18 Burst results for "Founder And Managing Partner"

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

05:22 min | 3 months ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

"Was copying to the point of they would have this chief scientist who would basically study. Let's say they're copying pinterest. He would send out an email to the pinterest of africa. The pinterest of germany be like pinchers changed their button size on the top rate from this to this do do have you ever thought. What do you think about those guys it. Have you ever thought of doing that. Tragedy where instead of invention. Let's cop it's just not our style. It's a very different style. First of all. I think the kind of talent you can work with that. You can motivate to just copy other people's ideas i think is very different than the kinds of people were able to attract at atomic and work on our companies. You know more of a mercenary probably than mission driven approach. We pride ourselves in everything that we've done has been innovative. It's been original. We haven't been copying other people's ideas. It's not in our ethos to do that. So and the processes in how it operates is very different and the culture is very different. Fundamentally as a result so do you think you need to pick one of those two things. Would it be easier to build something that just copies other people's yeah it would be easier. But it probably wouldn't work as well because i don't think just copying other people's ideas is as valuable and i don't think that it would work as well anyway but it's also just far less interesting to me. It seems like the ideas that worked well for them. Were the ones where there was like a local network effect in the us that had gone to europe yet and they did it in europe before the us company could go to europe but there were a lot of companies that copied that had a hard time because they kind of installed someone who the hired guns who just hire bank. Say just spend more money than this other company and missionaries often outlasts mercenaries in you have to longevity is one of the key factors. You need to to to win. Yeah right to some extent but it's just different. Let's do a couple of minutes. Real quick on crypto so on a scale of one to checking the kool-aid where you out with crypto just personally investing in it. What do you think is exciting or or completely overrated. I don't know what your take is sort of. It's pretty polarizing so people are usually very into it or you know think it's toxic and a ponzi scheme so where where do you stand get question. I think cryptos real and it's here to stay I think the question is what are the fundamental. Like real innovations in crypto. The things that are going to be around. And what are the things that are. There's a lot of manipulation. There's a lot of stuff going on behind the scenes. People don't know about talk on these chat groups and apps and like forums of like pump and dump thing is really bad you know. This is stuff that people will like in a normal market. Probably go to jail for like seriously. This.

europe germany africa us
"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

03:44 min | 3 months ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

"That and you know we looked into it and you know it's it's still such interesting technology. I hope someone does bill debt. But that there's some structural issues with it around fishing quotas and the industry industry capture of that industry that we could get into another time on the kind of make it a little bit difficult. But that's another idea. But anyway i discussed that moore. I'm having a progress into the irons behind. Go to the patterns. I'd be curious to what those are. Yeah so some patterns. That i think are kind of tried and true. That are really interesting to think about one. Pattern is if you take things that rich people have access to you or rich. Companies have access to and you figure out how to democratize them see make them more accessible distributable cheaper and accessible to everyone that is a winning formula for creating a really good company and part of the reason for that from philosophical perspective. This is actually something i learned from. Marc andreessen he has belief that human desires infinite which is an interesting concept. And if you believe that then people with a lot of resources in companies with a lot of resources are willing to spend on the outer limit of human desire. So they're poking around they're figuring out all of these things of what's the next thing on the human desire bubble that could be discovered and they might discover something and if something they're really takes hold that you can then take and give to everyone. Everyone might want that and it might be ready forever. Like uber was classic example. This right people had private drivers now. Everybody can push a button and have a private driver. Pick him up. Yeah private driver with uber. Private chef with door dash private shopper with insta- car. Those are all really good examples. You could even argue. You know second home airbnb kind of like having access to a second home much in a much cheaper way. So i think that that's a really really interesting pattern. That people can look into. That consumers is an interesting one and is pretty tried and true. And so what's what's an idea in that space. So what are some other things that you've seen that either. Very wealthy people are very wealthy companies. Have that the rest of us. Don't whether some other or some other examples in there that you know haven't looked into it but my might be might be interesting. Well i think that there seems to be some kind of a renaissance happening in fintech partially because the wealthy seemed to have access to financial planning financial resources around planning access to the markets. You know there's this whole ninety nine per center says the one percent and people have kind of figured that out. And i think that's why you're seeing this boom of new companies if you can give the ninety nine percent with the one percent has access to the ability to generate wealth. I think that that's actually really interesting. I think there are a lot of interesting start-up ideas that are being form there. We're starting one or two that we think can help empower people in that area for example so that would be one example of an area that they could be interesting. Are you going to do anything in the wealth adviser space. We are kind of tangentially doing things there. I think that there's probably a lot more to do their you know. Wealth advisory is a compounded issue. Where even the wealthy when they have access to wealth advisory..

Marc andreessen moore airbnb
"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

05:16 min | 3 months ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

"And get access to some pretty dope contact. That's my my recommendation to you go attend inbound. Twenty twenty one. I want to ask you about very specific ideas. So in the pomp podcast. Basically you said something. I entirely agree with which is distribution or. I don't know if you set it or if it it was discussed distribution over ideas so you look at. How do i get early customers. And can this actually scale some of the ways that you do that as you look at the payback period. So you try to see you trying to get that as low as possible. So if i acquire customer how much how long does take to get my money back. You said the best in class is three months. You also said that the ltv caq best in classes five. Meaning you acquire customer for a dollar worth five dollars to and you also said that you have a very at this point berry strict standards for launching companies. So you said you have six hundred ideas. You can launch up to ten now. And that's many years into this so what i want to talk about is what ideas didn't cross this threshold but in your head you think it could have or if the right person does it. Definitely maybe could work or maybe it can meet some those benchmarks but it's still pretty cool and pretty good. What can you tell me some ideas. I up an honorable mention question. That was a good question the way let me think through that. I mean there there have been planning plenty plenty over the years to think through just trying to think through some worth calling. Got your evernote. Just scroll click share and then add sam at sam part. Yeah totally okay. Well i'll give you some examples so so talk about problem solution so we got this. We got this new office in in letterman. And the presidio. For those of you who don't know in san francisco. It's kind of like a national park..

ltv sam presidio san francisco
"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

05:15 min | 3 months ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

"At the atomic level so companies are pushed out and people are pushed out of atomic. And there's not this effect where people just stay in the incubator forever because it's dangerous to do that and then it is. Isn't it nine months and three hundred thousand dollars. Is that right. Two hundred fifty thousand or something so we have multiple stages of investment the first check. That will right kind of get something going and do some initial research and homework is around a quarter million dollars but it could range from one hundred thousand four hundred thousand and then if that goes well we can write a check. That's usually two million dollars but again it could be one to four million dollars and then from there we can actually write a check. That could be three to eight million dollars that sometimes do with other. Vc's sometimes we do on our own kind of depends on the circumstances depends on the needs of the company and what we need to get to the next set of milestones. But that's kind of how it works. Now that's been evolving over our funds and our first fund. It was smaller so we obviously only did like the early rounds. Which is what. Sean is describing. And then as it's gotten bigger we were able to get the company's further which is why we can keep themself longer and now when they come out they usually have raised. These really big routes. Did you when you when you were starting this. How much of your own money did you put up to do this. And you like all right. I made this much money. I'm willing to lose a million dollars over the next two years to see if i can make this work. Yeah good question. So my general philosophy with things as you shouldn't sell what you wouldn't also by so i wanted to prove to myself that this would work before raising outside capital so the first year of atomic i did it with my own capital. Which was roughly on the order of what you described. And then once i was convinced. Okay i think this is working. I think we can pull this off. I think this model is gonna work. Then we raised our first fund and our first fund was roughly. The i i part of the first farmers..

Sean
"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

My First Million

02:56 min | 3 months ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on My First Million

"That i think makes us stand out in a little bit different from other people that have attempted best and in terms of the six hundred ideas. And we're faith come from it. Turns out our view of the world is like it's actually fundamentally very broken. There's just a lot of stuff in the world that could be improved. And that doesn't mean that everything's like broken broken bright like it just means that there is there is an opportunity in many many facets of light and many parts of the economy up level things and this could be just like everyday parts of life. This could be going to the doctor's office. This could be in commuting to work. This could be in interacting with a company or running sales team or something like that. You just observe all of these things and think wow. That doesn't seem that seems a little bit broken. There's probably a better way. And then i just got in the habit of writing those down and now that list has grown to over six hundred and that's a seed that we use to start companies on us at atomic. And i have a whole bunch of questions Like i i I was telling you. I watched a lot of your interview so i i understand a little bit about your process and i wanna ask you about that but before you did this. So you're thirty thirty four now. I'm thirty five now thirty five so before you're doing atomic your first big win was milo sold that for like seventy five million at twenty four right yup stayed there at ebay for san diego who is dad is i do. Come score yeah. I didn't know that till i was doing research. Because i just thought oh. He's kind of like a whiz kid. And i love for every whizzkid. Some unique childhood. I think where you get exposed to something so jessie your dad started com scores. That right with ceo. I don't know if he's still. Ceo and you were working there at age. Twelve or something crazy. Is that right thanks. Yeah had an interesting childhood where. I got exposed to entrepreneurship at a young age. My dad was an immigrant. He came to the us literally without a dollar to his name from where he was born in lebanon and then he actually went to college and france. Studying science and engineering and math. He came to the us goes phd in math mit. And he literally didn't off about whose name so he slept on concrete basement floor at mit in a sleeping bag. I was born while he was there and boston. And then you know. He took math in. He applied it to business. He actually invented all of these really cool. New forms of marketing which at the time of revolutionary ended up winning these international marketing awards for them ended up getting promoted in the company. He joined eventually became president of it and then decided to become an entrepreneur. Can you imagine the world dream. He was basically born at the bottom of the third world. He rose to the top of the first world started company sold at and then when i was twelve or thirteen he said jack. I'm gonna start a company that's going to measure everything everyone does on the internet and make sense of it..

milo jessie ebay san diego lebanon us france boston jack
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"The world really needs men and women who are alive. Yeah, and that made total sense to me well, but what about that girl? I know who decided in high school foolishly that she should spend hundreds of gourmet a hundred thousand dollars in debt to get a French degree because it made her feel good to speak French. She has a hundred thousand almost a hundred thousand in debt. Now. She now works for like ten dollars an hour last I checked and she doesn't have any way of paying off this debt and she's kicking herself twelve years later going what did an eighteen-year-old thought about what made me come alive. That's powerful my friends and that is something to consider Brian. I know we're out of time off. Like to pause this recording and jump back on tonight when you wake up tomorrow morning, I would love to do it. I I would like to even get in touch with you again some other time. If you would just either one tell where people can find you and ask my answer my final question of why do you work? Well, I got to jump on this other call in a minute, but Wellings capital.com is where they can get a hold of me. It's w e l l i n g s c a p i t g l Wellings capital.com. We've got a wonderful gift therefore listeners and you can actually if you have any interest in learning why the wealthiest people in the world invest in commercial real estate office you can find out there because we have a five-part free e-course on investing in commercial real estate Wellings Capital, How's that location? So I work for a lot of reasons but one of the reasons is this if you look at the stats of about human trafficking, which I had not heard until fairly recently about four or five years ago. I found out that if you took the record profits the record profits Of Apple GM Nike and Starbucks add those record profits together double that number that's the estimated revenues generated by human trafficking throughout the world and it's not just in the Philippines. It's not just in a country far away. It's actually happening in your town in my town and they just bought a whole lot of people in my home state of my former home state of Ohio for doing this just this week. And so if I'd like to believe if I was alive in the eighteen hundreds, I would have been in a polygamous abolitionist fighting slave against slavery and I'd like to believe that if I was an adult in the 1960s in America, I would have been fighting for civil rights. Well, this is a civil right? It is slavery and it's been ripped away from thousands of people who are dead. All over the world, and as a result, it's been their life has been literally ripped away, and I'd like to fight human trafficking. So one of my goals is to let the world know that human trafficking is a great evil, and my desire would be to use my work as a platform for that. But also use those funds. I generate at work to fight human trafficking and rescue its victims and I would recommend that you and your listeners on this podcast do the same Amor founder managing partner at Wellings capital. Thank you kind sir. Thank you. I just told my list of my my my my friend here that I'd be late for the college here, but I'm really really glad to be on your show today. I'd love to come back and talk more..

Wellings capital.com Wellings Capital Wellings capital Brian Ohio Philippines Apple Nike America Starbucks GM Amor managing partner founder
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Go to college in that and instead of doing a four-year $200,000 College. He said I'll give you a hint you can do just as well in this career with a two-year degree from this certain Community College wage. That is only going to cost it turned out $13,000 for two years of school 13,000 total. I think it turned out to be eleven in fact, and so he got that degree and he had already been mentoring in this exact field for a couple of years and it was a perfect combination. And so I think that would be home though, not for everybody. I mean i t people and medical doctors and dentists. They need lots and lots more school than that. But some people don't need school at all. Yeah, I agree and thinking more of the the listeners who may be discouraged and not knowing maybe like your son who were in a job that they shouldn't be in or they just didn't find their Niche yet. What type of encouragement do you give them in finding their job and finding their work? Hm, you know, there's two schools of thought on this and both their home. Pleat Lee contrary so I'll give you both one is the Jewish school of thought and I heard a Jewish rabbi very powerfully make this point. He said don't find out what makes you come alive. It's odd go out and find what the world needs fill that spot make a lot of I mean do a lot of good for them. You lose a lot of money, but you'll find out that that makes you come alive, huh? Really? I haven't heard that yet in my episodes. Yeah. I'm looking for his name doctor said Rabbi, excuse me, Rabbi Daniel Lapin. I'm looking at his book on my shelf now shall prosper. Okay, Rabbi, Daniel Lapin says that and then the other school of thought which people like I believe it was John Eldredge in Wild at Heart the great book Wild at Heart said find don't Don't go figuring out what the world needs but find out what makes you come alive..

Rabbi Daniel Lapin Jewish school John Eldredge Lee
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Such I said ethically and morally I think it would be right. I just found this out that I missed that I not have lunch with you but you're already set up to have lunch with my business partner. Anyway, I wanted to call to personally tell you how sorry I was and at that moment. I was really tempted to say I just found out found those words should come out of my mouth. I just found out but then the ding ding ding ding went in the back of my head and said that's not true. You found out 2 and 1/2 hours ago. You could have called him before he left home. And so I re-calibrate. Of course these thoughts, you know, you can think what is it 40 quadrillion thoughts a second. Literally your brain can do that. So all that happened in less than a second. I'm sure and I said well when I say just found out I actually could have called you this morning. I found out at 9 a.m. And now it was eleven I think and I said I really should have called you then, but I didn't even think anything about it. I thought well, I'm not I don't have any symptoms. I woke to meet you and then I thought better of it. So I went ahead and explained the truth. And so I think like my dad and I think my mom too. I wanted to be I wanted to have character over looking good. I mean, hey, I got a podcast called how to lose money after all. I'm willing to look bad on air. Mr. Mort, I wish I had more time with you. I know you have another I'm good. I'm good for ten minutes. You're well in in saying who you are is what defines your your life. What is a character trait that you're working on that you're trying to just I mean you're talking about honesty you if you talk to her own Integrity. What is something that might be lacking? That just is something that's been a challenge for a number of years that you're you're hoping to fine-tune a little bit..

partner Mr. Mort
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Home companies cannot build mobile homes fast enough and we're you know on a teetering wondering if we're going to be in a recession more people are moving into mobile home parks and there's virtually no vacancies in wherever there's a mobile home. Now, there's lots of vacant lots and that's because it's pretty hard to fill a vacant lot in a mobile home park a really good operator can do that all day long a really mediocre or poor or 1 a.m. Mom-and-pop operator has a very hard time filling vacancies. So at any rate all that is to say mobile home parks are a great recession-resistant investment off that's not recession-proof, but it's it does well and recessions at least Mister more back to you as a worker and managing. This These funds wage. Is it people that you would like that people could understand more about you and the work that you do and trying to help them with their Investments or to help them in their life. We've been really agonizing over some operators. We have only chosen so between our goal was to find five or ten good operators to spread money around and in the last Seven Seventeen of the last 18 months, we have only had one new operator join our investment pool and it's not to say we didn't try we searched far and wide throughout America looking for the next operators to add and we're again we are hoping to get 5 to 10:00 and we just added two more after many many months of talking to them and interviewing them. And so after adding these two more now, we have three operators in our current main fund we have other funds that are smaller, but our main challenge is finding those operators because we don't want to be apologizing. And losing sleep for the next 9 and 1/2 years of our 10-year fund because we made a one mistake with an operator and fact my business partner and I bought a new often disagree on things and that's what makes our Partnerships so healthy we often disagree on things and we we were disagreeing late into the the yeah into the evening last night about the certain aspect of the next operator that we might bring on..

Mister partner America
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"They really make compared to what they expected from the TV show or wage, they start building a portfolio of rental homes. And then at some point they realize it's much harder and much more frustrating than they ever thought. But if they're really on top of this they realized the tax benefits are pretty amazing and I mean people, you know in the news right now, we've we've just had a story that came out three weeks ago about the fact that the president of the United States pays virtually no taxes, and of course every real estate investor chuckled and said, well, of course, he pays virtually no taxes because he's a commercial real estate. Investor and that's how it is, but that's another story. Anyway, so these people scratch their heads and they can they go, you know, I'm managing. I talked to a guy last night from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He said he had 42 individual houses under management and he realized I really 42 is very high for the typical person doing this on the side. They usually give 3 to 5 before they write a quit or kill somebody anyway, they they they decide to trade all that in and they want to go commercial and they also want to be passive cuz they realize I'm making two hundred thousand a year and i t y am I trying working so hard to make thirty thousand a year passively and pulling my hair out on the side gig and so they want to invest passively and they want to invest in commercial which would be moving up to say a hundred unit apartment building. They'd rather be one of fifty Invesco. In a hundred unit apartment, then the only owner of five rental homes that are driving them crazy. I was in in real estate or in property management for a few years just a couple of years ago and I I remember being presented in this class that were taking. The opportunity in these lower-income sort of commercial residential buildings and what I can only think being simple is Monopoly. So is the value on these like, you know, the lower-income Oriental Place Baltic is a Baltic Avenue that rather than going to Boardwalk. Is that where you're looking at finding the biggest investment specially just thinking what little I know of storage in mobile homes. Self-storage is for all kinds of people the average. Yeah in the average age. Well, I shouldn't say the average. I think that would be a mistake the largest group. I should say of em, self-storage renter's or between fifty and sixty five from and again, that's that varies widely. There's there's college students and their senior citizens and everything in between mobile home parks our recession. Okay. So those are recession-resistant because the cost is so low. I mean if I'm downsizing in a recession from a 4,000 square-foot home to a thousand square foot apartment, I can keep that self storage unit for only maybe $100 a month. Well, that's a drop in the bucket compared to my mortgage or my rent a thousand a month. And so I probably tend to keep that self storage unit..

Oriental Place Baltic Baton Rouge United States president Louisiana
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Great. I mean, but it's that's how it works too. I I went to did my I went to my university because my friend was going that was there you go off to do that's a good valid, but I can go there you can get a job. All right, let's go. That's a great reason. We did our first semester. We were nicknamed Dumb and Dumber. I won't tell you what GPA but it's pretty bad Mister more the what you're doing now to bring you up you you mentioned that you're doing what what is some some difficulties in challenges in what you do in your daily work. So we carefully vet there are commercial real estate investing has always been the place of the Rich and Famous and wage has not been a place for the person with fifty or a hundred thousand US dollars to invest but now it is I mean used to be, you know, you need five or ten million dollars to get in a good place to invest but now somebody with 50,000 can invest so it's exploded in popularity which means the number of newbies the new home new coming operators as also exploded. We didn't want to be one of those newbies. So we decided we would just raise money and find the very best operators who had Decades of experience to invest with because of that we are we are super choosy about which operators were going to invest with dead. And we're super picky and that has been a challenge finding those great operators. So I know that you're dealing with what I saw on LinkedIn anyway as storage units mobile homes. So the idea of what I you know, I'm pretty simple and what you do is way over my head, but I'd like to understand it and I'm thinking from buying someone buying their first home. And I know you have experience with flipping houses. So what is the progression that maybe you're not, you know, someone who's making fifty to a hundred to two hundred thousand dollars a year normally takes getting into this industry wage. So I have some shows on BiggerPockets, which is the largest real estate investor Forum. So I taught to I don't want to exaggerate and say thousands but for sure hundreds of Real Estate Investors a year off in the common progression, is that got a W-2 job. It's typically an it or a doctor or dental or lawyer or something High pay Paid and they're not necessarily board, but they they saw house flipping show and they decided I can do that. So they start buying houses on the side with their spouse often or a friend and they start either flipping the houses and there are often disappointed and held little profit..

Real Estate Investors LinkedIn US 50,000 BiggerPockets
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"And they said what I said, well, you got a degree in parapsychology, right and they said no and they hung up they thought I was kidding. And so I realized quite quickly that I had to get another degree. And so literally one day somebody said hey you like Outdoors. You ought to get a degree in geology study rocks. Maybe he really thought I had rocks in my head and he was kidding. So I told everybody I was getting a geology degree and again without looking into what it entailed and what those people did. I just decided to do it and then I kid you not it was June my senior year, you know, how kids now get set up for Thursday looks like a yearbook. I'm talking about two or three months before I went off to college two months before I was at a pool have and I told somebody I was going to study rocks off and they said well if you're going to be a geology major you might as well take a few extra classes and become a petroleum engineer, they can actually get paid better and they drill for oil and I literally decided on the spot at the pool. It's become a petroleum engineer. And so I told some that I told the guy so where do I get a degree like that as well. Hold me one school of the 25 schools in America. He knew of one and I just decided right then I was going to school it. And this was June and my dear father-in-law the next week. It could have been the next day for all I know took off work and he dragged me to that college. We drove to that college. We track down the football coach cuz that was what was most important and we tracked him down to make sure he would let me play on his football team. Of course. He said yes because it was a walk-on school year. So I went to Marietta College and got a petroleum engineering degree and didn't even think about the fact that I should never have been an engineer..

engineer Marietta College football America
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Add fair with you as an employee then was he or was he a little harder on you? Oh, he was never hard on me at all. He he treated everybody. Wonderfully. He was the HR Director for the entire Factory and so he would have been he and the president of the company would have been the focal points for all the unions rage and the union was angry and they were always angry and they were always walking around complaining and trying to figure out how to get around the rules and complain but they would say to me and I mean way more than one person a factory said we don't like this company, they're terrible they've treated us bad but your dad is a wonderful man and he's the one bright spot in that big black white that white stuff shirt office up there. He's the one bright spot and if he ever says anything we know he'll keep his word and we respect him and that's one of the reasons we like wage. working here still You had some shoes to fill my dad. Never put that on me for one minute. My mom did she remember things she even said about that off my dad never did he was very very kind. Well, even yeah and I guess not even shoes to fill just something to Aspire to yeah, right that's really worth. It just it gives you some some tangible thing of something you've experienced that you could be like this and someone close like your father. Yeah. You're absolutely right. So as you looked into college, I know that you got your Bachelor and you went in to get your MBA. How did how were you starting to think more seriously or more focused on your career? Brian if I told you the process that I didn't go through to pick a college and to pick my grad school, you would not believe it. You might not even are thoughts podcast you sure you want to hear this I do too. So I just figured okay, so I'm going to go to Ohio State and be a football star. Well every year of high school. I was about six foot two in like seventh grade two hundred thirty pounds and then every year, I I stopped growing right then in seventh or eighth grade and every year people get caught up to me, you know, so like my my senior year. I was just a slightly big kid on a football field and every year relative to the other players. I got worse and so became a senior year there was no football scholarship waiting for me at all none at all. And so I started thinking about smaller colleges I could go to to play football and so dead. I just looked for the one that had the best financial aid package. I actually wanted to be a parapsychologist now for those of you who don't know what that is. That is somebody who studies supernatural phenomena. That would be UFOs ghosts ghostbusting the Paranormal haunted houses. That's what I thought. It was off. They go. So yeah, no not to psychologists. And so I actually went to my I actually went to my football coach. I was just telling him about this. I remember where I was sneaking in the library of my school that wasn't my senior year to really read it, but it was nice coach X my junior. Yeah, exactly. It was my junior year and he said so what do you think you want to do with my life? And I said, oh I'm going to be a parapsychologist and he said so like studying paranormal stuff and I said, yeah, he said.

football HR Director Brian Ohio president
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Commercial real estate projects. You were a busy man. I looked through your your resume on LinkedIn. And do you have exhausted it? I well I didn't get got encouraged. I mean looking at the path and this is just like a superficial view of what you've done but just on LinkedIn the path that you took to take you where you are today. It's it's admirable you did some like you went from you know, and you can touch on some of the things you've done in a moment here, but just the path you've took it almost seemed like you planned it, but I'm sure you'll say yeah otherwise, oh my goodness. I absolutely did not plan it and although I'm grateful for every failure mistake pain joy and success along the way. I'm grateful for the impact. They had on my life. If I had to start over again at age Twenty-One. I would have definitely done some things very very differently Mister more spring of 21. Could you let us know what your very first job was even if it was a lemonade stand or diving for golf balls or dead. I mean, I'm I'm searching back through my memory remembering some non-paid things. So have to sort those out those as well. Yeah, I mean just selling, you know, raffle tickets door-to-door. I'm trying to sort through those. I think my dad and I failed to mention to the grocery store owner that I was only fifteen and I was starting a football practice on August 4th. And so I got a job in a grocery store at age either 14 or 15 and I was only there a month for the summer and then I left unexpectedly to go to play football and go back to school. And so I still feel a little bit bad about that because the guy was in New York and I was going to work all year, you know that that kind of happens. Some people have different plans what got you out of the door you mentioned your father and and you had mentioned that you had football what God. Of the door to get that job at fourteen. I just you know, I my mom and my dad gave me a great work ethic off. My mom was a stay-at-home mom. She was great, but she gave.

LinkedIn football Mister New York
"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Welcome to why we work with your host Brian v as he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper issue. Our motivations struggles Joys seemingly missteps hopes warnings and advice which will be an encouragement to us all off to get up get going and keep on working working is tough but working is good. Now, here's your home to why we work Brian V. I'm Brian. This is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with palm or Palm or is the founder and managing partner at Wellings Capital where they managed recession-resistant commercial and real estate funds that is way over my head, but I think he can boil it down to where I can understand how they manage storage units mobile homes put these Assets in people's portfolios so they can learn on their investment, but also want to know how people get into these markets but more importantly I want to know what he values in character walk-in work. His own character the work of his colleagues and what it takes to be successful in this industry. Join me today with my conversation with Paul morgue. I'm Brian V and this is why we work today. I have the great pleasure of speaking with Paul more. Good morning. Fine, sir. Hey, good morning Brian. It's great to be here. Thank you very much for joining us. Would you do me a favor? I did a brief introduction to you a moment ago, which is tell us where you are what you're doing in your work at this present moment. And then I'll bring us back. Yeah. I'm in Central Virginia. Thought we moved here. We sold our company about twenty-three years ago. We moved to the Blue Ridge Mountains to start a non-profit organization reaching out to international student studying in the US and home when that didn't work out. So well, I began flipping houses and I got me over twenty years Twenty One years to where I am. Now we run dwellings wage. But and we invest my company allows small to mid-sized investors to put money together in a large fund wage..

Brian V Paul morgue Blue Ridge Mountains founder and managing partner US Wellings Capital Palm Central Virginia
Uber to Buy Postmates for $2.65 Billion

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:17 min | 1 year ago

Uber to Buy Postmates for $2.65 Billion

"Trying to tee that long awaited elusive profitability. They're announcing plans so far. The food delivery rival Postmates for about $2.65 billion summer. Welcoming the consolidation is the means to limit losses, while others expected Uber Postmates merger too now draw some antitrust scrutiny. Joining us now is Steve John. He's the founder, managing partner of Kindred adventures, and he was an early investor in both uber and Postmates. So, Steve Great to get your perspective on this, and I'm really curious. This market was desperate for consolidation. Is this the right deal? Even though Postmates maybe wasn't a big competitor. I guess you just want to take out a competitor and consolidate in any way you can. I think the important thing to know here is that These two companies have competed against each other for better part of a decade. Post me started out as a courier FBI. In fact, and I wasn't food focused. You were eat came into the market. Well after uber right sharing that and you know, there were early acquisition talks actually about merging the two companies about four years ago. And I think at that time over each was seeing hypergrowth hasn't has a new business subsidiary within uber on the platform here

Uber Postmates Steve John Postmates Steve Great FBI Managing Partner Hypergrowth
"founder managing partner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Think it's going to be the the forty dollars I think the best way unbiased having played my career and in Seattle to see why yeah I just I think the best when this back to being passive homes don't always say well he's almost like Russell Wilson a quick I need to do it do it Isaiah has been ski founder managing partner will be this is a welcome back to sports view next topic is it really all about power makes me think a progressive name your price tool give you the power to find options based on your budget for in a row the analogy met back in the day people in that's how many are there in the quake they just took the oranges they didn't say on a six seven twelve fifty whatever it was all Regis you get me we get your Jack in a word oranges into a straight with the progressive name your price to a progressive casualty insurance company in its present state law there are lots of considerations when you travel like comfort and safety and the big question well I still get the business news I need is it enough to convince us that growth is not going to roll over here's your answer at the turn of in this way the story is not going to affect the price of one you still see those inflationary pressures as transitory is that a function of GDP growth Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business happened Bloomberg radio dot com the world is listening the world's financial decision makers connect on the Bloomberg terminal the buy side and the sell side together collaborating across markets in countries in real time sharing ideas negotiating traits and forming an influential network of over three hundred and twenty five thousand financial professionals that helps power global markets isn't it time you join them request a demo at Bloomberg dot com slash professional number of money minute mounting fears that the corona virus will infect the world economy sent stocks through a big loss the Dow Jones industrial average plunged six hundred three the S. and P. five hundred dropped fifty eight the nasdaq composite tumbled one hundred forty eight two leading names in U. S. manufacturing a warning of tough times ahead for the world economy caterpillar says profits this year won't meet expectations US steel posted its worst loss in nearly three years and see similar results this quarter Univision is having a tough time finding a buyer hemisphere media and liberty global no longer planned to bid on the Spanish language broadcaster Univision is set a deadline of early next week to field offers coronavirus worries also slammed oil prices though some of the losses were reversed is OPEC and its allies considered an emergency response crude finished fifty one dollars fifty six dollars a barrel down fifty eight cents its monthly loss was the worst since may Larry coffee Bloomberg radio I'm a forty year.

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

05:01 min | 2 years ago

"founder managing partner" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"How does that leave US tenure yields? I is this is this an opportunity for that to to go elect lower. Comedy finance. She see this as a technical correction investment for markets. Move seismic getting over the next few weeks. Elliott was not any opponent. He was a banker when he wrote, you know, April is the cruellest month. Breeding breeding lilacs out of the dead land know that was his way of saying everybody else was happy, and he wasn't and I'm I'm kinda seeing myself as much less poetic Pierce Elliott right now that I'm I'm pretty unhappy with everything that was seeing data wise what really saying nothing that come firms any kind of rebound in fundamentals and economic fundamentals this supports weather markets too. So. We were delighted that the fed. I don't know if that listened to us, but as you know, the the last quarter of last year, I was getting increasingly hysterical about about the fed being out of touch. They had the sort of come to Jesus moment they had the pivot and that'd be great since then. But there's been no action, and we're not really seeing any kind of improvement any significant improvement in most of the real economic fundamentals. We're kind of cool in a kind of mediocrity kinda moment right now where there's there's nothing. That's that's bad enough for the fed to be able to cut and there's nothing that's good enough to suggest where you're covering. We'll mediocrities terrible place to be icon T S Eliot, but I'll give you the no which is black clouds over the white cliffs of Dover, and the rats are preparing to leave the BBC not with that in mind at this job. Because this is the died transports far exceeding the diamond dusters. You say you don't really have any long fervent drive to get a hold of these markets are columnists would say, actually, you should be more bullish. Because this is interesting oils romping hard, the die transports are doing well up twenty percent on the over the die. Is this not to the backstory that we should be looking at it stronger than we're all saying? If you if you the equity prices. Yeah. But again, you look at the mental you look at look at rail-freight numbers in the states. They've been really disappointing. Th they're still going down. You know, we've got Railfreight going down. We've got housing starts going down. We've got troops going nowhere. We'd go, you know, can take buildings which is a great leading indicator going down. There's nothing that really justifies any of the equity prices whether their industrials all whether they whether they trade school. So I don't think they'll theory holds in in a situation where the stock prices don't make sense. Paul. It's been. Paul gambles. He's the co founder managing partner at N B M G group with some bull poetic views up next. So what's the big idea segment and fed? Forecasts are in the firing line. More details next. This is Bloomberg..

Paul gambles Pierce Elliott US Dover Bloomberg Railfreight T S Eliot BBC N B M G managing partner twenty percent