18 Burst results for "Founder And Executive Director"

"founder executive director" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

05:48 min | Last week

"founder executive director" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"It's normal to have nominees questions about controversial topics, but this should not be controversial topic. This is a basic principle of our democracy, and so I found that surprising that judge parents didn't wanNA just concede that everybody knows illegal answer to this question. Feingold feel having done the questioning because his emily notes and in fairness it is certainly true the judges are not even supposed to say things that would prejudge right that would imply their ruling on a future case. Fi. Then there's some grey area where people could lean into that to be evasive or not fine. then. There's what's talking about, which is basically obviously in any normal non trump five, twenty, twenty world. It would be just black letter law to say, yeah, I open minded if there's some legitimate challenge but yes, the constitution has timing and yes federal law tells us when elections are not in the individual politicians running. And we absolutely right I mean, look at what she just said Eah you may apply illegal standard to whether or not you should recuse yourself but it's her decision. There's no appeal from it. She's not mandated to do it or not do it in. So she could have committed to the most obvious thing in the world, which is that she should not be part of such a case. The same thing goes and I would add this to emily's list, which is her answers on the institutional races. There was no problem with her with regard to a future case where it had to be cory booker was asking your body. It was like pulling teeth to get her to admit whatever. The American whose is knows is that we do have institutional racism. I found that troubling as well and taking this idea of being careful way too far. Yeah I think you make a fair point center by what you said? Emily List, which makes me think of course of the political organization. But here you meant the listed emily gave. Top Analysis Yeah exactly. But but yeah, you don't fairness again, we try to be as fair as possible. She could give an answer about the existence of racism or if she doesn't see, doesn't think it's a problem doesn't see it that way as someone who deals with the law and the justice system and prison and whether or not to. Ever doubt executions of people. These very serious issues she could also under oath explain herself there was a little bit of this sort of. Catch twenty two I can't talk about cases. I can't talk about anything that might upset Donald Trump who appointed me so I won't speak about anything and that leaves the viewers and voters understand going well, maybe what's the point of all of this? I have the two great panelist we're going to stay I want to remind viewers that when center Kamala Harris comes on whether it's in this hour or later tonight, it's a newsworthy moment will show you all of that live but I want to show you more of today's hearing on what they're going to do here what the Senate wants to do about trump's plan to fill the seat held by the Justice Ginsburg now senators I would say politically did not land many gloves on Barrett she for her part was clearly willing as we were just discussing to look they sieve to get through the day. Do you agree with Justice Scalia's view that Roe was wrongly decided. I can't pre commit or say, yes, I'm going in with some agenda. Do you feel like you should recuse yourself from that case because you're being nominated by president trump that's not a question that I could answer in the abstract upon his comments concrete. At correct, I can't offer an opinion on recusals without short-circuiting entire process. And that was the course of the day. This is true on issues ranging from obamacare to abortion rights gun rights. Now, as we were just discussing, I say this for fairness and accuracy some dodging is standard judges are not supposed to make our now's legal views on a case they could a rule on but. Democrats Stress Barrett was eager to announce certain views in the past she signed on for example to anti abortion effort and appeared to cast doubt previously on how part of Obamacare was upheld. Then they're also these exchanges that are specific to living in the trump era. This is important as the Senate will still decide whether to advise and consent. On if this person should be elevated, the Supreme Court processes not over yet and you have a president nowadays attacking free and fair elections demanding judges pledge loyalty to him above the law that is the context of what's going on in the Senate right now. So it should be noted that Barrett of Boyd Breaking with trump even when judicial rules do not require for example, it is illegal fact the elections held in November, it's illegal fact that the president's term ends precisely on January twentieth according to our Constitution. But the judge would not reference those fax when simply asked under oath if a president may unilaterally delay the election. The constitution gives the president of the United States. To unilaterally delay a general election under any circumstances does federal law. Well senator if that question ever came before me, I would need to hear arguments from the litigants and read briefs and consult with my law clerks and talk to my colleague and go through the opinion writing process. They think we went judges to approach cases thoughtfully in with an open mind. Our panel is here and we're bringing in Brian Fallon, the CO founder Executive Director of the advocacy group demand justice he also I should note his experience at the. Justice Department. And working for Senator Schumer who big driver of the entire strategy of all this. Thanks for joining US Brian..

Emily List president Donald Trump Barrett Senate Justice Department Justice Scalia cory booker Feingold Justice Ginsburg Senator Schumer Brian Fallon Eah Kamala Harris senator Supreme Court United States CO founder Executive Director
"founder executive director" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

06:31 min | 8 months ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Still know the extent which the krona virus is going to affect the healthy American people. We do know it is affecting how people think about who is leading the response in five States Ryan. Abc News exit polls. At least half the primary voters said that the coroner virus was important factor in their vote. This coming Tuesday March Tenth Democrats will go out and vote in another six states among them Washington State which today reported its tenth. Death linked occur virus. We're officials are asking voters not to lick. The envelopes used for mail in ballots in the state talk about the growing concern the virus effecting the body politic where we are in this race Mile Wiley University professor at the new school and Sean mcelroy Co-founder Executive Director of data for Progress Progressive. Think tank. That's been doing a lot of pulling I do think you know you're you hope that people don't like get scared about being group areas whatever but it doesn't seem to me that the biggest thing is it increases the salience of health care as like a central issue absolutely. I mean first of all if we see so many people we we know. There's so many Americans who don't even have health insurance number. One and people are being told to stay home right if they either have symptoms. Or maybe they're here. We have New York law. School has closed in New York and Yeshiva University so whether or not those people have resources to support themselves sometimes. That means paid sick leave. That's a huge national issue and some states have taken it on an extended it some have not and it's a huge issue in particular for voters of color. Were much less likely to be low. Wage jobs that do not have those health benefits. There's pretty strong polling also on the basic belief people had that you should be able to get tested for free and and vaccine should be free and things like that absolutely. We've already been testing this. In our polling voters overwhelmingly believed that the corona virus vaccine should be made available to affordable price. This is an issue where Democrats can really gain the upper hand on an issue inch waist. Would you wish they've overwhelming support of the American public and it'll be a devastating general election issue for trump for short so if we look at the next bunch of states of Mississippi is one of them next week Michigan as well? You know the big story to me last night there. A bunch of big stories but big stories that like once it went down to a effectively a two person race or something like that that sanders support among African American voters. Wasn't that much better than it was in two thousand sixteen in the twenty twenty five percent range. And you could do that if you're running five people but if you're running at one person and that's level support among Black Democratic voters. You're essentially toast. I think your your tusk fierce. You're also toast when you see the percentages that you've seen for Joe Biden. 'cause it's not even close right. Fifty percentage points in South Carolina sixty percent of the black population in Texas black voters in Texas. That doesn't mean that Bernie. Sanders doesn't have an opportunity. And I think you know one thing I've said it before the South Carolina primary when everyone was saying. Oh it's it's it's it's burning all the way Biden can't win and I was like you know what this is not like any other presidential race and black voters are going to show up for Biden but I in the same token I would say not clear moving forward. That Bernie can't the question is will he? And and and how does he do that? Because he's done it with Latinos by having a very aggressive long-term ground game with Latino voters there's also now the Question Sean of of Elizabeth Warren's future there is a statement that our campaign put out Saying she's reassessing. There's reporting that she's been talking to the Sanders camp. Also possibly the Biden camp. What is your sense of what the polling data for progress has done which has been quite accurate says about the degree to which her exit from the race would benefit sanders. Yes so our polling has a sixty percent of Warren supporters. Going to sanders as their second choice. That's a really strong number. It's a little bit higher than what we've seen in the other national polling but our polls of likely voters so they're much more high engagement and they're much more attuned to the lanes so basically that's that's is that your data suggests that like the intuitive take on this. Which is that Warren? Getting out of the race. It'd be a net benefit to Bernie. Sanders is the correct one. Absolutely and I think endorsement would be important. If the fact is is that Bernie. Sanders is having trouble with black voters. But he's also having trouble with college educated women and if he wants to respond to Biden's margins in states like Mississippi and Louisiana and Florida. He's going to strong among college. Educated voters in states like Washington right now. We're seeing California's. He's not getting the margins that he needs in those states among those voters there's there's also the fact that there's this generational divide and we talked about earlier. That is just so intense in the party right now and I do wonder like if you look at the Democratic Party leadership and it's not looking like the Democratic Party. Well it's just in terms even just the ages of people like generation Li. It's like there is a real gap. Edgewise between the sort of leadership class the Democratic Party and the average age of say a California. Yeah think about it if if you're young today young let's say you're twenty twenty two coming out of college you're looking at a world in which climate change is changing everything for you. You no longer feel confident that you can have job because you went to college and graduated if you're lucky enough to be able to afford it you're the level of insecurity is so so so very much higher that there's no question there's a generational divide because let's face it. My generation your generation. We were more secure. There's a generational experience so this is not theoretical so I thought Cornell said it earlier when he talked about that. Final question for you The Supreme Court has Hurt and abortion case today in which they might vastly restrict abortion access essentially overturning. Something from three three years ago and they're also going to hear a striking down obamacare. Do you think that that that connects with voters that an opportunity for Democrats absolutely I think did having a referendum on the affordable care act and expanding health care it would be very bad thing for Donald Trump? Yeah it is amazing to be there marching into that but that is essentially it whoever the nominee can focus the lens on that I think there will be any American massively of teachers for the Democratic nominee. Shockley thank you very much for joining me. That does it for all in you can catch us every weeknight at eight o'clock on MSNBC. Don't forget to like us on facebook. That's FACEBOOK DOT com slash. All.

Sanders Joe Biden Bernie Democratic Party Elizabeth Warren Democrats South Carolina Sean mcelroy facebook California Sanders camp Abc News New York Biden camp Mississippi Donald Trump Ryan Mile Wiley University Co-founder Executive Director
What's so bad about being the founder, executive director, and board chair of a non-profit?

Nonprofit Everything

01:59 min | 9 months ago

What's so bad about being the founder, executive director, and board chair of a non-profit?

"What is bad about being the founder E. D. and board chair at the same time you're this and I I don't understand it doesn't it just make things easier for everyone? Are there any positives to the structure. Okay so I'm GONNA be really snarky here but yeah if you are a a control freak who wants all the power then yes. There is a lot of positives to being all three right. I mean I'm sorry to be like petty about it but like that's why why that's a difference between like a non-profit structure and a for profit structure like you look at just the idea of a public charity like you are governed by the public public. You are more than one person right and my guess is if you really care about a cause or a mission enough that you founded the organization you want more people people round to like help champion that because that's going to just help with everything from more money to more growth more impact and all that stuff so so I mean anyway I yeah I think that Trifecta idea is not sustainable. It's not best practice. And at the end of the day it puts way too much control role and influence in one person's hands. Yep I agree and I just want to point out like we've got three titles here founder. Ed Inboard share founder. Isn't a thing now. So so it's cool that that you came up with an idea and you created an organization about an awesome pat yourself on the back giving yourself the title founder and I you know I'm going to insult a bunch of people that have done this but giving yourself title of founder is just self-congratulatory. Yes so you can be two of those things you can be founder any D. or you can be founder and board share. You can't be in board chair that's just not not. It's just not ethically right because you're basically your own boss and if your own boss you need a for profit you can't be in a nonprofit and here's the thing I know some of our listeners. Probably you're going. It was started by nonprofit and I was the was the board chair and that happens when you first start out. It's not like try to get away from that as soon as humanly possible for the reasons you just said you can't grow that way.

Founder Ed Inboard E. D.
"founder executive director" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

11:35 min | 1 year ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation member station with emily. May the CO founder and Executive Director of Halifax Nice. Emily may is the CO founder and Executive Director Apollo back and that's a global organization and movement with the goal of ending public harassment. The ORC was founded following a viral incident in New York City in in two thousand five young woman named town when was writing the are trained in New York when a man said across from her and staring at her started to masturbate bait took our foam snapped a photo of the man and posted it on the Internet the whole thing went viral and that was the beginning of this people led movement to to end harassment. Here's Emily may describing holiday mission and how and why it was started yes so hallback is a movement to end harassment Asman in all of its forums and we started it in two thousand and five and it was really started with this idea of this this harassment that we face on the street all day long you know. Why isn't anybody doing anything about it? When it comes to harassment in the workplace there's people who stand up and take action and do stuff there's processes plans and HR manuals but when it comes to sexual harassment on the street nobody does anything so we thought you know? Wouldn't it be great if we started to do something and we were inspired by a young woman named town new N who was writing the New York City subway when an older man's down across from her and pulled out his penis and started to to masturbate then Tau pulled out her two thousand five flip phone cell phone camera and took his picture with the idea of taking it to the police but when she took it to the police police they more or less ignored her. They were like he's already seven or eight stops away. There's nothing that we can do end so tau took that photo and she put it on flicker or the photo sharing website and it made it to the front cover of the New York Daily News which is our local tabloid here and it seemed like everybody had a story or knew somebody that had a story story my boss had seen that exact guy masturbating on the subway in front of her and so what if we did what did and we started to document our experiences as a way of shining light on what was going on I mean was to me. The most about the story is that she expected that the police would do something that doesn't surprise me. Actually I mean they didn't act because generally these things are considered unremarkable. Perhaps some jaded but I would not have expected to do anything about that but then I thought you know that's really sad because we've condition ourselves to believe that this is the reality of being a woman in public and of course the people who should be there to protect us aren't yes yeah absolutely and you know that was two thousand five two thousand eighteen we do do sensitivity trainings with NYPD but look they're not nearly as comprehensive of enough. We still haven't convinced them to have those sensitivity trainings in their camp when their on boarding new police officers and the reality is is that a lot of it is reports still aren't taken seriously and even worse you know they can be met with skepticism when people don't believe people or they think that they just need to buck up audio with it yeah. The thing that I love about Jala back is that most of the work I've seen around street harassment has been either academic or legislative and the the US of course has been slower to enact legislation to tackle this and I know another countries they have but Hala back does both the research in the actual actual tangible groundwork so that's what I really love about Holler back. Yeah I think so much yeah it's interesting from the legislative perspective because I think globally I think people's first instinct when it comes to street harassment as oh. Let's criminalize it. Let's realize it and at all back we'd actually don't endorse increasing criminalization around street harassment for a few reasons one an and I think the big one is the way in which particularly men of color become hyper criminalised in these scenarios that laws like this are used and targeted targeted at them and I think that there is a tremendous amount of hesitation communities of color to go to police with stories like this because of that and because of you the way in which they're implemented is quite racist and then I think there's also on top of that just the practicality right like the practicality of you you were to go and report every single incident of harassment to the police you'd be at the police station all day long like you wouldn't be able to have a job and you know people when we people talk about solutions to street harassment. Don't talk about wanting to spend all day at the police station or even interfacing with the police at all they talk about it wearing to stop and I think that's where where those cultural solutions start to show up right yeah that makes total sense. It hadn't actually thought about it that way because in some cultures creating laws may work cultures answers that don't have these disparities in you know policing in certain neighborhoods and certain neighborhoods where there is you know differences in race. They may not have that like I'm thinking of. I think Japan has laws against harassing women on subways. I think maybe in France they have laws but yeah yeah did they into that that may work conveyor there possibly but they don't have also the disparities in policing so yeah yeah and you know the the other thing I think when we look towards solutions and we look towards culture change the city council has done some really interesting things recently were they have been passing laws that require employers who have more than fifteen employees to get sexual harassment training that includes bystander intervention tactics so if you're not familiar with it bystander interventions that we do a lot of because it's about getting community is to stand up for each other. It's about doing something when you see harassment happening and doing it. In a way that safe you know that doesn't involve putting yourself at risk and they also also just past are looking at passing a law for nightclubs where security guards and bartenders would be required to get that same sexual harassment bystander intervention training which I think is just such a such a boon because you know just because you're a security guard or you. Bartender doesn't mean that you are briefed and how to handle these incidences sensitivity and we know that bars have a tremendous amount of sexual harassment happening in them so you know I think I think broadly broadly like you know. Society is moving in the right way and we WANNA see more and more people get training and awareness on this kind of stuff yeah so if you if you don't use laws or legislation in how do you plan to curb it. Yeah I think that movements really are energized when people share their story and we have seen that certainly this year with me too and hallback has always been collecting stories of harassment since way back in the day when we started to model ourselves after Tau New an and her incredible story and then I think thank you start to really see measurable Social Change in impact when you have local on the ground leaders that those are leaders that we've trained all around the world called another big social change lever that we have been looking at and examining is this idea of training right and I think developing a deeper sense of what sexual harassment is critical and how do you show up for each other. You know some people say well. It's really obvious like how you would show up for your friend or your family. Remember whatever it is but for a lot of us it's not really obvious when we think that we have to strap on Superhero SPANDEX and swoop down and beat everybody up if we're gonNA effectively intervene and that's just not the case so we've been doing a tremendous amount of those pieces as well and with with an issue particularly like what we call street harassment. We've also taken the tack of looking at research because it's so incompletely researched compared to things like sexual harassment in the workplace and it's so prevalent and and it's so disproportionately impacts young folks and so I think figuring out how to get more data on this to show people that this happens it matters and we've seen gene. Just you know I've been doing this for thirteen years now. Believe it or not and we've seen the tides shift so significantly on this issue during that time time it's just it's been incredible. It's been credibly I grew up like watching you know and looking and studying at the movements in the sixties and seventies thinking like you know what what like that is possibly going to happen for my generation and I think you know I have witnessed firsthand. When it comes to this issue of sexual harassment during my lifetime it has been a tremendous mendes title shift and that's on the back of the tremendous title shift that happened in the eighties and nineties around you know Anita Hill? I think you know our generation has has built off of that in a meaningful way and been able to take it to the next level right. I mean data is scarce on this. When I started doing research for this episode in particularly when I started to look for women's accounts of their experiences of public harassment I stumbled across the work of Fianna Vera Gray and she wrote the book right right around panic in for her research she talked to many women who had instances of caress men whose stories were told in her book they recount incidents of street harassment starting as early as age seven age seven yeah yeah it does start as young as seven and you know and we see that at least fifty percents of folks have been harassed by the time they're twelve and the vast majority of young women have been harassed around the age of sixteen seventeen and when we think about this issue so often like all of ours stereotypes like pop up all our myths start pop up and the idea that you're only getting harassed on the street because you're you know wearing a slutty outfit and all this? You're out at the wrong time at night. Meanwhile that's not what the data shows the data shows. These kids hits trying to go to school trying to pull. You know what I mean. This is this is. Not You know somebody's wild night out although even if it was somebody's wild night out. You deserve to get there safely but you know I think the data in this area really shows a different picture than our assumptions are this also neatly into our rape culture the culture of of blaming women for what happens to them you know which is absurd because there are very few crimes where we actually blame the victim so consistently but in my l. life you know I remember being warned as early as age eleven or twelve that you know Janoris courtesy short or Tapas too tight you know and and in my intent was not to seduce some stranger or some jerk slowdown his car to harass me on my way to ban practice. I was merely thinking you know I wanted wanted to dress like my favorite star. It was very innocent choice so we start to internalize that blame really early on and often begins with people who love us you know sisters and mother is in you know older women yeah and you see that institutionalized in the hormone dress codes for kids in elementary school and Middle Middle School this idea that if you just wear the right thing that it all you know stop the predatory behavior and it's the wrong message to be sending because ultimately it. It doesn't matter what you wear you should be able to walk down the street and feel safe and confident and you know and that goes for Miniskirt Seko's for burqas is it goes for everything in between and I think that our tendency to police what women wear is ridiculous in light of a you know really looking at the root issue and the real the problem.

harassment New York City Emily New York Daily News Jim Taylor skinner NYPD ORC CO founder New York Miniskirt Seko Japan Executive Director of Halifax Middle Middle School US Tau Society Executive Director Apollo rape Asman hallback
"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:37 min | 2 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Volunteer jobs here's the group's founder executive director and only employees. Tracy fate love the reason we're staying the wave of activity that. We're seeing now in the reasons for many people joined government with the reason so many participating movements has Ingle leave as I do in the idea of America in the team of, America in what we can accomplish when we stand up for those ideals together, joining, us as Nick Lieber a reporter for Bloomberg news written, about this group Nick it's not unusual for lawyers to do pro Bono work but this. Kind of a setup. And. Network is different from, the, usual. Pro Bono work explain. How it works sure so they're one point three four Million lawyers in the US and many of them work for themselves will work for. Small firms don't have. Pro. Bono councils as you, know, and This group is a way. For those layers, who don't have access to Pearl don't councils to volunteer and to find opportunities where they feel like they can do some good so it's a it's, a group that helps train these layers and helps place them in volunteer opportunities in that can be anything from environmental protection to preventing voter suppression to helping, immigrants Seek asylum Nick I was. Noticing in your article that a lot of the lawyers who are volunteering don't have experience in. These practice areas so what. Do they do to train them so the the organization itself worse for good government will do some training and the organizations in which they've on tier so say a legal services group on the border will will train them as, well so there are different opportunities to get trained depending on what you elect to volunteer and do and of, course it's competitive there are a lot of people who want to volunteer and and the detention. Centers there is, limited space limited visiting space where you can meet with clients so you you sort of have to have to find time space training and then be able to do How much time are, most lawyers devoting to volunteering with this organization I think it's generally about a week if. You're on the ground in a in a detention center that's generally how it works. But then people are also during the first interruption of the Muslim ban the travel ban people. Were spending weeks away from. Their offices and I think it depends I think there are also people volunteering remotely and helping prepare briefs and that could mean you spend six hours at night after you finish your work at your practice or four hours at night after you finish your practice I think it varies but generally it's about a week if you go to volunteer at illegal services group And, you're and you're, in a detention center you mentioned that they volunteer remotely which I thought was really interesting but the coordination it must take to get all. These, disparate elements together and even to get, translators involved it tell. Us about how she's managing all this well I think you know. Right when she she started the group there was an incredible outpouring of people who wanted to be, involved, and I think what she's been spending a lot of time doing is exactly that. Is figuring out okay let's make sure we have an interpreter who can be on the ground at Logan. Let's make sure we have someone who has spent a decade doing immigration. Law who can go to Texas it's, figuring out who has certain skills and who can get some point eight point. Be at a certain, time and a lot of that is key people volunteering their time to create spreadsheet It's, that they then use to say, okay I'm available, this this person is this time they have these skills and they can do this and they're willing to come on these dates and then. The, sort of magic of of then making, coordinating all that making. It happen but it's you know it's it's hard work what other. Professionals besides lawyers and translators does she have I think that they're also looking for psychiatrists who can, help, do evaluations of parents and children that they can use in their asylum requests who. Can talk about the stress and more hardcore realities that asylum seekers have faced and can document that in. Reports interpreters yes and people who are willing to give rides to silence. Seekers thanks for being on Bloomberg law, Nick that's Nick Lieber a reporter for Bloomberg news coming up on Bloomberg law Solicitor general no Francisco's first. Term at the supreme court was a success he not only one case is, he, also changed the. Government's position on policy in four major cases involving mandatory union fees in-house administrative law judges Ohio's purging voter rolls and mandatory. Arbitration for employees I'm June Grosso it's nineteen minutes before the hour.

Nick Lieber Bloomberg Nick reporter Francisco America US Tracy Nick I Ingle founder Ohio executive director Texas Pearl
"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Volunteer jobs here's the group's founder executive director and only employees Tracy fate love I think the reason we're staying the wave. Of activity that we're seeing. Now in the reasons for many people joined government the reason so many participating these other movements illegally as I do in the idea of America in the tween of, America in what we can accomplish when we stand up for those ideals together joining us. As Nick libra a reporter for Bloomberg news who's written, about this group mic it's not unusual for lawyers to do pro Bono work but this, kind of a setup. And network is different, from the usual. Pro Bono work explain. How it works so they're one point three or four Million lawyers in the US and many of them work for themselves will. Work for small firms that don't have pro Bono. Councils said you know and this group is a, way, for, those. Layers who don't have access to Pearl Dono councils to volunteer and to find opportunities or they feel like they can do. Some good so it's a. It's a group that helps train these layers and helps place them in volunteer opportunities and that can be anything from environmental protection to preventing voter suppression to helping immigrants, cheek asylum Nick I was noticing in your article that a lot of the lawyers who. Are volunteering don't have experience in these practice areas so, what do they do to train them so the the organization itself worse for good government, will do some training. And the organizations in which they volunteer So say a legal services group on the border will will train them as well so, there are, different opportunities to get trained depending on what you elect devante here and do and of course it's competitive there are a lot, of people who wanna volunteer and and the detention. Centers there is, limited space limited visiting space where you can meet with clients so you you sort. Of have to have to find time space training and then be able to do it how, much. Time are most lawyers devoting to volunteering with this organization I think it's generally about a week if you're on the ground. In a in a detention center that's generally? How it works but then people are also during the first interational of the Muslim ban the travel ban people We're spending weeks away from their. Offices and I think it depends I think there are also people on cheering remotely and helping prepare briefs and that could mean you spend six hours at night after you finish. Your at your practice or four hours at night after you finish your practice I think at. Various but generally it's about. A week if you go to volunteer at illegal services group and you're and you're in a detention center you mentioned that they volunteer remotely which I thought was really interesting but the coordination it must take to get all these disparate elements together and even to get translators involved tell us about how she's managing all this well? I think you know right when she she started the group there was an incredible outpouring of people, who wanted to be involved. And I think what she's been spending a lot of time doing is exactly that is figuring Okay let's. Make sure we have an. Interpreter who can be on the ground at Logan let's make sure we. Have someone who has spent a decade doing immigration law who can go to Texas it's figuring out who has certain skills and who can get from? Point eight point beer, certain time and a lot of. That is people volunteering their time to create spreadsheets that they then use to say okay I'm, available this this person is this, time they have these skills and, they can do, this and they're willing to come on these dates and then the sort of magic of, of van making coordinating all that and making. It, happen but it's you know it's it's, hard work what other. Professionals besides lawyers and translators does she have I think that they're. Also looking for psychiatrists who can help do evaluations of parents and children that they can you Use in their asylum requests who can talk about the stress and more hardcore realities that asylum seekers. Have faced and can document that in reports interpreters yes and people who are willing to give rides. To found seekers thanks for being on Bloomberg law Nick that's Nick labor a reporter for Bloomberg news coming, up, on Bloomberg law. Solicitor general no Francisco's first term at the supreme court was a success he not only one case cases he also changed the government's position on policy in four major cases involving mandatory union fees in-house administrative law judges. Ohio's purging, voter rolls, and mandatory arbitration for. Employees I'm June Grosso it's nineteen minutes before the hour. This is Bloomberg.

Bloomberg reporter America Nick libra Francisco US Pearl Dono Nick I Tracy founder Ohio executive director Nick labor Texas
"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Volunteer jobs here's the group's founder executive director and only employees Tracy fate love I think the reason we're seeing the wave. Of activity that we're seeing now in the reasons. For many people joined government the reason so many participating in these other movements because as I do, in the idea of America in between. Of America in what we can accomplish we stand up for those ideals together, joining. Us as Nick Lieber reporter for Bloomberg news who's written, about this group Nick it's not unusual for lawyers to do pro Bono work but this, kind of a setup. And network is different, from, the. Usual pro Bono work. Explain how it works so they're one point three four Million lawyers in the US and. Many of them work for themselves will work for. Small firms that don't have pro Bono councils that you know and this group is a way for, those layers who don't have access to. Pearl Bono councils to volunteer and to find opportunities where they feel like they, can. Do some good so it's a it's a group that, helps train these layers and helps place them in volunteer opportunities in that can be anything, from environmental protection to. Preventing voter suppression to, helping, immigrants Seek asylum Nick I was noticing in your article that a, lot of the lawyers who are volunteering don't have experience in these practice areas so what do they do to train them so the the organization, itself lers for good government will do some training and the organizations in which they volunteer say illegal services group on the border will will train them as well so there are, different opportunities to get trained depending on what you elect to volunteer and do and of course it's competitive there are a lot of people who wanna volunteer and in the detention. Centers there is, limited space limited visiting space where you can meet with clients so you you sort of have to have to find time space training and then be able to do Do it How much time are most lawyers devoting to volunteering with? This organization I think it's generally about, a week If you're on the ground in a in a detention. Center that's generally how it works but then people are also, during the first generation of. The Muslim ban the travel ban people were spending weeks away from. Their offices and I think it depends I think there are also people volunteering remotely and helping prepare Breese and that could mean. You spend six hours at, night after you finish your work at your practice or four hours? At night after you finish your practice I think it varies but generally. It's about a week if you go to volunteer at a legal services group and you're and you're, in, a detention center you mentioned that they volunteer remotely which I, thought was really interesting but. The coordination it must take to get all these disparate elements together and. Even to get translators involved tell us about how she's managing, all this well I think. You know right when she she started the group there was an. Incredible outpouring of people who wanted to be involved and I think what she's been spending a lot of time doing is exactly that is figuring out okay But make sure we. Have an, interpreter who, can be on the. Ground at at Logan let's make sure we have someone. Who has spent a decade doing immigration law who can go to Texas it's figuring out who has certain skills and who can. Get some point eight, appoint a certain time and a. Lot of that is people volunteering their time to create spreadsheets that they used to say okay I'm, available this this person is this, time they have these skills and, they can do, this and they're willing to come on these dates and then the sort of magic of, of then making coordinating all that and making. It, happen but it's you know it's it's, hard work what other. Professionals besides lawyers and translators does she have I think that there. Are also looking for psychiatrists who can help do evaluations of parents and children that they can use, in Their asylum. Requests who can talk about the stress and more hardcore realities that asylum seekers have faced and can document. That in reports interpreters yes and people who are willing I think to give, rights to sound seekers. Thanks for being on Bloomberg law Nick that's Nick Lieber a reporter for Bloomberg news coming up on, Bloomberg, law solicitor general. No Francisco's first term at the supreme court was a success he not only one case is he also changed the government's. Position on policy in four major cases involving mandatory union fees in-house administrative law judges Ohio's purging. Voter rolls, and mandatory, arbitration for employees I'm. June Grosso it's nineteen minutes before the hour this is. Bloomberg are.

Breese Bloomberg Nick Lieber government Nick Pearl Bono America reporter US Nick I Francisco Tracy founder Ohio Logan executive director
"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Government there's even competition for, some, of, the. Volunteer jobs here's the group's founder executive director and only employees Tracy fate love I think the reason we're staying the. Wave of activity that we're seeing now and the reasons many people joined government the reason so many participating and other movements because eagerly as I do in the idea of America in the dream. Of America in what we can accomplish only stand up for those ideals together joining, us. As Nick libra a reporter for Bloomberg news who's written, about this group Nick it's not unusual for lawyers to do pro Bono work but this, kind of a setup. And network is different, from, the. Usual pro Bono work. Explain how it works so they're one point three four Million lawyers in the. US and many of them work for themselves will work for small firms but don't have pro Bono councils that you know and this group is a way for those layers who don't have access. To pro Bono councils to volunteer and to find opportunities where they feel like they, can. Do some good so it's a it's a group that, helps train these layers and helps place them in volunteer opportunities in that can be anything, from environmental protection to. Preventing voter suppression to, helping, immigrants Seek asylum Nick I was noticing in your article that a lot of, the lawyers who are volunteering don't have experience in these practice areas so what do they do to train them so the organization itself worse for, good government will do some training and the organizations in which they've gone tier so say a legal services group on the border, will will train them as well so there are, different opportunities to get trained depending on what you elect to volunteer and do and of course it's competitive there are a lot of people who wanna volunteer and in the detention. Centers there is, limited space limited visiting space where you can meet with clients so you you sort of have to have to find crime space training and then be able to do How? Much time are most, lawyers devoting to volunteering with this organization I think it's generally about a week if you're. On the ground in a in a detention center that's generally how it works but. Then people are also during the first eatery of the Muslim ban the travel ban people were. Spending weeks away from their. Offices and I think it depends I think there are also people volunteering remotely, and helping prepare briefs and that could mean you spend you know six hours at night after you finish your work at your practice or four, hours at night after you practice I think it varies but generally it's about a week if you go to volunteer at a legal services group And you're and, you're in a detention center you mentioned that they volunteer remotely which I thought was really, interesting but the coordination it must take to. Get all these disparate, elements together and even to get translators involved tell us about how she's managing all this Well I think you, know right when she she started, the group there was an incredible, outpouring of people, who wanted to be involved and I think what she's been spending a lot of time, doing is exactly that is figuring out okay Let's make sure we have an interpreter who can. Be on the ground at Logan let's make sure we have someone who has spent a decade doing immigration, law, who can go. To Texas it's figuring out who has certain skills and who can get some point eight point via certain time and a lot of that is key people volunteering their time to create spreadsheets that they used to. Say okay, I'm available, this this person is. This time they have these skills and they can do. This and they're willing to come on these dates and then the sort of magic of of then making coordinating all that. Making, it happen but it's you know it's, it's hard work what. Other professionals besides lawyers and translators does she have I think that. They're also looking for psychiatrists who can help do evaluations of parents and children that they can use, in Their asylum requests who can talk about the stress and more hardcore realities that asylum seekers have faced. And Kentucky meant that in reports interpreters yes and people who are willing I think to give rights. To silence seekers thanks for being on Bloomberg law Nick that's Nick labor a reporter for Bloomberg news coming, up, on Bloomberg law. Solicitor general no Francisco's first term at the supreme court was a success he not only one case is he also changed the government's position on policy in four major cases involving mandatory union fees in house administrative. Law judges, Ohio's purging, voter rolls and mandatory. Arbitration for employees I'm June Grasso it's nineteen minutes before. The hour this is Bloomberg architect time is running out African penguin colonies have emptied in the last five years as breeding Nations have.

Bloomberg America Nick US reporter Nick libra Francisco Nick I Tracy founder June Grasso Ohio Texas executive director Nick labor
"founder executive director" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Hundred weathered steel pillars overhead each of them naming a us county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs this is a clip play during one of the opening events for the museum featuring the family members of lynching victims my great grandfather thomas william miles finger was lynched seven this man was taken and strangled to death be also shot bullets in him strange stay stabbed and beat him tied into the back of the buggy and drug that around town johnnie here's lynching was advertised in the mississippi news dismember parts of his body as souvenirs one of them say well we go and he put it around monique remember there was no accountability is torn apart communities torn apart loss of businesses loss of history as a black person you don't expect justice in addition to the memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching it's partner site the legacy museum from enslavement to mass incarceration also opened thursday museum is located on the site of a former warehouse where enslaved black people were imprisoned it's midway between a historic slave market and the dock and train station where tens of thousands of enslaved people were traffic during the height of the domestic slave trade the museum and national memorial for peace and justice or the culmination of years of exhaustive research and interviews with local star ins and descendants of lynching victims conducted by the equal justice initiative led by its director bryan stevenson in two thousand seventeen the equal justice initiative issued the third edition of its lynching in america report which found that white southerners lynch nearly forty four hundred black men women and children between eighteen seventy seven and nineteen fifty nearly eight hundred of those lynchings were previously unaccounted for the report details in nineteen sixteen attack in which a mob lynch jeff brown for accidentally bumping into a white girl as he ran to catch a train in nineteen forty a crowd lynch jesse thornton for not addressing a white police officers mr in many cases lynchings were tended by the entire white communities in an area for more we go to alabama where we're joined by bryan stevenson and turney who's worked on death penalty cases and the deep south since nineteen eightyfive five the founder executive director of equal justice initiative brian welcome back to democracy now cry congratulations on this epic achievement the museum and the.

johnnie thursday museum bryan stevenson america jeff brown jesse thornton thomas william miles mississippi partner director lynch alabama turney founder executive director
"founder executive director" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Yeah nineteen the sabah this his father and then me jim with head above sincere seared metaxis show i'm talking about human sexual trafficking with the had the founder executive director of the samaritan women the website is the samaritan women dot org and i'm talking to gene allard gene again welcome to the program when you uh reference of a 14yearold as he did before we went to the break it takes my breath away it seems to me and again i professed ignorance on the subject but it seems to me that law enforcement ought to be able to take care of that in other words it's one thing if we're talking about an eighteen year older twenty five year old but when you're talking about a fourteen year old it's astounding to me that that can happen in america and that the people who were guilty of dragging them into this work are not put behind bars forever what is your experience or let me give you a an acronym phd can we henry have right now so we've got a gallon hugh um i grew up in an urban area iron robert tired komo you a family there's were substance abuse in the family um but not grossly impoverished um but chaos and so by eight years don't move your her brother is molesting her um this continues until she's twelve thirteen years old uh she in that rebellion you know she rebelled against this and she starts running away so now she bubbles up above the system so to speak because up to that point to the molestation was really underground up willie for something that.

sabah executive director law enforcement willie founder america twelve thirteen years twenty five year eighteen year fourteen year eight years
"founder executive director" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on WLAC

"Adam falsely foundered executive director of a prosecutor impact in a and a da up uh in the boston who eat by seoul him at a an event and he came up to me he's like oh i gotta get a picture with you because my dad and i are such big fans and i am a dad has to have a picture of us together he was really nice guy ruinous guy in talks about something obviously we all know that the permit will justice system is in perfect and there are a lot of problems in some of the need to be seriously addressed a one of the approaches he has that i like is many people talk about criminal justice reform talk about it as if the prosecutors bad guys yeah like they have they have this power structure they want to keep people down they want to their they're they visceral langer against people in there i was trying to jit two two personify that yeah he talks about it in a different way and just as the incentives are out of why we don't need it should be about racking up winds should be about justice good conversation the glenn beck my y'all newsradio fifteen ten wola see for the nova copy traffic senators to work in to clear this crash up on twenty four westbound at old hickory boulevard as you're heading on into the jolson area left lane remains blog traffic is backed up all the way into the city right now as you're making your way on a from sixty five to give yourself plenty of extratime until they can get this thing wrapped up and out of the way work on a clear crash at any alps hiked and haystack and also work in october woods in old hickory now many hayes with your wctc traffic geordies radio fifteen ten wctc forecast from the accurate weather center.

Adam executive director boston langer hayes prosecutor seoul glenn beck jolson
"founder executive director" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on FP's The Editor's Roundtable (The E.R.)

"Not a bad in a minute going to be open to any we have designated welcome to foreign policy i'm sure weinberger executive editor for news you're listening to the er i'm in washington today joining me on the fan are makia cyril mike german nfp contributor jonah winter luckiest cyril is foundering executive director of the center for media justice and cofounder of the media action grassroots network for more than twenty years she's build the capacity of racial and economic justice movements to win meteorites access empowering the digital age born of parents in the black panther party cereals a leader in the movement for digital rights and freedom and a proud member of the black lives matter network michael german it's a fellow at the brennan center for justice liberty and the national security programme which seeks to ensure that our government respects human rights and fundamental freedoms and conducting fight against terrorism prior to joining the brennan center mr german served as the policy council for national security and privacy for the american civil liberties union washington legislative office a sixteen year veteran of federal law enforcement he served as a special agent with the federal bureau of investigation where he specialized in domestic terrorism and covert operations jonah winter is an investigative reporter based in washington d c she previously worked as national security reporter at the intercept and breaking news investigative reporter for fox news dot com he our listeners we love hearing from youth you've episode ideas are comments you can email us at our podcast at foreign policy dot com.

investigative reporter fox washington d c bureau of investigation mr german michael german nfp weinberger reporter foreign policy federal law enforcement human rights brennan center executive director cyril washington executive editor sixteen year twenty years
"founder executive director" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Two thanks rob think download here seven twenty wgn of justin kaufman coming up rich paul is going to join us talk about what it means to be a cubs fan now that there are no longer the lovable losers defending world champions to begin their playoff the hunt coming up here on friday suffer lifelong cubs fan who identifies with the brand of being a lovable loser and how that's affected his life how does how does it changes life now that they're no longer that and for generations that are watching the cubs for the first time rich calling my guest coming up here after the nine thirty news well i new project that you're chicago design museum is asking a pre simple yet important question what's worth preserving now you would expect that question from the chicago design museum because preservations usually ward that's thrown around when we talk about landmark architecture historic buildings design but this project created by foundering executive director tanner woodforde goes well beyond the built space tanner sent handwritten letters to friends and colleagues with simple question and when he got back was much more brock what's worth preserving some say fountain pens some say plums some say true love it's a great project that wants to be a book that features these handwritten responses for people like jane goodall and writer elizabeth crane and many many others tanner would for its in studio tonight with me to talk about the project answer read some of the responses tanner good zia good as eu taser thanks for coming it thanks for having me i'm thrilled that where does this come from this i mean what what a great concept to joe almost make it as a terek what's worth preserving where where does this idea come from deep inside of herself it is a relief marvel question and it's when the took me of the clear long tend to get there to be honest and for me.

justin kaufman paul cubs chicago design museum tanner woodforde jane goodall writer elizabeth crane zia executive director joe
"founder executive director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Beijing down sean hannity and live breaking news you might have ms today xi'an's insider information is on right now no this is on leave these for vital both of them have to serbs inside out because it says trump on the top flipkart shirts inside out because trump on a supported by me okay why can a kid in school have a tshirt that has the name of the president or what so offensive about any teeshirt or have that says make america great again just like you can't wear a swastha's sticker to school you can't wear make america great again like that the teachers i don't care what you do and other classes in all but for this class you can't do it and then of course a teacher pretty stupidly is answering the question about the whole thing i mean it's hard to believe this is the day and age we live in and anyway the issue came from cherokee county school district a math teacher river ridge high school rally is now we find out tell two students they can't wear their shirts with campaign slogans they're not permitted in class and joining us she's been highlighting a lot of what's going on in the classroom charlie kirk is back with us founder executive director of turning point usa and it's eight advocacy group for young conservatives you know every time you guys get involved in every time they get exposed it ends up you guys keep on winning and what happened in this case exactly right where we got the colder here initially issue an apology me a lot more activity around other key cure and the policies and a local school district your appreciate what what happened here and they just hurt i mean here at a public school teacher in.

Beijing sean hannity xi'an president cherokee county school distric charlie kirk executive director advocacy group school teacher america river ridge high school founder
"founder executive director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Show inflammation down sean hannity and breaking news you might have missed today xi'an's insider in the is on right now on the yeah these for this both of them have to shirts inside out because it says trump on the top got a flip their shirts inside out because trump on a supportive on you okay why can a kid in school have a tshirt that has the name of the president or what so offensive about any g shirt or have that says make america great again ju just like you can't wear a swastha's sticker to school you can't wear make america great again like that the teachers i don't care what you do and other classes in all but for this class you can't do it and then of course the teacher pretty stupidly is answering the question about the whole thing i mean it's hard to believe this is the day and age we live in an anyway the issue came from cherokee county school district a math teacher river ridge high school rally is now we find out telling to students they can't wear their shirts with campaign slogans they're not permitted in class and joining us she's been highlighting a lot of what's going on in the classroom charlie kirk is back with us founder executive director of turning point usa and it's eight advocacy group for young conservatives you know every time you guys get involved in every time they get exposed.

sean hannity xi'an president cherokee county school distric charlie kirk executive director advocacy group america river ridge high school founder
"founder executive director" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of billions of dollars into it if you had to do it all over again what would you do differently let's remember what we went there for eventually we got the death of osama bin laden and other shen and it is a case we have not been attacked on our mainland since sat nine eleven so to some extent it was worthwhile what we did wrong is going to iraq and when we did that we took our eye off the ball in in afghanistan uh troop presence just kind of stayed on its own that's what i'd like to have back but weren't you involved in iraq as well yes i was i'm no i'm not trying to evade at responsibility of be you ask me what i would do differently and i wouldn't be in iraq that's former deputy secretary state richard armitage on him here the mayor of bolton didn't water repeated the violence in charlottesville so late at night she had four confederate statues removed franz men on horseback road through the dark street strapped to flatbed trucks i don't know if we have enough museums the hasima enough cemeteries stick them i'm robert siegel both morris confederate monuments this afternoon on all things considered from npr news china's for all things considered at four thirty this afternoon on kqed public radio good morning i'm rachel martin now mrs taking speech easiest to a whole new level no passwords necessary but the entrance is unique a portable toilet unsuspecting attendance at a hungarian music festival at a surprise when they tried to use it because instead of getting too you know do their business they were led to a rave one of the festival goers said that's why he loves this show because you can open a random toilet and there's a secret party happening it's morning edition really matiur and notice the silver tips on the end of this hair that's word virgets his name these are the grisly ends of the hairs frizzy to slim tobacco ruth mountains near yellowstone park with the group of volunteers searching for evidence of grizzly bears jim that's and this is the pulse of the planet greek truly issues founder executive director of venture and scientists for conservation of the greater yellowstone ecosystem this whole area we know supports about six hundred grizzly bears.

iraq richard armitage bolton charlottesville robert siegel china rachel martin yellowstone park executive director osama bin laden afghanistan deputy secretary npr kqed founder yellowstone
"founder executive director" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on KOMO

"Komo news flight everybody good sunday morning at touch morning cloud cover otherwise temps back into the mid to the upper 70s around the sound for a beautiful sunday afternoon with blue skies backing of london's four once again going to have to battle a little cloud cover on monday morning and that may get in the way at least initially if some of the solar eclipse dealing hopefully the clouds don't laugh very long lacrosse our fingers and hope for the best highs monday afternoon upper 70s in and closer to 80 degrees give or take a few by tuesday income goma weather center i'm meteorologist shannon o'donnell twenty four seven news continues and now on komo news the 26th annual seattle hemp this underway we send come jeff pohjola down there to take a look this weekend myrtle edward park will be filled with tiedyed dreadlocks bandanna as in all things marijuana typically two hundred two hundred and fifty thousand people converge on this area over the course of the weekend killing to see one hundred twenty speakers hundreds of fans musicians and wonderful vendors and activism little bit of everything for everyone here but organizer carry buoyed or says the most important thing they're peddling his information we really have a wide variety of experts on everything if you're looking for something on the regulated in the industry the market is a great percent expert choi that command on mainstream marketplace how canvasses evolving there pique is are foundering executive director he's at main stage and seeing every day all day you can always take the term hand marijuana advocacy is also something that's in abundance name save ryan's iran the marijuana business association so i'm here to support our everexpanding group.

london shannon o'donnell jeff pohjola myrtle edward park choi executive director ryan komo seattle marijuana 80 degrees
"founder executive director" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"founder executive director" Discussed on KOMO

"The 24 nine thirty four i'm dustin richie on komo news two and now your komo forecast for a change a little bit later in the week of tonight look for clear skies lows tonight 55 tomorrow mostly sunny highs again back up into the 70s now for the first part of next week sunny and warm monday mondaytuesday tuesday with highs in the mid 70s to lower 80s but look for a change wednesday cloudy skies a chance of rain wednesday night that your komo forecast i'm pete combs a house explosion ruled if you like tiedyed shirts and everything having to do with him but marijuana than the place you need to be this weekend is myrtle edwards park in seattle three two hundred two hundred and fifty thousand people converge on this area over the course of the weekend and coming to see one hundred twenty speakers hundreds of fans musicians and wonderful vendors an activism a little bit of everything for everyone but organizer carry boyner says the most important thing they're peddling is information we really have a wide variety of experts on everything if you're looking for something on the regulated in the industry the market antenna crank is a great person on an expert play that your man on on mainstream marketplace how habits is a following their peak is are foundering executive director he's at main stage an and seeing every day all day you can always catch little tidbits from hands marijuana advocacy is also something that's in abundance i names dave ryan's iran the marijuana business association so i'm here to support our everexpanding group of volunteers.

dustin richie marijuana myrtle edwards park seattle executive director komo dave ryan