40 Burst results for "Founder"

Fresh "Founder" from Bill Handel

Bill Handel

00:36 min | 1 min ago

Fresh "Founder" from Bill Handel

"Whether from Ko Phi, sunny and warm with us from the seventies to the mid nineties, This report is brought to you by Albertson's from the Southern California Toyota Dealers. Traffic Center. We make it easy. We're clearing up a crash on the 10 It was involved in park on the westbound 10 to 605 The crash over the right shoulder is still just a little bit of a pinch from point A avenue. If you're heading to Coupland traveling through, uh, planned on to 10 eastbound after campus heads up here there is a fatal crash investigation going onto the two right lanes are blocked. Treated like a Caltrans work zone. Just slow down and move over, please. Okay, if I and this guy is sponsored by injury, attorney superwoman super lawyer dot com Jeff Law starting with someone No one here, but there's still a pretty good driver now coming out of the San Fernando Valley up over the hill, quantum lattice right down before Level. No problems North founder was problems around City Hall. But everybody every moving here so little so come out from the East l a interchange, but really not to bet it all. And look at some of the 7 10 alles from about, uh, Florence up to the five all about his good stays Good up to around the 10 freeway in the West end. I have to get past the problems that the earlier problems I should say that Robin just warned you about around the 605 from there westbound all the way. 75. What is this speed limit? Enjoy injured in an accident. Visit Superwoman super lawyer dot com Jeff Bark a F I and this guy trafficking sponsored by big O tires. If I and this guy helps get to there faster, Robin Banks bring your vehicle to the team. You trust Viggo tires now save up to $150 on select sets of four big old brand tires with installation purchase using your big O tires. Credit card offer ends August 23rd for your nearest location. Visit..

Founder Ko Phi Robin Banks Southern California Toyota Dea Jeff Bark Coupland Albertson Florence Viggo Jeff Law City Hall San Fernando Valley Attorney West End
Hong Kong police raid pro-democracy media group, arrest founder

On The Media

00:53 sec | 1 d ago

Hong Kong police raid pro-democracy media group, arrest founder

"I'm w est with the BBC News Police in Hong Kong have arrested a prominent pro democracy activists and media tycoon Jimmy Lai for suspected collusion with foreign powers. Still, I was detained along with his two sons and four other people early today on suspicion of breaching the new National Security nor America. Oi has more details. The newspaper he founded Apple Davey has been very critical of Beijing. But to see the live pictures of police raiding the office is quite astonishing in the city, where free press was very famous because this is the first time will has been used against media as well. And, of course, just last month, we saw The New York Times. Announcing that it was moving part of its Hongkong bureau to South Correa and several outlets have complained about a foreign journals these air not being renewed. So this arrested definitely a significant blow to Hong

Hong Kong Jimmy Lai South Correa Hong BBC Beijing America Apple The New York Times
Fresh update on "founder" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

00:52 min | 3 min ago

Fresh update on "founder" discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Founder and MD joins us now. Yes, we can talk about national security. The other big objective would beat the challenge China's ambitions to create the world's undisputed technological superpower on aggregate. These measures that we've seen from the US do you think that changes that trajectory? Off that ambition in any significant way. It's certainly knew Hurdle Eso again. China would like to have platforms that are along the lines of Google or Amazon. That are dominant not just in China, but globally and we chat certainly has had potential as it really point Becomes so big outside of China, but in other areas, Southeast Asia in years down by well on tic tac has has been won that maybe one of the first really done well in all around the globe. Sound so again, if implemented if the band is implemented, that's a new hurdle. We'll see how how I danced. Preparing somebody handles that if that happens, imagines that are being put in place right now, but you certainly are having some impact on China. The question. Long term for China is can it can't find work arounds here..

China Hurdle Eso Founder Southeast Asia United States Google Amazon
How to Transition Team Members with Sarah Sloyan

The EntreLeadership Podcast

04:52 min | 1 d ago

How to Transition Team Members with Sarah Sloyan

"T members transition all the. Time business and it's one of the joys of small businesses you get to work with some of your best friends and and also one of the biggest sorrows is when you get to a point in and you go on a different path and those friends leave to do their own thing to move on a different opportunity and our senior vice president of entreleadership Sarah Slowin Ir we're. Going to spend a little time talking about this idea of transitions with team members, how to do it well, how to coach your team to do it in a way? That's classy. Alex has been so classy all the communication up to this point. This decision he's included us. We've worked together on this journey by the time that the decision was made he made that decision we. All agreed felt right because of all the conversation that we have been having and It's really a beautiful thing when it goes well like this, but it's also a nightmare when it doesn't and so Sarah unpack a few of the ways that you can set your team up for success to have a healthy culture that embraces doing transitions well with your team. So check it out. Sarah we say it all the time and that is that healthy things grow. And growing things change. When we have team that's growing and a business that's evolving. There's times when people move on, they do their own thing. I don't know about you but I used to just be in denial about this I thought will hire people they'll stay forever will all love each other all the time and nobody's ever going to leave and It's not the case. It's very not the case. We take a blood oath. It's like you're committed staying forever the hot normal. Because I mean we put so much energy into hiring the right people and. We build these bond says we become family and working and fighting together I mean what was the first time you remember thinking like Oh, man I can't believe we're losing this person because I mean, I, think we can all think back to the first time. It's such an emotional thing that somebody's moving on for me. It felt like we're never going to recover from this. LOSE THIS PERSON WE'RE GONNA die yes I was thinking back to not only my first time also the time that probably hit me the most was win I had an admin leave you know and we were so close and she just had this gift and this calling to go back into the music industry but I just remember thinking Oh my Gosh, you know is there anything I could've done or what am I going to do without her or that one felt I think so personal because we worked so closely together and that was really really tough and we stayed in touch and were still great friends but I remember thinking that was going to be tough to recover from. But you made it. in the moment, it always feels like the end of the world and I think what we have found is that there is a natural thing that happens where somebody else comes along. Sometimes it's even a better fit for the next person that comes in you get a chance to kind of upgrade your tail, and that's what I've learned is I have gotten progressively better at identifying what I need like. If you take the admin example, the first time I've ever hired an Admin I didn't know what I even needed. Help with people just told me I needed this. Person, and so the subsequent times that I hired for that role I had a much clearer understanding of what I needed the characteristics that I needed and I was able to articulate that better on the front end to set us up win even better and I think that's the same in our roles. I think when I am rehiring for a designer role, honestly sometimes a business has changed and grown so much since the last time I hired for that role that we are looking for a different skill set even at that point, you know the bar is is changed. Into Stanley often says that the people that start with you many times will not finish with you. Yeah, and that's tough because you want to believe that the people that were early on the founders of your team that wants who really are building this from the grassroots you have these visions of standing on top of the mountain together all celebrating the big long journey that we all went on together and when that doesn't work out that way, it can be an emotional journey. That's the bitter sweetness of leadership. You know we're called to lead these people. Love them and train them knowing like you're saying that a large percentage of them will be called to do something else. What I always try to remember is it's a force multiplier when they leave, they are taking the principles that you have shared with them and the kind of unconditional love and acceptance that you've shown them, and hopefully they are pouring that out into other places and other operations, and so that's kind of a cool thing to think about the ripple effect you know, of course, I want everybody just to stay here and be at Ramsey. Forever. But the idea of them going somewhere else in being able to implement the things that they've learned here. That's pretty cool.

Sarah Slowin Ir Alex Senior Vice President Stanley
Fresh "Founder" from WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

00:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Founder" from WBT's Morning News with Bo Thompson

"The spouse of a U. S. Marine than another round table discussion on mental health. Three sources. In the Charlotte area and the importance of addressing mental health issues. A couple of major bakery crashes in the W. B T listening area this morning, one in Iron Hill County on Interstate 40 eastbound heading into Statesville involving an 18 wheeler that was hauling empty tubes of toothpaste. That crash happened late last night near Exit 1 41 A truck caught fire after it veered off the interstate and into a wooded area. The driver was injured but is expected to be OK. The other major, bigger crash on 85 south coming through and county near the Yadkin River Bridge, where Highway Patrol says truck crashed into three fire trucks that were responding to an earlier truck trailer fire. All that happening at about 4 20 this morning, saw 11 10 99 3 LGBT with traffic from the W B T Traffic center. Here's Pam Warmer, Pam Orner with the traffic impact of those incidents. Thank Steve of those air traffic Rex are still in the process of clearing right now 85 South found does remain shut down near Mile Marker 84 at the Yadkin River Bridge, and I think it's a good time to remind you anytime you see officials leaving a scene or on the roadway. Just make sure that you are moving over and away from them because this earlier wreck it could have been Avoided this morning. All the I 40 eastbound after Sharon School Road, only that right lane, it does stay open. The rest of those roadways are the rest of those lanes to remain close as cleanup is still under way. 85 South found near Little Exit 23. We have a red and 77 South founder John about freeway. That area also still running slow from an earlier accident. However, that one should be clearing up shortly. Greene Homes Solutions is Charlotte's leading expert in indoor air quality from old inspections. Re mediation along with dis infections, including Cove it 19 allergen testing an odor removal. Contact Green Home Solutions. Today that's green home solutions dot com Again. Green home solutions dot com com Pam winner W B T Traffic WLBT News time. 803 President Trump's Corona virus briefing Monday afternoon interrupted by shots fired just outside the White House. A Secret Service spokesman says it started with a man approaching a federal officer saying he was armed before starting to walk away. Suspect then turned around.

Green Home Solutions Yadkin River Bridge Iron Hill County Charlotte Pam Orner Greene Homes Solutions Little Exit Statesville U. S. Marine Highway Patrol W B T Officer Donald Trump President Trump Founder Steve Mile Marker White House
Guest Teacher  Alain Hunkins  How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

The $100 MBA Show

09:47 min | 1 d ago

Guest Teacher Alain Hunkins How to Increase Your Impact and Influence by Building Your Credibility

"Today's guest teacher. Huggins is the author of cracking the leadership code, three secrets that building strong leaders if you want to get the first chapter for free, hang onto the end of the episode, Show you how you can get it on the sought after trainer Speaker, consultant, and coach for over twenty years. He's worked with big brands like Walmart Pfizer, City Group General Electric IBM? GM. State Farm Insurance Microsoft and more and today. He's GonNa break down how to build your credibility, your authority with your team with your actual clients with anybody who work with some simple steps you can take. This is especially important for new to this if you are. are dealing with new clients or you have new teams joining your team. The first thing everybody's thinking about when they meet you is, is this person? The real deal? Can I trust them? Will they deliver? Are they the leader I'm looking for? Is this the business or client I want to work with and that all boils down to are you credible? Let's make sure the answer is, yes. So I'm GONNA pass it onto onto, teach you today's guest teacher lesson, but I'll be back to rabbit today's episode and share with you that linked to get the free, first chapter of allowance book cracking the Leadership Code, but for now takeaway on. Hello there, my name is Alla. Pumpkins. Thank you for joining me today. Today. You how to increase your influence and impact five building your credibility. So, let's get down to business. I'd like to start by giving you thirty thousand foot high level overview of our lesson today. We'll start by looking at what credibility is. Then take a look at why it's so important, and then look at the three biggest actions you can take to build your credibility, but let's start with a story about a leader named Clint. Clint is the CO founder of a software company that's grown rapidly over the last three years. He's smart outgoing and he's great in front of customers. In fact, the sales team is nicknamed Clinton Midas because everything he touches turns to gold. However for all of Clint's strengths, he has this tragic flaw. He's consistently late for meetings ten, twenty, thirty minutes. Late is par for the course with Clinton sometimes even more. In Clint is also the master of excuses as to why he's late. He'll say, well, this customer meeting went long or this operational issue needed my time or gosh, the traffic from the airport was horrible. However is much as Clinton tries to explain and excuse his way out of it. His team is just not having it anymore. It's having an impact on engagement morale. In fact, two of Clint's direct reports have quit in the last week. And the sad truth is clint doesn't have a clue as to why and the reason because Clinton has never stopped to recognize the importance of credibility. So let's start and take a look. What exactly is credibility. Credibility comes from the Latin word credibility, which means worthy to believed. Credibility, is the main ingredient in trust and trust is the glue of human relationship. Turns out credibility shares the same etymological root as the word credit, which means alone or a thing entrusted to another. So, let's take a look at why that is so important. So if you want to influence others, you want them to do something because it's important to you. So, how did they decide if they're going to do it? Well, it's based on your relationship credit score. If you have a high credit score, you've proven yourself as a low risk, high return person and the other person is likely to help. They think you're a good investment. However, if you're a high risk low return person forget about it, they're not going to help fact is people own their own talents and skills, and they only offer them to you on loan. So having a high level of credibility or relationship credit score is your way of proving that you're worth loaning to. For people to truly follow you. They have to believe you're worth following. And how do they decide it's through your actions or is Albert Schweitzer the Nobel Prize winner. Put it. Example is not the main thing influencing others. It is the only thing. So. If you want to increase your influence and impact and others, you need to grow your credibility. To take a look at the top three things that you can do to make that happen. The first. Showing up on. Time to lesson from Clint. If I could only choose one practice to grow my credibility. I'd say show up on time you should treat your performance in this arena is a big deal. It is think about it for a moment. Timeliness is the easiest and most visible thing to measure sure either here or you're not. Fact is lateness is about much more than just a few wasted minutes. In life being on time is the most basic social contract that of presence. When you're late, your behavior sends a clear message. I have other things going on. That are more important than you are. And when you're on time, you send a clear message that you value the other person. So you to choose what's the message that you WanNa send and know that your actions speak a lot louder than your intentions. The second thing that you can do to grow your credibility is to do what you say you're GONNA do. You see when you open your mouth and promised to do something you cr- create expectations in those who are listening to you for them that promise is now this open psychological loop of tension that seeks resolution and it stays open nagging at them as they think, will they follow through or not? The fact is people crave closure. So every time you do what you say you're going to do you strengthen the connection between your words and your deeds, which is exactly what's meant by walking the talk when you walk your talk your seen as congruent and when you don't. You're not. You're out of integrity something's off, which is what Ralph Waldo Emerson Express when he said who you are speaks. So loudly, I can't hear what you're saying. See Doing. What you say you're going to do is the precise deficit of accountability. have. You ever wondered where accountability comes from. It comes from the world of accounting in finance. There's a balance sheet, there's on one side assets. The other side is liabilities and the to need to equal each other to be in account. Well, in human behavior, the two sides of your behavioral balance-sheet are what you say you're going to do. And what you actually did. And when you follow through and do what you say, you'll do the two sides balanced out and you're accountable. So a top tip around this. Do you say what you're GonNa do is write things down. Keep a written record of what you promised to do your way better off being someone who under promises and over delivers than the other way around. This means you have to be clear on your commitments and also be willing to say no from time to time. So. We've looked at our first two actions. Showing up on time doing what you say you're going to do our third one is around being consistent. This is the practice of doing what you say you're going to do not just once, but repeatedly multiple times over an extended period of time. When you start to build the deposits in that emotional bank account, your credit score goes up. The, no. One's going to throw you a party for showing up on time. However, the little things done over time compound and have a multiplier effect. As an example, take the CEO of Campbell Soup, a man called Doug. It now doug was CEO of Campbell Soup, for ten years and in his ten year period as the leader of Campbell's. Doug wrote Thirty Thousand Personal Handwritten. Thank you notes to his employees. Now, by the way over those ten years, Campbell's only had twenty thousand employees, and if you do the math, it works out to more than eight. Thank you notes per day seven days a week for ten years. Now, that's pretty incredible to me. Now, I'm not saying you need to start writing eight. Thank you know today, but I think Doug Conan's example of the power of consistently and showing how that multiplies and compounds over time is great. It's so easy in this world to think that we're too busy to do the important things. See if you WanNa know what a person values. Look at their calendar and see where they spend their time because that is the ultimate test of what you're truly valuing because ultimately, every action that you take will either strengthen or weaken your credibility and connection between. which either strengthens or weakens your influence and your impact.

Clint Clinton Midas Doug Conan Campbell Soup State Farm IBM Walmart GM Huggins Thirty Thousand Personal Handw Campbell Albert Schweitzer Consultant Ralph Waldo Emerson Nobel Prize CEO Co Founder
Fresh update on "founder" discussed on The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:35 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "founder" discussed on The Paul W. Smith Show

"But as much as you hear me, point out the travails in the failures of a lot of our elected officials and the difficulty we're in You know, we said in March march that we would have depression level unemployed and unfortunately you were correct. I'm still optimistic about Michigan in the country. I mean, we have faced worse. This is bad, but it is not. It's worse. Not a Band of World War two we've gotten through that. Michigan's a strong state in our auto industry. It's a very important industry are egg industry is important. We've got a lot of hardworking people out there. They're working through the worst of this, and I am actually quite confident. That we will get through this. Relentless, positive radio. Thanks for helping us find that Patrick of circumstances. God bless you, Patrick. Thanks for your help. All right, take their problem. You two Patrick Anderson, founder and CEO of the Anderson.

Patrick Anderson Michigan Founder And Ceo
Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

The Keto Answers Podcast

06:31 min | 1 d ago

Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

"Today on the show I, welcome my friend Todd White, who is the founder and CEO of dry farm. Wise if you drink alcohol. This is a tricky thing. I mean we we talk a lot about why he may dry farm. He does she like alcohol he thinks it's a narrow talks should be drinking it and but he has this company that. He loves one he wanted people to access it and have the healthiest possible. Imaginable and so if you're a wine drinker and your Kito or trying to be healthy removed out, there's a lot of Stephens episode that frequent blew my mind when we do have into it and I've been drinking his death and dry wines. Very often, but a couple of times a year special occasions I pops dry farm. Wise. It happened last five years but I had no idea about the ridiculous nature and how process and how much garbage is traditional winds. Tons of Info there which wines you choose and why if you want to be as healthy as possible. We him and I both sentiment that alcohol. There's nothing positive about it. But you know sometimes you want to enjoy life and have some why not a big deal? No judgment there and also todd is just a really really interesting guy when it comes to his intention digging a little bit about how he sort of crafted his business in life. Overall, he said interesting background I've known for a while and a great conversation. So tune in and I hope you guys enjoy. This episode is brought to you by neuro collective. I've been using their products on and off last few years in a huge fan of how they form the products their dosing in dumbest around. So Dr Greg Kelly. Their lead product formulator is actually on the podcast previously upset out but you can trust that knocker collective is always doing one hundred percent dosing backed up by research, a lot of companies where they do. They sprinkling amounts of ingredients. So that way you're not actually getting the full amount that is required to have physiological effect. He just get a little sprinkling and dosing and their their practice. So expected that Dr Kelly actually recommends taking two days a week and they're servings is is seven really huge capsules which just shows how much active ingredient actually put in their product I am personally a huge fan of the caffeine. Free. Version of their product quality mind and I take it on an empty stomach with exogenous ketones in the morning when I know that really want to get a bunch of an interrupted deep work hours done I feel in his own literally hours and the best part is there's no crazy crash afterwards if you're not a neutral person, sales have an amazing product called attorneys that contains all the precursors to d which is. Far More effective than taking direct d supplements to reduce oxidative damage to yourself. Again, love the formulation and how they went about making this. If you want to try out any neuro hacker collective products had two neuro hacker dot com and use the code aged one five for fifteen percent of all the products. That's any you are O. Hacker Dot Com Code Eight, G one, five for fifteen percent off all of their products. This episode is brought to you by Paleo Valley. I've been a huge fan of this company for years ever since I met the founders at a conference, I'd say four years ago plus in have been eating their hundred percent grass-fed grass finished beef sticks ever since then the because reading the recently, why asked them to come on the show's sponsor? Is that? They do a lot of support in regenerative farming. They actually continue to reinvest into helping small farmer scale in really building on an amazing supply chain to help regenerative agriculture scale. The only that they're beef sticks aren't dry bone and leave that weird slim Jim style waxy coating, your mouth, they are plump in. In in a weird way, we gobble these guys up at the perfect offices when we don't have time to get a full meal in perfect real food snack if you're looking for one of the best beef sticks around, that are not only great tasting but responsibly sourced checkout Paleo Valley and great news is listeners of the podcast get fifteen percent off. So just go to Paleo Valley dot com slash one five or use code ag one five at checkout epithelial Valley Dot Com fifteen percent off that's p. E. L.. V. A. L. L. E. Y., DOT COM SLASH E G, one, five talk. Thank you for joining me today. Hey, I'm looking forward to it. It's going to be a great discussion. You're one of the first people that I met. That were sort of early Keitel Angeles. Before this whole boom happened years. It started with Christmas, you guys three or four years ago when you first were up. It's been almost odd years but yeah, we were or I should say many people on the team as well. But. We We were super early adapters before it became a thing. Kid Genyk Guy. It was starting to circulate in the biohacking community about five years ago. Maybe five miss closest six years ago when I started and and you know it was it was getting around biohacking community had not yet gone mainstream. But. Yeah, we were there early and still still big believers. Yeah I mean what was it? That got you into everything being was just the sort of request to optimize your personal health. It was an actually that would be a little bit more glamorous but it was really about vanity I had I had reached a weight loss plateau. It wasn't really overweight and in any way because I've been biohacking and sort of. been. In, and out Akita Genyk. Diet. Really since the eighties with the Atkins Diet but I had been eating a lower car diet for quite some many years. So it wasn't really overweight but I really wanted to lean out. And I I was at a weight loss plateau and low carb just wasn't doing it, and so that's I experimented with Kito that way and then the weight loss went away pretty quickly as it tends to do for most people in fact, lost a lot more weight than I had anticipated. And then sort of what I thought was a set point and a place I wanted to be but I continued the Ketogenic Diet in fact. Double down on it and really became therapeutically Ketogenic, which is different than Akita. Diet. or a modified Keto Diet, which is the way I would describe my diet today but. But I experimented with really therapeutic Ketogenic, which is super high fat and and and a lot of blood testing and a lot of kind of quantification and. You know the cognitive benefits for me. became. So extraordinary that I just stayed on the Diet, even though I didn't have any plans of further white. House.

Paleo Valley Todd White Valley Dot Com Biohacking Founder And Ceo Dr Greg Kelly Dr Kelly Stephens Kito Akita Genyk Genyk Guy Caffeine Keitel Angeles JIM A. L. L. E. Y.
Fresh "Founder" from Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:34 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "Founder" from Morning Edition

"What up with that in mind, Consider Ma Duma Soma Anthony, also dancing in the rain. Video of the 11 year old Nigerian boy has gone viral. It chose him outside in it down for pure wedding and leaping with such elegance. His teacher says that Anthony is a bit of a perfectionist. Anthony has been a very dedicated students from the day when he started is someone who, if it doesn't get the combination correctly, is that crying in class Daniela Jolla is the founder of the Leap of Dance Academy in Nigeria's biggest city, Lagos. Angela's getting young people like Anthony into ballet type of dance that hasn't been widely practised in this country. I don't want to be like everything agenda, which is actually into people or something has to bring a different picture of what has been seen or acceptable year. His classes small for the moment about 20 students or so, but he's working to raise the profile of ballet. You know, in this part of the world or in danger, they who Bali is not taking us educational skill. It is just something people do for fun to attract aspiring dancers. Angela offers something that most ballet academies don't free classes because I do not want the child to tell me or I'll say something like Oh, I never had opportunity when I was younger. So I just want to make the opportunity for every child. How's this for opportunity? Anthony has now been offered a scholarship from the American Ballet Theatre. The video of him dancing barefoot in the rain got their attention, and he'll be training with them virtually this summer. That recognition makes his teacher Mr Ayala, even Mohr optimistic. Danger is on the map Internationally on does activity. So my dream is to see the manger is recognized internationally and professional. Thanks to Anthony, Nigeria could be on the And tomorrow on morning edition. How government.

Duma Soma Anthony Nigeria Angela American Ballet Theatre Daniela Jolla Lagos Dance Academy Mr Ayala Bali Founder Mohr
Interview With Skye Pillsbury

She Podcasts

05:29 min | 3 d ago

Interview With Skye Pillsbury

"I'm sure it's fine. So without further ado, let's talk a little bit too sky about leaving inside podcasting like she just made the announcement that not only was this her last season but that she would no longer be writing for inside podcasting which I don't know if you guys know this but unlike hot pod and Pod News, Sky Actually works for a company that has asked her to create inside podcasting. It's not her own is not of her own fruition. So what came about that made you decide? No Moss. So I have been percolating in my brain for a few months I had actually talked to inside about it about three months prior and. I feel for I say that I'm super grateful to inside it opens so many doors for me to meet so many interesting people you included and so I loved the experience of writing for them but it did feel after two years like I was I was really pouring my blood sweat and tears into the podcast and the newsletter. It just felt like I was every day that I was working for them and building this thing for them. Felt like a day that I wasn't building something for me it didn't feel that. Way In the beginning but once I, sort of like established myself a little bit I just had this nagging feeling that it was time to do something new and I don't know right now exactly what form that is gonNA take but I will be keeping people posted about that on twitter and there's a few different things I'm craving one could be more ownership over something that I create one could be working with more of a team because it was very much a solo effort and sort of crave like that's why doing this. PODCAST with you guys, it's so fun for me because you're my friends and it's it's you know the sense of community that I haven't really had and you know it would be nice to get paid more. You know no one goes into journalism to make a million dollars. So I had all of that. The other thing which I think is fine for me to share is that Jason who is my boss? He's the founder of inside wanted and had been sort of hammering me for a few months to make eight paid newsletter. He's done that with a lot of the other newsletters that inside produces an I really didn't want to do that I didn't feel that my readers were the kind of years that necessarily that all of them had like extra funds to spend on newsletters that you know is my news are critical to your workday probably not it's. It's a nice fun thing to read but I also didn't want to be writing a newsletter for like the twenty people that pay I mean I don't know how many people it would have been we had. Eighteen thousand subscribers so maybe it would have been more, but the point is that what I WANNA do is to write for a big audience of people who love podcast, and so that was another had staved off for months and I knew that it is certain point I wasn't going to be able to do that anymore. So that was a big reason to for me. To say I think I need to you know it's time for me to strike out on my own I have no, there's no bad blood. There are no hard feelings. Jason is a total work, but in a weird way I, kind of love him too and I definitely am appreciative to the company and everyone that I worked with they're just as your friend. I you've never. Said anything bad about Jason that I can recall. You've always said nothing but nice things about him and it sounds like your dilemma is the dilemma of every entrepreneur whether you knew you were one or not. Eventually we all do that where even if you're already working for yourself like for me as a graphic and web designer I was working I was doing projects hourly. And at first, it was six yards and our, and then I was like wait in three hours only making one hundred, eighty bucks that's ridiculous and then I then you move it up and then you move it up and when you're working for someone else you don't get anywhere near what you would pay as a consultant and you're still like, wow, I spent eight hours there. And I made three hundred dollars and also I, didn't know work that I get to keep crap. You want your own body of work you want your audience and your traffic, and when you're talented, you know you're talented and when you're good even if you're not marketing like you know that you're good at your job and therefore wants to do it on your own behalf. So I totally get that and I think it's a big conversation right now within podcasting is that. Specific to podcasting a lot of people are producing podcasts and not getting the same kind of deals especially particularly, I. Think people of Color. Not Getting the same deals as other people are getting from the companies that they work for you know Britney lose from the nod has been very vocal about that as well as Meka Yousef created tell them. I am these are conversations that are out there happening my situation was different. I was under no illusion that I was going to be able to keep. Anything, but it is that same feeling of like you know it is weird for me. I have to say that they might continue that podcast and they'll be completely different homes and yet it really was like my creation and you know hopefully, it will always be out there but it's time for me to build something for me whether it's writing podcasting even freelancing I don't know it. I want to be more in control of my own destiny as an and I loved the interaction with readers and if I had to make it pay walled that interaction would have really narrowed and you know what I loved about writing. That was just like I had a big audience and people who wanted to engage with the and I. Hope

Jason Twitter Moss Founder Meka Yousef Web Designer Consultant Britney
Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

Outcomes Rocket

05:12 min | 3 d ago

Empowering Medtech with Anatoly Geyfman

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Sal Marquez here and today I. Have the privilege of hosting on a totally gave man. He is the CEO and Co founder of Care Avoidance, a healthcare sales enablement solution for life sciences that is doing extraordinary work for drawing out value propositions. Companies Looking to express that clearly anatoly came to work in healthcare early in his career, starting off as the lead engineer on one of the first hip compliant benefits, communication products for enterprises, he continued to work with large healthcare data sets and HR soft before. Before becoming the chief architect at Ambra. Health a cloud based medical imaging company. It was there at Ambra that Anatoly saw the need for high quality data to inform sales execution which germinated. The idea for care voyage were thrilled to have him on the podcast today, and it's such a unique platform that they're using to reach customers and for sales teams to reach their customers in a clear way Donatelli. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank Salty. Got Be. Yeah. Absolutely. So tons of great stuff being done by your company. And so before we dive into really the meat bones of what you guys do there, I love to first arc and find out more about you and one inspires your work in healthcare. I appreciate it, and so I started working in healthcare actually when I was still in high school. I just happened to luck out and find on an internship working on one of the first hickory maple insisting that for human resources management. So that really starting my love for working with large data sets and working with privileged data, like that I continue dot read some other gigs on signatory around Maple imaging on, and that's really where I started learning about. About, the difficulty that companies have selling in healthcare. So with my may imaging gig on I, I was the chief architect company called Ambra Health on big digital medic rummaging Bloomberg, and then I switched over to more of a developer evangelists than sales engineering role, and that's where I really started looking at how companies that produce the rate products go to market. And what inspires me a about healthier? Specifically, my little corner of healthcare is helping innovators, take their market big their products to market. I think there's a lot of great innovation that's happening right now. especially with digital innovation machine learning ai off care. But I think that the past to a successful product is still at I. It's still very hard to navigate. So that's what inspires me getting these products so. So, writer audience and getting patients right treatment at the right time, eventually through through the use of our product and obviously great innovation. Yeah. You know it's That's so great, and there's so many opportunities for companies and you know the people leading them, the teams that are representing the great work that you know I mean many of these companies we have on the podcast a totally you know the. Great Work and they have great products and services and the pathway to get there. The go to market strategy isn't always super clear, and then on top of that, it's not easy to sell inside of our healthcare system and it takes forever so. All of those things are true own. Yeah, and I think that there are a lot of products that end up failing because the products and successful and because the greater market strategy is maybe not very well informed their beats not very well executed, and so if I can do anything to help that and that was where I decided to spend, my time is opening entrepreneurs with way to go to market I. Think it's great and in our vertical or our economy or health care economy, it's so necessary. So tell us a little bit about what you guys are doing. Doing at care voyage to add value to the healthcare ecosystem of innovators. Yeah. -solutely. So you know I'll start with a problem I. think the really big problem right now, the REC- at least in our little corner of the healthcare economy is data symmetry It's you know everyone makes decisions or everyone strives to make decisions in a data driven way the acquisition of data to make those decisions, your go to market or even your your product strategy is still not democratized Jesus, sometimes available and very regularly available in. Thanks. It's not available at all on companies like care. Where we're trying to do. At least off the for. Right now, we're trying to do is we're trying to democratize access to this information whether it's you know information about who's doing, what types of services takes a physicians practicing the type of and your are devices best for or on that you're pharmaceutical product is best stations for it. I think a lot of like data's available, but traditionally, it's only been available to the wealthiest layers market and so our goal is to democratize access to that. So even startups that may not have the backing of the largest feet from on me, not how hundred million dollars in the bay and can't get access to it and really execute a great girl market.

Anatoly Ambra Chief Architect REC Sal Marquez Ceo And Co Ambra Health Lead Engineer Founder Writer Bloomberg Developer
Co-Founder Divya Gugnani on What's Next for Wander Beauty

Mom Brain

01:40 min | 4 d ago

Co-Founder Divya Gugnani on What's Next for Wander Beauty

"Divvy at what is next for wonder, beauty a lot is next for wander beauty. I think that we are. Looking at this year as very interesting time to be in business. We will definitely be launching some newness which I'm very excited about extending into the skincare category further and deeper. As we're seeing a lot of traction there people are really getting more into self care. They really look at us for minimum effort maximum result formulations, which is what we're doing in skin on will also be growing the category in and color and hair. I'm really thinking a lot more about sustainability that's been at the forefront of what we're learning and growing from really thinking through our packaging trying to be find ways to have less. Less of a footprint on the environment. So that's on our horizon up things to do. We're starting off cycle all of our components where people can actually send them in. We can upcycle them for them and then more growth for global brands. Now were distributed all through, southeast? Asia Australia. We're going to launch a new markets we're going to be penetrating in the EU in a deeper way when travel comes back, we're going to do a lot more travel retail. We just started to dip our toe into hotels in cruise ships but I think. More. Of that because that's the perfect place for the wonder woman who's on the go and traveling on when she's allowed to go back to traveling, she will be finding, many more touch points. So she really wants to go back to traveling. She's excited. All. She's really really wanting that right now. She just wants to be able to leave my house but. Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with

EU Asia Australia
The Pixel 4a is coming

The Vergecast

06:08 min | 4 d ago

The Pixel 4a is coming

"We just had soon are on the show. Was it two months ago? And we're like what's up pixels and he like we gotta make him. Good. Did he make him good. I mean he made he made one one. Good. So the Pixel for a has been announced and released viewed it bunch of a tear. Actually, the podcast of used one but because the Pixel for is late and we can talk about why it is really close to when we're assuming the pixel five is gonNA come out. So Google is like you know what? Yeah, we're making a pixel five. It'll be out here this fall also there's GonNa be a pixel for a five G. 'cause you know that's what you want. So they just announced all three phones at once just Bam per year of you reviewed the. We've not seen photos of the five. We have seen various and confusing leaks all summer and Chris you might actually have a better handle around this afar but a bunch of the early leaks for like this must be the pixel five. Am It's like well, no, there's actually the probably the pixel for five G. now, and then there's more yet more internal documents, even more pixels at a foldable pixel like later on down the line like it's a fiasco in Pixel rumor land. Super. Confusing I mean they had that league. I think it was last month there was a phone. It looks just like the four day but they said it was the five and people weren't sure. But then it seems like they might get rid of their face ID clone which I really actually liked on the pixel of four like to just walk away from that the thumb reader but I mean, yeah, no one's really quite sure it's going to look like even the four five G. might have new specs or a bigger screen or who knows who knows what the story is I mean it's there's there's just always confusion about what's GonNa Happen is GonNa have brightly colored plastic rectangle smug s Yes The four as a decidedly, not brightly colored plastic rectangle. Four, you reviewed it. So the big big new innovation in the Pixel Foray is they dropped fifty bucks off the price. So it to three hundred, fifty dollars, which is. Pretty big. It's a pretty big deal It's a hundred bucks less than these storage equivalent iphone se. To get one I WANNA see one, hundred, twenty, eight gigs and they just like. Got Everything as good as you can probably get it on a three hundred, fifty dollar phone like I. Wish it had a faster processor but we live in a world of android where qualcomm. If you want to get a good qualcomm processor, you gotta spend way too much money. So I got like, okay one that's got a pretty solid screen. It's it's got a hole punch. It's got the Pixel camera a Becca actually pointed out to me when we were talking to them, she asked if it had was the sensor Becca three sixty three. Yeah. Same Sensor as. The Pixel four and the Pixel three and the Pixel three they've been using literally like the exact same camera stack for like two years now. So it's great. It makes takes rate photos but they haven't pushed it much. I would love it. If you could select your software tuning on the Pixel who right if you buy a pixel for and like make this shit, look like the Pixel two that would make me very happy because I thought the Pixel two looked it was the most contrast in the most dramatic and they have veered towards looking more like the overtime. But I wish. I. Could just be like go back to that look I love that look the best because if they're using the same hardware, they should give you the choices software, right? Everyone is just looking at me like. I mean it's like it's like saying you should just get your choice of. Clutch on your Mustang like it gets tied. The thing. Okay. Versus automatic. Put Your Ninety seven clutch in Twenty fifteen I mean you don't WanNa do that but you can be retune in anyway. Keep going the pixel for we're not gonNA talk about mustangs fingerprint sensor on the back. It works great. It's got a headphone Jack. because. Apparently low and phones are the only phone's headphone Jacks Anymore Beca you holding one right now you're holding. I'm holding one right now and what I'll have to say about this is that I love this thing like it gave me everything I like about phones in twenty twenty like a big screen and it's slim and the batteries diesen but it kept the things that I also love about previous cones that I love a fingerprint sensor like a one on the back and I love a headphone Jack and I love the Pixel camera in its three hundred and fifty dollars, which is a pretty good pricing twenty twenty for a brand new phone. There's this. There's this meme out there. For him but like there's this idea out there that like Google was bored with android in the pixels reflection of its board on this phone feel like they're bored with it. Now I'm bored with Andrew. Debut. The one new features accessibility feature for software a IT'll do real time captioning phone calls but it doesn't record them and it doesn't put them on the Internet. So don't have your conspiracy theories thrown at me Breitbart. They wrote it up terribly anyway So that's like the one thing but that's coming other pixels. It's just like Google. So committed to keeping the pixel software like really clean and basic relative to the madness that happens on every other android phone that it can feel a little bit boring and their decision to be really like understated with their design. I think it's like they've got they've. got a little bit too far. It's been like, no, no this is this is the the android phone that isn't flashy. It's just like a phone and after a while like that message gets through that like. Made a phone. Okay. Like they want it to be utilitarian to the point where it's like become a little bit boring. Thank you. Go. Has has been so long burned by Sergey Brin. Coming into Google glass event. On a hang glider. That's a real thing that happened they. US In like one of the founders landed on sage on a hang glider glass is the future and that was their last big attempt to be splashy. In it completely backfired like in every possible way

Google Qualcomm Becca Sergey Brin United States Chris Breitbart Jack Andrew
Final Derby Dress Rehearsals

In The Gate

04:48 min | 4 d ago

Final Derby Dress Rehearsals

"The favourite for Saturday's travers stakes is the Belmont stakes winner Tis the law, the owners of the law, a group of fairly regular guys from the Saratoga area they go by Saka. Toga stables are the same guys who owned funny side the winner of the two, thousand, three, Kentucky Derby and preakness they showed up to each triple crown race in a yellow school bus, not a limo. It was a scene to which many of us could relate but I'm going to give you a comparison of two other. Owners of horses running in Saturday's travers they are and Lori Hall who owned the Third Place Finisher in the Belmont Max Player and Orlando and Jonathan Noda who liked their travers entrant I line are the longest of longshots George Hall is the founder of a Hedge Fund, the Clinton Group that company's assets reached a high of five and a half billion dollars in two thousand, sixteen. Orlando Noda is a thirty one year old trainer who co all of his horses with his brother. Jonathan who's in the car business? George Hall and his wife Lori sold a six level. Manhattan penthouse in two thousand seventeen for somewhere around thirty eight million dollars. Orlando notice biggest return on investment so far has been the horse not loves a fight who not claimed for ten thousand dollars in May of two, thousand nineteen and whose win a month later represented his trainers I ever. T loves a fight won four races for his trainer and finished second last week in the John Morrissey at Saratoga. You. Get the idea Max player for George and Lori. Hall won the withers stakes back in February and finished third in the Belmont. STAKES IN JUNE FIRST LINE FOR ORLANDO. Noda just earned his first win in four tries and he's returning on only ten days rest to take on an imposing field. But if his trainers story is any harbinger, don't count first line out and we are pleased to welcome to win the game for the first time the trainer of First Line Orlando Noda what went into the decision to turn this horse around in just ten days. The horse came out of it good and I nominated him prior to even run especially. Like figure that especially wasn't GonNa go I was I was GONNA test my luck there and restaurant him because. The horse had shown me talent ever since I had him and I think got strike while the iron is hot right now and everything is just clicking on all cylinders. So I. Think we're just going to give it a go is not every day that we can have a three year old peak at the right time via because of this corona virus that maybe I might might just be able to pull off the upset and get my derby points that that I high horse up about the beginning. You would said to a couple of racing aficionados over the winter that you had a derby horse and first line what made you think that then Oh no the horses super talented it from the first time that we breathed him. We knew we had something special. I'm not the lightest of riders and horses just noting on track with me and I just can't picture it. Any other way because everything has played out to where it should as he broke his. Maiden here in Saratoga and I think the past two races, six furlongs, it was just the the too short for him for his long strident. He just went comfortable and those fractions buying the mollering Nathan not many horses hold up biting the whole time that they are at the top of the stretch hometown in first line and they've been at it. Right from the START I line on the outside pokes ahead and front hometown continues to battle down at the rail. Now, they're at the eighth bowl it is first line and hometown go to battle for a mile and a furlong here first line hud and front hometown not giving up they come for the finish and first line is first under the wire. Race I'm wondering if he's even cooled out yet from that race, I mean that was affirmed and Alydar Rier Dan Against Jaipur was neck and neck for a mile and an eighth I mean, how do you think that part of a racist going to affect him the ten days notwithstanding? Even fresh I'm not doing much with him and. Keep Afresh to the to the race. Then you gotta show up on the race checking in, and that's how he is all game once it gets onto the track. IS A. Very level-headed. Once once he gets into training just like train I'm just giving just. Keep them -freshing raider fire. For for the drivers.

Orlando Noda George Hall Orlando Jonathan Noda Saratoga Lori Longshots George Hall Kentucky Derby Nathan MAX Hedge Fund Belmont Founder John Morrissey Manhattan Clinton Group George
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 4 d ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Imagine it Forward and Goodr

Zero to IPO

04:23 min | 4 d ago

Imagine it Forward and Goodr

"To another episode of Zero, to IPO were absolutely thrilled to have to amazing guests on the show today I wanna I introduce Beth comstock who for many years in fact, almost three decades was at GE and served as the vice chairperson. There is on the board of Nike is also the author of this amazing book called imagine it forward, which I am really enjoying and learning a lot from and have a bunch of questions to ask Beth about the. Beth welcome on the show. Thanks Josh. Great to see you great to be here. And our other guests is Jasmine crow who is the CEO and founder of Gooder, which is a company that I am fascinated by I. think it's one of the more insightful companies that I've come across. Recently I also have a lot of questions for you Jasmin about how the idea came to you, but but welcome on the show. Thanks so much gas and happy to be here. Of course, we've got Freddie caressed my co host. Zeroed IPO your morning Josh, how you doing good I bet and Jasmine, nice to see you. Thanks for joining us today I'm super excited about today. Yeah me too good to see you. Well, let's dive right in because we have a lot to talk about Jasmine I wanNA start with you and I want to understand I want our audience to understand where you're coming from. When you started gooder there's some kind of basic facts that I want our audience to understand domestically we are wasting seventy-two billion pounds of food every year while forty two million people are struggling with food insecurity absolutely that's a foundational mess. And it's even worse. Now, I'll of everything that's happening with current virus who are wasting more food and more people are going hungry. So it is a huge issue. Yeah. I mean just to be clear before this even. I read somewhere that we were wasting about a quarter trillion dollars a year on food in the United States if people number eight is that right? Yeah. Right Frederick in. So I guess to put an even more simpler context about two percent of GDP is on wasted food for that's a lot of money spent on food that never gets eaten in this country does Like many people I have some passing familiarity with this I. Read about it I don't even know where to start and it seems like maybe you go out and you you know you try to donate food as best you can and and I think that's maybe where you started. Yeah and it transformed into something quite extraordinary. So yeah if you know Josh I started feeding people that were experiencing hunger and homelessness in two thousand thirteen out of my apartment in Atlanta Georgia So that's where got started I found a parking. Lot I drove past it one day and I just saw hundreds of people that were homeless in in something kind of just pulled on my heartstrings at that moment and I said I wanNA help you know what do I didn't have a ton of money and I knew I could cook and so I just went home I post it on facebook I mean Sunday. I'm going to go downtown and I'm going to feed on the streets. If. You want to join me I had about twenty volunteers I made a spaghetti dinner. And loved it. You know brought out my little beats pill at the time, which wasn't that loud outside. Dating us, you're dating we know exactly when you're store your. Heckling when it happened so I really wasn't that loud music thing. But I have bad and you know the idea was it would be old school kind of Sunday music why Jackson five and Aretha Franklin James Brown like this classic kind of music and a good Sunday dinner, and that's how it all got started in. So of eighty own from one of my pop up restaurants went viral on facebook and people are saying this is so amazing which restaurants donate the food and the reality was nobody I was couponing on price matching I always say, I'm the reason Walmart doesn't price-match anymore I definitely feel like i. gave them a run for him. And then I was cooking thing taking it downtown, serving it coming home cleaning up, and so it would take me like forty hours every week I did this and I started researching food ways and was really like upset like I can't believe this much food goes to waste in here I. Am you know putting together five dollar donations and my own money and trying to make these feeding is happening to feed five hundred people

Josh Jasmine Crow Beth Comstock Facebook Nike GE United States Jasmin Walmart Freddie Atlanta Gooder Frederick Aretha Franklin James Brown Jackson CEO Georgia Founder
Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

CRYPTO 101

04:09 min | 5 d ago

Decentralized Storage: The Final Frontier, w/ Bluzelle CEO & founder, Pavel Bains

"Is Blue Zell and how is it different from other blockchain's? is a decentralized database. It's a delegated pufus state network and what we found was how came about was when we started a couple of years ago, we're doing projects for banks and insurers and trying to do the whole thing of enterprise blockchain and. Try to bring that in and saying, Hey, this is where the space is where it's going, and while we're doing some of those projects. We realized that okay. We do. For example, today attorney management system for three banks in Singapore. Great used know. But then all the data and certain parts of it we had to actually store in a centralized database. Then we had done in other one for insurance. Travel Insurance for one of the bigger insurance companies in Asia and that one same thing wait part of this information and what's happening store and centralised database, and we realize that you're not getting a full decentralized stack. It's only partial, and then you know you start thinking about at that time everybody's trying to figure out the decentralize web all the components we. Realized that our problem been solved if he had a decentralized database behind it. And that's where we kind of. That's where it came from. We dug in more and said, okay, that's you want to complete the entire decentralize staff and that's how he basically came together and said, this is the player. This theory we're GONNA play interesting. So it was when I think of blockchain's generally I, kind of analogize them with a decentralized database. Say That about. Bitcoin. Decentralized Database which holds ledger information. And stuff like that. So. Is it maybe the the design that makes it the design of Blue Zell makes it more just as secure as Bitcoin like first office. Is it just as secure as Bitcoin and you know that kind of thing and is it just faster or is it optimized specially to do a certain purpose that you know maybe bitcoin or a theory cannot? Yeah. So it's a different use case. So when it comes to ledger transactions, you know blockchain's are great for that. Just quick information things like that. But if throwing wheel data, let's say if you're building a financial product, can you need to store user information or building a game like profile sessions inventory management? You can't really put that on the blockchain because one it would be very slow. For all that hard data behind it, and it'd be very expensive I mean look the prices of cerium now. So what you said was who build a decentralized network database descended database with nodes at strictly are for storing data we get that security that one hundred percent up time of availability is there and you get and you can store large amounts of data edit or even. Less than half the price of centralized databases. So it's a different case. So your transactions, definitely, those things at the stadiums create at bitcoin the other blockchain's you keep doing that but the hard data lakeview application and you know, let's say you're using an APP whether it's Base Camp Mail chimp facebook. All data has to sit somewhere behind it and that's you put on. US interesting. So it's almost like Blue Zell would be a direct competitor. to any of those data centers that we would see that are be owned by Amazon web servers. Right or you know we drive past the freeway and we know that there's a big data center over there. Those are centralized and owned by certain companies right? So you're saying. If a group of people all came together to. Contribute their computing power to storing in serving files to anybody who calls it then you'll compensate them or somebody will be compensating them in Blues, L. Tokens. Right. Right. So think of it as AIRBNB. We've just discovered that, hey, there's a lot of people out there with a lot of computer space on on their laptops devices, xboxes that are sometimes most of the time not used right because everything's really run on the cloud. So what we're saying is made just give extra room in your apartment. Extra space on your computer. To, US will manage it and we'll have somebody rented. So

Blue Zell Blockchain United States Singapore Airbnb Asia Attorney
Praying for your Clients

The Plant Path

05:46 min | 5 d ago

Praying for your Clients

"Hey there everybody say Jay here founder of school have luminary herbalism and in this week's. I got a really a really great question from a student that I thought would be really great to share with the greater evolutionary herbalism community and And the question this week was about a kind of integrating more of a spiritual approach to your work with clients specifically in regards to praying with an for your clients and you know this isn't something that I really talk that much about. But I when I think about him I go. This is actually a really critically important part of my own personal work that I do with clients but I think there's a way to approach doing this with people in a way that is authentic in a way that is. Doesn't make people feel uncomfortable in a way that really is honoring and uplifting and encouraging and supportive for the person that you're working with and and I know that this is something that maybe a lot of you would really be interested in incorporating into your work with clients, maybe not just handing out herbs and just keeping it that way. But you know maybe wanting to incorporate a little bit more of that spiritual side into your work with people and I really feel that simply praying for people is a really great way to do that and so that was the question that I answered this week in. Our student QNA session and I just I just thought that maybe it would something that a lot of other people were interested in. It's not something I talk about that. Much. So I, thought it would serve you well. So so I hope you enjoy this discussion here on integrating prayer into your work as an herbalist I am super grateful for this comprehensive and straightforward guidance on intake, which can be so daunting. Otherwise I would love to hear about the prayer that you say with clients in the beginning I have been feeling called to do the same, but it would really be helpful to have a sample. Yeah Great Question Donna. Yes. So this has been any. Aspect of my work with people over the years. I. You know I think it's really about following your sense of the person. You know especially when you're just starting to work with someone, one of the things that I think is one of the most important aspects of starting a new. Client relationship is building and developing trust. Right, you want your client to trust you. You want them to feel comfortable with you you want them to. Up like you and enjoy your presidents and because if they don't like you, they don't trust you if they don't feel like comfortable with you. They aren't going to open up as deeply as they would otherwise. So one of the it's kind of one of the. I guess maybe one of the invisible things that were working towards as practitioners is. Is Developing that trust with the client and that's done a number of ways. Through, ideally getting results helping them. Just. Being kind and friendly and compassionate with them. Really listening to them. Really listening to them. And, and just following what their needs are. Now, one way that that trust can be really negatively affected is by making them feel uncomfortable and if you are you know if someone comes to you for very first session, they don't know you. They don't really know your work they don't really maybe they don't know much about herbs or herbalism. Maybe they're coming to you with their own particular belief system or religion or way of seeing the world, and if you just shake their hand and jumped right into. You know maybe praying in your own unique way of praying that could very well, really make someone feel uncomfortable. It could might really turn them off maybe it's. Maybe. It's not in accordance with their spiritual or religious beliefs, and that is just it's going to immediately kind of kill the vibe. So I actually don't do that anymore because I learned from experience the hard way. Unless you know unless you already know the person and you know that there's A congruency there I think it's really good to kind of wait on that a little bit and I think to me I think it's really good to go through the intake process. So you really know what's going on for that person, right? It's hard to say a prayer for someone if you don't know what to pray about right if you don't know what their struggle is if you don't know what their life is like and to me, that's what the whole process of doing the intake and the conversation and the the interview. Is All about right is that you're having a conversation Co creative exploration with this person about their life,

JAY Founder Donna
Mine is all gone

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

04:12 min | 5 d ago

Mine is all gone

"A and welcome in is with shall episode of some and smokes where everything good and wife is worth discussing I'm your house made man Bob and joining me for this episode is Made Man Brent. Thanks I didn't realize it quick shot meant that we were going to be short episode. Not Drink these really quick house too late now so that it had a different meeting. Entirely we have went. We have women at supplies. Mansell's out. And Good Ole boy justin it can morning by. Well, today we're going to discussing some recent limited releases from the folks that locks go. We have the stone two thousand and nineteen women at addition Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, and we have the what's Road Distiller as double barrel, Kentucky Straight Bourbon, Whiskey, and this episode sip sudden smokes is sponsored in part by the or whiskey society to find out more about the society in their events, you can visit them at. F.. T. l.. Ws Dot. com. And we've reviewed quite a whiskies from the folks that go yellowstone over the years But what's have Justin gives a little background about them just to refresh your memory. So let's go began in nineteen, fifty eight when Paul a Lux and David. Sherman. Senior created the David Sherman Corporation as private. Label bottler. Serving the needs of distributors, wholesalers and retailers starting out with one brand in nineteen sixty have steadily grown portfolio to include vodka rum gin occurs more importantly whiskey whiskey. Latin. Clean Windows. Get. In two thousand, six, they changed their name to Lex goes attributed to the founder pollock's. The company's one hundred percent family owned to this day. A few years ago. lesko bought a fifty percent stake in the limestone branch. Still Ary last year, they completed construction of their own thirty, five million dollar distillery in Bardstown. Kentucky. Named the Lux road distillery, it's really pretty distillery of your embarked. Sounded should. Definitely. A swing by I gotta try the. I. Haven't been to yet. So I went there when they were building it and we got the walk around through the construction site, and then just recently I got to stop in and it's been. Probably, ear and year, plus since I was there. So it's all finished and landscape and everything really really Nice Oh. Maybe. Why don't we have Brent, tell us about the first whisky thinks the first one we're going to be trying out is the yellowstone two thousand Nineteen Limited Edition Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, this is. Yeah one, hundred, one, proof, Fifty, point, five, percent, AB, nine age stayed they they say this has got a suggested retail price around one hundred dollars for seven, hundred, fifty milliliter bottle. So Steve, beam his brother Paul? Being opened up limestone branches story in. Two. Thousand Eleven With the goal of create crafting the finest whisky in small batches with the history of is still on both sides of their family beaming Dant, the brothers are seventh generation distillers in two, thousand, fifteen, they brought the yellowstone brand back to the family. It's A, it's A. Real Alec, and a lot at that story because it's it's the exact antithesis of every big corporate distillery. Ever go to. It's a little place. The first time I went there the first I walked in and. There's a dog land next to the still who's looking at me like, what do you want? It's just so laid back. They were. You know they've expanded now considerably, but still it's You know it's it's a family run operation and it's If you're if you're up in, Kentucky definitely give swing by the tour guide is worth a visit us even. As. He's he's he is awesome. Let me tell you that guy is golden. There's very few tour guides that are really worth visit and he's one of the. Absolutely, but yeah, really cool place and they keep growing and we were up there doing barrel back. They're coming out with some really nice stuff. So. What did you say? Oh, actually. I did have a little bit information. Rumor has it that this is a blend of nine and twelve year old barrels.

Kentucky Yellowstone Justin Paul Mansell BOB David Sherman Corporation Bardstown Sherman Lesko Road Distiller ARY Brent LEX Dant Founder Pollock Steve
Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

My Seven Chakras

05:05 min | 6 d ago

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

"If you're on the part of spirituality, you've probably come across the Book Autobiography for Yogi and Other Yogurt books. They talk about these mystical Himalayan yogis would live for a hundred and ten honored and twenty, one, hundred, thirty years or even beyond that what are the secrets? How are they able to live deal such an ordeal and more importantly power they were retain their youthful glow in the air vigour and energy. Even at such an orphanage are all those stories just mitts and rumors are is there some truth to what they're saying today I'm going to attempt to tell you at least one secret that might be key to living longer and I'm going to tell you how you can apply these secrets. Into your life to live longer once I've action tribe Asia here, host and founder of my seven chuckers my seven chuck dot com the place where we help you expedience healing awakening and abundance. While what are you? It has been right. So many changes corona wireless masks, social distancing staying at home, and of course, the implications of all of this on our mental health, our jobs, our relationships, and the entire word and this phase. Has Allowed a lot of us to really go inwards and find out what we're truly passionate about and how we can align with our life's book, and for me this is really affirm to me that Mike Calling lies in helping you heal yourself Gombe yo mind and relax your diabetes and I've been meaning to do more of these solo episodes but you know what? I just don't WanNA create episodes for the sake of it. Which is why I took the time to go inwards, get more clarity and alignment on exactly. I'm here to do and be a sponge and really dive into the stories into the practices dealt out experimented on myself and research all of the stuff that will help you my friend lead a better quality life and I feel that I'm ready to share because I have honestly missed connecting one with you. I do the interviews but this thing that we have here. That especial so I appreciate you listening and I want to do more of this but the question for today's what is the longevity secret of the Himalayan. Yoga. So to attempt to answer this question, let's I stand the a lifestyle. Most of these Yogis were live high up in the mountains inside kids where there was record and with less oxygen at that elevation what would they eat? They would mostly various and fruits and food available out in nature, and they would have bath in the cool cool waters of the rivers Gord explosion, and of course, they will also do. Yoga. And they would also do. Dancing practices to align themselves to purify their energy and to connect with the universe. But have you noticed something about people living high up in the mountains whether it's mountains in Tibet or Himalayas are Switzerland or the Andes? These people they seem happy. This seem youthful they seem radiant. They seem fit. So can there be something about the oxygen. Our lack of oxygen there might be factor in this three words action tribe brief. Intermittent hype boxer I'm going to explain more but hold onto these words. Brief intermittent hypoc show you somewhere in the nineteen thirties. Russian scientists discovered that when you reduce the desired level of oxygen in your blood for a brief period of time that are many positive outcomes outcome such as increased level of haemoglobin production. Production of nitric oxide, which defends the body and especially the tissues against oxidative damage and prevents erectile dysfunction in men, and also another benefit is the increase assocation of stem cells which have the unique capacity to differentiate into worship. Any kind of cell in your body, which has major implications for healing and longevity. So these Russian scientists discover amazing benefits of brief intimate hype box. Here I know it's a lawful, but they were busy trying to replicate this in their elite athletes and perform us, and they will literally Dick these high-performance athletes on helicopters to high altitudes where there is less oxygen they created these hypo Barak. Chambers to systematically reduce oxygen levels and gas mixtures that contained ten percent oxygen, even less than that to induce intimated HYPOC boxy conditions in the body.

Mike Calling Yogi Gord Explosion Hypoc Founder Asia Andes Chambers Switzerland Himalayas
Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:10 min | 6 d ago

Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

"So Camilla you're from Brazilian from Rio, tell us about what life was like growing up there. I had a very happy childhood. Brazil is a very special place for me my sister and I grew up very her suction at Hanley. We Love fancying we love eating. So an obstacle up the beach. So it was a very outdoorsy place to to grow up in and just a lot of energy and happiness beauty for you in Brazil how is that different and who were some of your beauty icons growing up? Oh, Gosh. The beauty icon for me growing up I mean obviously started my mom and my grandma there just seeing them and their approach to beauty what was their approach to beauty? It's this concept of always be ready Brazil's have a word they word. In particular is actually considered a good thing. Versus be overly produced Brazilians of spend a lot of time making sure that they're always ready. You know taking care of it. It's like a daily control versus you have a party and he spent three hours getting ready. It's about what you do every single day is there a diy Brazilian beauty secret that everyone does but that might surprise our listeners in north? America like about bridges are very big into going to the So that aren't many betrayal to there's one thing that resilience love and they do this either at whom or on the beach, and it's lightning the hair on your arms or your I on your belly. Always do at home or on the beach. What do you do? It's diy you have a mixture at home and you Li-. You know like the says share or a lot of. Women think that. Brazilian, remove. Hair. Body about his not true. A lot of women will keep the here on the side and the belly to that's something that that they'll do at home depot lighten dot that Peach Fuzz just getting rid of it. Yeah. Right now we're out of stock of our original product of it and will be to bring it back but we have a product I got which one of the products launched with what's that called it hold Golden Body Veil we'll get that back in. Stock Soon yes. So it's like a cream that bleaches the hair is that right? Yeah and even I read that Brazilian women are obsessed with taking care of their feet. Is that true or is that a myth? Now? It is true. It is very, very true. We have fetish obviously a lot of this is because of the weather, right? It's a very, very hot humid tropical country and we were sounded almost all the time I mean why are resilient and it's basically everyone. Parachute, to every household has. Vienna's so yeah, we show them off and you know president going back to this concept of always being ready. You always keep your feet soft mood touchable and I'm I am personally obsessed with my feet is my favorite body part.

Brazil Camilla Vienna America President Trump
with Isaac Morehouse founder of Praxis and Crash - burst 02

Humans Rising Podcast

05:46 min | 6 d ago

with Isaac Morehouse founder of Praxis and Crash - burst 02

"And today I am here with Isaac Morehouse who is the founder of praxis and also crash dot co a welcome Isaac. Thank you so much for joining me today. Absolutely. It's great to be here. So, I have been I, guess following your excellent work in the world for several years and I am so inspired by what you say your mission in life is your purpose, which is the relentless pursuit of freedom. And so. As I watched. Some of your videos you talked about how you started early in your career really teaching principles of freedom to young people. But where you are today is rather than just share ideas. You really giving people a taste of freedom so they won't settle for anything less. So yeah. That's exactly a good way to to frame it out Because I'm a big ideas person and obviously freedom is it's an idea but it's it's really a lived experience. It's a feeling you have and I. I spent a lot of years. Trying to through just argumentation and education. Trying to expand the scope of freedom after myself and for others you know trying to argue for freer government policy is in, you know people that took to make choices to make themselves more free in their lives and. I. Found that it's really hard to envision. What you have to know what could be you have to have a bit of a taste of it in order to be motivated enough to make a change. So there's my favorite economists Ludwig von me says, there's three preconditions to human action. One is dissatisfaction with the status quo to is vision of something better, and three is a belief in the ability to get there and I find that whether you're talking about education, which is a space I've been in a lot or just any other career government, any areas of life it's not that hard for people to feel dissatisfaction discomfort with where they are. Of Vision of something better is a little harder, it's a little harder to be and I know that there is a superior version of my life over here and then I think the hardest is a belief in the ability to get there even if you have that that vision of something that might be better and so. I thought I've been I've been basically trying to convince people that the status quo. Socks, and to a lesser degree that there is a superior vision of life over here. But if they don't have that belief in the ability to get their nothing's going to happen. So if you just tell somebody you know, for example, the public school system is Scott all these terrible incentive. There's always reasons that it's bad. They'll shake their head and you can convince them pretty quickly and then if you say you know. homeschooling and run schooling. You know Sudbury model school or some other alternative is this better vision they'll. They might come along with you on that as well, and then they'll kind of walk away and say, so what because they don't know how to get from here to there and so I just I had this realization that. If you start with hey, her something for you give it a try. And if it makes your life back and it makes you more free, you'll want more of it. You don't even need to be intellectually convinced at all. You just choose to live that way without any argument required. And that's kind of to me entrepreneurship, it's creating the alternatives creating kind of world you wanna live in instead of just complaining about what's wrong with the world today so that it took me a lot longer than I wish it did not to go to that place where I realized all of his energy I had was better spent creating new experiences for people. Then merely it doesn't mean I don't WanNa talk about ideas, but then merely talking about the ideas. That makes such good sense to me. You know as I unschooled and allowed my daughter's to self direct their education. So many people said, wow, you're so brave to do that and it looked so risky and. Your tenable to them, and then I would hear them all these. MOMS August saying Oh, I hope it gets a good teacher and I hope they're not bullied because they were asked year. To me they were. Spinning the Roulette Wheel on that one. But so so as you have been able to give you know hundreds of young people, the experience of freedom. That's one thing I'm so excited to talk about today because. Practices and crash are such. Amazing. I'M NOT GONNA say a ballot alternative because I think it's really the most risk-free path into adulthood that I see you know rather than getting tens of thousands of dollars of debt and hope you can get a job on the end of that. So could you tell us a little bit about your path in creating practice and then how out of that you spun crash? Yes. Absolutely. It's funny. I. Just WanNa quickly comment on you said it's. It's risk-free at it's it's really funny I think about this law because. In the kind of. Financial sense or sort of pragmatic sense. Practice in particular is very, very low risk I mean if you get into the program and you do it like pretty much everybody gets a job after the program and the program pays for itself. So the net cost zero. So it's like a very low risk, but it's not risk free at all. In the terms of the price that you pay socially.

Isaac Morehouse Founder Sudbury Model School Ludwig Scott
Evan Kuo: AMPL - the Controversial Digital Currency With an Elastic Supply

Epicenter

04:41 min | 6 d ago

Evan Kuo: AMPL - the Controversial Digital Currency With an Elastic Supply

"I began our journey there. But just to set the context like to introduce to your audience. Audience. What ampoules are? So the foundation is called ampleforth foundation and we have a protocol called ampleforth protocol, but the ample amp pl is actually a token. It is a non collateralized cryptocurrency like bitcoin with an important twist, its supply elastic, and what this means is on a daily basis. The token in protocol will automatically increase or decrease the quantity of tokens held in user wallets based on twenty four hour weighted volume price. Let's the mission of influence. So what was the thing that drove you to start this? What needs? Did you see it flipping? So the mission of ampleforth this to become an essential building block of an alternative financial ecosystem, and really I think what's interesting is how we came to this realization that we've been needed a building block or how we even decided that that would be an interesting thing to produce and just kind of going back to the beginning of the journey with me and brandon like I said were thinking very deeply about why bitcoin was designed the way it was because it was so obviously difficult to scale and. Two things, kind of emerged from that thought process number one, it was designed to counteract a sovereign monopoly and that was very different than our minds from say a free market monopoly. So say, for example, you're not happy with how Google or facebook function you, and I are free to go and create a search engine to our liking or a social network to our liking and compete on the open market. Now, they have a lot of advantages being incumbent, but nobody would tell us You cannot compete with Google, you cannot innovate upon facebook we're free to try. But. In the case of money, it's not the case, right? So historically, people have tried to create their own currencies like even liberty dollar meeting their own coins started used them in circulation in been stopped by the government, and that's the difference between a sovereign monopoly, and if market monopoly and one thing that struck us is that the bitcoin protocol great lengths to counteract the sovereign monopoly in being censorship persistent. Made huge concessions along the way. For this reason we think that if if the service that you're producing doesn't really require that level of censorship resistance, you might be handicapping yourself a great deal in attempting to say create a better search engine on a smart contract programming platform because of scale and usability limitations, and so on and so forth. How would you say the bitcoin protocol has restricted itself and basically you said earlier that you think it's not scalable. What's behind? That can go a little bit into technical detail. What exact you thing is not scalable. I think as a layer one blockchain. It has a limited in TPS right and as the ledger gets bigger and bigger, you run into all sorts of congestion issues and you let's say comparing to something like visa, it can't hear handle nearly as many transactions per second, and again, this is thinking back to our interpretation of the original paper title, appeared appeared digital cash, and of course, our naive understanding of money at the time was that caches that which I use. Use to purchase coffee. There's something different about how bitcoin is designed rate, but I also want to just move forward to the next point of realization that we came to, which is really important and the bitcoin protocol succeeded in articulating scarcity in a purely digital context, right. So unlike golden natural commodities, which naturally scarce by the physical limitations of the world, the bitcoin protocol was able to define scarcely using just an algorithm and that's very unique in the digital world like. Many things are scarce, digital world somebody takes a photo, it gets replicated. You can't really undo that you can't say that this is the only instance of that digital photo. So that was a really big idea and the takeaway for me. Brandon was that the the most salient opportunity to apply this sort of technology is money, and then what happened was we began to wonder about what was wrong with money rates. We saw that bitcoin has succeeded in creating a censorship resistant fix apply acid that's analogous to a digital gold. But what was even wrong with gold? Is there anything wrong? Wrong with gold and you know we really recruited a very helpful and we're super grateful for this team of investors. In advisors. You pentire capital true ventures, founder collective, even Brian Armstrong and folks from the Hoover Institute at Stamford, which is,

Ampleforth Foundation Brandon Google Facebook Hoover Institute At Stamford Founder Brian Armstrong
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

07:54 min | 2 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I had friends that were everything grown up. like in high school like I had white kids that were friends. You know Italians at first of all I I hate to term white, and I hate to turn black. 'cause to me. Those are like cargo Pronoun mean like type of people, but it's like colors I had. Yeah. I had Italian French. Greek friends at Irish friends then I had like South American friends you know, and of course the black friends? But like. I don't know the the whole. I like black people saying like I'm black, so that's why I respect it, but But I, you know I. Just always feel weird like all right blocked friends. I have white friends like. Your from somewhere even if you even if you were here for years or like your your family have been here for years your second third fourth generation. Why can't we just have putting American? because. You don't say like. I know now. People are sending like black and Brown people but. I don't I'm not I. Don't view. is saying like oh? You're a brown person. No Man like. All American you know and I have roots Spain. It's an important. Why don't want you to know me as? The Brown. Yeah, but that's the thing. It's always been backing white, black and white, and I remember always thinking well. What about US like? What about us? Like? Everyone's talking black and white and we're kind of like. kind of like in the middle. You know always yeah, not for awesome time. Overlooks middle of everything I got race, if you. Calling it race 'cause river. All humans were from the human race. the just I duNno I think. Pretty much just wanted to be united. Men just stop bullshit and just second. Just treat each other as equals and I mean it's crazy how? Twenty twenty. We're talking still about racial issues and. There's so much education out there. There's there's Internet there's. I mean. It's just ridiculous to me. This is still going on. hopefully this'll be something to pass something in the history books. Just right now. This is just the current situation. yeah that. That's pretty much my perspective in my take on it from my side. I mean I. Do you have anything else to add from? Yeah? I think I. Think I think We've we've done this? We've been talking a lot of good stuff. The podcast and I'll say in closing just like you say it's To me, all this stuff is silly. In Hey. I wish we could just hit pause. and. And I don't know leaders of a couple of all sides ceiling. Hey, can we hit restart and? Just love each other. That's respected chart just all the eagles. Because, there's so much time wasted. In, life. With all this racism and hate. And Life's too short and Eight people be racist against other people. We're all human. Bad humans there could humans. That's it. Just lift together and. Like I said life is short. Where here for? One Hundred Years if you're lucky, eighty five eighty. Don't you just want to enjoy life? Or you want to spend it. On, Energie hitting other kinds and fighting with each other arguing like I, I wanna live life and enjoy it. Just be happy when I'm eighty looked back. It's A. Great Life, and most of my life was was pretty good and I was happy. And you know I know they're offs in downs, but Let the towns. Just be situations about life not. Not because you know you hate somebody or somebody in you, so you know that hurts you. I just think it's song. In the grand scheme of things thinking about it this way we're on. Iraq. That's. Going that spinning around the Sun. In space. I was just floating space spinning around the sun had I don't even know how many minutes per hour. and. There are tons and tons of galaxy space is infinite, and we're like a speck of dust in this tire cosmos. And we're wasting time? This beautiful world. Silliness. I think all the silliness. Thanks. And now that's all I got. Down in. Our office. That's. Let's. Go! Back clearing. Painting a waste of energy. I think we should try to get off. Professionals. It'd be nice to get a therapist to see like what that rooted from. That's eight. And also like what's the impact on May. First of professionals point of view. Because we're here, we're. Entrepreneurs. Air I mean I I program. I'm a Latino Programmer. And Saying that this is my perspective, you have your perspective. Yeah. I mean. Don't. And saying you're Puerto Rican program because. You're the only Puerto Rican program. I ever met well. There's actually one. On twitter that were connected on twitter, but other over the UNICORNS thank. Puerto Rican programmers. We're all you got. Thanks for? Doing this with me, so you like dig deep, and then also say like perspective your story. I think this is where my favorite podcasts ever recorded I hope that. Whoever's listening. Wherever. They come from you know, look like me and you and come from areas like me you. That they, too. Can you know build something? Ability, Santa Mine and you know No. No problem, thank. Your podcast, a perk appearance and So. This more frequently and. Half sharing that story I mean. It must have been difficult tonight come. To have those thoughts be brought back up Sometimes we have to air out people to let them know that. They're not the only people that have gone through some things and. Hopefully, You know the people here this. Impact somebody in a positive way nothing that they're not alone. And I am just. Trying to get you. trying to be optimistic to the future. As just keep grabbing a keep hustling. And Yeah try to be good so that what? Your family is taken care of and yourself. All right depending. thanked. It is up at that. Metro, quota and you guys know about the total. On twitter. and not yet. So I take a stand on my daughter..

twitter Twenty twenty US Spain Iraq eagles Programmer twitter. UNICORNS
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I mean yeah. She was seen the severity of it, so she was. She was more worried. and also like you know. We were like lower class working class, so she didn't. Like I don't even know where she got the money to pay for the lawyer, but you know she she. She wasn't GonNa Let. She wasn't GonNa Levy take oppo defender, my mother always. My parents gave me everything and more. You know when I was growing up as a little kid, I wealthy because I just get everything and more than ever wanted. But as I got older than I understood, it was like it was too hard work and you know credit cards and. It was you know easy for my parents to do that, but they wanted to keep me interested that. Sounds like you had it I mean mom definitely came through. Clutch and helped out with the Yeah, that sacrifice just to make sure his son was in. part of the system that I'm pretty sure she's probably. I, Dunno, she's witnesses. The any type of issues like that of the past where it's you know when people get wrongly accused but yes, you believe in the innocence inch your mother. Who knows you better than anybody, right? And and she really made that sacrifice There's a lot of families out there like your friends. For instance. They weren't able to have that opportunity that you had. So so yeah, thank you, thank your mom. Because I. Now your friend Dave got out of it so. Yeah Man. Yeah man and that's like. I mean there's. There's there's like one other story that I'll say really quick. When I was a little AL's little kid, I was about probably ten or eleven, and I was at the I was at the Boyega and that was. Crossing the street to put my grandmother's house, but I saw my at the door, and I wanted him to hold the door so I ran across the street and ran up to the door, so he can go with him. And as he's opening the door, I see a cop car jumped the curb and just curb, and in my head, and I told my uncle ocean something must have happened like they're driving really fast lights on. But then they stopped right in front of my grandmother's house. WHO THE COP! The COP and the driver's side comes out and now I'm on top stoop is three steps. He pulls me by the back of my shirt. Out from the. Third Step. Do onto hit onto the hood of his car. My chest is hood of his car. It was so loud that my my aunt was upstairs the second floor. She thought it was a car taxes. She came out the window to look and when she saw that. You know this cop had be Ma had thrown me onto the hood here already had he had turned me around, and now he was screaming at me and she screamed she.

COP oppo Dave Boyega
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:42 min | 2 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Back on a podcast and Solo founder. And this is after a couple of weeks after the either pitch. And I'll go through that pitch the route. This podcast episode. But I got a Man. Edwin is back on the PODCASTS. With me and we're working together again and we've been working together for the past three or so months than really been added every day and I'm excited to be working with him again and excited to be talking to him tonight on my balcony today again. So what's up at? What's going on man? Has Everybody doing? Hopefully everybody's doing create more time. the M and it's been an exciting Spent a crazy couple of months right. Yes with things in our society but then also businesswise. That's pretty Nice What's going on? We've seen a lot of positives throughout this time. Yeah we have we. We started working again and right away. We got to it right away. We started preparing for the Pitch. Friendlier for about three.

Edwin Solo founder
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:19 min | 2 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"<Music> Quickly <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> built a <Speech_Telephony_Male> web product <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to go with the <Music> APP <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in the last <Speech_Music_Male> two <Music> weeks. <Music> <Music> <Music> What else have <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Music_Male> done? <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> we started <Speech_Telephony_Male> started marketing <Speech_Male> doing some more social <Speech_Telephony_Male> media marketing <Music> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> we can acquire more <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> therapist. <Speech_Telephony_Male> The platform <Speech_Male> also <Speech_Male> been reaching <Speech_Telephony_Male> out a lot. More <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Sitai slow things <Speech_Telephony_Male> down and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I went through <Speech_Telephony_Male> Adler looking for <Speech_Telephony_Male> Co founder <Speech_Music_Male> by <Speech_Telephony_Male> the way I did find founder <Speech_Telephony_Male> at Atlas <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Telephony_Male> actually <Music> Edwin <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Engineer. <Speech_Telephony_Male> That was working with <Speech_Music_Male> back in <Speech_Music_Male> the summer. <Speech_Music_Male> So we linked <Speech_Telephony_Male> up recently <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> worked <SpeakerChange> harder <Silence> than ever <Speech_Telephony_Male> another reason. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I think they <Speech_Telephony_Male> may not <Speech_Telephony_Male> are. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> a reason that say <Speech_Telephony_Male> my it <Speech_Male> was they invested <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> no revenue <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> obviously <SpeakerChange> revenue <Music> <Music> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> one of the prerequisites <Speech_Male> to getting <Speech_Male> funding <Speech_Telephony_Male> at <SpeakerChange> Adler <Speech_Male> to not include <Speech_Music_Male> revenue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Nice to have. But <Speech_Male> we aren't <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> just aren't <Speech_Telephony_Male> ready for that <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Telephony_Male> moment we <Speech_Telephony_Male> will be <Speech_Telephony_Male> in the next <Speech_Telephony_Male> thirty days <Speech_Music_Male> but you <Speech_Telephony_Male> know as as of right now <Speech_Telephony_Male> you know. We've had an <Speech_Telephony_Male> APP on my <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> wants to do. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I build <Speech_Telephony_Male> build <Speech_Telephony_Male> out the back end <Speech_Telephony_Male> and API <Speech_Telephony_Male> so that <Speech_Telephony_Male> the APP and the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> product <Speech_Music_Male> can <Speech_Telephony_Male> talk to each other <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> the update <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the APP updates <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> the update on the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the APP <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> pretty sure can explain <Speech_Telephony_Male> that better but that's <Speech_Telephony_Male> hard <Speech_Telephony_Male> layman terms. <Speech_Telephony_Male> We're building the foundation. <Speech_Telephony_Male> They <Speech_Telephony_Male> see of the product <Speech_Telephony_Male> of the structure so we <Speech_Music_Male> can <Speech_Telephony_Male> so for first <Speech_Telephony_Male> candidacy reasons <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and then <Speech_Telephony_Male> from now moving <Speech_Telephony_Male> forward <Speech_Music_Male> There'll <Speech_Telephony_Male> be easier for <Speech_Music_Male> engineers <Speech_Telephony_Male> that join team <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> to build <Music>

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

03:59 min | 10 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Right right so today I have y'all and he's another founder in the atler accelerator slash incubates Ormat Having talked much about that on this podcast but I guess we'll go into it now so yeah thanks for joining the podcast exciting to be yeah yeah this is cool because we I'd like to learn more about like I know what you come from I know what your interests are what kind of businesses are you trying to build here okay so I think it hard the type of business I'm trying to build is one that is very people centric and the purpose of the business is to either elevate communities that are overlooked more help people who aren't compromising situations just like deliver results that very directly influence people's livelihood their job prospects or whatever they're working on their mental health like anything that I can do to make people's lives specifically gutter Something that I mentioned working on and so it's kind of your typical starter founders like I'm going to be to be Saas product I'm GonNa sell it and that isn't to say that I'm not going to build a BBC response as a result of the larger thing that I'm trying to work on I think the big thing that drives me and has always driven me is people really making direct impact on the lives of people and not just organizations which presented some challenges but is something I'm excited about figuring yeah that's cool so I remember when you does your founder intro talked about being from Ghana and said he wanted to I don't know if you want to create something that helps people backing you wanted to give doc somehow is is that something that you're still focusing on an interested in doing or is that something you want to build activate your main company yeah that's a good question I think it's we more so the second thing that you said where I may be more down the line type of thing I'm trying to work on on a big thing for me is that I don't want to I don't want to start a company press like I don't want to do something that on on its face looks great but when it comes down to the details of how it actually works it's not actually that effective faces significant barriers doesn't actually and I think the more time that I spent reading ideas in this incubator the more I started to see that a lot of my lofty ideas and goals that I want to accomplish and gone on require like a d mount of either I don't know commitment to living never really long time or like deep amount of experience in like a huge network within the system and like as much as I love to be doing it myself as a person who is firmly rooted in the US right now it's like very difficult for me to do so you know my heart goes out to like you know the communities that I'm from and I see myself as almost like an ambassador for what type of person linked I can do and I still get back send money back to my family members donates organizations like I do these things but I think where that actually intersects with my business needs I think is going to be more of a down the line right now but asked me again tomorrow and have you have you found anything you're interested in doing on it you talk about the person system and marketplaces for consultants Have you like if you had to choose one which would be like the one you'd be passionate more passion Wa so the truth This is surprise me but I I think I'm most interested in the personal systems a service concept because the more research I into it them more deep but I see that the need is so for listeners the basic idea is you know the future of work is going to be very different than what it used to be right and everyone's thinking about houses going to change house automation GonNa Phase People's jobs what are we going to do with humans universal income Andrew Yang all that stuff and I think what people are really forgetting is they're trying to look at the industry and saying how can we ship people into industries that are maybe not going to be affected and thinking how can.

founder
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Still yet to be made that's strictly for producers and more so for independent producers because making been making shit you know they're making music in they're trying to get out there but the only music that's being really pushed hard on spotify the platforms are the big artists little artists has to promote himself on instagram on social media facebook twitter everything all him or herself breath and there's no company out there really supporting the house music independent Dj are slash producer so I felt like like maybe we should try to do something and that's when Ed was like so let's build it near because it's not only that but the events that we have over big companies that were agile they give something doesn't work I mean you can talk to us yes like you're not going to be until I the main CEO you know spotify account manager spotify probably getting technical support you're lucky if they're even in your area and they understand what you've been talking about so we have that advantage right like we Kebab and we you know we could dodge things we could we could do crazy the ideas that nobody's ever done because we I mean we're trying to push boundaries were we are being creative in our own I'm nick base right but we're using our creativity to empower other artists yes so where in the sense artists of course artists are is different from there but we're GONNA tag team and try like that we're we're we're literally teaming up with producers mhm an artist that just giving an empowering them because assembling a team together and everybody has their gift and this was like let's come together and make something great is these big juggernauts men that I don't feel like they're going to go anywhere no of course you know what I mean but definitely there's an opportunity to space is definitely opportunity there to do something great and impactful and we could yeah I think could make a lot of change and that yeah and I think if we can be those people just a spark change spark conversation once we started doing different model that empowers artists and seeing now that the power of paradigm is going to shift now back to the artist yeah where it's never been before where it's always been my you know these labels the big companies and things of that nature then now we can he was targeting better music is we're giving more access exactly yeah everyone right now music is GonNa get pushed to its limits that's right 'cause now going back to disability of information and things of that nature now we're GonNa make it more accessible yeah you're not I mean it's like people are GonNa want try more yeah I mean try harder in the main so I'd have people people are probably thinking way rate end to reload and they're probably thinking oh you can only focus on one thing if you want to really build it because that's what everybody says if you have a startup the product focused on that one thing and do it right you know you can't do two things but I don't know rules to this right but psychologists and they're both creating content pushing it out on the platforms so to an audience to northern so it's kind of the same you know you're the one the builder but it's kind of the same back in you know so why not were distributing clash and why not we do not try you know I think that's that's why I said to you you know when I when I asked you I was like hey why don't we do this together no settlement as well because it just would be silly and harder on me to have two different co-founders and it just be it just made sense let's just do this together you know we're going to do one thing I got this other thing let's just make it happen together you know and it's Kinda the same mm-hmm theory was just disturbing not only that man but I like working multiple things going back to creative it's kind of like dude I like I'd like getting pigeonholed into anything that's just like one dimensional man because what happens if we're working on one thing right for reload and olives how can we use this for Santa Mind yeah vice versa yeah right it's Kinda like interdisciplinary earning it kind of helps to in like building the product that's what it is it's interdisciplinary earning it's like mixing disciplines together like what happens if we figured out something that nobody's like for instance I'm just thinking right now let's up all right so now it could be an algorithm that literally just play the right music for you for the mood that you're in yet you know what I mean I know exactly I've thought of that yes so the whole thing is is like music is therapy yeah it's a different form of you know what I mean I I love listening to music it changes it literally changes something in your vibe how many is the modern terminate with the youth divide yeah yes they literally speaks to your to a different part of your consciousness yeah different genres make you feel different things young man so that's why they're they're wondering this right one is through music instrumentation electronic instruments the other ones verbal. You're not I mean but I remember to tell you I wanna get into using therapy yet one hundred percent so it's it's literally so it just it's offering together and I thought it would be great if we just did awesome together and I'm glad and I think another thing that you're going to do is you're going to inspire a lot of kids And even older older men and women to maybe Puerto Rican Puerto Rican known for being you know computer scientists like they don't really do that thing you know I mean a lot of minorities really have given the opportunity like you know what I'm saying they were just literally what we technically equal rights one was that pass that was only like a early years ago like the first generation of my favorites have really experienced that freedom right so it's like we're finally given Oh you know technically legally some type of equality so it's kind of like which is another thing right being pioneers right and and being that beacon of light and saying other people if I did it you can also do but if you feel like you need help you can reach out to me because I did actually right so it's Kinda like everybody's is helping each other on black there's video of somebody trying to save trying to save a dog or something from a river and they nobody had rope right so all yes they did a human wrote like everybody just grabbed one one person was the anchor on land and then everybody just hold onto each other yeah and lift each other up and it's as what we need to do is needed we need each other and people you know what I mean like that's world here for a short period of time while we here at least while I'm here I would like to create I would like to do something impactful and if I can help anybody I mean that's more rewarding than anything else right you know what I mean so that's dilute goes beyond material that goes I mean that is thing is what our real purpose is here but that's another we talk about that another time but yeah I think giving back is amazing you know what I mean that's that's that's the reward it feels good man and I want I want people who you know if there's anyone listening to this I want them to feel comfortable in reaching out and if they have I'm not an expert but if they have any questions you know whatever I've been through I could I can help out and yeah it feels great man and you know I'm Puerto Rican too so I remember when I met you like a million Puerto Rico Puerto Rican that's computers computers like why I've never never met one so I thought it was really cool and now that's another thing we got an aside you know like I don't think there's any other founding team that's cool us either I don't think so I don't think there's another team cooler than US man oh man I hope there's other people out there uh-huh.

spotify facebook one hundred percent
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

23:04 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"They never encouraged at least from my experience from my point of view I don't know what everybody else's point of view was eh I mean and and and and not what's different in what I mean now it's completely different and I'm grateful because if I had yeah I like that guy over here yeah so yeah so like that there was that but I like I'm not saying not all of it is is necessary but the fucking if it wasn't for the artist you wouldn't exist yeah I know you're I mean it's a dude it's so we're trying to flip that yeah we're flipping that we wanted to be lower we want empower individuals right we want people to you know feel better mentally healthwise right and then we also want people to create right and just focus on that man yeah create create create an just don't worry about don't worry about you know the money's there and yeah and we were talking about how his access to opportunities and right now the artist gets better equipment get now you're going to now the fan ends are getting to get a better product right has acknowledged gonna be able to invest more or maybe that money goes now more into tours now the tours are going to be better yeah I mean the shows are going to be better now they expect expert Saadi Wins Yeah you know what I mean it's Kinda like these middlemen happier artists better music well I mean not I don't want to say that because we have to make great music if you're not happy you know that's when a lot of I'll do bruise EXAC- that's like that was that came up from that literally the title of that Genre speaks for so using how we started and you know what I really like how we didn't have to ask each other like Yo can we work on this together it just happened naturally like when you hear stories about founders it's always say like oh no we either in school when they were talking like all right let's build this or they kinda man they were chatting they said let's build this doesn't really happen the way I've been trying to do it for the past few years like looking for someone that wants to team up with me and it just happened and I said you know there's one thing I wanna do after Santa Mine is a really want to build this product for music you know and you said old and it kind of threw me off and I was like all right let's build it Ma'am and this is the kitchen in the kitchen kitchen cooking up ideas yeah and the kitchen cook enough ideas man yeah it was just organic due to it's just like I don't know if it's the right thing to do why not you know what I mean like what's is holding us back in nothing like you have the insight into the music industry you have experienced to that right meet have the technical ability and I also have a passion for music as well so it's like let's hope those that we to be we we appreciate art so why not help the artists like I want to hear more heart and just people probably whoever listening but Sata mind together during Santa Mine in Santa Mine is Santa Monica podcast Solo founder podcasts or you know what Santa Mine is reload is something that because I you know I come from music I produce music I always wanted to do something for producer producers last season so I know there's apple music tidal but there's nothing or a house music industry just for the House music industry just that niche and I know there's going to be people out there but I listen to house music on spotify or apple music or Amazon Music Yeah but I feel there's a cool it's like a different experience for people that listen to her music go to house music festivals I know spotify tapping into that market a lot more now like actually like networking but you know the two there huge now and whatever nobody you can't stop someone for trying something you know but I think there's a there's still yet to be made that's strictly.

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"The house now I'm going to call but I was messing with the contract things I had to learn the whole the whole Stereo CISA right it was a wall unit this way if you have an hour long movie let's say double the speed of movies on our you half an hour you gotta wait for one more when I was young because we then get cable until I was about eleven years old but before that and I remember just having to always knows the kids so you know my my father would has made me get up and change the channel but I always used to have to get up type in the number because it was it wasn't even have upper down had like a little keyboard yeah I had to type in the channel go to next channel and Dude I don't even remember I remember it he's right I'm thirty one all okay okay hey I'm I'm thirty five zero four years I missed that wave of TV's yet well the cost remotes came came a little bit maybe when you maybe you can around for a while I don't even yeah it was expensive it was more okay so you you grow boozy I didn't grow a boozy I don't even remember TV of me growing that's what I'm trying to tell you I remember the TV when I was like wasn't seven seven if that you're saying but I remember remember the TV when I was yet like I don't remember why you know what I remember as a kid what Chord board boxes are no I had I had so we had those like furniture TV that it was a piece of furniture with the TV built-in you remember the law yeah we have one of those living room and then I had little one had a little one in my bedroom you had your own TV your wallet yeah that's ball and ball on TV with a VCR player on our yeah is that you start watching porn and stuff no I didn't I didn't know about until how I think a no I she found that found that pretty early but no I didn't have any videotapes gotTa have anything that's crazy how would get as little kid there was no way for me dogs no family here just my father mother you said you're talking about electronics and computer engineering so computer science how did you get into how did you get in that honesty meant I was working for one company actually now I'm not lying and it was a girl your motivation is the girl I've always liked computers I've always dabbled they're saying being broke you gotta figure out how to make things happen fix things and I know how to build computers I knew how to work with them you know all that stuff but yeah when I really got into it was when I when I was a girl and then I was like dude I got got official job you know what I mean I can't just be like you know some reckless nomad savage I'm smarter than that so I started I started I was certifications okay and then just get into like the it world like networking and things of that nature network security Mhm they didn't they didn't really offer that so that stuff is still like you know what I'm saying people really weren't that interested into and that was to be honest men when I got out of high school I was really more into like design was very into like I was one of four people that were accepted into this war in class and it was just all about learning adobe programs you know what I'm saying so it's funny you say that because complete opposite because now you're like I don't WanNa work undesired I wanNA make sure works and you like back end telling me I I like functionality jake if I have a vision it's going to irk me until I get it very right yeah with code I might say this code might be a little bit I don't WanNa say easier but it's a little bit more structured yeah when it comes to being created to.

thirty five zero four years eleven years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"The house now I'm going to call but I was messing with the contract things I had to learn the whole the whole Stereo CISA right it was a wall unit Expensive Yeah Lemme mess this up yeah so I was the one that had to go through the instructions because you don't want my my mom is definitely not messing with that she it it was the broke into box it was nine I was the Freedom Act box was freedom freedom freedom hacked the box I remember just having to always knows the kids so you know my my father would has made me get up and change the channel but I always used to have to get up type in the number because it was it wasn't even have upper down had like a little keyboard yeah I had to type in the channel go to next channel and Dude I don't even remember I remember it he's right I'm thirty one all okay okay hey I'm I'm thirty five zero four years I missed that wave of TV's yet well the cost remotes came came a little bit maybe when you maybe you can around for a while I don't even yeah it was expensive it was more okay so you you grow boozy I didn't grow a boozy I don't even remember TV of me growing that's what I'm trying to tell you I remember the TV when I was like wasn't seven seven if that you're saying but I remember remember the TV when I was yet like I don't remember why you know what I remember as a kid what Chord board boxes are no I had I had so we had those like furniture TV that it was a piece of furniture with the TV built-in you remember the law yeah we have one of those living room and then I had little one had a little one in my bedroom you had your own TV your wallet yeah that's ball and ball on TV with a VCR player on our yeah is that you start watching porn and stuff no I didn't I didn't know about until how I think a no I she found that found that pretty early but no I didn't have any videotapes gotta have anything that's crazy how would get as little kid there was no way for me dogs no family here just my father mother you said you're talking about electronics and computer engineering so computer science how did you get into how did you get in that honesty meant I was working for one company actually now I'm not lying and it was a girl your motivation is the girl I've always liked computers I've always dabbled they're saying being broke you gotta figure out how to make things happen fix things and I know how to build computers I knew how to work with them you know all that stuff but yeah when I really got into it was when I when I was girl and then I was like dude I got got official job. You know what I mean I can't just be like you know some reckless nomad savage I'm smarter than that so I started I started I was certifications and then just get into the it world like networking and things of that nature Network Security mhm they didn't they didn't really offer that so that stuff is still like you know what I'm saying people really weren't that interested into and that was to be honest men when I got out of high school I was really more into like design was very into like I was one of four people that were accepted into this war in class and it was just all about learning adobe programs you know what I'm saying so it's funny you say that because not only cut you off but now is complete opposite because now you're like I don't WanNa work undesired I wanNA make sure works and you like back end telling me I like I like functionality Jake if I have a vision it's going to irk me until I get it very right Ed with code I might say this code might be a little bit I don't WanNa say easier.

Jake adobe Ed thirty five zero four years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"About it and that integral not yeah no definitely not I mean no no I'm not not Buddhist okay I'm the joys Ian Okay you know what I mean Okay Yeah we've got the pork rolls that they could hear that we'll we'll we'll do New York is US that they never gone out at all no I don't WanNa go it'd be like it'd be like probably going somewhere in the south yeah yeah yeah yeah well you have that everywhere do you think every state has won I mean I wouldn't expect a New York New York's yeah if you can hear hot ninety seven la mega and still people exist there's a problem here that everywhere now within the -cational podcasts now we're talking about air we're talking about still am fm be you know what I mean like the the the I'm not gonNA say dial yeah Okay and this will surfing you know what I mean they still they stand out by the radio every night at six PM saying for the latest dialogue did you ever have to put this just reminding did you ever have to put when you were young and you had the TV remember like the regular tennis the we'd like the two dials did you ever put. AM on one of the metal things that fell off. Did you ever put a hanger on there and you have to put the hanger but Abdun if there's no hang because those are exclusive those hangings if you got money for draconian and if you any of the drag Lena gave you the hangers correct Pam's hang back in the day things we're limited edition because back in the day all right we will leave we will leave the paper on it that said we love new everybody Yeah I love dry cleaning one hundred percent not yeah you have to but if you don't have that what I've done this aluminum foil oil I've seen done all so what you do so basically what you do go right so the reason why you're doing is basically you you as hi old as a youth you figure this thing is made out of metal for Areso yeah right so that's why you like let me get something metal and replace it right so then what you could do though engineering youth engineer a computer engineer curiosity this is broken fucking okay engineering so survival things like you'll matter was shiny and my house aluminum foil so boom you get the aluminum for you got a toothpick because now you're like I need a stick of some sort so use the stat stick as a staff staff in bloom all of a sudden you just made a conductive thing I never I never did that all on another level I never did it I just did the the hangar one time I had two hangars train them out I had them just like hangers sticking like the hook and everything you didn't even by the training I just put him in the way they are I just put them in the you know how easy it is to like unscrew like the well I don't WanNa do it for me it was a it was looking back looking back it was like a design thing 'cause I don't WanNa straight up I wanted a different type of antenna now headed nicely the design not I'm thinking they look like maybe like some sad dog puppy ears they look nice like two years yeah yeah but floppy but it was cool though loppy nobody was doing that my friends houses nobody was doing that because they were buying a new one exactly yeah it's crazy how now you get those things at the dollar store I know back into the you need to go to radio it was check minimum thirty Oh my God remember fuck that now you have the digital converter box now you can get ten eighty p Channel Two for all of them all of them aged equality missing the news so you see that's so you were has not little engineer before you to even thought about going to school for you WanNa go to be a computer engineer that's crazy computer science computer science computer science decide Oh yea not not a not a boot camp four years of university to get a degree computer science one hundred percent computer scientists yeah but I I can't yeah but that's not just me it all started when my dad though I don't know because my dad because all right so I'm Puerto Rican so I don't know if it's known throughout the interwebs that international but we like hug and sound systems so Oh I you know I know that we liked loud music we can't just play regular like we have a five hundred dollar car but we'll put two thousand is with the speakers and a radio and they're gonNA back to make sure everybody knows the mix were playing in our web you like it you may not love it but is what we're going to listen to it because we spend a lot of money on this boy yeah so basically a party so boom so my dad it comes from Puerto Rico the land of opportunity starts working and then he has money so he's like okay let me get my speaker is on you know what I mean so he would speak as he will get sound equipment he would get so back in the day you had you had to get the whole sound system you had to get the the amplifier this guy and if you had a CD player with the dual take that was on the boom amplifier would go like sometimes in the passenger side on the side of non talking about from the home all yes it was yeah took up the whole wall it was like you had to buy a house big enough or an apartment big enough dedicated a whole of this house five feet with the with the speakers that are five feet tall skinny so it's ironic though because those systems were actually better than what we have now but I don't want to really get into that too amazing sound systems amazing and there were crude but it's like their way better like it was bigger because of amplification and obviously electron components have gotten smaller Dong but yeah he would buy this equipment but him being from Puerto Rico and being here on for a couple of years I'm a little kid he would just open the box and throw me the manual okay so I'm over here like I got this thing it looks like something from outer space is Dino Miss and it looks like expensive yeah Lemme mess this up yeah so I was the one that had to go through the instructions because you don't want my my mom is definitely not messing with that she molly asking why is this shit in this house yeah so that was basically a VCR's remember VCR VCR's deeply remember do you remember the little the little VCR reminders it was all yeah yeah one hundred because if you're going to blockbuster take charge you like please Rwanda Tate returned charge you a fee like five bucks or something so they were winder paid for eh to avoid avoid the penalties yeah man you need it to Rwanda how you how it would it would be a wild for something to rewind needless to say you know fifteen minutes whatever you know what I mean so it's like a great and then hold up it was revolutionary when you had the VCR that once you're the end it automatically rewind Oh yeah dude that was the also you didn't even have to get up you didn't have to hit inject I know and put it in the other thing you just got the one unit thousand luxury remember now that that also reminds me of remember normal controls for the TV where you to actually get up and change the channel you remember that I mean I think I was lucky so you add remotes cable like we have the cave like the legit cable the cable it it was the broke into box it was nine I was the Freedom Act box was freedom freedom freedom hacked the box you act box you know what I'm saying so that's basically was it was like one gay and so you don't have to worry about none of that stuff but remember the guy that remember the Knob you don't WanNa mess that that was the only way to do it yeah I remember.

New York Abdun Lena Pam one hundred percent five feet five hundred dollar fifteen minutes four years two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"So what's up Yup it's been about six months but I'm back and I'm back with a special guest you're hearing this episodes about an hour eighteen minutes nausea out here because I'm in the city walking kind of Santa Monica Solo founded podcasts and yeah we just had a conversation recorded it for unedited natural like everything else I do on this podcast so I'm really excited about this episode man longtime common listened to that episode let me know what you think is starts really funny and then gets a little serious maybe a little boring at times depending on what you like what you don't but yeah cool turning point and onto chapter two I hope you enjoyed the show pace per ten you fucking yeah good enabled sin yeah yeah so I think that's a good trip to Asia Abelson said yeah who'd you start recording already I started recording we're we're live live ninety nine live action so I mind nice food we have anti today what is beautiful breeze beautiful the baby baby grasshoppers what else holding their grasshoppers they could be some cockroaches that are upgraded hopefully takes green green cocker on Ah yeah ankles all you have to check your jerseys crazy with the ticks mine disease control I know disease L. Joke man there's no cure for that dogs well there's no cure but it can be cured I have a friend who's a naturopathic doctor and she's held that people with lyme disease it'd be cured with time a long time yeah long everybody's times were she's had it for like ten years and she's I think about like seventy seven five percent yeah but that's one of his crazy ticks figured that out but we got we got schiffer AIDS and you know there's one one take that jumps ooh I could jump from where I'm at to you that what's up come on Bro we'll be like brothers I mean back in the day they had what is it like when you were like blood brothers take brother Kinda like blood brothers will be a tick mosquito bites you let's go bites me and we're kind of blood brothers I'm sure yeah yeah it's just safer yeah which is not joe it you know how crazy it is uh-huh if somebody had HIV and they get stung by a mosquito say you're on a beach the Mosquitos Mosquito okay jumps off that person to call a high five and then they come over me and they stink me I don't get it you don't get it got it how come how do you know you don't get it though Google's that's why Dr but there was somebody did the research somewhere somebody had it available on Google I don't WanNa mosquito a bit you you could get guys right away died like a little later he also being mosquitoes so be that's why they don't WanNa problems all we technically doesn't WanNa problems that if you fuck with it they fuck with you defending themselves yeah but kamikaze fucking themselves they're like all right brought me that like the Japanese so fly away they like the Japanese Pearl Harbor Bro you GonNa Fuck and take me down we'll go down I you know what I mean you know what I mean okay kamikaze kamikazes the animal kingdom that's crazy yo so I don't know why this maybe Bat now so you have had remember what Louis let's talk about this senior though right now because we're on top of a mountain over seeing Manhattan and Partner Jersey is definitely more Jersey noticing well you can't see because of the trees but I've been here before when they weren't leaves yeah but they'll fuck that that's not even highlight Manhattan Fuck Manhattan Lakers Jersey Brown's New Yorker so I have to Jersey which I know New York is New York is used like New York state yeah yeah yeah yeah everybody thinks the little the Little Peninsula Ryland I think that's New York's NYC burlap thing is John West has to I like I like upstate upstate is nine yeah yeah definitely run into some shit there some people.

Santa Monica Solo seventy seven five percent eighteen minutes six months ten years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"So what's up Yup it's been about six months but I'm back and I'm back with a special guest you're hearing this episodes about an hour eighteen minutes noisy out here because I'm in the city walking kind of Santa Monica Solo founded podcasts and yeah we just had a conversation recorded it for unedited natural like everything else I do on this podcast so I'm really excited about this episode man longtime common listened to that episode let me know what you think is starts really funny and then gets a little serious maybe a little boring at times depending on what you like what you don't but yeah cool turning point and onto chapter two I hope you enjoyed the show pace per fucking yeah good enabled sin yeah yeah so I think that's a good intro to the Shaw Abelson said Yeah who'd you start recording already I started recording we're we're live live ninety nine live action so I mind nice food we have anti today what is beautiful breeze beautiful the baby baby grasshoppers what else there grasshoppers they could be some cockroaches that are upgraded hopefully takes green green cocker on ah yeah ankles have to check your jerseys crazy with the ticks mine disease control I know diseases L. Joke Man there's no cure for that dogs well there's no cure but it can be cured I have a friend who's a naturopathic doctor and she's held that people with lyme disease it'd be cured with time a long time yeah long everybody's times when she's had it for like ten years and she's I think about like seventy seven five percent yeah but that's one of his crazy ticks figured that out but we got we got schiffer AIDS and you know there's one one take that jumps ooh I could jump from where I'm at to you that what's up come on Bro we'll be like brothers I mean back in the day they had what is it like when you were like blood brothers take other kind of like blood brothers will be a tick mosquito bites you let's go bites me and we're kind of blood brothers I'm sure yeah yeah it's just safer yeah which is not joe it you know how crazy it is uh-huh if somebody had HIV and they get stung by a mosquito say you're on a beach the mosquitos mosquito okay jumps off that person to call a high five and then they come over me and they stink me I don't get it you don't get it got it how come how do you know you don't get it though Google's that's why Dr but there was somebody did the research somewhere somebody had it available on Google I don't WanNa mosquito a bit you you could get guys right away died like a little later he also being mosquitoes so be that's why they don't WanNa problems all we technically doesn't WanNa problems that if you fuck with it they fuck with you defending themselves yeah but kamikaze fucking themselves they're like all right brought me that like the Japanese so fly away they like the Japanese Pearl Harbor Bro You GonNa Fuck and take me down we'll go down I you know what I mean you know what I mean okay kamikaze kamikazes the animal kingdom that's crazy yo so I don't know why this maybe bat now so you have had remember what Louis let's talk about this senior though right now because we're on top of a mountain over seeing Manhattan and Partner Jersey is definitely more Jersey number thing well you can't see because of the trees but I've been here before when they weren't leaves yeah but they'll fuck that that's not even highlight Manhattan Fuck Manhattan Lakers Jersey Brown's New Yorker so I have to Jersey which I know New York is New York is used like New York state yeah yeah yeah yeah everybody thinks the little the Little Peninsula Ryland I think that's New York's NYC burlap thing is John West has to I like I like upstate upstate is nine yeah yeah definitely run into some shit there some people.

Santa Monica Solo seventy seven five percent eighteen minutes six months ten years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:58 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I'm back everybody was up it's been a while since I put another podcasts out there I want to do things consistently but a here comes the excuses just had a lot going on in just everyday life and yeah I guess I over think it and I put it he still winging it but have a couple of things on this podcast that I wanna talk about but I if you haven't download the APP please go down the APP it's available for IOS is cold Santa Mine S. A. N. O. M. I N. D. Santo Mine and just give me your thoughts ideas feedback it's still pretty still pretty barebones simple MVP but the whole point of it to to get the content out there and to see people listen and people are people are listening check those numbers every day and I think we're about to go into being able to build more features and products so yeah that's coming soon but we'll see we'll see what happens but yeah I still been working on it I hate I hate to admit it but as far as the product yeah guess we are Zombie mode which is is the worst multibillion having build any features and just been out there with the same with the same product and just been focusing on getting content out there for now which which is the most important part but there needs to be an experience on the APP there needs to be a couple more features than like to add for now an you know if we want to be a technology quotes startup or at least product than We need to work on that but yeah so besides being Zombie mode where I think into health is going I I mean I don't WanNa say where it's going but because there's a lot of things going on in mental health out a lot more people are talking about it from a hot topic but there's there's still there's still a stigma I wouldn't say stigma is the number one reason that people don't seek help and it isn't the number one reason the number one reason people don't seek help AK therapy because of the cost and that's that's sad I don't think unless the government or insurance companies pay therapists and psychologists their full rates I don't think it's ever going to be cheaper and when I say when I say cheaper I'm talking about face to face one on one therapy in an office setting that's not going to be cheaper you know reality is the therapists and psychologists they go to school for a long time it's not easy and they need to be paid for their time so I'm glad that there are a lot of other ways that people can work on their mental health but when I say where I think mental health is going I think because we have a lot of APPS and you know meditation and there's all these other ways of self care and taking care of your mental health I I I think preventative is debased because get to prevent the onset of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety because nobody has ever taught us to you know Armenta health work on on mental health or do any sort of preventative care for mental health when we were kids growing up and I think they're starting to do that a now but it's taken a lot of initiative from individuals like teachers they're Biz everyday people and like me that talk about it put out podcasts work on products for it but I think Oh people with serious mental health illness they need you know to see a therapist to see a clinical psychologist psychiatrist but as far as just everyday general anxiety and depression and people that they might think they're depressed but there not really depressed there's just you know in a bad place in their life or you know a lot of things been going wrong and throughout the roller coaster of life emotions I think there are still ways for those people to management to health You know using a lot of the self care tips that are out there are or doing whatever you like to do whatever they enjoy doing whatever it takes their mind off things but another thing is is asking yourself the hard questions and answering them honestly listening to your body and you know focusing on what's on your body's telling you and and then just push through and talk to people right Journal every morning Do something like an audio an audio journal where you talk into voice memos and you just just let your let let words right and just get everything out sometimes it's not enough to to write it down or sometimes people don't like to write so talk it out just put it hit record and just let go or if you're in the shower talk to yourself and when I say talk I mean verbally not in in your head because there's a there's a big difference they're just talk it out when there's some there's something powerful about just letting it go from your you're from your head and listening to yourself talk and just putting it out there I know I'm going off in Tangents but you know I just wanted to see talk about you know mental health and this helps solo founders too because this is what gave me the idea when when I'm out running obviously I don't talk out loud because people just think I'm crazy but I talked to myself inside my head all the time when I'm running and I I've been running semi consistently for it'll be two years in June and I see highness I've kind of seen that I kind of on my own on my own therapists because I'm talking to myself and I'm asking questions uh-huh giving myself ideas I'm giving myself advice and I'm trying to figure out issues and problems and come up with solutions for myself and you know anything going on in my life which includes building sat on mine and you know trying to build this product to help others so although well I'm not speaking it out this kind of like a mental inner chatter that's been helping me and it's kind of weird I mean it also helps to that you know I read about psychology and I talked to therapist so a lot of the things I've learned I'm just repeating in my head and just figuring things out on my own and I I kind of enjoy that challenge and I don't know it's part of growing but as a solo founder especially if you're alone most of the time I think that's great I mean you know try it go run see what happens if you don't like it you can do other things just the key here is do whatever works for you whatever makes you happy and whatever you think is helping if you see results but yeah moving board with Santa Wine I was worried about you know building the right things for people and just just worry about what people are thinking and I just went back to the basics is listen it's it's about helping people with content you know I'll listen to feedback if it makes sense you know we'll put it into the product if it doesn't we're going to keep going the way that we wanted to go mission follow the mission and follow intuition and you know back to basics to why started this because I started for one reason and that's the only reason if people don't don't want to join or don't like the APP or it can be this or that you know there are other apps you can get onto do those specific things and there are other ways you can do whatever you do it is you wanna do but yeah after going back to the mission it just makes it so much easier and way less stressful on myself suggest focused on why why why why why why why we're doing this and I've just come to revelation you know when I first started I heard everyone saying you know focus these are focused tunnel vision on that Y and block out the chatter follow the data and just go with what the data saying if you have to if something's not going wrong if something's not going right the data's going to tell you fix it it rate and fix it and see what starts right but if everything's going right and it's going right based upon your y than just a stand that seeing that lane I can't stress enough we listened to many people there's so much information out there you know there are a lot of their VC's their aims Dell's there are other founders their soup assessment what works you you're welcome to to read it all you do learn about things but it's just simple men it's really simple focus on the why follow the data and if it's working continue that way that's it doing anything else you just going to you just go nuts nuts in your head and another thing is that there's another point I wanted to make about but you know the truth is a lot of people don't know what they want or especially what's going to work if they do what you feel is right and do what you want and again follow the data but give people something news you know different activities and they think that feature would would be perfect on your APP because then they would love to use it I think it's cooler and it's a a better explain if you give something if you give people something different and that excites them that wiles them and that's the hard part but it's fun that's all that stuff out so yep this was a little bit about Samba Mode Mental Health and where I think you know Santa Mine should go or where it's at now and you know you should do when you're building a product I'm not an expert this is just little things that I've thought about it and things I've learned along the way and hopefully it helps somebody or are hopefully you hear this and you know what I'm doing is cool and you WanNa meet and you WANNA help out join the team that would be great right now it's just me and might be one of the person pretty soon we'll see but some you're more strategic but it's been digital content digital it just takes up a lot of time and I love doing but it's hard to do all by myself and so I'm looking for somebody that's that's interested in digital marketing when I say to the market I mean across instagram facebook twitter Lincoln and somebody that loves creating content love creating good headlines or good copy nothing of that Corny Witty Shit that's a lot of people do now on just I don't like it to be honest but cool but the copy I like copy to be more creative than witty something that makes people think I think you have to be into you know more than anything mental health wellness mental wellness wellness and strengthening your mind you gotta be.

S. A. N. O. M. I N. D. Santo M MVP two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:08 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I'm back everybody was up it's been a while since I put another podcasts out there I want to do things consistently but a here comes the excuses just had a lot going on in just everyday life and yeah I guess I over think it and I put it he still winging it but have a couple of things on this podcast that I wanNA talk about but I if you haven't download the APP please go down the APP it's available for IOS is cold Santa Mine S. A. N. O. M. I n. d. Santo Mine and just give me your thoughts ideas feedback it's still pretty still pretty barebones simple MVP but the whole point of it to to get the content out there and to see people listen and people are people are listening check those numbers every day and I think we're about to go into being able to build more features and products so yeah that's coming soon but we'll see we'll see what happens but yeah I still been working on it I hate I hate to admit it but as far as the product yeah guess we are Zombie mode which is is the worst multibillion having build any features and just been out there with the same with the same product and just been focusing on getting content out there for now which which is the most important part but there needs to be an experience on the APP there needs to be a couple more features than like to add for now an you know if we want to be a technology quotes startup or at least product than We need to work on that but yeah so besides being Zombie mode where I think into health is going I I mean I don't WanNa say where it's going but because there's a lot of things going on in mental health out a lot more people are talking about it from a hot topic but there's there's still there's still a stigma I wouldn't say stigma is the number one reason that people don't seek help and it isn't the number one reason the number one reason people don't seek help AK therapy because of the cost and that's that's sad I don't think unless the government or insurance companies pay therapists and psychologists their full rates I don't think it's ever going to be cheaper and when I say when I say cheaper I'm talking about face to face one on one therapy in an office setting that's not going to be cheaper you know reality is the therapists and psychologists they go to school for a long time it's not easy and they need to be paid for their time so I'm glad that there are a lot of other ways that people can work on their mental health but when I say where I think mental health is going I think because we have a lot of APPS and you know meditation and there's all these other ways of self care and taking care of your mental health I I I think preventative is debased because get to prevent the onset of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety because nobody has ever taught us to you know Armenta health work on on mental health or do any sort of preventative care for mental health when we were kids growing up and I think they're starting to do that a now but it's taken a lot of initiative from individuals like teachers they're Biz everyday people and like me that talk about it put out podcasts work on products for it but I think Oh people with serious mental health illness they need you know to see a therapist to see a clinical psychologist psychiatrist but as far as just everyday general anxiety and depression and people that they might think they're depressed but there not really depressed there's just you know in a bad place in their life or you know a lot of things been going wrong and throughout the roller coaster of life emotions I think there are still ways for those people to management to health you know using a lot of the self care tips that are out there are or doing whatever you like to do whatever they enjoy doing whatever it takes their mind off things but another thing is is asking yourself the hard questions and answering them honestly listening to your body and you know focusing on what's on your body's telling you and and then just push through and talk to people right Journal every morning Do something like an audio an audio journal where you talk into voice memos and you just just let your let let words right and just get everything out sometimes it's not enough to to write it down or sometimes people don't like to write so talk it out just put it hit record and just let go or if you're in the shower talk to yourself and when I say talk I mean verbally not in in your head because there's a there's a big difference they're just talk it out when there's some there's something powerful about just letting it go from your you're from your head and listening to yourself talk and just putting it out there I know I'm going off in tangents but you know I just wanted to see talk about you know mental health and this helps solo founders too because this is what gave me the idea when when I'm out running obviously I don't talk out loud because people just think I'm crazy but I talked to myself inside my head all the time when I'm running and I I've been running semi consistently for it'll be two years in June and I see highness I've kind of seen that I kind of on my own on my own therapists because I'm talking to myself and I'm asking questions uh-huh giving myself ideas I'm giving myself advice and I'm trying to figure out issues and problems and come up with solutions for myself and you know anything going on in my life which includes building sat on mine and you know trying to build this product to help others so although well I'm not speaking it out this kind of like a mental inner chatter that's been helping me and it's kind of weird I mean it also helps to that you know I read about psychology and I talked to therapist so a lot of the things I've learned I'm just repeating in my head and just figuring things out on my own and I I kind of enjoy that challenge and I don't know it's part of growing but as a solo founder especially if you're alone most of the time I think that's great I mean you know try it go run see what happens if you don't like it you can do other things just the key here is do whatever works for you whatever makes you happy and whatever you think is helping if you see results but yeah moving word with Santa Wine I was worried about you know building the right things for people and just just worry about what people are thinking and I just went back to the basics is listen it's it's about helping people with content you know I'll listen to feedback if it makes sense you know we'll put it into the product if it doesn't we're going to keep going the way that we wanted to go mission follow the mission and follow intuition and you know back to basics to why started this because I started for one reason and that's the only reason if people don't don't want to join or don't like the APP or it can be this or that you know there are other apps you can get onto do those specific things and there are other ways you can do whatever you do it is you WanNa do but yeah after going back to the mission it just makes it so much easier and way less stressful on myself suggest focused on why why why why why why why we're doing this and I've just come to revelation you know when I first started I heard everyone saying you know focus these are focused tunnel vision on that Y and block out the chatter follow the data and just go with what the data saying if you have to if something's not going wrong if something's not going right the data's going to tell you fix it it rate and fix it and see what starts right but if everything's going right and it's going right based upon your y than just a stand that seeing that lane I can't stress enough we listened to many people there's so much information out there you know there are a lot of their VC's their aims Dell's there are other founders their soup assessment founders they're found is who are early their founders who are like into thick of it now and everybody has the different what was I gonNA say everywhere everybody has different feedback or advice everybody has different advice what works you you're welcome to to read it all you do learn about things but it's just simple men it's really simple focus on the why follow the data and if it's working continue that way that's it doing anything else you just going to you know just just focusing on what you WANNA do everybody has ideas of what they wanted an APP or what you what you should put in an APP but you know the truth is a lot of people don't know what they want or especially what's going to work if they do what you feel is right and do what you want and again follow the data but give people something news if you give something if you give people something different and that excites them that wiles them and that's the hard part but it's fun that's all that stuff out so yep this was a little bit about Samba mode mental health and where I think you know Santa Mine should go or where it's at now and you know are hopefully you hear this and you know what I'm doing is cool and you WanNa meet and you WANNA help out join the team that would be great right now it's just I love doing but it's hard to do all by myself and so I'm looking for somebody that's that's interested in digital marketing when I say to the market loves creating content love creating good headlines or good copy nothing.

Santo Mine S. A. N. O. M. MVP two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

09:14 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Guess who's back your nose back because you are you clicked on the podcast and it's been a couple of weeks in heaven Dropped an episode maybe because I had nothing to talk about nothing was really going on this is going to sound terrible here right now because I am getting ready to go to work yes bartend at a nice upscale Japanese restaurant I used to bartend years ago and I decide I did hey instead of you know just try to look for a full time position because gotta make money while you're building something way trying to pull the because Santa Mine is not bringing in any revenue or money in my pocket we're not charging anything yet but so I thought Oh shit what am I go back to bartending so did just that and I forgot how much fun you get to meet different people fifth grade the place that I'm bartend at is called Dodie it's carmine street downtown Manhattan what's it called it's not so he's I think he's back but anyway so always was a slow month for Santa Mine it was the slowest month for forgetting on any therapists on the platform I think I only put up two or three pieces of content and I choked up to August being the slowest months of the year for everybody because the last month of the MAR people on vacation everybody's checked out at work and nobody's going to be thinking about really recording audio content for for Santa Monica at least not yet because everybody was still posted on facebook twitter instagram so they seem to be doing all right which is good for them but anyway so a couple of things happened last month I well everybody that apply got into Y combinator start school it's not the y combinator a celery later with a provide funding but this is the start of school that S- run by Y combinator alumni and who partners at y combinator but for me the only difference is actually getting funding at the Y.. combinator celebrator and meeting investors. VC's because I mean the content the lectures that they've been putting up have been amazing and one thing to me that was that stood out that ever since I launched Santa Mine January seventeenth of two thousand eighteen I've been working to get users and get contributors licensed services that causes and I just been catching them however I can you know and social media being on podcast engaging people on twitter linked in writing me podcasting anyway possible I can to get you to attract users on groups on facebook and I thought that you know I was like Oh man what's what see what's the best to do this because I'm growth is good but it's it's slow I wanted to be a lot faster and and yesterday there were two lectures about building products getting more product market fit and there was an ask me anything with it the partners that Y C and he was also I think he was head of Grove at Airbnb and everything that he's nope all the questions that he answered were mostly around growth and a lot of them were around BTC which is business is consumer ABS- or companies and he said there's no magic formula it's basically doing everything that I've been doing already you know just going out there and agent with TV using every every site every tool imaginable that you can track those first users because it's hard to get massive growth until you have product market fit you know product market fit is actually something that people actually want to use need and and and also something that they're using I guess every day and can't can't step away from like instagram for example facebook or twitter their way past product market fit you know people millions and billions of people use these products everyday and that's where I wanNA get Santa mine the way the product is now I know that it's not you know at product market fit and I knew it wasn't going to be a part of market because there's still a couple little features that are needed for both users and contribute to actually want to use it more often but I'm excited that everything I've been doing today is actually the right thing and I've been thinking that in the right spot the founder of Whibley to talk on product market fit and growth and when they launched they didn't get product market fit until about eighteen to twenty four months after they launched and their grass look the same as mine up and down up and down not much growth but you know everybody has been saying you know all these talks and the C O only side and I will continue to do what I've been doing which is every social media tool available to man and posting an engaging with people anywhere I can up to even on the street and and you know meditation and Mindfulness but there's a book that I've that I've had here that I've been wanting to actually read because I only read maybe about one two three chapters probably mid August and I started really reading it every day and the book is called Mindfulness I'll I'll put the why you're feeling that way what makes you feel that way but not shying away from your feelings.

facebook Santa Monica Santa Manhattan twenty four months
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"What's up everybody I'm back I was away for two weeks not because I'm lazy just because I had nothing to really put out and I was also way for a couple of days for a wedding so outside of the country and as soon as Shen not really have to think about much until two days before I was coming back I guess subconsciously mine new you know I was getting back into the stress to work mode and I started getting really really just and the breathing again that that shall oh breathing's happening but when I got back I started managing it with running so I've been running for the past year and I used to run in high school and I used to run in college of on my own and it was mostly because try now for baseball teams and just having been on Jim Beam in gym and playing some baseball in the summer so you have to run a lot so I actually enjoyed running so last year I got back into it so I could get back into shape and got back into shape got good stamina back but now I'm running for Stamina and speed so back in high school when I was sixteen seventeen ran a mile and five minutes and that's pretty fast so last year when I started running my first mile was about somewhere between twelve and fourteen and a half minutes I I don't remember probably on the higher end forty minutes but I I was in shock and not in shocked at how how shape I was so thirteen months later my fastest mile to date has been seven minutes and seventeen seconds and that was yesterday so I've been pushing myself every day too beat to beat the fast time Monday I got back to running and I did seven thirty seven minutes and thirty seconds yesterday I did seventeen seven minutes and seventeen seconds today tried to beat that but wasn't happening first mile Iran was nineteen twenty five and it's I try to get an A. second mile seventeen twenty six but that's good though because I'm still running at a great pace and it's only gonna get it's only a better so now I'm training like I said for speed and stamina so I'm focused on doing hit training on the treadmill for speed I'm focusing on my core so I can it's good for running 'cause use your core lot so whatever I'm I'm working on my core you're and I didn't see much anything about doing any work for the legs but I'm more into that another thing Ed is I read that the best runners do one hundred eighty strides per minute so I counted my strikes today oh I think I did the first one I did one hundred seventy two and the trick is to take shorter and faster strides before I I was I was taking long strides in trying to go faster because I thought that that just I would run faster but I would get tired faster than that wouldn't work but now the short strides I saw that when I was getting tired mid mile or the second the second mid mile that taking those short fastest strides was really didn't have an effect on getting me more more tired and also focusing on my breathing while I'm running so you've gotta take deep breaths into your stomach and exhale it all out so you can continue deep breath because your blood needs oxygen and that's when you get really tired when you blood doesn't have oxygen and you start breath really fast but anyway this podcast is not about running is just it's about Santa Mind but it's also about my Life Buildings the mine so I use the running to get mental strength to get all that negative energy and all that anxiety the and depression out and it really works and it also gives me a ton of ideas and it also boost my confidence to do things that I need to do for Santa Mine Aka raise money and I would love to build a company and get it two hundred million in revenue and not raise time but the company I'm trying to build I need Technology Team Aka I need a team of engineers and some designers so that takes money that salaries so I just made the decision to start raising start get the ball rolling and raising money it takes awhile especially for someone that's not in the in that tech startup world because they only really take warm rose so that sucks but I really don't care but what really pushed me was I saw this is article on tech crunch come out and forgot her name but she's the founder and CEO of a paint company So she her background is interior interior design and she just saw how terrible the whole experience for of buying paint is for your home or office whatever and and she's so low nontechnical founder and she raised two million dollars with just a powerpoint deck just a pitch deck so I see that and I'm thinking I'm working on Santa Mine want to help bring therapists into the like new age where everything is about content and awareness and attention and if people follow you and love you that most likely for therapists at least will turn into hopefully a client but it also I'm also working on helping people there's twenty five million people they don't get the mental health help they need and the number one barrier and this is this is this comes from these are real what's the number one barrier cited is cost so listening to content prerecorded by therapists which you can access demand I think will be a game changer not only for people finding people trying to get the help they need without going to therapy they have different mindsets so when you're on Lincoln your mindset is business business networking connecting with people for business finding the job whatever when you're on facebook your mindset is different you are in I guess maybe family mindset because connected with your family they're close friends maybe like the other thing you know they have you can read reviews of restaurants and events so that's another mindset instagram different mindset you there to see picture and also bringing people that suffer bringing them together and they all talk to each other within these smaller groups and communities to build where people that suffer that need help that want to get educated on what mental health is or what they might be going through can come on discover new therapists from all over the country in America hopefully one day in the world with them I mean how does that and they're going to be other features built in within the APP which are going to be making more socials read about the female founder that raise two million on a deck and I actually have a product launch eight traction and it's known that it's needed by the people and the people want it still little if he if therapists are fully on board with this because you know it's like a.

Shen seventeen seconds seven thirty seven minutes seventeen seven minutes two million dollars thirteen months thirty seconds forty minutes seven minutes five minutes two weeks two days one day
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"What's up everybody I'm back I was away for two weeks not because I'm lazy just because I had nothing to really put out and I was also way for a couple of days for a wedding so outside of the country and as soon as Shen not really have to think about much until two days before I was coming back I guess subconsciously mine new you know I was getting back into the stress to work mode and I started getting really really just and the breathing again that that shall oh breathing's happening but when I got back I started managing it with running so I've been running for the past year and I used to run in high school and I used to run in college of on my own and it was mostly because so I actually enjoyed running so last year I got back into it so I could get back into shape and got back into shape got good stamina back but now I'm running for Stamina and speed so back in high school when I was sixteen seventeen ran a mile and five minutes and that's pretty fast so last year when I started running my first mile was about somewhere between twelve and fourteen and a half minutes I I don't remember probably on the higher end forty minutes but I I was in shock and not in shocked at how how shape I was so thirteen months later my fastest mile to date has been seven minutes and seventeen seconds and that was yesterday so I've been pushing myself every day too beat to beat the fast time Monday I got back to running and I did seven thirty seven minutes and thirty seconds yesterday I did seventeen seven minutes and seventeen seconds today tried to beat that but wasn't happening first mile Iran was it's only GonNa get it's only a better so now I'm training like I said for speed and stamina so I'm focused on doing hit training on the Treadmill for speed I'm focusing on my core so I can it's good for running 'cause use your core lot so whatever I'm I'm working on my core her and I didn't see much anything about doing any work for the legs but I'm more into that another thing Ed is I read that the best runners do one hundred eighty strides per minute so I counted my strikes today oh I think I did the first one I did one hundred seventy two and the trick is to take shorter and faster strides before I I was I was taking long strides in trying to go faster because I thought that that Just mid mile or the second the second Mid Mile that taking those short fastest strides was really the mine so I use the running to get mental strength to get all that negative energy and all that Aka raise money and I would love to build a company and get it two hundred million in revenue and not raise time but the company I'm trying to build I need Technology Team Aka I need a team of engineers and some designers so that takes it takes awhile especially for someone that's not in the in that tech startup world because they only really take warm.

seventeen seconds seven thirty seven minutes seventeen seven minutes thirteen months thirty seconds forty minutes seven minutes five minutes two weeks two days