbol to policy? I think what this. Is that. Lives. Matter is not just a radical a year. And frankly when we look at. A lot of consensus in the consensus is that it is time. In us our money in our resources in a fully different. At the end of the day Tuck. Everyone can agree that we don't have that. We need to look well and that we are using policing. In a way that far exceed certain. From

Lisa Garza Matter Movement F Kennedy President John Museum Of African American Lincoln Abraham Founding Director Secretary Washington
Kathryn Sophia Belle

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

08:30 min | 8 months ago

Kathryn Sophia Belle

"I'm India Lorrie Wilmot. And you're listening to the PODCAST TALKING. Journeys out belonging to blackness. Joining us today is Dr Catherine Sophia Bell. Catherine is associate professor of philosophy at Penn State with research and teaching interests in African American Afrikaner Philosophy African American Studies African Diaspora studies lack feminist philosophy and critical philosophy of race. She's an author. Co Founding Editor of the Journal Critical Philosophy of race a certified Yoga instructor in founding director in owner of La Belle. Be Coaching which Offers Executive Academic coaching workshops and retreats for administrators faculty and Graduate Students. Catherine also offers services specifically under happily unmarried and erotic empowerment that provide individual and Week Group. Coaching workshops and retreats designed to support the social emotional and physical wellbeing of her clients. Thank you for having me Katherine. Let me tell you. I just love the way. You're able to demonstrate for so many folks out there. How one in academic can be multifaceted in dynamic right. Don't sit at a desk. Let's read in on this thing right and then also to how as an African descended person and woman how he can truly embrace and live in your truth when it comes to your personal relationships and partnerships and even with yourself as it is the case with happily unmarried and then I love this and open to the sixty nine ways to embrace ecstasy. Yeah I mean there's more but sixty nine such a fun number and then I'm also my son. Signed his cancer and sign kind of looks like a sixty nine so I like playing with things like Bat. I love that. And so all of this falls under your business tagline philosophical purposeful and practical approaches to La Shelby. The good life. All of that fantastic. I'm so excited to have you here. Because you are such a brilliant scholar and you also have this really great. Entrepreneurial Mindset as well. I think our audience here will just enjoy listening to your journey as to how you've been able to combine these two passions. It seems to me I love it will fall right into our first segment. If you don't mind because I have so many different kinds of questions and thoughts act one call to adventure so for our listening audience. Who may not know you changed your last name from Gyns. Yes to bell and bell spelled with an extra e honor your maternal grandmother and and as I understand your maternal grandmother named herself. And Yeah and you see this active. Changing your name as a way to honor that power and legacies. Yes well first let me say I absolutely love my name. I mean every time I see it written down Catherine Sophia Bell like I get excited at the sight of my own name. So in terms of motivations oftentimes our names are patrilineal right. So many not necessarily all women are given the name of your father in. May Take on the name of their husband and that was my experience. So my initial given name was Catherine Theresa Johnson. My mother wanted the name Catherine after her mother my father wanted to name you theresa and then Johnson was his name. So that was my maiden name I got married in. Nineteen Ninety nine at the age of twenty one between my first and second semesters in Grad School and at that point I changed my last name to guidelines which was the name of the former husband I got legally divorced in twenty seventeen and I'm now berry happily unmarried. And rather than returning somebody that patrilineal name I mate name. I decided to go with a match. Lineal named honor my maternal grandmother so her initial given name was Katherine Smallwood. Which was my great grandmother's last name. Smallwood. But by the time she got the high school she changed her name's Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Now I have no idea how she went about changing it or even if she went through some legal process to do that but my mother got me a copy of her high school yearbook class of Nineteen Fifty two where in that yearbook so by the time. She got her senior in high school. Her name is listed as Catherine Bell. And so there's something really powerful to me about this black woman in the nineteen young black woman in the nineteen fifties by her senior in high school Made her name Kathryn Bell. And that's the name that she's recognized as you know later in life she. She went on to model. She showed up in jet magazine a few times and her name is Catherine Bell knows faces as well. You know that was just a powerful legacy to me and it was important Tap into in connect to that legacy empower naming oneself Have a match lineal name as hopes to patrilineal name. I'm so I changed my name Catherine. I actually dropped the middle name. Interestingly my mother when I was changing my last name she was like. Oh well I never really liked Teresa anyway. That was your father's toys. That would choice so she got a chance to rename me. My Middle Name Sophia. She recommended because she said you're Lhasa. In philosophy us so you can be Sophia. My Mother's middle initial is S. My two daughters have the middle initial s so we were able to share that s middle initial further sophia in the bell It's still sounds the same as the way. My maternal grandmother founded by added the extra e. Just a little bit of self friendship over the meaning of beauty. I think evidence that there was so much thoughtfulness and care. Yeah even your process to say okay. How do I go about changing my name because even when we go through relationships such as marriage? And you're going through the divorce there is a lot of conscious thought around. Do People keep their names Ryan or even when you're getting married forget about even when you're getting divorced but like when you're getting married some people choose to keep their name drop the name in my case I hyphenated. I've even attended a wedding where the husband and the wife decided to both hyphenate their names just so that it would on paper as well as the presentation of this new joined. Family Union Unit. That it wasn't that someone was giving up but they were just more so adding naming oneself is so powerful. I mean I can't help but to even reflect on scene in routes where yes lavar. Burton is as as Coon to Kim. Tae Is being whipped. He ends. It's you know this holder of active submission. That's trying to happen with him being beaten because he refused the naming Tober right and he's like Kota Day trying to be broken. Think about that example. I also think about the example with Muhammed Ali. Right where he's like. You know. Say My name. Say My name right before the destiny's child came out with it up. You know what I mean and so yeah. I'm not GonNa say that that you know the cultural model my mind that I figured I'd put that out there. Once I said it I was like okay. This is GonNa be the connection that comes up celebrities name that too. But that's not quite what I have in mind right. There is something and I think we have more examples of men doing that than or the example of men don't eat more celebrated than examples of women during that but definitely for me like I look forward to dropping the maiden name when I took on the Mary name but I also very much look forward to dropping the Mary name and renaming my for me. It was another beginning for me. Like who am I in this new chapter this new iteration of our life? And how can this naming process a reflection of that kind of a launching point for me for that? So that's been beautiful. Young kids is all about identity. And the all these different phases and stages just you know what does our about us and then our names judge. We're judged by our names whether we're applying for different jobs or positions. I mean their scores and You know them very well. Also but their scores of research studies and the employment field that talked about racial bias and discrimination based on candidates nate. I think that's a fantastic way to pay homage to her legacy. Thank you

Dr Catherine Sophia Bell African American Afrikaner Phi Catherine Theresa Johnson Lorrie Wilmot Katherine Smallwood Katherine Bell Kathryn Bell Associate Professor Of Philoso India Journal Critical Philosophy Co Founding Editor Executive Week Group La Belle La Shelby Lhasa Katherine L. B. E. L. L. Muhammed Ali
"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 9 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For the times founding director of the initiative on communication and sustainability at the earth institute and co author of weather an illustrated history from cloud atlases to climate change Andy thanks for joining us welcome back to W. and I say it's it's great to be here so you might say Staten Island Chuck and punks a tiny Phil did not see their shadows on groundhog day predicting the advent of spring but they weren't supposed to take it this literally what happened well there's the world is warming so if you look on a long trajectory right just by the way this this past winter if you determine winners December January February Stockholm Sweden had its warmest winter since it's since measurements began in seventeen fifty six you know the world's warming so the background warming is there and this this winter the last couple of months for sure there is this the doors closed between us and the arctic there's this thing called the arctic oscillation it's a certain pattern that sets up in the high pressure low pressure systems around the North Pole and it literally close the door so the warming we had here the warmth we had here was the same in Europe that's why against Takam has there was such a warm winter and the the thing called the polar vortex which we think of I think I might have been on your show wants to talk about it he is not locked away said there's I tweeted on your twitters string there's an image of what the polar vortex looks like the last month and it's like a circle you look down at the North Pole all the cold air is at the North Pole where should be so it's a mix of things warm sea surface temperature anomalies is one way I've seen this polar vortex described can you put that in plain English well it it's really the atmospheric pressure is what shapes a lot of things and the warmth of the seas you know the the water here off New York City.

earth institute Phil Sweden North Pole Europe Takam New York City founding director Andy
Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

08:12 min | 9 months ago

Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

"Guest today is Morag Gamble. Founding Director of the PERMACULTURE Education Institute Morag is a permaculture teacher and designer based in Queensland Australia where she lives in a permaculture eco-village when Morag is in educating or designing. She can be found in her award. Winning Garden Morag has taught permaculture in twenty countries and is the host of the popular. Youtube Channel are permaculture life. Welcome to sustainable World Radio Morag Gamble. It's so wonderful to have you here with me today. Thank you Jill. It's lovely to be here to today. We'll be chatting a bit about your no did guard method. Which is really appealing to me. Is the Lazy Gardener. Then we'll be discussing some of your favorite permaculture plans to put into our new garden beds or into pre existing gardens fantastic. It's one of my favorite topics. I think the ninety got any something that has just ever. Since I started doing permaculture gardening ride in the early days when I helped to get the north St city farm going in Brisbane about twenty five years ago the neither method was something we started doing there. Because well you couldn't actually get anything into the into the ground OUGHTA shovel. I think you used a pick. It would bounce back. Army way was up and that time every almost saying. Let's do it this way. Let's do it that way. And so we tried all these different methods and over the years. I've evolved this particular way that I create the ninety gats and I always do my God C. Span. I've used this method around the world and is kind of a bit of a twist to the way that I do that. I think it's an interesting part of it to explore because I think it makes all the difference. The four we embark on that journey. I just wanted to ask you for your definition of permaculture in case we have listeners here thinking what the heck were they talking about? Wolf Ame- permaculture is essentially all about design and my simplest response would be designed for regeneration designed sustainable living. It's about reconnecting with nature and living a more simple low impact life and surrounding ourselves with Wonderful Food. Great community doing things in a way that a regenerating the US Amer generating communities regenerating ourselves to. Because it's it's we. We're in a process now. I think where we need people. Who have they kind of? Healing the planet so permaculture Regeneration as well seems like your life and work are all about permaculture and I did read online that you discovered permaculture as a teenager so permaculture has been a large part of your life for quite some I I was at I remember at when I was in high school. I was sorry passionate in as a as a peace activist. There's a lot of things happening at that time. There was the I think. This should notable incident Though at the same time cities. We're getting captured by massive dust storm so the landcare movement was studying. There was all these massive movements happening around me at that time and I spent a bit of time kind of being a peace activist and an environmental activist. And I. I still call myself that but I got to a point where I was feeling that was fighting against something all the time. And and a lot of babble on you see me coming and turn the other way. She's going to start talking about that again. I E to I you know what I may not and so I. I was really looking for something that was that was a positive solution art. If it's not that we don't want that world what will do we want. I remember my my parents. Kinda brought us up in a really natural and and You know a really low fleet locate life and my dad was always reading about coach and he kept handing me this book. Saying you've gotta you've gotta read this. This is this is where it's at and I think it was because of that I ended up going doing Landscape architecture and Environmental Planning Union. I always worked it through what I was doing. And yes so it's kind of being there guiding and and I guess driving in a way what what I have done with my because it made so much sense. It's just really good common sense and sometimes we we overlook the things that seem to be the most simple approach thinking that they simplistic will actually think it's not. It's they often the simpler approaches. Which can have the more profound impacts on a mock sensible to more people? Yes definitely and you know you took your skills as a landscape architect and you created this verdant using permaculture as well but created this verdant gorgeous oasis. I believe your garden has over two hundred plants. Can you tell us a bit about your garden? Your climate and where it's located. Well I'm I'm in subtropics. I'm in the Jaffe of of Australia Dole. I'm on the East Coast and about halfway up the coast of Australia. So about one and a half north of Brisbane and a place called Crista waters which is a permaculture village. And I've been living here for about twenty years this this place. It's an amazing place. Actually because we have six hundred forty acres. That is the Chris. Awards and within that we have one AK- that we have the tower owned freehold title so most of the land is common land for forests for the Rypien Zion's this kangaroos hopping around everywhere and wallabies and platypus. In the rerun. The other day almost bumped into an occasional wounding through the bushes and it's this beautiful natural oasis with surrounded by National National Park. And so this we have a group of about two hundred people who live here and and and work together in different ways. You know From little cow collectives to cafes to All different sorts of things. It's quite an ECLECTIC group of people. And all different ages and backgrounds at last count sixteen different nationalities so krista waters in itself is an interesting place and it has received a United Nations World Habitat Award for demonstrating low impact. Sustainable ways of living I think was there the tag back in the nineties. And so within that context. If it's kind of like a place where people look to come and see what does Pimco Timothy Look like? What does it mean to leave a culture life? Because I think and that's the reason why I'm here I. I came here in the nineties because I realized in e conscious be talking about. Penta cultural people need to see it feel. It tasted touch it experience. It see how it kind of looks what does it. What does it actually man and I wanted to explore that too. So that's what I've tried to create he and we built around hyme And we've created Dot Gardens in the whole way of life that we have here to do that and it's and it's turned out to be this beautiful thing. I didn't have a full plan when I started. I had those guiding behind it and so of being able to create we have a higher Menara Garden and I work with gotten a debt. It's just been an starting out from that point. I actually think the no debt thing has been a huge thing. That's been able to free up a lot of the possibilities for creating this so Gradually just saving up a bit of money and and building a little bit more building a little bit more finding local resources Engaging with my friends and my family to help us build and my house is almost finished. It's finished enough. You

Morag Gamble Permaculture Education Institu Brisbane Youtube Founding Director Jill United States Queensland Australia Wolf Ame Dot Gardens Pimco Army Australia Dole United Nations World Habitat A Environmental Planning Union Australia Subtropics Crista Waters AK East Coast
The Late George Curry

In Black America

10:56 min | 9 months ago

The Late George Curry

"The reason I do what I do because I grew up in Alabama and the first black journalists avenue with me. Get A job and couldn't get a job in my hometown newspaper so you will never be able to say you never met a black killed 'cause campuses around the country and some reading they always WanNa know what you think. What topic Us Don't ever have one called anybody who knows me knows that comes comes out but I actually have seen. I actually have a challenge tonight and I hope you make a decision tonight and my topic is in the form of a question. Do you want to be eight of Mamata or do you want to be a thermostat? Let me put it another way. Do you want to measure the temperature? The temperature the late George E curry former editor in chief of the National Newspaper Publishers Association New Service Former Editor in chief of emerged magazine author and syndicated columnist. Curry died on Saturday August twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen. He was sixty nine considered the dean of black press columnists his weekly syndicated column appeared in more than two hundred. African. American newspapers. Curry was a journalist journalist. He began his career. Sports illustrated magazine. The Saint Louis Post dispatch and then the Chicago Tribune where he became the New York girl. Cheap two thousand three. The National Association of Black Journalists named him journalist of the year he is also in a BJ's list of most influential black journalists of the twentieth century. Curry was unapologetic. Stewart and champion for the Black Press and frequent need for it in the civil rights narrative. He was deeply committed to fostering the next generation of journalists of color. They became the founding director of the Saint. Louis Minority Journalism Workshop in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven. I'm Johnnie O. Hanson junior and welcome to another edition of in Black America on this week's program a tribute to the late. George E curry in Black America emerged was a news magazine that was published for ten years up the year. Two thousand I was editor to the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July called the best of emerge at Ballantine books a publishing in your arm of a random house and it has the best collection of Of Our stories over the years so it's very different and quite frankly one day soon. I expect this starbucks. We got the most attention. Because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas. Random as the amount of his head and they me ram two years later. The lawn jockeying for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen. Single Clarence comes today. People mentioned that though. That's that's not the stores I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith who was arrested. Twenty four give a twenty four year. Mandatory sentence been Amman. Mine are basically going with drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she needed sold or used drugs But she was very attached as ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on and ran a couple of other stories. In addition to that a couple of years ago she was pardoned by bill. Clinton I'll Office Delay George. E Curry is best known for his heir to ship of the former emerged magazine. Most recently for his work as Airdrie and cheap for the National Newspaper Published Association from two thousand to two thousand seven and again from two thousand twelve until last year. Warren George Edward Curry on February. Twenty third nineteen forty seven in Tuscaloosa Alabama is mother worked as a domestic and his father was a mechanic. His father abandoned fan when he was just seven years old leaving him to step into the role of the man of the house assisting his mother in raising three younger sisters and nineteen sixty five. He graduated high school where he was a member of the football team and sports energy to other school newspaper and nineteen sixty six curry moves in New York City way worked for the student. Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He earned his bachelor of Arts degree in history from Knoxville College. In nineteen nine hundred seventy fulfilling a lifelong dream. He began his professional journal. Career as reporter for sports illustrated magazine in nineteen seventy. He was the second African American hired by the publication. Curry died on August. Twenty two thousand sixteen. He was sixty nine. I met curry back in. Nineteen eighty one and N. A. B. J. National Convention in Louisville Kentucky. The following excerpts of interviews from two thousand one and two thousand and three well up up in totally segregated tuscaloosa hours can Segregate my feelings tell people that In terms of the so called gration after drink from separate water fountains right back to the bus go to separate schools and I have very strong feelings about that But at the same time when I look at my black community those black teachers black people who were supportive There's nothing in the world like it and I wouldn't trade if anything you a pretty good athlete. Bet Did all right for the country boy. I play football. Play quarterback When a quarterback call plays from the attendant Knoxville College in Tennessee? I'm Alma Mater and I'm still in the blue. I'm on that board of directors there and what sparked their initial interest in journalism and The newspapers Emma wouldn't do the newspaper hometown the only time they wrote about black people when they were suspected of crime committed crime plan football it being an entertaining and I thought they were so many other stories out there. It'd be told and since they won't go and tell them. I decided I had to be the person to tell them now. What is interesting is that I could get a job my first job out of Knoxville. What is that sports illustrated so I can get a job at Lodges Sports magazine in the world but couldn't get one in my hometown. Newspaper reminded me that every time I go should be sending a thank. You note saying thank you for not hiring me so I can go out and see the world but that meant that meant a lot. I mean that could not get heart my hometown paper and And whenever I go back I remind them how Tuscaloosa be. I was back a couple years ago and they gave me a key to the city then told me it was fine but you didn't open anything. And secondly I wanted to the bank and combination to the vault. But they haven't done that yet. Former editor in chief of emerged magazine. Tell us about that. Publication well merge was a news magazine that was published for ten years up to two thousand. I was editor of the last seven years. In fact we have a book coming out in July call. The Best of emerge at Ballantine books are published in the New York arm of Random House and it has the best collection of Of our stores over the years so it was very different and quite frankly one day soon expected starbuck and what was some of the highlights of of that publication well We did a lot of things and we're proud. We got the most attention because the way we Took on Clarence Thomas Random as the amount of not hit and they may ramp two years later. The Lawn Jockey for all right and That's the kind of thing that you've seen single Clarence Thomas. Today people mentioned that though. That's that's not a lot of stories. I'm I'm most proud of. I'm most proud of Australian Kemba Smith. Who WAS ARRESTED? Twenty four and give it a twenty four year mandatory sentence. I've been Amman mine of exit. Basically go over to the drug dealer. I mean the Fed said she neither Seoul nor use drugs but she was very attached ringleader. Who have been killed and We ran to cover stories on it and ran a couple of other stories in addition to that and Couple of years ago. She was pardoned by bill. Clinton in office and So we're real proud of that story. I'm proudest of is One of my staff members. I fortunately I feel vegetable about young since college lower. Hit a little little experience. Laurie Robinson was all right how she was on my staff and And it really shouldn't be up the whole Staffan certainly are and she's a graduate of Spelman in Atlanta and There was a allegation at Morehouse being raped. Spelman woman and only because laureate toby. She wanted to write a book about her experience. I suggested that she go back there to her alma mater right about that and then we've been home person experience with it and it was just one powerful story and those are the story. I mean a lot of store them reattached. But those are those are the real special with you on the immediate past. President of the American Society of magazine editors in the first african-american Elia and also not from New York. Right right they kinda you gotta be from New York and got to be life. Magazine's the worst newspaper in terms of diversity but They did in all fairness did let me president and it was indeed a Han and You know in fact. I'm coming from a black magazine representing the magazine industry so I was so pleased with that. Your current position as editor in chief of the National Newspaper Published Association. Give us a brief history of that organization and your responsibilities with black presses. About one hundred seventy six years old gotten around fighting against niches slavery and everything else. I have been here. Two years. Essentially is a federation of more than two hundred African American newspapers Most of them weekly and essentially what I do is provide news out of Washington and and National News as well For a member newspapers. And so we've pretty much such service. Washington bureau founders for audience. That aren't really familiar. That are not African Americans. Why has the black press particularly organization the two hundred or so Weeklies still viable in this country today. Well I wish having spent thirty three years journalism most of not into black press. I wish that the media was doing this job. And there'd be no need for the Black Press a Hispanic Women magazine but it but it is not doing. It does a terrible job and still a worse job. I think when I came to business thirty three years ago. So if you're going to get in order to be well informed you have to read from a variety of sources in the first place you know you just can't read just to Austin space when you just read just you know Dallas Weekly. Just can't you gotta read from different sources and so So would ask an American perspective gives you a different look at some of the same national issues and then he's going to be really inform. You need to reap the black newspapers and go out website. black press. Usa DOT COM

Black Press Editor In Chief New York Warren George Edward Curry Clarence Thomas Curry National Association Of Black Sports Illustrated Magazine Emerged Magazine National Newspaper Published A Alabama Knoxville College Starbucks Random House FED Editor Kemba Smith Tuscaloosa George E Curry Amman
"founding director" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

08:41 min | 10 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"Founding director of the center for American war letters at Chapman university Andrew great to have you back on the show great to be with you again now before we get into the love letters were going to talk about here in this Valentine's theme show talk to me about the center for American more letters sure and just briefly I mean it's kind of ironic how this all came about because I grew up with no military connections whatsoever I really don't even have an interest in history and then my sophomore year of college our house in Washington DC burned to the ground and we just noticed her which is the most important thing but we lost everything it was really losing the letters that was the worst part and because they're just absolutely replaceable and so that's the kind of you know launch this initially word of mouth effort ask veterans they would do with your letters so long story short that's what led to my creating a nationwide effort to seek out and preserve America's war letters and and what's so great about the letters to the human eyes these men and women who go out and survey and so I actually got a collection of boards of about a hundred war in U. S. history as you said from the revolution up to the present day and so our mission is still to keep seeking out the letters and preserving them so cool and I've been lucky enough to be at your place in Washington DC where we've spread them out on a table and looked some of them and it is like a it's like a time capsule it's like going back in time like seeing the the cursive that some of these you know some of the penmanship they used day seeing the stains on the corners of the page I mean it's just an amazing view into history and I got to ask how many of them are love letters in the collection you know it's it's what I was just actually thinking about this it dawned on me for the first time that the majority the letters we have are probably love letters of course we have letters between parents and their children it's a different kind of love but the the borders between sweetheart spouses X. that are I find you know the most moving of all the ones in our collection now I know when we got together this time last year and we were talking about the poetic verse that general Pershing wrote to his love during World War one ever since we first met you have been in my thoughts by day and my dreams by night your beauty your greatness of soul your brilliance of mine have been my sincerest inspiration and my purest love I mean it's the right like that anymore or so say most of my female colleagues here in the office but that's not necessarily true because that you found an email which you shared with me from a sailor to his wife from Iraq and this poetry is just some of the most romantic stuff I've ever heard one is a little bit this email so this isn't he wrote to his wife when he was fighting over Iraq and you said it's by a police officer second class at one Garcia Lopez and he was writing to his wife Debra it is zero four thirty again awoke thinking of you it makes me smile when the first thought I have when I wake is of you as I now gaze out across the sea the horizon has become thin strands from sea to sky a dark haze a shot I read a yellow gold and finally a light blue I looked behind my shoulder and the coast of Iraq is still dark I turn Ford is the haze succumbs to a soft orange rising sun hi in me as minutes grow the Iraqi to coast turned a quiet blue with the increasing light and once again slowly another cloudless day awakens I watched on not break but blossom I can't resist telling you a dream I had some nights ago I'm walking alone on the beach and I feel the time searching my heart for something to give you I sense the distance I'm angry and at the experience oceans and continents that have separated us in the dream I remember cursing you in two languages on why cannot lift and carry myself to to offer you something that would make all things right and happy later that day as I remember the dream I promised myself the given the opportunity I intend for you and me to accumulate many pleasant memories than retelling will keep us warm in our old age my love I wish I could offer you more years always had one man that guy right there and when I I tell you what buddy I you need to write the card I'm gonna give my wife this year because that is amazing and this next what I found really fascinating not just because it's a war letter but it is a war letter from a woman to her service member share with me what I'm looking at here when I see this picture of paper yellow from age and this beautiful cursive handwriting so what we have is a letter by a whack and so that's that means a women's army auxiliary corps they were female soldiers during World War two and so this whack gene civil owski was writing a letter to her fiance in she said in late October because she would take a while so it kind of about Christmas and gifts and things like that there's just one sweet little thing I I do want to emphasize I will cover your hand writing but she says when I tell the girls and Lou and Betty that I received a letter from you they always ask me what you had to write and so I tell them that first that you think I'm a cute kid but then I also say that on this well this girl in the world and it's just it's very poignant you know just you know how much they love each other and so she sent a letter off and you know we also looked at was the envelope that with the letter inside that was returned to her and on the cover the envelope is one word written in red that just says deceased and that's how she found out that the love of her life was gone forever and because they were married she was not officially notified by the military that her fiance had been killed in action now also with this collection was a letter that was not hand written but rather typed and it came from the military describe that one for us one of the other thing that was her it was a letter from her her fiance's commanding officer and I just thought this is a really moving sentence he says it's impossible for me or the boys in the company to express in words our feelings of sympathy for John's parents and loved ones many of course her to his record was far above reproach it was a privilege to have him in my company and not letters December dated December eighteenth so so's almost two months after she send her letter the gene learn how John died in the in the coming off your goes into detail about that as well and it's just you know this is the kind of sacrifice we sometimes overlook it's not just being in combat and the risk of losing your life it's you know the the how relationships were torn apart and just you know what these people go through in times of war now let's talk about the next letter and you sent me over the words from this letter to a Werner Walter E. and I'm unusual name and then even more unusual story behind it it's written by a woman named Mary and we don't know her last name suppose from Palo alto California this during World War two and so she writes good morning silent one I've been wondering where you were and have been afraid you would leave without saying goodbye you may have gone already but you can't be farther than my wishes for your happiness can travel your Christmas sweater and the beautiful El Greco statute or my treasures never will I forget that perfect Christmas day and your wonderful surprise I love you for all that is fine and you and for all of your encouragement my love goes with you affectionately Merion so can you imagine that that would lift up your spirits and like you know you're receiving that it would be if the letter was actually real and this is what I love about it so we like I came across this letter I'd away I did a trip around the world almost forty countries to because I already visited all fifty states so Stalin was what one of my stop and I was in the archive there and so they showed me this water so it turns out that Warner Walter who we talked about was actually a German spy named Robert header and he was in Scotland and his his what he was really there for was to see the royal airforce units and how large they were because he was you know gathering information for Hitler and for the German sissy here how strong is the Scottish military and so he had this fake letter on his person so that in case he was captured but none of this is on my name is Warner wall T. that here's a letter from my girlfriend and so forth it was completely made up and so they soft through it and they realize he was a spy and he was arrested and was sentenced to life in prison and it's just funny how again you know you come across a letter and if you do know the contacts with us the very sweet love letter but then you realize that this is actually part of a much larger campaign as part of an espionage mission really and just how unusual it is and so you really.

Founding director Chapman university
"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:23 min | 10 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nice to see you nice welcomes welcome to the road hi there is the founding director of the brood which this year celebrates its fifth anniversary you know I was doing my reading for this and it and it's amazing it's been five years I mean it's not like that it has gone like that and the amount of people who've come to the museum is just astounding us and we didn't even expected we expected about three hundred thousand a year and it's how many last year we welcome nine hundred and seventeen thousand people may drive by and you see the lines it doesn't surprise you but it's still kind of amazing it is amazing a also this is not it off topic is not especially big museum my response you're trying I sometimes joke that we might be the most visited museum on a per square foot basis it makes sense right but but it's it's not a joint place you can get pretty slick yeah I think it feels good people tell me that it feels different here it feels welcoming here and then they tell their friends are visiting from out of town and here we are and that gets to the kind of people you have here and I don't want to get too deep into demographics but museum people tend to run old in mostly white right traditionally yes and we have seen a very different audience come into the roads so our audience is about seventy percent non white and our average age visitor is in there low to mid thirties where is it's more like mid forties nationally okay Sir you're you're an art curator right you're a professionally trained art person I imagine there's a little bit of marketing and branding that goes along with that but how do you get that diverse clientele in here well we did a lot of things we're planning this museum that changed how it feels to be in a museum for a visitor we took away a lot of barriers starting with free general admission but we also took a note from digital retail and thought about the fact that can we just do everything in a mobile device in terms of ticketing etcetera the roads collection is also kind of a lending library for other contemporary art museums the portion that's not on display stored behind all kinds a locked doors I'm gonna bachelor thank you inside the art world turns decidedly unglamorous this is so funny there's gonna hang in there and little slots they hang in size which of course makes sense but what you're do you have a favorite we fought applica who I I actually this is busted out right this is boss yeah this for me a painting called with strings to and the great thing about the boss gets in this collection that I think is really for it's not always the case is that he they were all purchase in the time but they were made how do you know when there's a piece that you want to acquire for this region well that's a great question and it is one of the great great things about I think working in contemporary art where you just have to live as a curator or collector and be happy to live with a little bit of not knowing you know you can't possibly know for sure no matter how intelligent you are that in fifty years or a hundred years a given our work is going to still have currency back it out for me for second talk about the art market has your market is this well like the rest of I think you can tell me better well I know your well what I was going to say is that I think in some respects like at least certain segments of the overall economy there's climbing values and yet not as much clarity or consensus about why that's happening that's exactly what Jay bell is it the other day in his press conference after the fed meeting prices are relegated lots of uncertainty out there well that's that's really interesting I see I see at least the the part of the art market the makes headlines and I'm I do want to say it's easy to get caught up in that part of the market for their many our markets right and there are many emerging artists and galleries that aren't trafficking in works they're worth it out one two three five million dollars and a lot of ways collectors young collectors can get in and not have to participate in that part of the market do you feel recessions when they happen to the art market feel research I have a minority view is that two thousand eight was definitely a big deal for the art market but it really was only a speed bump for the top end of the of the art market and again I think that might have some resonance it's exactly the same way the rest of the town right right that's how I see over the wrestlers that stood in the interest of the the monster in the economy right for companies and for for institutions is grow or die right you gotta get bigger yeah control do you have to do that as a museum to have to do that as a as a as an art collector I think it's kind of human to want to keep growing and keep expanding and but I also think that museums are very particular organizational creatures right so they are non profits so you're basically generally on a fixed income no matter how large your resources are and in terms of growing the way that we do want to grow of course its audience and in that sense I am a bit of an evangelist an art evangelist but nine hundred thousand people your come through here now if you do really well and get a million to a million five the lines out front the use you driving down Grand Avenue we're gonna be longer yeah your well the lines are always that's our long history there are and I thought that we would have maybe already hit the ceiling before we got to nine hundred and seventeen thousand like we did last year I think we can go a bit further and I think another way we can expander audiences by going out into the community because no matter how higher attendance numbers cat I'm very very cognizant of the fact that there are still millions of people in southern California who may be hard to believe might not know who we are yet number sense transaction.

founding director
"founding director" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

04:19 min | 10 months ago

"founding director" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"And the the importance of that as we move forward. Because if we don't care we won't take the next steps that these research is pointing us in the direction of that's right and we won't keep going right. We you might start but then it gets boring. We get tired or frustrated and we don't stay the course and we don't inspire other people and get other people fired fired up and involved so yeah I agree completely and in that way. The whole field of therapeutic landscapes or healing gardens is a really effective two way street that nature is healing us. And hopefully we are learning as people of all varieties whether we are home. Gardner's or accountants or scientific researchers how to heal some of the damage we've done to nature. Yeah Yeah and there's a really interesting. The set of studies that have looked at childhood engagement with nature and basically the more children of young and middle childhood years have good experiences with nature the more more likely they are to become stewards later in life. Yup and this is important not just that they might go clean up. The trash in their neighborhood could park but also their voters and they pay taxes when the Greg Norman Makin decide whether whether the city continues paying taxes for a park or not or for the Grand Canyon to be maintained on our national park service us on our National Forest Service so if we can inculcating a love of a nurturing for nature young and keep that going and keep people passionate than that ensures. Everyone's future that's the idea anyway. Is there anything else you would like to add You mentioned the The garden at Boston Children's which was the the prouty garden and they did take that down and there was an incredible community organization innovation fighting that garden being destroyed and they have now built the first of a series of rooftop gardens at Boston Children's and before I came to University of Maryland? I was a post doc at Cornell for a couple of years and one of my and my former boss. She's in the Department of design and environmental analysis. She's a masters student and her research. She has been on that new rooftop garden at Boston. Children's and using the healthcare garden evaluation. Toolkit that I designed designed for my dissertation to do a post occupancy evaluation of that garden and see how it's working is it working the way that they expected affected. What's working what's not working and she's come up with some really powerful interesting results and I'm so excited for her to finish the data analysis and write it up in her thesis? It's so good to see something. That was very powerful to people but for a number of reasons had to go away and something else was built and rather than just taking Boston children's word for for it and saying okay. Yeah you built a healing garden on the rooftop like you said you would. Let's hold them accountable and say okay. How how does it fair and how does it compare to what was lost and Kellyanne? The wound of losing the garden be healed with with this new garden. Too and given that we are in a world in which losses are occurring daily to figure out how to grow from those those wounds is going to.

Boston Children prouty garden Boston Greg Norman Makin Cornell Gardner Grand Canyon National Forest Service Department of design University of Maryland
Garden Resolutions with Ken Druse

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

09:24 min | 11 months ago

Garden Resolutions with Ken Druse

"Not just approaching the end of the year but the end of a decade so we'd better make some hefty resolutions right. Yeah well I'm not sad to see that decade go a years ago I made a New Year's resolution and I've kept it and my new year's resolution solution was to not make New Year's resolutions. Okay so sorry. You're saying garden resolutions. Because I'm going to make some of the okay so do you. You want to start town by telling me some of yours and before I tell you some odd. I'll start with a real quick story a many years ago I I was at Helen's daughter Garden in western Massachusetts and was planting whips Magnolia whips and with some of her friends and they said Oh Helen. Why are you planting such small trees? She was you know Richard Dirt and I remember she was about seventy five years old and when she was ninety two sitting on a bench edged the shade of the trees. So I try to remind myself plant anyway as it crosses my mind. I'm not GonNa see this mature sure or maybe I won't have fruit in my lifetime just just planted so no stinking thinking as they would call it in self help program right right in writing none of that negativity and and the other thing is that if even if you don't literally get to sit under like Helen's daughter did someone will and so yeah. Plant it all right. So that's a good one for planted for kids planet for granted exactly exactly cut down too many trees anyway so plant plant trees like I thought about my resolutions on. They're almost all about what he plans so into what he plans. Now you you WanNa tell me one. I'll tell you one then you tell me what do well mine are a little more. You know complicated complicated. Like I really need therapy Because and I mentioned this very briefly at the end of the last visit to the show that you were on You know that I a I have. I have to acknowledge speaking of twelve step programs in self help a little mantras stuff you know. I'm powerless over. Dot Dot dot. I'm powerless over. Some of those early ground covers that I planted you know thirty years ago or whatever all these things ground I wrote a book about ground covers. We were all into ground. Covers the whole ground cover section and every catalogue and and a lot of and turn out to be thugs And so they spread a lot and that was a good thing. At least it felt like a good thing to a beginning Gardner but it's not a good thing and now I've got all these things that are romping farther and farther and they've far out Gone beyond their bounds and so the problem is and maybe other people listening. Have this problem to on a smaller. A big way in their cartons if they've been there even ten years or five years stuff. That's where it's not supposed to be. It's gone farther than you intended. And you know we can turn a blind eye and then suddenly you've got a mile of it and if you look at it all every instance of that in your whole garden. We need to divide this. I need to take that out and vote you get paralyzed. At least I do right so my resolution was to. I made it this past fall when I was doing clean up and I said you know what I had to help her that Dan you know what today. We're going to spend our four hours. We're going to pull out this one. One section of Lamia Stream It's sort of a Nedeli like being a very gated ground cover. We're going to do this one section and then this winter we're going to sit didn't have coffee someday and we're going to decide what ground cover plugs little baby plance to order native probably Shade Plants Ferns or whatever that are going to go in this section they're not gonNa Romp you know but one section so my resolution is one section time in and so clean it up and replanted wanted and then I can move onto the next because otherwise I'm all over the place and nothing gets finished. That's how I am. I think I don't think you're like that. I think you follow thirty better than follow through. I think you're marcus tedious than I am. Not As tidy as your because you have tourists and I don't have the mini tours. But you know you're saying to pull out the ground covers. I was with you and I was thinking. Well what is she gonNA put down chopped wood mulch or something but then you said you're going to plant plants. Yes I can think of no better ground. Cover Mulch mulch right. And so I'm thinking and I'm pondering it gives me because I did that section it's a big section in fall You know kind of prep didn't and I know that what will happen in spring. Is that some of the remainders that I didn't get tried to dig out the root of these things. But they'll sprout up here and there and I'm GonNa have to do one more smaller cleanup but I wanna be ready with a plant outdoor a number of plants to like a mosaic. And you know again it might be ferns it might be you know I love trillions. I love you know some girls because it's in a place under a shroud so it's A. It's it's semi sheets. It's bright shade but it's shade. It's definitely shade so I have to think about what. I'm going to put their have the winter to do that but I need to be ready in the spring so that that's my kind of resolution is give myself time. I have the time to order your plan to choose to order the plants. Not a super rush job and then I can move onto the next section once. I've good. Yeah so wish me luck. I took Lampien last balls. Yes we'll see and I'm sure I've already planted bulbs there so you know nature of horsa vacuum. And so do I. Yes yes yes yes yes yes so what about you another one. Well this is a very hard one for me You know our friend Marco if he doesn't like a slant it's out but I I have so much trouble letting or ground covers not so bad lambaste room Yorkshire but when it comes to in trees I've planted a whole lot of Doug Eastern dogwoods from the mountains of Mexico the Urbana which has fused brax have have lots saplings Eighty tall now right so sear. I hope to have some flowers some flowers and out of these eight trees that are very skinny too. Close together the ones. That don't have nice flowers or nice state. It's going to be a little are Bora side. Think of Markle. Yes and so. We used to people who don't know Marco is was the founding director of horticulture of Wave Hill the public garden in New New York City in in the Bronx and worked for many many years fifty two year old garden and he was probably the first forty years or thirty five year. Thirty five years. Something like that. Yeah Yeah so And he is and he says barrier dead and fast. Which means if you have a languishing plant that's looking to us? Miserable like stop op fussing over it start over you know making new make a fresh start. Oh you made me think of something no or give it away. Oh Oh new. Don't give it to me you don't give it to me. Okay Yeah Yeah So another thing that I've done I hate to say that I've done wrong or I've been bad but that's how I feel and so I just want to say that loud so I feel it makes me feel bad when then I haven't taken my own advice or the wisdom that I know from others. I haven't set a good example And I in really what it is is my garden is too big for me. You know it's two point three acres and it's you know it's a lot. It's really a lot too much manage and so stuff gets neglected. I'm getting ready for spring. Bring tourists your mentioned before all you know in April and early May the first ones are usually in the first or second week of May and I have to say. Hey you know we're not going to get to that area and so what happens. Is I close off that particular area and I do that a couple of years in a row and guess what you know. It's a mess and one of the things things I've noticed is that instead of because I'm again having the tourist instead of All my beds are in turf so my beds are within grass ask. They're surrounded by grass. There's no stone edge or metal edge Is that they're like islands. I guess is what I'm saying in turf and so the the easiest thing is just to cut a clean edge with your edging tool and put on your mouth. Well the thing is though. The bed gets an inch bigger and bigger in an inch Baker right because because because there might have been a plant that flopped over the edge and made the battle messy at the edge. So you cut it a little white. Well you do that for a few years without reselling reselling some grass seed right and re you know kindling that turf on the edge. You don't keep the bed the same shape and size it gets bigger. And then guess what happens to your pathways single-file loops between two beds. You know so I need to do turf stuff stuff and I hate. I hate growing grass. I hate it I just hate it But I need to do it. So that's my other thing for the coming Spring and actually in my in the northeast. The best area is mid August to mid to late September for turf repair but I need to do some spring this year

Oh Helen Marco Massachusetts Richard Dirt Gardner DAN Lampien Markle Mexico Founding Director Wave Hill Yorkshire New New York City Bronx
Rekindling Cultural Burning

Think: Sustainability

10:00 min | 1 year ago

Rekindling Cultural Burning

"Naturally actually occurring processed in a string through a lightning strikes on principally but also I can occur so other races. He's Oliver Costello is a bundling man and founding director of the five six aligns indigenous cooperation what he's describing is a cultural burn a traditional channel method of environmental management which has been carried out by aboriginal people across Australia thousands of years though people sort of learn so on manage for a really positive why the raw and how interact with different plants animals and landscapes in some ways cultural burning is similar to hazard reduction Burns wins it reduces fuel Lord and hopefully prevents more intense and damaging fire down the track but there are significant differences. OJ were used to turn to clean up country and you'd have a feud action outcome but it wasn't principally. Wa doing now doing it because I had a responsibility to look after the health that lane I wouldn't be out of because people in one context I really survival is traditional. Bush race authors nine Houghton gathered us of all over there have to UN's out of the Bush to survive outside of the United Morton and writings on those relationships of China China and so you know I guess nineteen is which is now back to the opium did but understanding valuation ships the ladies. Fis Ben Loa slower and often set more frequently means. They have a different effect on the landscapes in the hot intensfies used by local agencies. You can get applies to the fall out. You can get around the fire. You can move through the far more win at school and moving slightly it also means that plants and animals animals are more resilient you the plant particularly canopy while Principles Full Canopy Frost Kate the far out of the Kennedy because the canopy cited food for the animals you know the animals can insects and stuff can crawl up the trees in house can can climb up up into the canopy and get out of the intensity of this Mike and the idea. Is that a lot of teams aside painting on on five day regeneration. You know whether it's sort of like compete like pruning back in I think the grass and shrubs and stuff sometimes I just need a bit of a growing recognition of the benefits of cultural burning and government agencies as have shown support for the practice to varying degrees but they're a huge barriers to widespread cultural bunning that have been in place since colonisation. I'm Kaitlin McHugh. This is think sustainability. A common description of cultural burns is a fire trickling through the landscape like water gentle revitalizing certainly not dangerous. That's a world away from merced people's experiences of fire in Australia through the accurate hazy nuisance of Hazard Reduction Burns blowing in from the Bush all the seasonal Tara of Bush fires. It's been another relentless definers and the emergency is far from a with the number of increasing around the state dramatic afternoon here emergency headquarters eight thousand people in entire township had urgently being asked to leave to leave calmly to pick up their kids literally from school jump in the car. Ah Don't go home. Any residents still in those areas are being urged to an accident bushfire survival plan those who've left are wont it is too dangerous to return It's the way we have come to fear fire and I've just been down to the mountain. Ash Forest forest burned outside Melbourne. This is Jacqueline girth a professor at the University of Technology Sydney School of design. She's worked with fuss sticks to communicate Kate. The importance of cultural burning government institutions and other stakeholders and in the process discovered a deeply ingrained fear of fire in Australian culture. I went there last year and I saw what had happened. There and those the mountain ash those trees that were hundreds of years old have you just been destroyed by that fire and the response around that has been to close off the area like a crime sane. It's an and attitude that traces its roots to the first moments of colonization says Oliva on Salas Fan FA threatening they pay you know using for very commonly used I used to mine and then they will say used for warfare and for hunting and stuff like that and so there's been a fear four in first contact. That's in that flight three tonight because you say that she's impacts of waffles. phya according to official institutions is something to be tightly controlled restricted to the domain of highly qualified government endorsed experts. The wide agencies a little bit frameworks. You have to offer even beyond Afar so if you I wanNA become in the rural service throw it. If you want to become a member you've gone up. You're going to be accepted. Then you go and do training. I'd run the training couple Tom onto you and you get some experience and also full even let you on a fire seemingly your national parks and forestry and all and all the way management agencies. Aziz employees and then you go to be dual the training then you've also got to do fitness requirements to be out of a four in. Ucla files on through the agency frameworks has been quite honest what this bureaucratic approach ignores is a long and shameful history of Australian government's attempts to eradicate Aboriginal Cultural Practices Oliva points out that apart from being an effective tool in improving the health of the landscape rape burning is a cultural practice and its suppression is a continuing example of colonialism are you. I was GONNA paypal actually have wrought to do onto ninety total. you know total hall whether it's been recognized bottom the crown or not if I if I have culture connection saw in nineteen cultural practicing law actually brought to size being able to do that. I need to be out to get around. Cancel these processes that restrict them from doing it because otherwise practicing alone culture apart from depriving aboriginal people of the cultural practice the often unbending rules around when how and web burning can be carried out mean burns on always done as efficiently as they could be. You know we've we've gotta behind by five. We can't be at night banning when sometimes the best time to be banning his in the later afternoon and evening because it cools that five down on slows it down this is Peter Murray Stanley a researcher at James Cook University whose work focuses on cultural burning in north Queensland. It sometimes means that those windows where it's the perfect timing to putting a fire get missed because of you know the resources required the paperwork work required to actually sort of implement I hazard reduction Ben or conservation burn prescribed Burns carried out according to a strict timetable will this block of land at this time in this manner cultural burning on the other hand response to cues in the environment which tell practitioners when it's safe breath and desirable to burn this responsiveness means cultural burning can adapt to the changing conditions brought about by heating planet indigenous. These people have lived through a number of different major climate shifts and you know more and more oculus goal waxed on anthropological work you know strayer is learning about that continuity of connection being on country and being able to read those signs in those changes ages is probably more important now under the pressures that you know climate change is bringing but reading countries really critically okay the Kay and so you know as climate changes indicators shift and they may come more than once a year but when you look the landscape it's telling you that it's ready for burning the Kula gentle fi used cultural burning also means that overtime ecosystems become more diverse. Peter Murray saw this firsthand in her research over several years she documented burning carried out by Kutai Elba's duct Tommy George and Dr George George Moose grave so we had you know instead of one species of grass in the undisturbed. We had four different species of grass in the story. We didn't have background between all six tusks were interconnected and that was connectivity between them. Tulsa clumps of grass like you might see dotted around the ground on a Bush walk and then that allowed loud sort of the right environment for the Forbes and leg games and flowers and things like that to grow back through those systems the changes pay to Murray. We documented in homework want immediate. She says it took around five years for the ecosystem to reset itself and to an outside observer might not have been incredibly doubly dramatic but diversity has knock-on effects for the entire ecosystem it is major in terms of species diversity and then obviously what relies lies on die species as well that coming to that system that I'm perhaps once we just had moved on and found other places in the landscape

Bush Australia Oliva WA Peter Murray Oliver Costello UN Ash Forest Forest China China Opium Founding Director United Morton Kaitlin Mchugh Bunning Tulsa Kate Melbourne Kennedy Ucla
"founding director" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"founding director" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Hello and welcome to background briefing available twenty four seven a background briefing dot org hi I'm Ian monsters and today we'll look into number stories and issues in the news we'll begin on this eighteenth anniversary of the nine eleven attacks and speak with veteran Washington correspondent Jim lobe who is chief of the Washington bureau of inter press services and runs the influential low blog website with trump now trashing the justified tireless hawk John Bolton who apparently we can thank for preventing the photo op of the Taliban who harbored Osama bin laden shaking hands with the leader of the free world at camp David but now that trump's biggest donor Sheldon Adelson has seen his protege booted from the White House we'll assess how Israel's prime minister Netanyahu might feel about losing a like minded hawk who has been anxious to bomb Iran and we'll also examine Netanyahu's campaign promise that if he is reelected he will annex nearly a third of the west bank along the Jordan River to capitalize on what Netanyahu Coles quote the unique one off opportunity of having such a compliant in a blur as the trump administration boasting that thanks to quote my personal relationship with president trump I will be able to annex all of the settlements in the heart of our homeland. I will speak with Jodi Freeman professor at Harvard Law School and the founding director of the law schools environmental law and policy program she served as counsel for energy and climate change in the Obama White House and joins us to discuss her operated at The New York Times the auto rule roll back that nobody wants except from and the looming war between trump and the state of California of the press in this peculiar obsession of on doing anything Obama achieved. even in this case when increased fuel efficiency has the support of major order manufactures Ford BMW V. W. and Honda and it means clean air less global warming and trillions saved at the pump by American consumers. and finally we'll get an update on the turbulent and tortured politics of breaks it in the UK and speak with rob Ford a professor of political science at the university of Manchester and author of revolt on the right which examined the rise of you kept the UK Independence Party he joins us to discuss the latest intervention by the courts in Scotland ruling that bars Johnson misled the queen something the Supreme Court will decide on next Tuesday which could put her majesty in an awkward spot caught between the leave and remain poles of a divided country. and on this eighteenth anniversary of nine eleven I'm joined by Jim lobe who served as a Washington DC correspondent and chief of the Washington bureau of inter press services until retiring in twenty fifteen he's now an associate fellow of the institute for Policy Studies and he also runs the influential lobe log website welcome to background briefing Jim lobe thank you very much and they just fired by two eight and Nash could advise the John Bolton trump is trashing him ironically do we have Bolton to thank for the fact that we won't have the picture of the Taliban hanging out at camp David around the time of the nine eleven anniversary particularly since the Taliban of course happened some bin laden. I don't know if it was Bolton alone I don't think there was too much enthusiasm within the administration and certainly among Republicans in the Congress for the idea of inviting the Taliban to camp David close to that nine eleven anniversary I'm sure he voiced strong opposition that may not have helped his case with trump impact it may have been the straw that broke the camel's back between Bolton and and Tom but I think there was a large consensus that the idea of that camp David retreat was not a good one and combat to deal with that. well of course trump is trashing him and I'm wondering where that old ones other circle adults in the room not that necessarily Walton was one of them but in them with monster madness eccentric they have gone silently matters just write a book that's absolutely useless we all know that on the inside you're dealing with an insane person in the oval office and you would think I'd be there turning Judy to let the American people now what kind of person is that is running this country to the ground but now that trump is picked a fight with molten do you think balding might be one of the people that break that damn and start talking about what it's really like to serve Sacha incompetent and irrational any radic chief executive. I frankly I don't know I think it's possible he he may write a memoir or maybe a series of op ed he published in the wallstreet journal which was his favorite platform before he became national security adviser. covering.

Jim lobe Taliban John Bolton Netanyahu Coles Sacha Washington camp David Sheldon Adelson Jordan River White House Obama rob Ford Obama White House Harvard Law School Israel UK Independence Party David Jodi Freeman institute for Policy Studies camp David retreat
Many Latinos feel targeted after El Paso mass shooting

Democracy Now

09:16 min | 1 year ago

Many Latinos feel targeted after El Paso mass shooting

"It was a deadly weekend in America over the span of thirteen hours the country was rocked by two mass shootings around at ten thirty Saturday morning the heavily armed gunmen opened fire inside a crowded Walmart and Paso Texas authorities say twenty people were shot dead the victims were predominantly Latino including seven Mexican nationals at least two dozen people were injured then just after one AM on Sunday a gunman in Dayton Ohio shot dead nine people outside a bar in the city's historic or of industry the dead included the gunman's own sister most of the dead were African Americans police are still investigating the motives of the Dayton gunmen of white male names Conor bats according to news reports the twenty four year old had been suspended from high school after compiling lists of girls she wanted to rape and kill meanwhile federal authorities are treating the el Paso attack as an act of domestic terrorism the suspected el Paso gunmen has been identified as twenty one year old white male named Patrick Chrissy S. who live six hundred miles away in a suburb of Dallas shortly before the attack in el Paso the gunman posted an anti immigrant manifesto on the far right message board eight chan which is also being used by the gunmen who attacked two mosques in New Zealand and killed fifty Muslims and the gunmen who attacked a San Diego synagogue on Sunday the founder of eight chan cold for the site to be taken down some of the language in the manifesto echoed remarks by president trump including his use of the word invasion to describe immigrants crossing the southern border on Sunday president trump briefly spoke about the shootings in el Paso in Dayton but did not refer to guns domestic terrorism or white nationalism more supremacy in his remarks president trump is scheduled to address the nation today at ten AM on the presidential campaign trail a number of democratic candidates link the shooting in el Paso to trump's anti immigrant rhetoric former congressman Beto o'rourke who is from el Paso accuse trump of stoking races south bend mayor people to judge said trump is not helping to stop what he described as a quote lethal violent white nationalist terrorism meanwhile senator Bernie Sanders called on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to hold a special session of the Senate to pass a gun safety belt they'll Paso attack came just days after a white male shooter attacked the Gilroy garlic festival in northern California killing three people the gunmen in Gilroy promoted an anti immigrant manifesto online just hours before the shooting according to The New York Times white extremists shooters have killed at least sixty three people in the United States over the past eighteen months we go now to el Paso we're we're joined by two gas struts are Blanco is a democratic member of the Texas house of representatives Fernando Garcia is the founding director of the border network for human rights and advocacy group based now passed away welcome you both to democracy now first of all condolences on the Harvard that is taking place in your community and I'll pass so we want to begin with SSR Blanco on if you could talk about what your tell us about your community in el Paso and then tell us what you're demanding right now well thank you Amy are a boss who is a warm welcome mean bi national community located on the US Mexico border our sister city to the south of us in Mexico twice we are a community that is very tight knit we are a community that opens its arms to immigrants and welcomes immigrants this community is a community of immigrants my father was an immigrant from the state if you are one in Mexico and this is tragic and it's it's horrible that were seen these type of acts of violence and murder tied to white supremacy occurring here in our in our communities Hey we need to see action we need the words of the president have been harmful and a it's a it's unfortunate that this president has not condemned this white national of violent acts here in our communities and other communities across the country and work it's horrible that the United States Senate has not taken any action in terms of gun reform to not allow these type of weapons to reach the hands of these individuals who wants to create havoc and fear in our communities cry for us what you understand took place on Saturday morning at that Walmart well early about ten to ten thirty there were calls nine one one calls to police a good man began firing in the parking lot of Walmart a here in el Paso and he entered the though the store began shooting and firing at individuals this community is majority Latino he drove a in six hundred miles to perform these acts of violence against our community we have seen in his manifesto the level of hate toward our community in toward immigrants in this country and clearly looks like it was an intentional act throughout the day families of had been waiting to hear news so they set up a family reunification center in the elementary school that I attended as a kid to allow families to wait here is the good news the bad news unfortunately for many the bad news is that their family members were killed by this individual Fernando Garcia at founding director of the border network for human rights on can you talk about the report said some survivors were afraid to get help maybe they were injured but afraid because of their status right now their immigration status yes Amy are present wild let the last actually two days we had received several calls from families that where a freight of actually going into the hospitals and clinics because they they soulful mainly border patrol personnel and vehicles in they were actually not report the in the in your face and they were actually going to the hospitals and clinics on their own so they call us and what we need is we will eventually we called our congresswoman esquire because we wanted the border patrol in nice actually eastern a statement that they would not enforce immigration laws these days in el Paso and I think people as they are for it's still a friend of that because he didn't before this the shooting happened people were afraid already off immigration enforcement so I think a little a little people is getting away with more comfortable obviously but is gonna take a little bit more than that in the spring we are you still receiving calls of people being afraid of reporting their injuries stool that hospitals and that though it is because so far the few that we have with the immigration do you believe that Latinos were targeted I mean clearly in this so called manifesto I mean right before the gunmen opened fire at the Walmart in el Paso he then posted this anti immigrant screed apparently attributed to him appeared online the manifesto is titled the inconvenient truth about me it reads in part quote I support the Christ Church shooter and his manifesto this attack is a response to the Hispanic invasion of Texas they are the instigators not may I am simply defending my country from cultural ethnic replacement brought on by an invasion Hispanics will take control of the local and state government of my beloved Texas changing policy to better suit their needs they will turn Texas into an instrument of a political cool which will hasten the destruction of our country the manifesto read it also cites the great replacement theory the white nationalist right wing conspiracy theory which was also invoked during the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville in Virginia in two thousand seventeen when the neo **** chanting tools will not replace us the author of the

America Twenty Four Year Eighteen Months Twenty One Year Thirteen Hours Two Days
The tariff debate continues

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

07:39 min | 1 year ago

The tariff debate continues

"Step forward. Number one, just to continue with a theme. Here was the official word this morning. The President Trump is going to hold off on big card tariffs for six months at any rate step forward. Number two, is that the US Mexico and Canada have come to terms on the president's steel and aluminum tariffs. They will be lifted and Canada and Mexico will work on getting the NAFTA agreement approved. It's still does have to go to the US congress member that the step back was a report from CNBC this afternoon. The Chinese trade talks have, and this is their word stalled, so we're going to take those steps, and we're going to run with them as it were K Davidson's of the Wall Street Journal Dan rea bone is at axios. Everybody. Okay. What do you think two steps forward? At least one step back. Is that a fair approximation? I think so. Yeah. I mean we, we at the journal been reporting that the talks are stalled. And we heard earlier this week Treasury Secretary Mnuchin saying, yeah, we really intend to go back to, to Beijing soon to resume negotiations. Other people close to the secretary of been saying the same thing then we heard yesterday that Chinese Finance Minister saying, I know nothing about this. He's said, I'm not sure if there are plans, you haven't heard anything, so, you know, that suggests that there either they're in the dark or there's not a whole lot of action behind the scenes. And meanwhile, you know, we're hearing from the Akron, culture sector, a lot of concern. Yeah, we hear dear the farming machinery, manufacturer, lowing lowering their profit outlook today, saying, you know, farmers are buying fewer machines. They're being hurt by lower overseas purchases of corn, and soybeans because of the tariffs. So that's a concern growing from that group dealing just assume that we're in this now. Specifically with China for the long haul. There are no signs as, as gate was saying, then go are going to start and then they'll be they'll be fruitful yet. No signs. And actually, you know if you want to characterize about steps, I think we have taken a couple steps forward. But we moonwalked all the way back to this stage when it comes to progress this, this US China trade war, China's our number one trade partner, and we've really engaged in what looks to be a long-term conflict. The, the term Cold War has started to be thrown around and a lot of. Yeah. A lot of fun managers, financial analysts are really sitting here looking at okay, what are the effects the long term effect of this whole globalization theme that's been in place in the market for about twenty thirty years now being rolled back and talking to UBS strategist the other day. And they said, you know, it's interesting because globalization on the way up is like an escalator but on the way down, it's like an elevator shaft. So kate. Look, here's the deal, though. Right. I mean, we're, we're banding about big numbers. Right. Twenty-five. Percent tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of stuff. The White House is thinking of three hundred billion more. And yet there has been limited at best real consumer impact. I mean Larry cudlow sprays for this president's chief economic adviser is the impact has been day. Minimus. Yes. Well, I mean, that that's certainly true. I think that if you were to ask a communists, who studied this for a long time is that they're, they're often appears to be short term gain, but it's often at the expense of others in the economy over the long term tariffs just are not good for the economy. They divert resources away from more efficient producers to less efficient ones they can raise the cost of parts and materials, eventually, which would raise the price of goods for, for consumers, and they tend to burden lower income household, so you know, we've heard fed officials say this we've heard other trade experts say that over the long run. Yes, there are certainly people who are harmed by globalization, and in by other previous trade policies, but terrorists are not really the way to go about solving this issue, what do you make of the White House's contention that the President Trump and bug cinch in the United States are in the street? More in a better position than president. Residency and the Chinese economy. Who? Yeah that's, that's a tough one because on the on the one hand on the other hand right on the one hand. It is true that definitely the US economy is stronger. It it doesn't rely as much on imports. We are much more closed economy than China, even though they are shifting in that direction, where the US gets a lot more of our GDP from services than we do from exports manufacturing button also, you've got these folks. And we, we talked about a little bit earlier, you know, pressure from the manufacturing sector farmers. You've got these groups like tariffs were at the heartland, national retail federation that are really pushing back on President Trump and the big question that we're going to find the answer to these tariffs. Stay in place is how much do firms actually have pricing power can companies raise prices and continue to see customers coming through the doors or is the American populace right now not in a position to pay anymore. And you're gonna start seeing a real decline in some of these sales, if they try to pass on the tariffs, that's a big thing that the Fed's been trying to trying to figure out and that a lot. Analysts have. And it looks like we might just find out Kate why with the caveat that the stock market is not the economy. It is. However, you know Connie Jason. Right. What do you make of the argument that, that you have started to see now that what's happening is that the stock market is basically letting the president, not have to deal with real pressure on these negotiations that it goes down? And then the president says something, nice and traders, go. Oh, look. Everything's spooky. Everything's fine. And we ended up up for the day by the discs by the right. I think I think that that's becoming the new normal. Right. I think that it's a little bit of a chicken and egg situation, you know, this the stock market, right here's here's something from from the president. I think like I guess the bar is pretty low here. Right. There's a strong signal from someone in the administration. Right. Things go up. The Chinese responded, they go down. I guess I'm not I think that he's, he's kind of taking the response to his to his tweets as formation that, hey, everyone's happy that things. Are going well, and yeah, so I do think there's something to that idea that you floated chi-. And I'm not sure what's going to break that cycle. Right. Let me just very quickly hit on the way out stay with you. And and talk about the Congressional Budget Office Alice Rivlin the founding director died this week, and there's a new person coming in. Tell us quickly who he is an and, and then the, the short term future, the CBO in terms of the politicization of this economy. Sure, we'll fill sway goal is, is going to be named the new CBO director. He's someone who had served on the CA during the Bush administration. He was also a Bush treasury official in the years leading up to the financial crisis. He was a big player in on the attempts to sort of keep the economy, pull the economy back from the brink in two thousand eight two thousand nine he was an aide to Treasury Secretary, Hank Paulson. But I think the key thing is, he's very widely respected by folks on economists and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. So this was a pick that was roundly praised. I think people are, are really happy to see him move in there. That means of course that key. Hall. The previous director is on his way out, and he faced a lot of blowback from Republicans during his time leading CBO when they were scoring these ObamaCare repeal bills. There's a lot of, you know, contentious debate over that will have a tax from the White House. So I think that there's some confidence that Phil is going to, to come in and sort of keep the easy actually set to me yesterday. You know, I I'm keeping Alice Rivlin in my mind mindful of the tone that she said and the tradition that she that she had an, that's what I wanna follow. So I think that sending a strong signal that the CBO will remain nonpartisan and, and to the extent that, that it can, you know, try to ignore the political pressure that's been getting a recent years

President Trump United States China White House Donald Trump CBO Kate Alice Rivlin Wall Street Journal Official Cnbc Dan Rea Canada UBS Congress Mexico K Davidson FED
"founding director" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"founding director" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"As the founding director of the Congressional Budget Office, and I use walks there with the most complimentary attitude Basel because under Rivlin the CBO established its reputation for nonpartisan analysis of proposed legislation. Here's a Bill how much they're going to cost how much revenue is it going to bring in and how is that going to affect the economy? Marketplace's Tracey Samuelson takes a look at the creation of the CBO and Rivlin's legacy there. It was nineteen seventy four Democratic Congress was in the midst of budget battles with Republican president, Richard Nixon who was also in the midst of Watergate, the Nixon administration had a new practice of refusing to spend money that congress had appropriated an authorized for particular purposes. Sarah bender at George Washington University says. Congress decided it needed its own source of budget information. It had been getting that information from the executive branch, the office of management and budget. One Senator says, hey, what do you think happens? If we pass our Bill, let's call up being asked. What can we trust them? That was the problem. Douglas Holtz Aken is president of the American action form a former CBO director. He says it was Rivlin who really coated independence into agencies DNA open created by Democrats. She was a democrat. And she didn't nothing that would make them happy. And thereby establishing that it was the job of the CPO to tell people unpleasant truths, regardless of the circumstances. It was a role she defended throughout her career my most important contribution. I think she has testifying before congress last year was insisting that CBO not make policy recommendations, objective information and analysis. Yes. Costs for policy alternatives to but it would not presume to tell. Congress what to do and that's helped the CBO maintain. It's nonpartisan. Reputation says Holtz Aken and the CBO the sheer power of being very good at what it does has acquired its since. But he says the CBO is often the bearer of bad news if it's not being attacked likely isn't doing its job. I'm Tracey Samuelson for marketplace. So here's a question for the city.

Congressional Budget Office Rivlin Democratic Congress Douglas Holtz Aken Tracey Samuelson founding director president Richard Nixon Nixon administration Sarah bender George Washington University Reputation Senator executive director
Scientists partially revived a pig's brain after the animal died

KNX In Depth with Charles Feldman and Mike Simpson

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Scientists partially revived a pig's brain after the animal died

"Scientists are about to blur the line on what's considered alive? Dead. Researchers being able to restore some cellular activity in the brains of pigs that had been declared dead for four hours. Now, the brains didn't regain anything close to consciousness, but electrical activity did indeed return and the potential ethical questions. This sets up potentially massive affair Honey is founding director of Duke science and society and a professor of law and philosophy at Duke University law school, so professor what are some of the? Questions that are now going to be raised by this revelation. It's an incredible breakthrough to be clear what the scientists restored with cellular activity, but not electrical activity to the brain. And why that matters is what they did with take brains that had been deprived of oxygen for four hours, which by all of our current understanding of science would say that. There was no way that restore any cellular functioning that it was damaged that was irreversible. And through a proprietary system that they call brain X, they rebelled to restore cellular functioning. But not global activities. I meaning there was no EEG. There was no consciousness. There was no sentient capabilities or anything like that yet. And might be by design of the study. They used something that they call neuronal activity blockers, which prevent EEG they did that. So that they could allow the brain to rest to restore function is has great promise for immediately having a better model to study the human brain, which is incredibly important for being able to eventually solve so many diseases that afflict people, but it also blurs the line because before we had a definition of brain death that was based on the irreparable loss of brain function. And we had these categories of dead and alive, and while the definition became blurry. Or once we had to bring the comes blurrier still when you can go from what we clearly knew dead. I mean, a decapitated big pig is that is a gut and then being able to restore so much dowdy means there's this complicated gray area that we have to address. So what do we do with the gray area? Now that it's even. Greyer you said, maybe it was by design, and I think they even said that it was by design that they didn't want the electrical signals back because I don't think we're ready for that question. Ready to have electrical activity restored, the pig grains, at either, but you know, moved immediately raises the question of, you know, our our animals that are part of these research subjects part of these research. Studies subject to the research protections that we afford to living animals so we ensure that research is designed and carried out in a way that doesn't pose unnecessary pain and distress to animals with that animals because you're dealing with tissue. At that point. I we don't have the same kinds of protections or restrictions on research. And so when the goal of the research study really is to restore activity to the brain. It may be that we need to not treat that as dead tissue in animals, treat it more like living animals somewhere in between we need to devise some ethical guidelines. Does this does this change in any way, the notion of you know, when someone has a stroke there's a time limit right after which it is presumed that the. Is is brain dead in the brain is now beyond repair. Okay. We're certainly cannot survive to this change that it may eventually not today. And the reason it doesn't today is because the way we defined brain deaf right now really that loss of electrical and global activity that is essential to to function to perception our consciousness, but you know, research that could build on this may show as it actually that if you removed, for example, neuronal activity blockers, maybe to maybe that electrical activity would reemerge in which case, then it, you know, both offers potential providence. You know, we think that when somebody suffers deprivation of oxygen to their brain. If they have a cardiac arrest or famous stroke that there's no way that they can recover that function. And that may not be true, which is really exciting and promising, but there's a long way to go between here. And there we have to be able to do it with the brain still inside of a person's body. We'd have to be able to run the system. In humans. There's a lot of research questions that would need to be answered between here and there, and you know, what what are commentary in nature today along with this. Incredible research study suggested that we start figuring out how to enable that ethical progress to allow us to get from here to maybe one day in the future being able to apply to humans and in clinical applications think about both at the same time before you get ahead of yourself. That's right. Yeah. And I think people are gonna get really out of themselves. I mean there there's so much. We tend to of course, right? Want to go to they want to imagine that these are ambi- pigs, which they're not. I mean, this is still just cellular really active, not electrically active brain. But they also want to see their hope, and it which is at one day, we might alleviate a lot of human suffering. And I think what's so exciting about this is that this makes that so much more likely. Professor, you just probably started half a dozen screenwriters in Hollywood's. Okay. I think that people have been pretty excited about these these researchers results, but also, you know, kinda shocked, and, you know, given it really fundamentally undermined so many of the assumptions people have had up until now about what the live and what's dad and what's reversible, and let's not I think it seeks up a lot of things. And when that happens, we really have to think about how do we make sure that the ethics and the guidelines keep

Professor Duke University Law School Professor Of Law Honey Duke Science Founding Director Hollywood Four Hours One Day
"founding director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"founding director" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Four five. And welcome back to coast to coast, George Noory with you. Dr Paul Thomas with us also known as Dr Paul is a board certified doctor and pediatrics addiction medicine and integrative and holistic medicine. Dr Paul is Todd residents and medical students since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and opened up his own practice, integrative pediatrics in two thousand eight or he currently serves more than fifteen thousand patients in Portland, Oregon. He opened fair started his medical talks clinic in two thousand nine he's helped over a thousand patients. Wean off oldest just a wide range of opiates. Dr Paul is a founding director of. The pediatric health outcomes initiative and physicians for informed consent. And here he is on coast to coast as we talk about vaccines. Dr Paul welcome to the program. Hi, george. Thanks for having me on. I'm looking forward to this. And as we get into this. Let me ask you this. First of all the opioid epidemic is out of control. Is there anything we can do about this? Oh my goodness. It is out of control in two thousand sixteen. We had what is it forty five thousand Americans with overdoses and sixty three thousand drug overdoses and then last year, it was seventy two thousand up seven percent. It's a hundred seventy four deaths per day and two thirds of those are from opiates. It's just tragic a big piece of this. No, it's a it's a synthetic super strong opioid and car sentinel, which is ten thousand times the strength of morphine. So a green of sand of that added to your heroin and you're dead. Oh, absolutely. But don't the people who are taking these opioids don't they realize that you can't combine all this stuff. Together. Well, the the end user is is one thing about opiates.

Dr Paul Dr Paul Thomas George Noory founding director Portland Oregon morphine heroin seven percent
"founding director" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on KGO 810

"Nikki medoro. A lawyer for Mark judge the high school friend of supreme court nominee. Brad Cavanaugh says judge has been interviewed by the FBI. But his interview has not been completed judge is one of multiple people. The FBI has already interviewed as part of its reopened background investigation into Cavanaugh the outside prosecutor hired by Senate Republicans to pose questions on their behalf at the Cavanaugh. Hearing is out with her report. Correspondent Linda Kenyon has the latest from Capitol Hill. Rachel Mitchell says she believes Dr Christine Lasi Ford's claim of sexual assault allegations involving judge Brad Kavanagh are as she put it weaker than a he said, she said case Mitchell center nine page memo to Senate Republicans Sunday night, she says Dr Ford's account has no corroboration. She goes on to say Ford has not offered a consistent account of when the alleged assault. Happened has struggled to identify Cavanaugh by name and has no memory of key details. Mitchell goes on to say in her. Her words, I do not think that a reasonable. Prosecutor would bring this case based on the evidence before the committee. Linda Kenyon, Capitol Hill. Critics are sounding off on a garrison Keeler appearance in Vermont. Organizers of the Burlington book festival are facing criticism. Over a scheduled appearance by garrison Keeler, the former host of a prairie home companion killer was accused of sexually harassing a woman who worked on his radio show last November Minnesota public radio separate ties with them the festival's founding director defended his decision. I noted keeler's contributions to literature Keillor has defended the allegations against him. The few words with garrison Keillor event is scheduled for October fourteenth. And after sixteen years as governor Jerry Brown has scientists final Bill. He cleared his desk Sunday of hundreds of measures that were awaiting his action Brown is known for pushing California to new frontiers of liberal policies and using his veto pen to pump the brakes Brown's decisions over the weekend reveal both his personality and his powder left pedal right approach to balancing interests now back to chip. Franklin on eight ten. All right. Let's chip Franklin and Nikki medoro. You can follow me on Twitter at chip Franklin also on Facebook. It's your Franklin as well. And you can track down Nikki on that's probably the wrong way to say it you can find Nikki on Twitter at Nikki medoro too. But I love that picture you posted from when you were fine. The blue angels how long ago was that.

Brad Cavanaugh Nikki medoro Dr Christine Lasi Ford garrison Keeler garrison Keillor Rachel Mitchell Linda Kenyon FBI chip Franklin Jerry Brown Prosecutor assault Franklin Senate Mitchell center Brad Kavanagh Twitter Mark
"founding director" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"She's founding director of the Stanford center on longevity. Medical advances means we're gonna live longer, and that means changes in the way, we look at lifestyle and retirement. So the event that you've staged a talk about this. This was the inaugural kickoff for something that you expect to be a five year project. Right. This was the beginning. This was where we declared that we were starting a project that would last for five years, and we're going to really flesh out not only what a new map of life might look like for high quality and happy secure live. But to begin to say what's going to get in the way, and anything that's going to get in the way, we will identify take on and see if we can knock down, and you broke everybody out into several subgroups. You had a section focusing on work another on financial security, which is obviously where I was another one on social influences one on health another on environment. Then environment is the one that caught my eye the most because I think of environment as saving the bay, you know, cleaning up toxic waste and so on. But in this context environment was referring to urban living, the concept that in the future. Seventy or eighty percent of all humans will be living in cities. It's really true. You know, how the proximity of where we live also people have other ages of sex whether or not we have friendships or not it affects whether or not people older people engage in care about younger people. So the environment is is really important. You displayed an amazing set of data throughout the event the one statistic that just shocked me and kind of set the stage for the astonishment of the entire program was. The following children spend less time outdoors than maximum security inmates. Astonishing or not. Yes than what we've done is. We've we've told kids to sit still put a lot of children in a small room with a little desk, and we've taken away recess and in many schools, we've taken away sports and athletics. And so kids are less physically active, a reduction in physical activity is associated with all sorts of physiological changes that increase your risk of getting second developing chronic diseases by middle age, we need kids to be outside to run around to be physically healthy, if they're going to navigate these very long lives in a high quality fashion. It's essential that we keep people physically fit. So kids today because they're so sedentary now have a preponderance of obesity nineteen percent of children under the age of five are obese that leads to diabetes, diabetes is a precursor for Alzheimer's. So is there an opportunity? We for our listeners to learn more about the research that's going on at the Stanford center on longevity and the work that you're doing. We have a great website. And if you just Google one jeopardy and Stanford you will come to it. And it has a lot of information about various projects that we're working on. We will make us a designated section on this new map of life as we really flesh out the project and begin. And so people will be able to follow this project over the next five years what we have is an image. And at the meeting this this spread I think that was twelve feet high and twenty feet long, and we had a grand map on one whole side of a wall and the meeting room where we listed these different kinds of percentages as a function of age and showed all these different kinds of interactive statistics that were ongoing like the ones that Rick just mentioned about diabetes, obesity and dementia. And we have the image that he produced that fifteen by twenty foot piece of art filled with Satistics, an amazing connectivity. And you can look at it by going to our website. Go to Rick Elvin dot com. It's there on the main page, I encourage you to read all of it. You'll be fascinated by the data. You'll be in transit by the art. And it will really give you a perspective on the map of life. We can't fail. We do this together. I'm very much looking forward to this very very excited. Thank you so much Laura Nabi talking with you a lot.

diabetes Stanford center Rick Elvin founding director Laura Nabi Google Alzheimer Satistics five years nineteen percent eighty percent twelve feet twenty feet twenty foot five year
Women and Minorities See Significant Gains as First-Time TV Directors

24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Women and Minorities See Significant Gains as First-Time TV Directors

"Television is getting more diverse studied by, the directors guild of America shows the, industries hiring a first time female directors and, directors of, color hit record highs for the second year. In a row women represented forty one percent of first time. TV episode directors last season and the found directors of color represented thirty one percent, of first, time hires up from twenty seven. Percent of the previous season but the directors. Guild said the picture is complicated by hiring practices it says writers actors and others already. Connected with the, TV series can be gifted one time directing jobs blocking career progress for other directors

United States John Mccain Directors Guild Of America Vanessa Marquez Washington National Cathedral Washington Hoover Dam Tim Maguire Pasadena Senator California Lehman Brothers Guild Vietnam European Union Eurostat Germany
YouTube’s mobile app gets a dark mode

Daily Tech News Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

YouTube’s mobile app gets a dark mode

"Attackers access data stored on amd's reisen and ep wiessee server processors and be able to install malware on them as well amdi is rising chips power desktops and laptop computers ep y processors are found in servers the researchers give md less than twenty four hours to respond before publishing the report even though standard vulnerability disclosure calls for ninety days notice so companies have time to address the flaws when spector and meltdown security flaws that affect intel chips were announced back in january amd said it was not affected because if it's chip architecture differences kitty hawk the flying taxi company funded by google co founder larry page and ceo by google x founding director sebastian thrown launched cora a vertical takeoff and landing or veto l personal copter drone hybrid that will carry a passenger or two quarter will be launched in new zealand which is ideal given the sparse population and part of the country and fewer flight restrictions cora has a third thirty six foot wingspan with twelve rotors and his battery powered it can fly up to sixty two miles and carry one or two passengers the american civil liberties union foundation has filed a freedom of information act lawsuit against the tsa in an effort to extract more info about its procedures and motivations the aclu wants to know why the tsa launched stricter screening procedures for domestic passengers electric devices last year how it records its findings what a quick minute uses to search phones and laptops and what kind of training the officers who conduct these searches get this is the second freedom of information act lawsuit the aclu filed its first attempt was in december of twenty seventeen finally youtube i intro a dark theme for its desktop app last year and now youtube ios apps is getting dark mode as well with an android version on the way with the sending enabled youtube background turns from white to black as the theme suggests the company says the dirk theme will cut down on glare and allow users to take in the true colors of the.

Co Founder Youtube Sebastian Thrown Founding Director CEO AMD Google Intel Spector Aclu TSA American Civil Liberties Union Cora Twenty Four Hours Thirty Six Foot Ninety Days
Kitty Hawk, A Self Flying Taxi Company, Launches With Backing From Google's Larry Page

Daily Tech Headlines

02:02 min | 2 years ago

Kitty Hawk, A Self Flying Taxi Company, Launches With Backing From Google's Larry Page

"Attackers access data stored on amd's reisen and ep wiessee server processors and be able to install malware on them as well amdi is rising chips power desktops and laptop computers ep y processors are found in servers the researchers give md less than twenty four hours to respond before publishing the report even though standard vulnerability disclosure calls for ninety days notice so companies have time to address the flaws when spector and meltdown security flaws that affect intel chips were announced back in january amd said it was not affected because if it's chip architecture differences kitty hawk the flying taxi company funded by google co founder larry page and ceo by google x founding director sebastian thrown launched cora a vertical takeoff and landing or veto l personal copter drone hybrid that will carry a passenger or two quarter will be launched in new zealand which is ideal given the sparse population and part of the country and fewer flight restrictions cora has a third thirty six foot wingspan with twelve rotors and his battery powered it can fly up to sixty two miles and carry one or two passengers the american civil liberties union foundation has filed a freedom of information act lawsuit against the tsa in an effort to extract more info about its procedures and motivations the aclu wants to know why the tsa launched stricter screening procedures for domestic passengers electric devices last year how it records its findings what a quick minute uses to search phones and laptops and what kind of training the officers who conduct these searches get this is the second freedom of information act lawsuit the aclu filed its first attempt was in december of twenty seventeen finally youtube i intro a dark theme for its desktop app last year and now youtube ios apps is getting dark mode as well with an android version on the way with the sending enabled youtube background turns from white to black as the theme suggests the company says the dirk theme will cut down on glare and allow users to take in the true colors of the.

Co Founder Youtube Sebastian Thrown Founding Director CEO AMD Google Intel Spector Aclu TSA American Civil Liberties Union Cora Twenty Four Hours Thirty Six Foot Ninety Days
"founding director" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Eric harley rick roberts all across america it's red eye radio i'm rick roberts enver gary mcnamara ambit eric harley gland bureau long as uh we we get into day three of our look back at the year two thousand seventeen almost a different issue every day in a poor so the issue of sanitising the united states of all confederate term images i never understood and if i may if i could just finish up because i think it's important uh rick grab retell founding director of but edith oh adopt uh o'donnell institute of art history at the university of texas uh former director of the dallas museum of bart and wrote a great piece and the guy the commission did know was such a huge outcry um in dallas about the removal of serb general lee and his forced the traveller and enforce uh the uh uh the soldier riding with him on his worst you know you got to give the uh the sculptor some will when the conversation has retell uh points out out his general lee the if you don't hear anything else i say all all show listen to this his general lee is not the lee that's bannered about as the slave owner ernie's defending slavery in blah blah blah blah blah but rather proctor the sculptor uh probably one of the most important sculptors in an 20th century he was from the north he was an opponent of slavery he made a bronze monument not to the racism not to slavery but to american unity after the civil war that's what his his statue was all about so rushing to remove it made no sense no hang on a second no everybody yet slowdown take a deep breath and try to think about what it meant to the man who made it like your rig retell points out he deserves as say even though he died sixty seven years ago his was not a monument to racism are slavery but to american unity after the civil war all right let me get your calls let's go to uh.

rick roberts united states director the commission dallas lee ernie civil war Eric harley america enver gary mcnamara founding director o'donnell institute of art university of texas dallas museum of bart sixty seven years
"founding director" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on WTMA

"Rick roberts all across america it's red eye radio i'm rick roberts enver gary mcnamara ambit eric harley gland bureau long as we uh we get into day three of our look back at the year two thousand seventeen uh almost a different issue every day in the course of the issue of sanitising the united states of all confederate term images i never understood and if i may if i could just finish up because i think it's important uh rick garb retell founding director of but edith howard uh o'donnell institute of our history university of texas uh former i'd rector of the dallas museum of bart and wrote a great piece and the guy the commission did know was such a huge outcry um in dallas about the removal of a general lee and his forced the traveller and enforce uh the uh uh the soldier riding with him on his worst you know you got to give the uh the sculptor some role in the conversation has retell a points out out his general lee now if you don't hear anything else i say all all show listen this his general lee is not the lee that's bannered about as the slave owner ernie's defending slavery in blah blah blah blah blah but rather proctor the sculptor uh probably one of the most important sculptures in an 20th century he was from the north he was an opponent of slavery he made a bronze monument not to racism not to slavery but to american unity after the civil war that's what his his statue was all about so rushing to remove it made no sense no hang on a second no everybody at slowdown take a deep breath and try to think about what it meant to the man who made it like your rig brito points out he deserves a say even though he died sixty seven years ago his was not a monument to racism or slavery but to american unity after the civil war all right let me get your calls let's go to uh dave in boulder colorado dayabhai appreciate the your patience very very much how.

enver gary mcnamara colorado brito dallas museum of bart university of texas o'donnell institute edith howard founding director eric harley Rick roberts america civil war ernie lee dallas the commission united states sixty seven years
"founding director" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on WCHS

"Eric harley rick roberts all across america it's red eye radio i'm rick roberts enver gary mcnamara ambit eric harley gland bureau long as uh we we get into day three of our look back at the year two thousand seventeen almost a different issue every day and of course the issue of sanitising the united states of all confederate firm images i never understood and if i may if i could just finish up because i think it's important uh rick grab retell founding director of but edith oh adopt uh o'donnell institute of largest route university of texas uh former are director of the dallas museum of bart and wrote a great piece and the guy the commission did know was such a huge outcry um in dallas about the removal of a general lee and his forced the traveller and enforce uh the uh uh the soldier riding with him on his worst you know you got to give the ah the sculptor some role when the conversation as retell a points out out his general lee va if you don't hear anything else i say all all show listen to this his general lee is not the lee that's bannered about as the slave owner ernie's defending slavery in blah blah blah blah blah but rather proctor the sculptor uh probably one of the most important sculptors 20th century he was from the north he was an opponent of slavery he made a bronze monument not to racism not to slavery but to american unity after the civil war that's what his his statue was all about so rushing to remove it made no sense no hang on a second no everybody at slowdown take a deep breath and try to think about what it meant to the man who made it like a rick retail points out he deserves a say even though he died sixty seven years ago his was not a monument to racism or slavery but to american unity after the civil war all right let me get your calls let's go to uh.

Eric harley rick retail dallas museum of bart texas o'donnell institute founding director rick enver gary mcnamara america rick roberts civil war ernie lee dallas the commission director united states sixty seven years
"founding director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Founding director of the enough project you fat suss kim executive director of monterey david toh bear president of the international center for transitional justice and robin right to sir writer for the new yorker and a senior fellow at the us institute of peace and the woodrow wilson center this broadcast is made possible by the generous support of chevron and now to our moderator who is robert molly vice president for policy at the international crisis group we have a stiller panel all introduce everyone as as i ask them the first question we have a great panel we also have the exact right time to have them on stage because as i said a luke is on the rise after a period of relative decline in the number of conflicts we're now seeing the highest number of convicts since 1999 and the causing a greater number of civilian casualties and they have in the past also the incidence of recurrence of conflict wants a conflict ends and it starts again that's increasing between forty 1945 and two thousand nine fifty seven percent of civil wars reoccurred between two thousand and two thousand seventeen that figures jumped to ninety percent so obviously it is something that's going wrong in terms of our ability not just to end the conflict but to make sure that it doesn't start again other other pieces of evidence about how in fact we're facing a worse environment again i think everyone here would would a test the last time the un declared a famine was in two thousand eleven in somalia but last time to u n declared more than one firm and at the same time was more than three decades ago and now we're on the verge of the un declaring four firemen simultaneously in yemen nigeria south sudan and somalia at the same time we're seeing pressure as all these comfortable taking place more refugees more internally displaced persons and.

somalia nigeria un stiller robert molly us institute of peace monterey david Founding director sudan yemen executive director vice president chevron woodrow wilson center senior fellow new yorker writer robin president two thousand nine fifty seven ninety percent three decades
"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"founding director" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Part of the national museum of african american history and culture was closed for nearly three hours on wednesday after tour spotted a news an an exhibit on segregation museum founding director lonnie bunched the third calls it a reminder of the challenges black still face it is the second such incident in less asked than a week ago museum in washington smithsonian police say they found another news on the grounds of the hirschhorn museum friday and an exhibit on contemporary art and culture cnn has dropped comedian kathy griffin from her annual gig as a host of the networks new year's eve coverage as npr's david folk conflict reports cnn responding to outcry to a gruesome anti trump stunt by within the photograph making the rounds on social media showed griffin holding a fake bloodied head of the president the photographer tyler shields has said they were creating a provocative image of political art democrats and republicans joined to denounce the image as did griffins cohost anderson cooper as criticism built griffin posted an apology online i went way too far the images survey i understand how offense people it wasn't finally i get it later in the day a reporter asked the white house press secretary sean spicer about ted nugent who repeatedly suggested that then president obama should be killed spike is there said he didn't recall trump's reaction trump greeted nugent in the oval office last month and hosted him for dinner david focant flick npr news pittsburgh penguins have taken a two nothing lead over the nashville predators in the nhl stanley cup finals with a four two.

obama stanley cup nhl nashville pittsburgh david focant ted nugent press secretary white house lonnie founding director national museum of african ame trump segregation museum sean spicer reporter anderson cooper tyler shields president social media npr kathy griffin cnn hirschhorn museum smithsonian police washington three hours