33 Burst results for "Founder And Ceo"

Growth in Turbulent Times

a16z

07:00 min | 3 months ago

Growth in Turbulent Times

"Begin by describing a typical growth model and discuss how that fundamentally drives a company's business strategy the first voice who here is Brian's followed by Andrew when we think about a growth model. The question is how does one court of users lead to another cohort of users? And how are you answering that question? In a way that describes not only how you acquire users but the actions they take in your product what those actions generate and how you reinvest whatever that output is back into generating more new returning users so within this model you have hypotheses around the who the what the why who were doing these actions. What are the actions that they are doing and why they are doing them? These are all fundamental hypotheses whether you have it written down or not. I think like a very very simple simple shortcut version of this might be something like I find yelp because I searched Best Dumplings San Francisco and then a yelp page comes up. I'm excited about yelled at some point. Some percentage of those users end up actually than leading reviews and those of us get index like Google and then they end up in Google listings and more people find it right. And so that's kind of how one group of users might indirectly than lead to another group of users versus something like linked in which is focused on getting people to invite their colleagues at people that they're meeting through professional networking and is very focused around getting you to send invites and that's a very different type of loop? It turns out that there is like many many many flavors of this. This is kind of like a verbal version when you go deeper. You're actually able to translate this set of hypotheses and ideas into spreadsheets and numerical models for what's actually happening business and understand with lows right. You're operating against this hypothesis right. That hypothesis gets stronger over time. As you run experiments you validate them. You see the data in data kind of feeds the quantitative version of this in this environment. A lot of those hypotheses are thrown out the window. And what we validated in the past might have changed as a result. You might have tailwinds or headwinds right. The quantitative variables behind these things. Either get stronger where they get worse. But the only way that you actually get a decent picture about is by going through each one of these individuals steps asking those squash right once. You drill down into a spreadsheet. What kind of data are you tracking? What are those metrics? Like if you're a travel company right now I think you're seeing very specific metrics Right if you start with the end of the funnel. What you're saying is a number one. There's going to be fewer people actually like booking and converting like if you're expedia our king regardless of whether or not are looking at flights my guess is percentage of people who actually look out the flight versus. Actually Book. The flight like that conversion rate is probably down. You probably have folks that doing research. Because they're not quite sure. Like when defy or the wafted shut the State Department website where I can actually go and then all the way to the demands question of how many people are in that activity versus. I guess. Light if you're you're inside of you know one of these collaborations tools what's going to happen. Is All of a sudden every is going to be sending more invites other users. Because we're the meetings in right now and says results of that all of those metrics go up when it's happening is if you think about the verbal version of the growth model as a series of events that chained together than what you start to realize they're going to be certain steps that are. GonNa go way way up. 'cause the entire growth models like really radically amplify or there's going to be ones that dramatically tempings out and if step one or two is the growth model start hitting a lot of friction than of course. It's just going to get harder and harder because each group of users going to produce fewer and fewer users if you think about it from an acquisition standpoint saint big engagement well. There's a couple things about this though one is that. I've seen a ton of categorical data out there. People saying this is what's happening to be to be south or this is what's happening to this category and I think I specifically founders. Who Probably. Let's do this. The category is interesting. But it's actually not that helpful. Everybody sits on a spectrum of people who are experiencing extreme headwinds class pass for example would probably seen what ninety percent of their business disappear overnight. And there's people who are seeing extreme tail and if you're sitting on one of the spectrums your job is easier the data's clear it's immediate of what is happening and what the net result is but the founders who are in the middle of the spectrum the hard job you actually have to look at each one of these individual steps to understand what might be changing. What might be happening to build specific. Hypotheses of how. Your Company should act and respond. Most companies will need to go back to basics and reassess their businesses from the bottom up if you are a travel company or an in person fitness company. How do you go about completely? Revamping and reevaluating your growth model. How can founders be proactive rather than reactive? I know it's like Old Silicon Valley message of talk to your customers but honestly this is one of those times where you need to be talking to them at least a couple of customers at a couple times. A day founders. Ceos executives the leaders of the team. Because the only way that you're really going to be proactive is going to get a sense. For what is going on in your customers. Lives and how things are changing what questions they're asking and how their behaviors are changing. And by the time that comes through the data. It's just GONNA be too late and so if you WANNA be proactive. You'd have to go back and rely on a little bit of basically founder intuition in the way that you build that founder. Intuition is just by having lots and lots of conversations very close to it. I think a really big thing strategically. That's changing right now. Is there's a whole discussion for flex? Even be the output goal at the moment. I think this is where the growth model overlays with. Some of the financials the company wildfire. You know we've had several years where it's all been about top line growth and you have a lot of companies that are looking for two x three x five outs year over year growth and then the growth model ends up meeting to support that but I think the whole industry is saying okay. Well maybe actually top line growth of that type of several hundred percentage points. Italy is actually not the focus. Is Everything so uncertain you? We have to watch our cash. So then what I've seen in conversations I've been in is then. Your growth models are actually as much about. How do you grow efficiently from a cash standpoint? And so if you're thing about okay. We need five x growth. And that means that people need to invite each other as at a certain rate. And if they're not then maybe you need to make that up with a marketing spent with financial incentives for users to use the product whether that's in the form of free subscriptions or in the form of a lower priced lane or if your marketplace company you might give people discounts that are dropped into. All consumers

Founder Google Yelp San Francisco State Department Brian Expedia Andrew Italy
Why Casino Stocks Dropped

CNBC's Fast Money

02:29 min | 4 months ago

Why Casino Stocks Dropped

"So Brian. Las Vegas Sands cut its dividend today. Which is a huge deal. Considering that it's founder. Ceo and chairman exclaims in every earnings. Call that I've ever listened to your day. Dividends the casinos are hurting in a big way. Over the last three months shares of casinos stocks have plummeted win off fifty percent off sixty percent. Eldorado off almost seventy percent over three months as it prepares to close on a merger deal with Caesar's and inside Caesar's Palace on this trip. It is still and silent. The Las Vegas Mayor Calls this Nevada shutdown. Total insanity her words. The Governor says look. The state is not passed a severe health risk and yet already casinos nationwide are beginning to game out what reopening would look like. We'll because property likely will have to ensure social distancing for some time every player becomes vitally important deutschebank gaming analysts Carlo. Santa Rally suggests that casinos may implement crowd control based on customer loyalty and theoretical spent. They may hike table minimums nationwide twenty five dollars. Maybe fifty dollars depending on the locations and the least profitable slot. Machines are those that they have to pay a fee on because they're least would be turned off and then those casino amenities that a lot of us. Enjoy SPAS nightclubs. The shows likely those are going to be sparse to non existent in the near future. Also location location location where the casinos earn their to gaming revenues matters here casinos in. Macau already open though. Visitation is still only about a tenth of what we saw from this time last year because the government still restricts tourist visas the ramp is benefiting WYNN Las Vegas Sands and mgm there even though it's slow in the US regional properties without a high case load of Kobe nineteen are likely to see a quicker return to business that includes Greater Nevada in the Las Vegas locals market. So that's Red Rock Resorts Pen. Eldorado Boyd and finally the Las Vegas Strip. Maybe the slowest of all to return because it relies so heavily. Brian on tourists. Arriving by air travel you can look for an impact there on Caesar's and MGM which both get nearly half of their overall revenue from strict properties whereas win for instance gets a quarter. Brian

Las Vegas Sands Las Vegas Caesar Brian Las Vegas Strip Nevada MGM United States Eldorado Boyd Santa Rally Red Rock Resorts Pen Macau Founder CEO Carlo Chairman Kobe
AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

01:47 min | 4 months ago

AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

01:47 min | 4 months ago

AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

03:28 min | 4 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"Register for the Rally on April, twenty fifth and La so you can register for the girl boss Rally at girl boss. Rally DOT COM. Registration is open now. You can follow the go bus rally. All our NOUNCEMENT S- of speakers at girl boss rally rallying at girl boss. I, post about it and I'll be there, and you can follow me at the girl boss rally if you can't attend their in person at Sofia Amoruso, it's A. M. O. R., U. S. L., and despite our guys I've Gone I've spoken. I've been an attendee. I can't go this year. Because I'M GONNA be in New Orleans speaking at something. Not as fun and interesting, however, it's a great event like there is such a yummy feeling there, and it's just how I would describe it as sunny like it just felt sunny was sunny that day that I was there, but it was just everybody was smiling. It was kind of like being at a really good resort like everybody walked by smiling. Everybody is interested in hearing and again. This is after I'd taken my mic off and I was just walking around being an attendee. It was awesome meeting. Other people's mandatory. Yes, thank you and girl boss is also offering need based scholarships to the rally to a select few girl boss community this. This year. How can people find out more about those of you?.

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

05:31 min | 4 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"And a month later, Netflix series came out about my life called girl boss, depicting a woman named Sophia. Building a company called Nasty. Gal, and how did how did you like that I've liked it I mean. It was canceled after one season which to me, it was awesome thing to have happened, but just having the story of who you were ten years prior weird. Hold while while you're trying to start over. Is such a mind fuck. I'm sure say that. Yes, you can say that. It was really cool. I kind of intellect AC-, and maybe it's just my ego or something, but I've like left a trail of things that exist longer than I do, and Netflix's one of them. It put the girl Bosnia into one hundred and fifty million homes in one hundred ninety five countries so as marketing. Dot alone I'm really proud of IT I like to show I. Think it was really a Hugh Britt. Robertson okay, and did you meet with her? Did you talk to her? I? Yeah, absolutely she, like she got shadowed me and I think she did a really good job. Charlene Darren. Produced IT K Kannan who did pitch perfect pitch perfect to? Was the show, runner and writer on the show, so we had really a Primo team. Re Paul was a character norm MacDonald way north was on the show. He was my boss okay in the lobby. but it was. It was a great run. It was bad timing because. It was a show called girl boss four months after trump was. and. We were held to a standard of this has to be a show. That's an example of women in the workplace, and it was just like an angsty like white girl right in San, Francisco, an ebay store, right so I think boss was you know had a certain amount of responsibility to depict women or a woman? In a certain way that? Maybe we wouldn't have a year prior way and it was four months after Vanities Fair said you know the. No, no, it was It was four months after all of the press and wall. Street Journal covering right downfall of nasty gal, so it was just like it was just bad timing, right? Right well, it's still super cool and what you said about legacy, and even ego like that's fucking cool I mean it really is. Let's talk about girl brass rally a little bit. I did it in two thousand eighteen. Johnny and I loved it I loved the energy. I loved the young women. I love being able to talk to people about it. This year's theme is find your support system, which is why I'm talking about that, but it's also kind of our theme at all's fair, and it's over easy. Why did you pick that this year? Yeah, so it's what we've seen in our community is yes. We're here to learn and exchange ideas and educate one another and provide the resources, both within the community in from girl boss, to level up in our work but also personally and without relationships. We can't do either of those things, and so we built a social network less than a year. Year ago. That's a girl boss Dot Com now and what we've seen is women connecting over not just what they do, who they are nice and that's where a girl boss really lives at the intersection of so spiner support system is yes, you're coming to to learn a lot and hopefully take what you learn at the grow boss rally into your life immediately. Right Inspiration is table stakes. Stakes but relationships as you know women who've gotten as far as we have in our careers have learned which may be, we didn't know earlier. Careers are everything. Yeah, totally everything. I'm still in touch with Tracy Gray. Who I met at the girl boss rally. She's on the podcast like she's so wise I, so enjoy her I. think it was her was her birthday. I don't know if it was. Was Their fiftieth fifty fifth birthday when we were there, but she's just amazing, but it is true relationships hanging on them. Particularly Women now can men attend. Men can attend. Okay, so we got okay. We had one man speak at the first rally, and it was the founder of instagram which is pretty cool, so seven Kevin System Very nice of him. We've some really big names that were announcing You. Can't like scoop there. No, no, no, you're team contract I tried okay, so you guys know it's twenty fifth. That's quixote. Studios here in Los Angeles. You do want to New York as well. Yes, yeah, we'll do one in New York later this year and we're planning. Actually have an announced now. It's a big deal for me announces, but we'll do a third rally for the first time this year. Oh, cool. We normally do to, and where will that be I don't know. Another city, different city, and back to relationships right both with men hold the keys to so much. There's someone in conferences can feel like so awkward and cheesy and. into the girl boss rally gives opportunity for women who may not be invited to fortunes, mouse, most powerful women to attend conferences, but the you know the few very selective about attending or have been over the course of my career built some incredible relationships. I found investors. I've found confidence I've found you know other entrepreneurs I've collaborated with new given me incredible advice and I met. Someone not named Joe Markazi, and I don't know if I'm fast forwarding here, but that relationship. Has happened over the last five years. he built a company called True X, which was an ad tech platform sold to Fox. Disney acquired Fox while he was at Fox. He was the head of advertising, so he did billions. He sold into the super bowl well, so he was responsible for driving billions of dollars of revenue for Fox. Network's not Fox News. Which is now called.

Netflix Fox Fox News Bosnia New York Charlene Darren Vanities Fair Dot K Kannan Joe Markazi Dot Com Robertson Street Journal Hugh Britt Los Angeles writer Disney head of advertising
"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

11:17 min | 4 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"It was a cash flow positive business for until Basically Venture Capital Cayman unbelievable. So when did that happen? When did you okay? And I didn't go out and raise. They were like we heard about this thing. That's exploding because I had gone from Seventy Five K. My first year on Ebay. Which is a Shitload of money? Dad Myself because I didn't want things don't even know what luxury wise right I think eventually had a blackberry. Pearl really fantasy. I drove an eighty-seven Volvo and I lived in a pool house for five hundred dollars a month with the hot plate and I was pretty satisfied. A lot of Boston market and drink a lot of starbucks venti soy chide. No water no foam every day. An upset my stomach every day prior back upon it the fact that this all started so early on for you and your life but also in the life of this kind of business is kind of amazing. Thanks so then at what point? At what point did you decide to do the not side they came to you again? Tv Show Book. Come in all of this stuff. Nasty Gal is like huge still Liz. Yeah Yeah I did it for ten years. Twenty two to thirty two. So I'm like I'm glad it happened. Yes but I was also kinda trapped in a business where I couldn't quit and it couldn't be fired right. 'cause I had raised money So in twenty twelve venture capitalists came knocking because they had watched or somehow heard about a business that did seventy five to fifty K. One point one six and a half and then twenty million in profitably with strapped. Why owned one hundred percent of the company and twenty twelve index ventures came in and said. Okay you're doing. Twenty eight thirty million in revenue. We're GONNA value you at three hundred fifty million dollars And so they put fifty million dollars and delays on the pool. House like what's happening. I moved the company to Los Angeles during Twenty eight million revenue. I probably had like thirty. People's tastes okay And so I sold twenty percent of the company fully controlled it for fifty million dollars injected that capital into the business took a little bit for myself which I don't really talk about but it's him homeowner. I still need to work. Yeah I have a mortgage but not. I have a lot of equity in my home. So that's nice. I blew way too much on furniture. Be careful I've rancher so expensive that was when you know the the mandate was to go as venture capitalists Demand from twenty million one hundred twenty eight million a year and we hired a hundred people. I had never worked in an office. The only office I've ever worked in today to date. My name has been on the lease while it's like the businesses aim on the least right for a while. It was my name as early in the business. I know that feeling. Actually I didn't know anything about you. Know I knew how to buy stuff and sell it and manage a few people to do tactical thing leadership and growing people and Like nurturing edges. No one has ever nurtured on the fly whenever nurtured my career? I'm still learning as just like it's taken so long and they still I'm still alive. You're you're doing okay. Wh- at what point did you meet our friend Gary Steph woman? I make areas diplomat in twenty twelve. Okay Gary diplomat is an entertainment attorney. Who's been twenty five years at different Britain Ham which is a well known entertainment firm here in Los Angeles? He spent most of his career in music but I was introduced to him by this money manager person who was like. Oh we're going to you know. Get an early and be there. Awesome but They like managed. Sheryl Sandberg's money or something and they were like you're worth so much on paper. We're going to manage like the cash that you have. Which wasn't enough to normally work with people like that but they were like when you actually have two hundred and fifty million dollars which eventually Forbes said I was worth will manage when anyway move to La. And I just needed an attorney to negotiate some contracts and for some reason they enter introduced me to an entertainment attorney named Gary Stillman Amen. By the way guys yes yes and I'm so glad we met. We talked about PRENUPS. Actually I don't know how much I can talk about. You can tell me what the terms of the of the of the separation agreement on what you call it our anyway men and he was like you know instead of like. Let me connect me to your architect. And we negotiate their contract which he did gas which is Kinda below his pay grade He was like. Do you want to do a book? Do you WanNa do a TV. Show the singer doings crazy. Oh my God and I was like TV. No gross like what is what would it be reality TV. Like I don't want let's Tacky I think non scripted has gotten a little bit like classier net flix. Yeah he classy. Anyway I was like I don't know maybe a book. My story is pretty interesting. And you know the press has written a lot about it but I haven't put myself out there and told the whole story all of the shit that I just told you about. I'm not gonNA tell that to a reporter them. Write their own shoes. You do it yourself. I wanted to control my narrative and I hadn't seen myself I bought you know Ebay for dummies and a whole bunch of business books and this was a year after a Leinen came out and there were no millennial women in the business book section writing books about their experience or really books at all right. They're pretty dry books. It was like you know suzie. Orman WHO's awesome? I should have her on my podcast time. Just a different generation primarily men and primarily people who weren't accidental entrepreneurs who had used the tools that have got to be totally didn't relate and overall accidental entrepreneurs in a wave though like you're extremely accomplished in a educated. I'm sure I'm We lost like world of Star Trek new things differently. So many of us aren't groomed for this in technology today has allowed us to start businesses in ways that we weren't anyway so wrote a book about my craziest story building this company up until it was worth basically three hundred and fifty million dollars and we were aren't close to doing one hundred million dollars in revenue and it just it just exploded A named Hashtag robot thinking that would be viral. But there's no way that Hashtag gets as far girl boss Scott without it writing on a certain amount of merit So girl was at that. Point was just the name of your book just a book okay. It's the book and you know I put that out into the world and spent eighteen on the New York Times bestseller list and to date has sold over half a million copies and and then became a whole bunch of other stuff. I figured out what intellectual property was and I've dragged it real far impressive extremely impressive. So I've met your mom before and we know Gary like who's your support system not just for business we'll get to some of the personal seven Who who supports via Mu Gary officiated. My wedding yes which is really cute. Just so that we a little background. So I wrote Sofia's Prenup and then a few years later no eight months. Oh okay that was. He was like eight months later. If you're called and said that prenatally get together again so we also did the divorce and throughout that as you can imagine. We got a little bit close. 'cause that's close period of time. Usually I do a pre nup. Neither I never see the people again. Are I see him again? So long after that. Like I've had a couple of kids or something so this all happened relatively quickly and just to put a pin in the support system question for a second. What's that like? I mean being a very strong very successful young relatively speaking. How old were you when you guys got married? Like twenty nine thirty so getting married and then having it not work and really trying to do all the right things having the pre-nup having the conversations I know you were very supportive of him in his career financially therapy yet that happened and You know he was very his mind was made up that this just wasn't right for him after five years of dating which was like. I wish you'd told me that before. I spent so much money on a wedding and had published and Martha Stewart Weddings. Which was like so not me. It's not a whole nother story. About how my life became not me because I could do things right rather than you know? It's like you have money for the first time you're like well. I should be doing these things right of access her can go on vacations or whatever and this is what really matters in life and kind of ended up not being what really mattered in life is nice perspective to have anyway Yeah eight months later did my best I mean I think I'm probably pretty. I think I'm challenging and I think I'm increasingly aware of how challenging I am but I also think everyone's challenging. That's what I was gonNA say everybody's telling my boyfriend's challenging right Oh so who is there for you? Mom Who's there for me? My mom was there but I was really there for you. Yes thank you. Thank you Yeah it was a great pre-nup I'm glad he left when he did. Because it would have gotten a lot more expensive for me. Overtime as how it was structured And my mom was there but she was like get angry right and I was like get out of here like I'm super sad getting him like you can't tell so. She came down for a few days and we had like a blow out and she like drove home early. She's like backed into the neighbors. Tesla Cross and then like went home. Okay that must have felt Super Shitty. Okay so now. Mom's not even their mom was there but mom like wasn't just wasn't giving the right advice. That's okay I think it's always a struggle for MOMS and And so after that I went to the Beverly Hills Hotel I was like I gotta check out of this House. His like wine glasses out. This is like a crime scene like we live here right and went to the Beverly Hills. Hotel with my three poodles checked in S- cried and screamed into a pillow for a week. And my best friend who was in Grad School. At the time this is in the summer was off school and so she came and lived with me at the Beverly Hills Hotel for a full week and I was lost my appetite. I lost weight. I was chain smoking in the courtyard on a bench wearing a bathrobe with three poodles with like really long hair. Extensions coming out of a baseball CAP. Uh-huh if you can imagine the dislike Hollywood caricature of like woman unhinged dray. It was that And I wasn't completely certain that it was like really over. I still had hopes and you know was trying to like not text too much in you. Know I don't know be like gentlewoman or something and Lived there for a week and then went back home and I wound up in another relationship really fast. I never expected. And that's this relation that this one and that's lasted spent almost four year. Congratulations thanks very tall tight. Yes yes it's a trying time. That challenges all of our basic assumptions. However one thing that brings us all together is our common humanity now more than ever teams must come together and.

attorney Ebay Beverly Hills Hotel Los Angeles Basically Venture Capital Caym Volvo Gary Boston index ventures Sheryl Sandberg baseball New York Times Grad School Gary Steph Liz Beverly Hills Britain
AI vs. Coronavirus: How artificial intelligence is now helping in the fight against COVID-19

KIRO Nights

05:38 min | 5 months ago

AI vs. Coronavirus: How artificial intelligence is now helping in the fight against COVID-19

"With you our special guest tonight Cyrus a parcel of the A. I. organization happens to be a security professional which specialties include emerging threats anti terrorism human organ trafficking smart technology bio digital programming artificial intelligence and social media manipulation and there's lots of that he is the author of a number of books including his most recent which is artificial intelligence danger to humanity and he has brought a massive lawsuit to the front steps of the tech giant's Cyrus welcome to the program looking forward to this thank you George thank you for having me on what a time for you to be on all my gosh I mean you've been hearing the stories of these corona virus scares what's your take on this because you some more touch on it in a very interesting way in your book artificial intelligence well I I turn to the bio disease that that potentially hazardous to the entire human race and also connect to the possibility that the Chinese government no labs working with community is in other animals trying to make human stem cells with with animals animation from irises so this is one of the threats I put in initially I investigated over one thousand artificial intelligence biometric by engineering cybernetics and company that relate to robotics and five G. had bought five hundred what Chinese companies station out of time but had that had platforms and and have offices all over the world can US six hundred US or western companies which many concluded of American companies and European companies and some companies that go around Australia New Zealand I concluded my first book published it was called the action China and the weaponization of a box of five G. which is actually in that it was in this book artificial intelligence to Mandy I concluded that the world's citizens are in danger view China's big tech all world citizens and in stages not just in one shot but in stages suits by engineering cybernetics they I. threats and mainly walk away so far away is your gas probably know they have more than three billion people servicing all around one hundred seventy countries there and they were attempting to take over the world and still did a I. systems digital infrastructure quickness five G. system so you have full control over China the Far East you have the Middle East you have Africa and then you know Europe and you would have America's well if we did make some initiatives past two three years so in initial phase it would have been total surveillance and maybe in or million despotic dictatorship but then what all the misuse of Hey I and then this lab experiments they do that by engineering cybernetics that in itself threatens all the world citizens so the guilty parties a train coming through gene that being said there's negligence and and misuse whether big tech companies and one of the founders CEOs so I've been trying to get the word out for six or seven months I got a few networks I really appreciate you having me on and what time yes my gosh absolutely and in China are they is devious has a lot of people think because Cyrus more more so than so I I lived in China for almost a year in the year two thousand I live in the mountains with five remarks and I got to know the Chinese people when I went to the city's not have friends I have to have a network of Chinese coast to coast around the entire world and I I probably have maybe fourteen hundred numbers in my phone and he's a good one and also meet look we grew up in communist China in nineteen forty nine it took over the country the massacre a lot of people intellectuals and scholars detective of the property owners to talk everyone and they put them in camps and during the course of their history of seven years it's been a a process of rape murder conjugation caps and setting up that the pope or the communist regime and the people were deprived of all ethics and morality and there are tough to struggle so we have a system like that is controlled by one dictatorship which the pork barrel and you have one point five billion people fighting for that very limited resources limited jobs you have to dissect a jungle psych wards do you have to basically be a person become a professional liar you have to be good at sections and beans devious and the Chinese government dear dear dear regime and their leaders right shrewdly DDS and shrews screaming clever they can put one past the smartest intelligence agents we have but now they've been catching up the past few years has been a lot of arrests in the U. S. and so we're making a change but unfortunately it was a little bit too late in the summer cars as as everyone has seen the moment it seems iris that their government seems geared to all kinds of technology that would infringe on our rights spy on us and do all kinds of things in the end by reading your book artificial intelligence dangers to humanity I got that in a big way that that's what the Chinese are doing correct so do something so I put in the future that can happen the five G. is not built for human beings people don't know that it's made for

Voice Technology in Healthcare Book Launch

Voice First Health

10:24 min | 5 months ago

Voice Technology in Healthcare Book Launch

"The book first of all is divided into four main sections. I should also mention if you want to get access to the book or get more about it. You can always go to voice. I health dot com slash book. And there I've got lots of about it. That's also where you'll be able to access Links to order the book if you decide to do so and so on so again we have designed the book to really be made up of four main sections and in doing so we wanted to think about the different main areas that would make sense really to have this type of format and section one is made up of four different chapters It is an introduction to voice technology so these chapters really form the fundamental the basis for some underlying key concepts that really are relevant to the rest of the book and so yes these introduce some of the key concepts of voice technology in healthcare. Now if we dive into that section. I can tell you a little bit about the chapters and the people that are contributing in these chapters. The first chapter. I'm I'm very honored to say was written by myself. And it really looks at an overview of voice. Why is voice such an important Concept now when it comes to healthcare technology why I feel this is going to completely transform healthcare. Why believe that voice is actually the next operating system the video s and get into different types of communication and then I lay the groundwork for different use cases which of course are explored in more detail throughout the rest of the book the second chapter is by Atlanta ear. You may have heard her speak if you've gone to the voice of Healthcare Summit over the past couple of years. She was a keynote speaker there a few years ago and she is truly one of the World foremost experts on design voice. User interface design. And how it applies to healthcare and we put this early in the book because we really wanted to keep this in mind for all the readers when they are looking at some ideas and how best to design voice applications because the user interface design is so critical and so Atlanta's chapter is here at the The outside of the book as well the next chapter which we feel also is critical to designing good a voice experience. Healthcare is one by Audrey are beanie. She is the CEO and founder of audio brain and her chapter is entitled the Science Behind. Sonic branding how audio can create better patient caregiver and healthcare provider outcomes. And I'm really pleased to actually have a clip from you're you're just describing a little bit about her chapter so here is Audrey are beanie. Hi I'm Maury are beanie. I'm the founder. Ceo and executive producer of audio brain. And I'm honored to be a chapter contributed to voice technology and healthcare. This is an amazing book for anybody. Who's interested in health and wellness from every aspect? I specialize in sonic branding at my firm audio brain and one of our passions is and we advocate for the use of music and sound to promote health and wellbeing in this chapter. I discussed my twenty five years of experience in working in the healthcare industry. We talk about how the brain processes music and Sadam why. It's the perfect tool for communicating and helping to heal and promote wellness with new technologies emerging. Sound is even more important than it ever was and really has a strong influence on patient outcomes. I discussed some of the projects that we've worked on and the history of the industry and where it's headed in the future. I hope you enjoy the chapter and hope you enjoy all the other amazing authors that are in this book please go out and purchase voice technology in healthcare and you can find it at voice. I health dot com photos slash book. Thank you so much. We look forward to seeing you at hymns and the release of the book on March tenth. Thank you very much to audrey for those comments fantastic The next chapter is a really critical one as well that we thought fit really well at the outset of the book. And that of course is when we talk about voice. We also need to talk about privacy insecurity and so in this case we have nature lore From orbiter who wrote a chapter called secure voice in it is It's a great one It's all I can say. Really really critical information there. The second part of the book is another seven chapters and this is looking at voice technology and the patient experience and so here we have quite a few authors that have had experience with creating these voice applications and how seeing how it impacts patients some of these chapters include chapter five automated virtual caregiving using voice for services proactive personalized holistic. Twenty four seven and affordable. This is by Stuart Patterson from lifeblood then we have a really interesting chapter by Dave Kemp on voice and wearables and that and how that's going to affect the the Patient then we have another fascinating chapter by Rupa Patel. This is on synthetic voices for healthcare applications. Rupel is doing some amazing work looking at how you can create voices for for brands but also in the medical field. How can you create a voice for somebody that may be losing their voice? It's really really powerful. The next two chapters are edited versions of podcasts interviews. That took place here on this podcast voice I health we wanted to incorporate some of these interviews into the book as well touring to bring a real personal aspect to the To the narratives that you are reading and so as I said we have two chapters here coming up next Chapter Eight is voice. I health interview a diabetes. Care plans with an wiler. She actually won an award for her diabetes Alexa Skill and then chapter nine is entitled Voice I health interview Alexis skills for pediatrics. And we have Devon Nadar Speaking about some of her experiences with creating some skills specifically for pedes then we have a very interesting chapter by Robin Christoffersen. And it's called the rapid rise of voice technology and it's awesome power to empower. This is all about accessibility and Wonderful wonderful addition. And I do have a short clip here from Robin. Speaking about his chapter. So here is a Robin Christoffersen. My name is Robyn Christopherson. I'm head of digital inclusion at UK technology and disability charity ability net. I wrote chapter about how the Echo and voice first technologies more. Broadly represent a fantastic opportunity for people with disabilities. I've been lucky enough to be working in this area of technology and disability for the last twenty five years and health is incredibly important so read the chapter and learn about how voice first technologies are being used in so many different ways to help people live more productive healthier happier. Mo fulfilling lies. That's wonderful. And I love those comments from Robin so you can get a little taste of what that chapter is all about The next chapter is chapter eleven. And it's entitled an overview of Voice Technology and healthcare and is really by a team of authors from a Macadamia Technologies And they have been real leaders in the voice for space as well. So it's a it's wonderful to have them part of the book. The third section is next and this third section is called voice technology and the provider experience. Now go from you're describing. What the patient will experience were is experiencing with voice technology. And now we tackle what be provider is experience is experiencing and the first chapter is chapter twelve in this section and it's Mayo Clinic. Patient centered innovation driven. And this is written by a team at Mayo Clinic including a Doctor San Pruthi. Who's one of the cover authors of the book so Again a very very well written and excellent chapter chapter thirteen we get to another a voice L. Interview Voice Technology for behavioral changes. And in this chapter I speak with Dr Mattson Boesky. Who was on the PODCAST? Awhile back and he talks about his experiences about how we can use voice technology to really influence positive behavioral changes and hopefully this results in positive health outcomes. Now the next chapter chapter fourteen is called the laws of voice. This is critical to us in the healthcare. Space looking at implementing. Voice Technologies because. This is such an early early industry when it comes to voice technology healthcare that there are a lot of questions right now and we have to lawyers heather dealer and Bianca Phillips who we are very fortunate to have as a contributor to the book who outlined some of the questions. Some of the concerns in this regard and Bianca has Been Gracious enough to provide us with a clip for her as well alenquer chapter so here is Bianca Phillips Phillips I'm a lawyer with research expertise in medical law and digital helpful and they coordinate at Elektra of legal process methods and institutions in the. Jd Program will try blow school. I'm one of the contributing authors alongside co off a headache SLA. Us Attorney specializing in digital at life. And then what happens? The title of our chapter is the laws of voice as we enter this new frontier of waste best health lawyers and lawmakers will seek your expertise on the role of voice technologies in society in order to cheat. They understand the legal environment and the laws of voice. Now chapter rate is presented with nine hypothetical scenarios. We've uses a voice. Technologies in pre and post operative cat pediatrics genetic testing into health impediment health tracking. We then discuss some of the lake will considerations and legal contracts relevant to h scenario the chapter then tends to you by asking a range of questions and presenting. The guide called the eight pillows. We get you thinking about what below should be. And you'll role in shaping the future of law and society. So that's wonderful as you can as you heard. It's an extremely important chapter in this Early Industry when it comes to voice

Voice Technology Voice Technologies Robin Christoffersen Healthcare Summit Audrey Bianca Phillips Phillips Diabetes Atlanta UK Founder Sadam Maury Mayo Clinic Dave Kemp CEO Robyn Christopherson
Interview With Shashwat Gupta Altcoin Buzz Co-Founder & CEO

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

07:42 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Shashwat Gupta Altcoin Buzz Co-Founder & CEO

"Very interesting questions because you you're at a Singapore. I live here so you seem quite good. Quite a bit with the spice from NBA's I started Auburn bus. Jeff back in the middle of two thousand seventeen. The goal was always to have a channel where we put out our opinions. I always like doing research always like making content so we combined forces love almost two and a half years down the line now. We had a team of thirty people creating content to be not super biased base. Talk differently from where we started which was just for fun. It's become a more serious business. Now is the first VICI into the character in the space. Yes actually in the early two thousand seventeen I wanted to do something in the crypto space when I found out about it and like there are a few options that you can do here is get people to fund into an ICU. Which made no sense to me at least like for me. I was like you take people's money. Then what you do with it and the coin doesn't make any sense so that was an idea. Drop pretty fast. The other one was to do something like an on ground thing where people could buy and sell bitcoin from you which is an OTC thing. But I don't think I failed to secure about it. I don't come technology background. Then the third one was to provide concerning services for legal accounting marketing and set up a form for that. I thought it was too early for that as well. So getting into the media space and just like talking about stuff that you learn was easy and at the same time I felt had value in the space as well coming to see checks. Let me ask you as UCLA. Correlation between a surge in traffic and then a surging bitcoins plus. Yeah it's the other way down the hall workout which Way Guy. From day definitely do correlation. There's definitely a coordination I feel even amongst the Bitcoin community itself. This is the price and they're like okay. Whatever but if either price and it's moving up or down there like what happened so then the search volumes go up quite a bit as well I think you do is now the second biggest. So it's engine in the world. So that's why we keep connecting our between the website and the Youtube as well. The reason we want to grow up website is because that's the one we own in a way you do bestowed on Youtube. It's it's super exciting. This is the most exciting time. There's a reason why the way says this is. My voice sounds lot. We've been young everywhere you need to everybody. It'll be learning a great deal of learning Tinley. What's what gets the attention of your rate is the most what what is what's the story. What's next hadn't attract US IN PERSON? I think to a certain extent people like to know what's happening with the prices like what's happening on the trading side. What's happening in the movement of prices? Basically I think over the last three years since I've been studying the community quite a bit. It has since quite a bit as well. People get attracted to good use cases. People get attracted to companies getting traction in terms of user user base as well. There's a lot of attraction for people to understand more things to with. Decentralized finance even centralized finance companies like Celsius network next saw CRYPTO DOT COM by. Nance they have all these multiple centralized financial services. They're getting a lot of attention as well and people love to know what's going on so harvesting right now would still be a price right the but besides that. There's a lot of improvement in the demand for technology. Decentralized Financial Wizards Centralized Finance crypto gaming started locked-in. Gaming segment is separate separate blockchain. Gamay yes has that guy. I mean that must be combining bicycling looking through the community cryptic through dining sets. It must be just typing. Yeah like if you see that magic. The gathering card was like the one that was mound gawks named after her anyways. Keeping those things in new perspective you see how many gamers have been millionaires in the CRYPTO. Space already so many traders either engineer who studied data or many of them are gamers as well who understand this space rather well as well within gaming can essentially be used for three basic reasons. One is used blockchain to authentic authenticate if particular moved to place or not so example. You and I are paying poker you in case you an extra day goes away and you know I clicked it but you do not have electricity. So that's on the blockchain and Newt says did not move us. Oh when there is high stakes games happening etc. That's a good use of blockchain for it as well. The second one is when a game wants to use it as a currency so they want to have an in game currency where one piece of the currencies equal to the second piece of currency. That means it's fungible here so and then it can have a big plan that could be a platform in which that currencies used the third one which is most dear and near to me is rocky items and these items can either be present something of your own and you want your audience to kind of have a piece of something that you've created on the blockchain it can be used to make audiences interested. It could be for a musician to presell often album. It can be for game items as well and these game items now can be used within multiple games as well so I can make one game item and you're game developer. You can use your game and there is another game. He can use it in his game as well so the last item we made just for fun on the engine platform can now be used in four different games last spice to the even this is two thousand and fifteen in spices. That one thousand sixteen doesn't sixteen and you start at the start of the Rodney around this time. Yes visa started around the same saying a lot of child. Yes Las Vegas. If idiom changed a lot even team changed the space quite a bit because before that a lot of focus was on currencies. Some people were like blockchain. Cryptocurrencies will be used for payments and payments and payments. But then when he tedium came and people started doing smart contracts it became more about platforms. So where tiptoe currencies were meant to be a motive? Payment suddenly became a mode of community building. It became a way that people can actually invest it begin tool for investment. I'm not sure if I really liked that bit but it did. Become the changes happen with people coming up with smarter and more intelligent use cases for things that they can do with cryptocurrency rather than just payment. And I don't think the problem that we need to solve is to buy coffee. That's not the problem. Bitcoin auditorium needs to Saul didn't other financial issues that these guarantees need to solve and they are slowly getting towards solving the Lord of interesting problems that the world has in the

Youtube Singapore NBA Jeff Auburn Bus Ucla Bitcoin Auditorium Saul Cryptocurrencies Nance Newt Engineer Las Vegas Rodney Developer
Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

Outcomes Rocket

12:11 min | 6 months ago

Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

"Ashim. Welcome thank you. Thank you for the great introduction. I really appreciate absolutely as she now. Did I leave anything out of your introduction that you wanNA share with listeners? Oh sure actually what happened? Is that a sense. Mike Graduation Undergrad studies in India. I had left the country. I did my PhD in Australia. And then I stayed overseas. I've mostly had to Canada. Us and I came back to India about thirty years later. It was a different country. Fortunately I had the opportunity of that time to travel to some of the relates from where I live. I live in Bangalore India at the moment and within hundred kilometers. You see a larger rural territory. And what I realize a to my journeys in these areas is that affordable healthcare education financials visits Viennese significant barrier Afar many of the people living in those communities and I wanted to do something about that and I just wanted to grab back in and as part of my section now that's a really important factor. Ashim and so kind of gets us to the first question that I wanted to ask is. What got you into the medical sector to begin with right. You've highlighted why you're focused on what you're focused on today. The around the globe journey. That's brought you back home. But what got you into healthcare to begin looking at some of the challenges that are faced people living in rural communities in India and I'm sure similar conditions exist in many of the developing economies. What I saw was something interesting. I come from telecom background as you told your listeners and I have seen the effect of Moore's law being obliged into telecom industry and the computer industry where the you know the cost comes down every two years and the performance goes up every two years. I don't see that I didn't see that in the healthcare sector and I felt intrigued by the fact that healthcare solutions would be provided in silos. There there was no opportunity to bring innovation into healthcare industry particularly in a country like India and that was a challenge and I felt that if the light some of the principles of information technology and communication et CETERA. You would be able to bring down. The cost of the air be able to deliver better care to communities in the rural areas because people in Abia the journey taken care of that of infrastructure available expertise available etc. If you take a look at a simple problem not so simple for people living in the religious cardiovascular divisive which is very common in India and yet a cardiologist Available only in the top twenty five cities so. I felt that something had to be done and that brought me into the medical sector. That's awesome Ashim and you know what it's great that you identified. This need like you pointed out even developing countries. We do have that care gap and it's important that we start looking to different ideas and technology to bridge that gap and so I'd love to hear your thoughts Ashim on an example of something that you and your team have done to create results to address this really what it is. It's access right access to healthcare so love to hear your thoughts in any stories you have to share in that room. Some of the things that I T- I feel that healthcare the fundamental right of every citizen every every country healthcare leaders need to shift their attention from primarily from two more into primary. Care if you look at many countries today particularly where loved healthcare solution designed larger importance to primary care. I'll give two examples either the energies in UK our health services in Singapore. They probably among the best and dumps of health care being provided to the citizens of the country and there is a adequate not only liquid is really established network of from regulations etc and services available. And I don't see that in You know countries like India developing countries like India where there's a huge amount of infrastructure available in the urban centers in all from the place that I bear in Bangalore kilometer radius two mile radius. Then six major so I'm really lucky. In case something happens to me. I really love that. I will get good services wherever I go out. Not even fifty miles. Maybe thirty miles outside of the city and that situation changes drastically. Finding a cardiologist is a rare finding a specialist of any kind finding simple diagnostic capabilities which are taken for granted in developing countries like USA of will not be available and we address that yes so about very good question so let me kind of come to the main point that I'm trying to bring here. Is that to provide quality healthcare beneath you technology's innovation in healthcare designed or developing economies like India. V cannot use the technology that are available in. Us are many of the developing countries because they would be too expensive for deployment in a country like India. Just affordability what it would not be possible however deaths lots of things that can be done little things that can be done. A take a simple case of vascular disease. It's a chronic illness. It gets worse and worse over Peter. Time if a simple. Ekg capability exists at the primary care level in these rural communities. What happens is that all of a sudden diagnosed people early enough and early diagnosis always saves life. And it's always less expensive by no means struck at science is very simple solution and yet we don't have those kinds of solutions today and that's exactly what we are trying to bring to the non urban areas communities that are underserved. We want to provide those kinds of solutions. I think that's Great Ashim and and you know we recently had guest His name is Ronny Schiff. Ron He's over in Israel and his his organization. Global health is very much focused on the impact. That you're working to effect and one of the examples that he provided Much like your example is the technologies that exist in developed countries. Really have a ton of bells and whistles that aren't necessary for basic like an Ekg for example and. So what can we do? If we want to address the needs of the broader global population. This is a conversation really kind of at the government level hiring an address it right and so two ashamed point we gotta take a look at small shifts small things that could be done in order to make that type of impact and Ekg for example is one of those things that could be done. Have you guys? Ashim started any programs. Anything that's yielded results spar. Okay so I can. Thanks for pointing out that audience. That looked better. They looked in the western countries and to fit the budget of the blubbing communities and just to illustrate that in another way winning them. All I would like to give is everyone. Most of your listeners will be Miller Microsoft Excel. Did the street. I'm apologies of Microsoft and high tech. I use only maybe two percent of the capabilities. The Bells and whistles. That are there that I don't really use. Yep so that's either actually thing that can be done in health care and what we have done the EKG. There are expensive solution that are available which are suitable for. I see us. That's not the market that we want to go because for us. The diagnosis must happen at the primary level. Yes soup or hormone actually will reach the ICU. So we can provide bitty simple solution handheld solution robust solution that would work in the Are the other environmental condition that exists at the primary care level with. There's no air conditioning. In the impetus can go up to maybe Hainan. Vendetta night. The device has to work the condition but began take advantage off certain things that are actually coming on rice so fast that is amazing. Take for example. The smartphone be don't really need a printed paper to give the outward because it's basically going to do with it instead if that is available through an APP on android fallen which cost less than one hundred dollars. All of a sudden beheaded capability of displaying mation. That information is available. Honestly that can be sent to a cardiologist sitting hundred miles away or maybe the word and all of a sudden we have created the solution based on existing technologies around us and yet the solution as many low cost. Yep So taking. This example is a great way of doing things and so tell us a little bit about time when you tried one of these things and maybe you ran into some obstacles. Ashim. What did you learn from those obstacles the into lots of obstacles and I'm glad that we did because become from myself and my other CO founder. Both our technologies become from non medical background and as a result of that may fence that for not necessarily league correct. So I'll give you three or four examples of those are maybe towards suspending on Hammerstein. But simple one was that during the early testing of the Barak behead given the product to driver and he was driving around the whole day with the device and India's lady heart most of the year and His mom would get ready getting device at all and it could slip out of his hands on down so by the time he finished his trial two weeks later he was video blood ridiculous like sad phase and I spoke with him through a translator because I didn't understand his language and figured out that excelled on multiple times and has maybe ladies Saudi awarded and yet it's a simple feedback that actually change the way the product is now the actually have silicone rubber grip around. It is easy to hold very very comfortable. It doesn't slip out of the hand and more or less moreover if it falls down nothing happens to realize another one. I will tell you is. We made it incorrectly at all. Maybe we were due naive. At those days that taught that if the allow our device and the information from our device to travel from the primary care physician to cardiologists. Our job is pretty much done. The largest come on line provide guidance to the primary care physician. They will talk to each other. Everything's date and Beijing sticking. What he didn't realise is the whole imbalanced. The situation is in country like India. There are about sixty million people with cardiovascular illnesses less than ten thousand cardiologists so guess what every time the Tradition wanted to get in touch with the cardiology. They will be busy somewhere else. And so they won't get any response on the grady. The primary air from the relatives for maybe maybe never in some cases because the cardiologists is really the busiest person under the Senate. So what we had to we had to rethink our solution and desks spend meteorologist that interpretation if they want to deliver a solution that would work under all the circumstances than the solution has to be on the basis of a Machine Lynn. Either machine learning or AI. This interpretation that we can deliver to the primary care physician on time every time the dog area. And that's exactly what we ended up many so these are the market feedbacks that regard as Donald mistakes but in the end is actually overall with a solution.

India Ashim Bangalore India Australia Canada Mike Beijing USA UK Microsoft Bangalore Machine Lynn Ronny Schiff Singapore Moore Israel Senate
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

02:51 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

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"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

11:18 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"I can say I own a very interesting story. I I can basically some appeared which is very similar to what we did the early. Two thousands with maybe Muqataa was only maybe excursion wise Tom Doesn't challenges but they will never deleted pickup and build a visit to build but they they did create philly fight with which the on the appealing it. Okay and they. They want positive somebody else that we will begin So that's how they approached us on that up to be amazing combination between deal directly be in Actively in living using relationships. That's a little seem to be gone. So now it takes define right so he started another company now and it also totally different space. No longer in the in the kitchen. But what made you get into defining. Why tell people what the findings so the idea? Full Shoe Voshel official. Just maybe one sentence but you think I missed the first Short Cup which is post this merger moby have some eight million dollars. Invested in this merged company An icon using US begin licensee campaign will into license in all this beauty have now and do not working now with be amazing though. Show this fortunate stations. Now cautious donations would be hundreds of millions so it became multi-billion Nice. There's anyway so break officials also and I and again I'd have committed. MIC is again to learn to rod and then actually you know few as you team member fish. We want to keep working together and actually you know we do not want to be super. It's a- and we had we want to be again I think if you're able to innovate and the company at this visit do have experienced it. Better not commenting dispath Good enough with all the experience had gone to do this more challenging entering. And you've go the way we did this. Time was basically not looking for an ideal and then choosing the vertical and Dan come up after you spend few month in the vertical chose was a finance. Why is that because we have this Attraction like and wanted to be be in that space and also identified two elements committee good elements which offer good Inde- okay number. One extremely high mouches think about it goes Muslim. Faith find out. It's amazing I mean that's that's relevant talk about a few of dental wasteful and become goddess out folks in the ten thousand. It's something the hundreds of millions of of course they the ball because of materialize than awesome margins though infinite deal that the IP is headed by a person not by an organization if you compare it to other industries have you know the organization enterprise in politics and waste of time and we have to do in finding reading Enterprises One person owns dipy. So then we begin to look robbing the the beginning who take like Phil take type and direction. And then as we begin exploring and talking to the begun players inconsistent which is That is also interesting. Investment uncoordinated amazing terms to early for example if you look at them from the US Perspective as point seven million people yes which have more than a billion. We spent portion of the quarterback investors. So out of this eight hundred seven million also less than one percent money's twelve money into stuff nothing to find out In is an amazing investment president of new goodies W it is investment Bozell everyday wakeup beautiful alcohol on the walls and we'd La in trying to figure out. Why is that? Why nobody real people with money to out? And we saw that the basic necessities of financial assets consists in the main. Things are exposed if you want to invest in something to see how much volume Much shall we say about transparency is. It's it's something that's not there right now in the art world not no you. You have very limited ability secondary market which is will you know. Small portions of these happened but the pound. I'm in multiple. What's happened in in totally blocked deep into the space in the biggest gift for so sort of dot problem others and shallow? This data has to use it so so it is financial as should be the graphs and did everything likely financial asset seconds ability. Now it's really how to serve Out One of the big margins on complicated though the way of snow sold via the Auction House Christie's so we are so figured out on path of to sort of phase one by Nibbling Youtube replaced outlook We have to be buffalo can place. Different Outlook Woke second-phase which women twenty twenty dollars we you'll be able to cash out doing that. Based on digital cores that branding in Psalm taking public away and be the day too. Graphic changes an inevitable cash out investing so pretty much wanted to disrupt the our community. Who is that it was? You're taking more than stopped out. Community would ultimately because many many people have money. Aw Nuts and it's beautiful. I I hear that that's great. You know we'll go to fewer fewer questions just to wind down. You know our talk you know. So what are some of the management skills that you feel you know make you effective you. You were get your big. How you're on the small side here you know? Do you use the same thing with management skills or you know just you know the star in inherently since the your personality leads. Certain style that you have. It's nothing is what drives Zil behavior gives it probably adopt. Plus you're learning new spence which would be teaches you. You wanted to conduct yourself okay. I hear that did you have a mentor. That you trenches sometimes for advice like throughout the whole process. Did you have some that you can rely rely on or this is more just internally ticket by yourself. You thought through a specific mental amount of advisors in frazier in defines or people from the industry people augment not an expert in two big fields which are relevant for the final took off field within defined outwards. Have a bunch of rules. They have to offer quote in which I work with a lot and figure out the right path it would measure the food was fortunate. Hope launched in for period. I think sued Minto along with him. Dot Okay and you know. What do you want to be when you were fifteen? If you remember remember that far back do you know what you want. Did you have an idea. Do you want to be you know a success. Pure did you want to be. You know doctor lawyer. There was this concept. Of course nothing exist in five. Yeah five the storm was not newsroom and extend okay I hear that very good and other on the productivity side is there. There's something that you could recommend to you. You know founders to be more productive whether it's on the personal side or whether it's on the you know works you know is sir whether it's just taking time for yourself or you know just trying to keep more organized. Is there some that you've you've done that you feel like really keeps you productive of their love. No.

US philly Muqataa moby Christie Dan official Phil Nibbling Youtube Bozell president spence Minto frazier
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

09:56 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"And culture think things gotta get better. This country was built and I. It's a cultural central. Tried to be more just and it's not about in Oh meets about us On the first Olympic. But no. It's always do. We always tried to give the food pictures of what it choose. What is Dale part instead of innovation? Why would they really matters? And is a big part of the big story in in all seven factors but as equity everybody on you give you give equity employs. Everyone mean I mean anybody from company Integrity So they feel part of it and it's about company meetings. Will you emphasize what each one does. But it does anybody else knows what each one on does so everybody sees the picture and and so Kvant atmosphere so far being professional and and executing correctly and Delete which is supposed to being a comfortable just bombed and without being nick at four and friendly and positive There's always a big challenge of trying to somehow fight it negative politics. A natural situation in a way is negative politics. Aw and for people to know us you as the CEO others the way to confront each other so you have to wait for energy or the fighting in the south Keep open communication between people When people come through and and start saying that guy so bad because does that not not you know become part of that to join that but the opposite figurative? Okay got it so one more question with with excellent and then we'll go into fresh off and then from there we'll go onto what you're doing now the white you step down. Seo Did you feel that you want it you time you know. Let me give it to somebody else could do do other things within the company or was being burnt out. What was the? I'll get a lot of people that do that right. I know Dennis Crowley who's on the show from foursquare. He stepped down after a number of years and you know he ended up just focusing on the RND and development and he said it was a great decision in that sense that he could really help to build more products at etc.. Actually the big trigger was accelerator which his viscous Company in Komeda wanted which was a really good decision for me to move to. US With my family. Which I did and my wife was amazing? Came with me and did his anyway but starting with by she wasn't happier and Co was in stock and I felt birds. It's unfilled for me to be the When she's unhappy that I thought that you know some do i? Do you know a good job in the company of the time could find somebody who's is going to know a job that in actually four thoughts multiple do an amazing job and I was pushing the ball for that and ended up and accepting my mom commitment accommodation which is also being good with external trim. That's great here that so you're saying earlier in the show right so connecting the kitchen you. Why did you get into to decide to really make that shift from ethic into something totally? I O T in the kitchen are pretty far from the tech world. Basically failed the not not want to be in by not only at Dick and bench. Not good things about at that. which by the way becoming even worse now without the favor on site to find something new and don't think by the way I dilettante smart way they mentioned I had to deal with a great idea? Started executing it so it's not such a but after being in the industry of supermarkets in was this actually was disappointed initially was supermarkets not guilty After being in that space for many many months really begin to learn that space facing status and then followed looking in all around and singles GonNa which began picking up. I did come up with this concept. which book concept to connect anti into supermarkets? So I've been off from experience markets to compensate you. The did make sense of this initiative initiative you so you know. The MODEL was what for the supermarket. Stuff to pay you for the the the supermarkets factor. That can win win for everybody. President factors it was a big deal because it gives them kitchen presents. I mean if you think about we make decisions about buying groceries. Most of them have been indication. Simple your milk is out Tabei milk so being able to execute decisions the benefit consumers and of course big supermarket Arkansas John Incentive as has become incentivized to get into the kitchen. They won't head depress manufacturers themselves. MM set have been in places into the kitchen start becomes interesting. The plasma factors under this busy had both Pinkus us both the president factors and markets. And so you know the market size. Did you realize how big boys when you started like you. You know when you're thinking about it did you see yourself. Did you know that the manufacturers would come on board or did you realize that you know martin pain to in the kitchen or did it come at when you start. Do you have a different idea. Mind I mean this. This concept physically. Getting the supermarkets to the constant presence in the kitchen was quite news. It was no numbers Saying you know you couldn't understand that they should be kitchen just minute up sense since and by the way pretty soon if the we began doing another little company figured out made sense Supermarket put into the kitchen which has ECO system with Alexa. which they know in America but I Cathedral shortly before in the field with traduced the concept of for example shows. You Know God if my yeah manning. The voice in the agenda does this stick undertook barcode. So just made sense. And that's why US and other companies began offering guy and so you have fresh up when you when you merged with I can. Was it merger aquisition I mean it was. I mean they can be equity pisses. It's emotional yeah. So how many people did you have there at the end we had. I mean when we began basically the peak we are not so many eighty people. Uh but but then when we begin Jonah's income competitor charge you to to secure funding branding because invisibles boom to invest into your competitors especially when Amazon's and then when we took that merger a juror path actually wind good down a little bit.

President sense Supermarket Olympic Dale Dennis Crowley Jonah foursquare CEO Kvant Seo Komeda Dick Arkansas nick Amazon martin America Alexa.
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

08:04 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"Hunt people and did you. You know building the team at growing it and this is over. What four or five years or longer it was longer it was launched in two thousand seven? Okay actually the last week or so six and and Dan. I was founded on sale for the first first four and a half years and Theodora then in two thousand eleven and then the government will quickly we almost. Every month was recalled months or for the ten thousand seal We made like fix real quickly. How did you bill well? How'd you scale that there? I mean you know you so you brought your co founder from or already. Did you find other executives. Did you network do you recruit I mean how did you build the wellbeing and Mexico. Okay was the sale all we use the according of the day we got funding for me. Commend ventures on became the active chairman MHM. Then we use the quoting from mark. US wouldn't family. Did it. Then executive in America and he was a good is it time at God n show. Was it hard. You know. Go to be a CARAMEL. Was it hard to raise the funds early on like where people skeptic of of the adequately skeptical of the New Orleans the marketplace at your building in a sense. We're like well you know we just don't see it or you knew that was happening. Was You saw. Aw is that the issue on investors is pitching very different than you believe in the they need to see. The vision is what I think was very positive with. I'm at because the great reputation so I took was not an issue as a buzzword thing. It's always tough. Though say compared to my other government does maybe the easiest round but it was tough anyway. Most people in all did not believe this concept like some big questions encouraging maybe considered to John DOE panels sitting called. How do you look back and see many small businesses big name uses? This is no. It's nothing let me just walking in and then we do next company. It's based off before I saw things turn out so don't be in college by smart people walk but this is this a lot of things you can just believe everything. uh-huh yeah I mean so as you're closing and building the company you had partnerships dealing with you partner with Google Yahoo Nielsen icy with with a hard to sign them up or they were just coming to you. Want is what you proved that once you put the marketplace things tend to. There's always proof right. Everybody wants to see a working product etc usually usually ah those liberal companies. Come to maybe willing to listen to do to engage. Do if you walk into other we companies when you have enough brand improve on but usually you the small company have the you company and how is it chase. How was the? Was it hard difficult time so long. It says on business is an art. You can over pressure but you have to be persistent and you have to find opportunities to know cooperates of the play the corporate game you have to understand the politics Yeah Yeah it's out that takes time to muster Bu- The again focusing on those two aspects persistency and over pressure those two actually concepts a lot of I know that of other. CEO's they tend to want results like they expect you know okay. Can we deal especially with the become visit. Visit Your partner partner with interstate time to close closed. That deal as well So I had to come about all right so you know you pretty much the two rounds you both the company you know Twenty fifteen here. You're doing well how did you do you have. Do you WANNA WANNA get out or the opportunity came upon you. We we as the bold gut to suit with the decision that the company we fear that you know the complexity had somebody supporters and and and we thought you know and we saw the market maturing and numbers were great lighten with position and felt in all of the the somebody came to our went pushes. Some kind of uh-huh wake up call where we have a bit of serving. The company process took a banker the then in all which Delta Marquez in everything by the Book Bank job and there's a by the way well auctioned client early on I for many years Actually they will be dependent on us because we did it off of them more in partner. There's some old economy type company the wound so home so digital and so we will in a way the digital arm and we offer digital capabilities to them so the way they needed us and and that also numbers to this competition the cellphone four companies but ended up being two companies competed increasing and all the things on one sixty two million to complete. Yeah it's always nice feeling. They did a good job and process in Bandung. Isn't really you know basically really squeezed out. You know. It's not at all and happy about it but then don't onto extremely happy. Basically numbers we gave them ended up. Doing one hundred percent from those numbers and will to the best of Nixon did until now we'll an exit is a big part of nuisance on separate entity. That's the good part is exit area. They also ended up doing very happy. We squeeze them out in that competition with unhappy. uh-huh okay so two more things here so you know you have a company culture you built an did you feel that. There's a culture you know. Did you have any mindful culture. Just came natural.

partner Theodora Dan MHM New Orleans Mexico active chairman co founder Bandung mark Google Nixon executive America CEO Delta Marquez interstate Book Bank
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

11:12 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"We come back to that that is well. It's not a problem. That part about about the the recent example of farm fresh up basically you know we saw the mark terms changed physically. I do WanNa now like John. Wait over jump up the pressure will go back up on my jump around and basically After an attic space freshman which was in the IOT space basically collecting supermarkets walking with the plasma factors to make it possible for people two older and it will update shopping cards from the kitchen. Schulman's out in buffalo you can use voice and update your shopping cart and also was stolen and challenges and but we were strong company with big big supermarkets on nuanced in your pocket with us Customers any loved US made nice revenues but they and became actually competitor of ours could begin doing both thinking over in the way the kitchen appliances and the homeschooling with the assistant and the other things and also they became like the service provider for supermarkets. Basically doing what's called Google expressed which is solving online charges for supermarkets so both inside devices in the kitchen and collections which made them competitor and Google is not a good so I think at this point. We realize that even though we had a beautiful company on it's probably a good time to sell the company and look for a way. Well we will fortunate to find good exits of Donald Gould Anyway. But the thing that you have to all the time around figuring out of is the son you know. Is this about a direction or not but you have to go forward because many times you WanNa give up and it's hard but it's not to give up because there's always a struggle so that tension between when it's time to switch to people to sail and when is it a good time skip fighting in keep building the wall until you break it you have to figure out and learn about in always looking to be long. Aw I am I am. I wanted to give up now because you know todd all three list logicoop because the decision to give up gone and so we'll come back fresh you know later on in podcast. Let's go to excellent so after you. You know pretty much sold to break on. Why back then you know you started actually right you we did? What did you take downtime? Did you jump right in. No why'd you say like. Oh okay I just finished one. I worked excellent time. I I just had the tickle back like what what he didn't want to take any time off so negative on and off because they started the excellent actually student doing gone again was done with the boot is concerned. Actually on the show. Those in the Wigan got equity in Excel. Excellent was sort of spin off. Sort of a spin of for me Arabian so it was done in pilot a I would say the aftereffects rated it took off rush up. That's I commended. And don't cheat you serve you can do it and don't think that You know the the embarrassment stuff you know do something else. I specifically studied the awful you but you know do whatever makes you feel pretty good but very different from lunatic. It would help your career would help the company with your family life. I I know commend taking breaks from. Today's you can but anyway and always started. We started launch. Tom Exit from within Vinh way down. And and we're GONNA find this data again becoming an interesting element and important asset in ethic and we saw this opportunity wanting to quit the company that enables Zahn industry to have more there. It was data. I think it important take from that is that it's always very big advantage to think of companies and build companies where you have an expertise. We've when doing something for many years That's a good place to come up with ideas and billion companies on it's extremely challenging bill the company and to get funding and and to figure out the right business mothers and so many challenges. At least you have to come equipped as much as possible and they sense a quick means equipped with the knowledge college and relationships and so on cementing him people want to infants More and you idea and and jumping new field where they have no previous experience and and I would say that. That's that's a big take and beyond the big takes studying coming thick framing new relic. You can really try to build something or you have some advantages got and so did your your experience at a ringing help you excellent did you. Do you feel that okay. I learned some things that happen. I'm building new the company I see the market. I've been in it and you say okay. I'm GonNa do this differently now. And how did you build you build from within. Did you take a lot of people from already into excellent. If you start from scratch you know you know. How long did it take you to get your first custom research that I mean a lot of questions but we'll go back to subsequently absolutely it was a big advantage to fit with molitor had took a lot of both both in all to identify the paternity and then relationships for example as mentioned right media which was a big player so they'll Gresham and their will the first big powerful affects it so that of acid able to bring to start up when you studying in a field that you are already in those relationships sign advantage of that is it took a few people from the dame again everything was done with the and consent is down there but he got those shares in next right So it took a few few people from the team actually. The CO founder allowed was walking in the end of the timing now with to accelerate in Kim but as I mean so did you when you started out you have the vision of what you wanted excellent to be very clear vision John Okay and and excellent example. Actually that vision was really what ended up happening by the way when it started to live at the start for example to finish up and the vision which turned out to be done to invent it. Because I did do the field. But he'll send you the bill. The will which really made sense to be. So what was the vision. The vision was what the marketplace for their data be become become began becoming an asset on. And then you had those companies who had a lot of data and are you getting the data from different websites and you were in different. I mean if you analyze the intimate before you know they. Google guests and their stuff in different full-face bookings on so then the big data was concentrated under a small number of websites which didn't have massive traffic so think about traumatized in price line those companies and didn't think think about you know the the auto calls like Ed Malls and causes of call and so on Saturday those specific verticals with was viable and uses. Those were there but not to use not too many expressions and impressions and then there was the other part of internet which was accompanied the works website which had massive traffic and Muslim views. But no there was to link make between in all those websites. The ETTL's data with with with traffic on the website the data always also very expensive. CPM'S APM's expensive rates and the website to reach had noted at very low to say the mentally and there was a few years the GO-TO expedia. And then if you're gonna go to live in an article somewhere you sit user and hopeful if people we're going to pay fifty zero scipion only when he will expedient you'll stairwells that out of money not only five cents when you go to and I was young. Yeah so basically in this marketplace and then have expedia on and caused the comb become the sitters the mass media websites become the buyers then and other ecosystem players like the agencies and the ad that walks says ads and disconnection between the settlers bias of their data. And show you know so you help pretty much with relation with the right media and you know. Did you win Amdi people in the world where it was a company one hundred hundred people.

Google Schulman John expedia Donald Gould Amdi todd Wigan Tom Exit ETTL Zahn industry CO founder molitor Gresham Ed Malls Kim
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

06:54 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"I can't take in June two thousand nine Erie. Currently is the founder and CEO of defying Erie. Welcome to the show. I hope I covered everything I know. There's a really really a lot that you've covered today so if I missed anything I'd feel free to fill in the blanks. Thank you and I think those that was a good overview and yeah okay so we'll jump right in and this where people I've known earing for really almost ten eleven years or any when he was actually living at the time as well so okay so from teaneck so so starting your career I mean you know before no it was really so you were an ethic before actually it was. So how'd you get started in there. What was your first? I thought actually before everything happens you. They started being ninety six in a way I started thinking about the first thought of actually the friend and technion student taking on and my friend in actually invited to join startup. Not In another fund will willing to that is quite a new dating in the Internet This new thing. It's prior to. I think when Yahoo was ninety five but on when the stores may be created. John Thought it to me look exciting thing nobody did startups. No there was nothing there. But you know it's on made sense to me to do dating Internet so I started doing that within the French left. then he left dating concept builds it was called in the club built a little bit necessarily need to cough. You didn't have any money. So I moved to beating websites and plug which was successfully did some big websites for the government of the corporate rate. This there was using zip. Tips on fire is now is weighing down no zip at the time took maybe like half communities still the ball I was thinking old should should be adds to waste of dying. ADS began to happen. Due to Nathan said came to meet with Allison software applications A new building startup ecosystem. Nothing those on ninety seven when that idea came up but started building dot and the loud into I dust cider the radon which was in two thousand seven to buy electrical after a bunch of different changes and developments whatever for the process became the adviser for because ah which became the most popular download amid a lot of money and some other stuff in the industry came into challenges. When are the record company? Burqa sued Kazaa. They began aggressive stuff. And putting our was called down spy will into the program which reflect negatively take on the phone industry so we moved to change the company become successful again and seven gun show prayed to company to company called White Brent Walgreens Indian morphed into break COM- com- e- so from that experience. What did you learn What was one of the challenges right when let's say when all of a sudden the Spiro came that was really a big issue back then it was for people that I would say who aren't old enough to remember devils? was everything before he was speaker. So slow. Tom had software downloaded and with it back doors and everything right so that was a major issue. I think privacy issues were just starting right to really bubble up there. So how'd you Adad. You rebrand yourself in saying what was the. That must've think to yourself. Oh my God like this is it can be disastrous. So how'd you get around that. Yeah I've learned a lot. Maybe one figure that you will. I learned from this experience. Is this tension between just keeping on doing what you're doing that giving up and finding adding both on the charges because you always have to fight The attention of saying okay. That's not a good direction and and you have people in. It's really very hard on sit. was I really keep on rising distraction with. Ask yourself should I continue the same path. Should people attractively looking at. It was a good decision to people that I was bunch officials spivey I wish was also the development of of the Internet And then the decision to pivot to Dirksen where we had ad in meaningful assets which is advertising in continuing to being the attic space which which was a good thing just moving from software to mall gentlemen websites and then analyzing the market in finding the lights niche community community time remember the Real time bidding began right media Otley and by for exactly so we were able to the first series play all that and likely they walked with and got the two terms from them defy. Then you know the the choice in of course we did in a way where we had to away brand name Lebron everything because the SPA will issue in stockton everything that was often so good way to move the business got it so one of those are like this was also you know that you fill that or you had. I had a really big challenge early on that. You're that you had an ED. You overcoming.

Tom Erie founder and CEO teaneck technion White Brent Walgreens Yahoo Dirksen Kazaa Lebron John Nathan Allison software devils Adad stockton
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"This podcast is part of the C.. Suite radio network turning the volume off slow business. Hello and welcome to the plugged in podcast where we talk with founders and CEO in order to bring you the real stories of failures and triumphs highs and lows. They've experienced based on their journey towards success. We will go in-depth with our guest to give you insight into how they have taken an idea from concept to realization. Making those spurs key hires into building the right team scaling revenues how they overcame obstacles and much more as we learn how they achieved success. This is the podcast and you want to subscribe to if you want got to learn how to succeed. Hillary welcome to another episode of plugged in. I'm Elliott Obama Industry issue veteran who decided to do more than just listen to podcasts. But actually start one in which people much smarter than me this episode. We're speaking with Aereo. Har- Serial Entrepreneur innovator always is at the front Forefront of technology and world renowned ethic industry expert here. He's a proven authority or started star strategy business modeling and strategy excusion. His family led comp- and completed accessible excellent to Nielsen. In two thousand fifteen or redeemed to WBR. which is now I think? Break Com two of the largest and most prominent Internet companies Moseley led the merger fresh up to a leading provider of smart kitchen commerce technology. Oh Gee with..

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

14:58 min | 8 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Stuff going out your doors as you better make sure it's all correct and Within your company purpose and values I understand the need to have to constantly produce content because audience audience so splintered and you don't know who's going to see what etc I'm just overwhelmed by the amount of content that we have in the world that I can keep up with a small fraction of it. When do you think that will just keep going? That will just keep having all this content and it'll be more and more and more or is it will there be some I'm sort of Plateau at some point. I think humans in browns are going to produce content and they have been producing On ten forever we are creators at the or so. I don't think that's ever going to stop but I do agree with you. That there's an issue. She also quantity over widely and the moment a and I would go for hunting the quality I rather than quantity and two. It doesn't matter to producing less content but it's beginnings a huge effort for your team in both situations. You need to think about operation questions you need to think about. Structure Your team. How could you robbery? What should teamwork look like For Your own organization so the problem is still there with Quality over quantity. Thank you for saying that by the way as someone who owns a creative shop. I've seen that it's just so much. Content is not as just here. Let's put some bullet points in this. There's a really old saying old ad guy though Burbach. He is my favorite quote about advertising in. It was this when a person talks to himself. We call him crazy. When a company talks to itself we call it advertising and I think a lot of content is that let me tell you how great we are? I think good content takes longer to develop than sometimes people are just in a hurry to get something anything out. Yeah I totally agree there. There's an old by at think. Mark Lean something related to the fact that he broke the law because he didn't have time to write off in mass. The that's right. I think it was in a letter hero. They said Apologize to the link this letter. I didn't have time to to make shorter. Obviously this platform form that were multiple can look at it and evaluated may commented streamlines that process. Do you ever run into the flip side of that where you'll have the client saying move this make this bigger and and making design decisions when in fact they don't know about design and what I'm getting to his. I've found often when creative is presented. People understand the thinking and why things are the way they are but we moved so quickly. You can't do that. They just it just gets sent back and forth and then people make it comments. So how do you think that sort of back and forth affects the the actual creative content. I think the way we it incredible is that it's so flexible. They can build whatever way of working again he need whatever way of working comfortable to Kim. you move. E Year type of funeral teeing dead justice extremely nimble annual fee ship context ass and you can make that for yourself so it feeds very well into the type of work so marketers have in different in different companies. I fear the type of Human wants to take time and explain that to the client. You can do that as well. You can eat showcase the work the client when you're ready going back to your e book for each team member. You include the primary responsibilities in review them daily weekly and monthly which seems like a lot but now that you've mentioned it you do need some sort of governance. DD recommend that people create some sort of governance in review it that frequently in terms of what should and shouldn't go out content wise. I think it really depends on your so So you know there's brands that Atlantic Grand Plan Mafia recommend planning more than a month ahead. Dennis streaky not real time at all. But I think he's really depends to your specific low on the way you build content but it's it's extremely important to do this. Type of analysis says like to look into Hoggart gains working and to audit everyone's responsibilities. What everyone is doing day today because that's GonNa give in strengthening people you have to have a clear understanding of what everyone is doing? This part of your entire arche effort. WHO's in charge of publishing? WHO's in in Georgia? The creative science charges strategy. And so on those committees have to be very well-defined because otherwise it was time you have a new person in we have some more than Li very cards. Just entire system. Auditing the way your team works and hopefully looking into your team works takes a lot of time you know. It's a big deep dives and time. Consuming disciples initiatives. If you don't do it you're not gonNA find bottlenecks. LX You're not gonNA understand. What are the issues that you have in your e able to truly seeks to improve your process tend to send was working and the more the more you accumulate what I call this operational debt? That means that it's GonNa be harder and harder for you to work together because because those issues are humiliating and this debt is increasing. Get to you need to do as early as you. The Angel how have you seen the plannable and its technology transformed. What's it before and after look Mike is brought into an organization? I love that question so I think before plannable a lot of the teams were using includes like a spreadsheet and emails and they had a lot of Mesh national tools of phone calls texts emails else. Bedsheets somewhere using trello somewhere using slacks more using Google Docs or Microsoft office tower using neutrally Whiteboards stickies on on a wall. You know a lot of meetings two meetings. I think those tools. It didn't work for them. That's they switched flammable and and made them more productive a lot of our clients answer stating that. They're saving percent of their time on those tasks that they are using and they're not stressed and overwhelmed as they were before her her. Everything is really really organized that radically year and they have more visibility on what's happening and communication has improved can occasion between themselves internally but also communication with their clients. They don't know inundated with emails. Taymor so I think things have changed a lot for some of the people that switched for Animal so what do you think think is next in the evolution of plannable in terms of technology. Because obviously any technology you have to keep or what are the next Maybe goals or things that you see maybe incorporating into the platform big all this just raise the productivity of marketers everywhere doing for social media content already but we want to move into law formats contents. I think that's the next step for US edition. Taking collaboration to the next level Dhingra during the FERRUGIA job with improving the way teams King members collaborate. You want to do that as a lightning speed. This is collaboration and content formats. Our two biggest goals were some of the big barriers that you hit when you go and try to pitch to people. Teaching is is hard but he has to do it allowed. This is a founder Yokich Pitching to to customers as well so he change change itself is hard people are used with the way they're working anything that's the biggest barrier to just make them understand that it's a problem and that we can really sold that problem that they might have not thought about this. He convincing people that have already identified. That problem in the works. Always stays consented. Solution is simple rights. Bring everyone on the same page. Engineers wants to go to those other chosen. You've been abusing but for those people that are you happy with their current workflow even if they we haven't identified that it's actually not their productive and think just shining some light dot. Problem is the biggest barrier here. Okay that makes sense. A lot of it is automated. Correct a lot of plans on made your technology. What aspects of content d think are are things that ought not be automated or automated? Think all the tedious mechanical tasks should definitely be automated identity. Creativity aspect of concert. Production can't be automated and at the moment and my personal personal opinion is that it. It shouldn't either. I think it's such a human base and amend based function the amputee the OC communication skills psychological aspect Or buildings like the cultural aspect of building content dined. I find it hard to be one day is going to be able to automate and that I can't imagine that in the next few decades AIDS and I don't even know if I wanted that research that was honestly a loaded question because that's what I wanna do to say there. You go these seeing some trends and content at UC happening better bitter exciting. Yeah I think He turned in on in in in our future Knowing it's probably nothing new for people during following chance but storytelling VR AR is probably you know one of the big transparent can happen in the future because it's just again creek very nurses its contents experiences. It really takes a lot of time to think about them. Invest Energy resources in producing experiences like that. We're probably not going to st those types of storytelling in yard stories. Having any time soon just because of the type of Requires Yeah and they're no more than the girl that are more in in overseeing Interactive Video Nets pioneering that with their shows Contracted you think it's GonNa take off once Just going to be more flexible to allow that in the end it's up to the platforms when we can produce live with us. There's obviously he has been surge in like the production the same you know with three hundred sixty Images and it just really up to the bathrooms two tickets fan Dan on those formats are emerging. But I think attracted Vigo's this is one of the the next ones are really gonNA conquered the space Khakbazan Here requires a lot of Structural contents to build ready personal experiences with chat bots. So so. That's already here. The LEGO case study where they created a chat bots to help parents choose the toys for Christmas for their kids. First first of all solving problems so parents can It's personal experience. Asking all those questions about your kids in order hard-edged help you select the right product. Those are very useful Type of of endure engaging content experiences that are already here. Here and then I hope more interactive video and maybe being the future of three ten weeks near maybe and UH. None of us will have time to work. We'll just be absorbing this content branded content so of all the changes you see in marketing a next year or two three to five years. All changes do marketing. What excites you the most and what concerns you the most? I think what excites me the most host and scares me the most at the same time is this deep deep personalization of content can have the effect of being very useful and very efficient where the end users. Because you're getting exactly what you need but at the same time in this queasiness effect dead you might get with the personalization. I think one one the trend for the Senate's for I've heard other people and I have the same concern. It's yeah and it just creates this burn we're GonNa play on your giving personalized content in debt. You're asking yourself. Where did he get the data? Just crazy Roya annoying around that. It's fun it's useful to it's creepy. Yeah Yeah thank you so much. This has been such a wonderful people treat me. I've I've learned a lot and enjoyed talking to you very much. Well thank you so much. Slow with the glass yeah..

robbery US founder Yokich Pitching Burbach Georgia Mark Dennis streaky Taymor Li Kim. Microsoft Senate Mike VR AR FERRUGIA Vigo
"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

14:29 min | 8 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Hey everyone this is Rudy Fernandez some creative outhouse. What a pleasure it was to speak with Zanny Moon on the CEO of plannable? It's a content review and marketing collaboration. Platform form. She had some sharp insights into how companies need to rethink how they get their social media content done. Let's face it. Social media can't continue to be handled in a loose way. Hi It's officially reached the grownup stage and requires the same type of processes in review is more established media and had some smart thoughts and solutions to that enjoyed her thinking and the conversation. You will to check it out. Welcome to marketing up evil. You're listening to marketing. People broken the marketing people. My guess is semi semion Montagne. Co-founder plannable a social media collaboration and approval platform for agencies in large France Hughes named in Forbes thirty under under thirty list for two thousand nineteen She frequently speaks about social media. Content trends including at cans. Sania is an expert on creating social W. programs and has a lot of insights into content distribution and collaboration. And how it could be better. So this is GonNa be a great conversation. Thanks for joining me. Well thank you so much inviting me. Ask while I'm excited to do this. Well I before we talk about plannable and socio content you had just I think an extraordinary the meteoric career. I think you started your first social media company when you're still university. I believe yeah that it wasn't agency so we're doing a lot of socially get content production for Branson. I started at during my second year in university. So you started in Moldova. Where you're from? Yes and then went to Romania and now it's just it's just taken off. Research is very much important. Yeah congratulations so do you find that your age is A benefit when you approach the new business. That's a good question. I think you know in the beginning has thinking that people are GonNa oppose more to talk with me because I'm very a young. I don't think it hurts anything because I'm building a software company social media marketers. They are young young as well so I think he's been better. I think it helps. Because we're on the same page. We drive to work in Microsoft. Alcohol aalto Canyon Micro says you know we can resonate with me at. That's right. I think the younger Generations have a much better handle on it. Yeah I agree. Yeah so tell listeners. Well plannable just so they know little bit more about the company with us. I started it. S You mentioned. After I had my own Social Media Marketing Agency and I started the company together. You get there with Michael Saunders. Because all of us work in the industry were frankly a bit frustrated with how everyone was working in in the industry for the people that are not very familiar with how social media content lanny happens. Usually you plan your content calendar contents editorial calendar other in spreadsheets spreadsheets. Woke sarongs in the entire team. And if you're an agency and you've got lands you're sending that spreadsheet to clients CI- on a distant back-and-forth happens on email. That is big a waste of time. It's not streamlined. At all it's very fragmented your keeping the assets for the content itself like the videos the GPS the the images itself keeping somewhere else. It can a Google drive folder. The jury broken. And it's not seamless. Work and a lot of timing is being wasted just by doing goal does tedious tasks like having to formats. That's spreadsheet having to call everything from that stretch it to like a scheduling tool. You know just trying to centralize all the baggage receiving receiving from everyone from your internal team but also from clients stakeholders and so it was not a pretty process and having grown up with Lake APPS MOBILE APPS it has beautiful design. Three good wine. You actually expecting something else. Your professional workspace. So I was trying trying to find something that was laboratories designed for teams. When I didn't find that then spoke with microphone while they were working in different against at the time and they have the same challenges we decided to plannable to? Joe Stats you. Empower marketers to be accepted and their day to day. WHOA so people design the content for various social media platforms for example and then Nat live somewhere on a cloud so that everyone has has access to it and see okay? This is the right message. That's wrong message. There's not a lot of back and forth to Holloway. Yeah Yeah Donegal is. The Iran is literally early on the same page in real time. It's just helps. Content creators in brand marketing team. Create everything quick older their content Visualize how those posts phase the fit. INSTAGRAM ARE GONNA look like in which is tasked that you know. This is like an internal joke. I I tell to every social media manager there I need everyone of us have a fake page where we go in there. We like mall Cobb. The social media posted planning to publish. Just make sure that it's GonNa look good dragged so I had this taste but baked back in my agency days. It was like could chance on published page of going in there. I was creating the post just to see how it's GonNa look like sometimes been taking shots sending it's my clients because they were asking the same stage sending ten in photoshop to mock it up. I was just going down the page so they danced. Hannibal at that Visual separation everyone can exactly the competition look like in the end. It can experience though. It's already lie so I think that's this. This type of accuracy and disability is crucial for efficient collaboration and then publish it in the ends to those social media channels. I imagine you Seeing your message spread across the different channels also helps you understand how it all fits together as a campaign helps a client as well. Well that's actually one of the other bands that's right because you can just see how everything ties together can make sure that it's cohesive at all make sense you know message message in it also helps you understand if you if you're not sending confusing messages across different channels else. It just helps you have more united brand. I take What are some common mistakes you think brands are making in terms of their content? In terms of consistency the head compost social media manages. The company has grown a lot in the past years it has become very very or attend function of the entire marketing mix. Yeah due to the fact that you have social media managers in different departments in different business units in different regions. They are all working across the world role. And you're not giving them a platform to work together on this invasion. You think that's one of the biggest mistakes because your morning. Some use socially. Yeah intern in there. They might not know the brand values tone of voice that you wish said thank thank being more secure with a distribution of content having some mechanism in place to ensure that your brand is safe dead. You're not Ghana boasts an empty black Friday weep Donald's dude a few years ago it banks insurance. Those kinds of safety safety mechanisms in place is extremely important and those that just mechanisms are in place for traditional media like TV commercials. Commercials are reviewed used so many times over and over again. There's no mechanism bag that for social because in the beginning it was is just a toy for marketers. It was nothing serious. You are getting to your ancient. There was no dedicated team so there was no workflow system no reviewing doing approval system over everything else there is for additional marketing there is platforms like plannable arena starting to cure because because now social media marketing has become so so so important for organizations that they need to improve the way their capricious. Yeah I hadn't thought of that but you're right a TV commercial for example is reviewed quite a bit and it's almost like social. The media has is growing up this natural process of of being a grownup medium and with social media..

Zanny Moon Rudy Fernandez Michael Saunders CEO Microsoft plannable arena Google aalto Canyon Micro Sania Ghana Moldova Romania intern Co-founder Hannibal Joe Stats Holloway Hughes
"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

12:04 min | 10 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Uh this episode is brought to you by our friends at voyager trading cryptocurrency can be tough not just talking about making smart crypto investments. I'm talking about really I lease slow loss of space and use roads segments crate and I said no no no I know I agree it's great but literally I do hoffy on chain police so I think we just had this experience where we built this entire startup on top of the chain that really wasn't role to sword thanks natively would would you say to the criticism was unrealistic and nation which is totally true yes so I mean so don't get me wrong for months I was like very because I just said why why can't why are we segment by solve these businesses Meyer sacrificing with an option These sort of like it felt like I mean I'm an engineer traded quote lake bike shedding a little bit why we're not doing this and it took me a long time understand that it is more important the show that we're resilient to pass than it is to support by coaching so whether whether or not we need security hundred that it's not it's not about whether you need a case and we paid for different pay on chain coffee morning I think for me it was I'm not saying humble pie that definitely might awesome that you all of it and realized like Okay maybe the store value ideas of censorship society is more important than thought it was mentioned serve as a turning point for you ought to this is twenty sixteen again I developed and seventeen it becomes clear that they're going to be a version disagreement after zip we're way and then all of a sudden nobody really need tension I and is this out in early August when when did you stars too the question is this is really interesting because you save what's the switch but just clear after touch Bitcoin we still never touched it sure but it instruments so so yes I so for me so I actually had evidence of using our service with novello action he's buying our coffees actually expect and And I think you know I think we just under protest honestly I just didn't even if you see something like that we won't ask please keep saying no I think it was I wouldn't send my attention shifted so much of a direction Paul very much like I was like oh you guys don't care about me he's case because it wasn't I think that I knew all of Bitcoin for work it was he's don't do this without an alternative lightning was ready at the call you know and you don't some people say it's not ready today I strongly disagree but but there wasn't announced this looking back if I had had the right mindset a little bit earlier we could have done like some really cool stuff came and chances along Congo and most of us would not have these issues like old have been a simple unilateral came at channel wallet and we had any issues but because we were so focused on and on the half and on chain we would look at it so it's like there's no reason to wait for lightning but you just you know you look at people complaining about like Coin Base funding credible of all these players you know what it's totally true most of the Ruben Kruger skill over time and the irony is that for all its loss Lee Icu Boo Salsa right allies soaps that whole mindset that so rosy Yeah I know you're not ninety nine percent ninety percents check percentage even the ship actually useful two and when you as as you about what as ditch shutdown fold we're not gonNA pay it was actually you know I was thinking about the time line my attention really shifting away January seventeen so I know Sirtzi craziness not leave hold phrases Louis Louis later in the year but we started to see think like I had I bought I bought some eat their way back when you know.

ninety nine percent
"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

20:45 min | 10 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Trading cryptocurrency can be tough not just talking about making smart crypto investments I'm talking about actually capturing your wallet have probably much easier people the problem I think we've been them while it's it was I don't want to call out depend on school job the non custodial today and next year as a payment network I see Arjun as a network of users great Dingo value a new book out an insurance system it's really what what we should tell you what is it high polka calls whether it's by one day long-term being more pain on so you're so you're competing purchase banks then you're competing with I would say more trading or trading products you're competing with is in Mexico so this this quite some room for a lady business it's a long long journey by game I area where you could see after aimed action visa what was the right way to think of Al so allieu after as as your users add new shirt report at you assets walls so I mean we've not been actor start to community is a thing what we want to be careful mistake over to grow a message User Base Trumpet in some thing is more value we can occur on top of the you could imagine a very straightforward maybe fixed rate savings account with an insurance company and deserve this should pay for that so if we do that yes we can take a of interest rate and being many users would go option it would still have the option to go direct to Eleni public whole and big always that's really up to us so giving users options that these parking orphans and Rhinos delighted to for best bill that's and also Dr Marquette's where the payment structure is not as a as we're used to in Europe or the US although Europe at things relating Haymond so you could send Nivo payment experience going to be taking merchant payment where you can be significant or lower cost than isn't mastercard because fraud and talk can be handled very differently when you have a good trafficky to trigger action so I think there's no partito subscription club there and industrial businesses Yuping Europe and and the US I used to subscription model view yet robbing gold with with subscription or Revolution Hormones Oh for twenty six so you can imagine the more conventional it's more pitcher maybe more bigger ones or three guys of trade just know this thinking here whereas users came on safety we pretty much much more advanced services or maybe user as you mentioned want presidency mentioned more premium services so you have a non-custodial while at which you pay monthly fee to really really gets an experience to scrape for your the law how do you switch to this there are other while there are other Secured Sodium This is something you're and there are is some benefits US mercy very all with regard to your users is that enough I is is security in Brasilia wallets really that much of a differentiator today or is it more about the attraction of away from some other Audrey said another way what are some of the competition actually help you to switch outward takes us to switch it can use things with you it would lease elsewhere so I I think the shock on Sir trying to get people to switch raid Arjun Asian is to enable users to this that's we were we grow obviously today we have on rampart level who are working on that you should assume that every user anything comes from another while that and recently so if you're not so we are working on that we're we're we're working with off nursery nipping online because that's obviously the only way to really oppress them so well that's our targets and so we I'll have released a g on making people switch we've seen the league with of deserve recently and let's probably not selling security you cannot send.

one day
"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

15:41 min | 10 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Uh this episode is brought to you by our friends at voyager using a leg rubbing who is the more bitcoin should just functionally speaking how our users able shoes Bernanke his over your wallet have no traditional Ashford of reaction is the reason why though third party it is missing oh how you track that key recovery so the way we should see how John You have your mobile those Akina from its star securely here but there is no fun at that so that key is the remote control to a slot unpacked created unchain consumers you're on your own I have no control that's one contract so then a protocol liberal without say we've defined what we call Dr Gets so you as an owner you can say I would trust he's other addresses to be gardens and the gardens just another type of Lizard within your song by the the only right that had is a six regularly that actions that's always if is my contract level then we can build anyone can vinnie critique what we have done we've built I would sit tation you can take other Arjun users friends colleagues at their own opposite on key and you say okay I would trust Liane to be my garden you can also be you on dog and other vices so you can have Haga well at night take a million dollars you can pick three hopper while at an auto and it's a majority of your garden is something I for recovery will so I argus that holds keys again the honor cheers on not the Chinga funds down at the speed of your key its own keys and you trust us through took her to act as a guardian and then the protocol defines all the rules are exemplary cooperate extra hours do need a majority of guardians older rules that and it feels like appropriate was repent when you tell what we what we did this read the same experience and utilizing your Wallet Calling Bank say Hey I lost heart send me a new one the difference in theory of choice you decide who you would trust who will act as this like event and be origin and your service with other device offense I supported acids right now therion here she compos is there obviously twenty seven point one other of an he's come to so any any really theory is where we're putting our energy right now and that's where we were focusing all aw give up an apartment judy this is a compliment or ero madness rate now what what is the uranium market right now so into nitrate amount of specific competitors we're using it I'm asking millions of us like it I think I think it's more an hospital to stay I think they've been doing a really good job we I think it's more the fact that in the we don't really segment the world heard me saying poking custodian custodial I didn't talk about cold Rodriguez upon we see Arjun fit or holding a hundred dollar or holding a million villar we may be different gardens setup was probably have on Lung Garden an indoor control rather than using from France so we general waitering practiced ops that's really one of our take being right now where you will use Arjun distort the money but also in practice other calls that component me that already native integrating Arjun also future in track your identity your luggage on any website a good likely would amass out where you see this going future kiss just e wallet that serves a valuable option but it doesn't seem to me like a very big visit Fraser will what are some of the applications that ultimately hope to track away and and what's the Roi Free user refusing Arjun versus Ozora JR or some other less often as we think so so I did that on your first question I I think it's actually stranger Okapi Cozy Wallet has maybe how many times I think that while it's the oh just place to go if you want to capture value owning their relationship and the trust of users is actually probably the most critical art disposal and needs while protocol can be squeezed because can park protocol is operatives some some great the effect but.

million dollars hundred dollar
Is WeWork's Business Model Viable?

Digital Business Models

12:17 min | 11 months ago

Is WeWork's Business Model Viable?

"Today we're going to look at the complex topic week which is easily work at viable business model be if you've been following. Actually the news lately you so that we work is pretty much anywhere and why. I don't like to cover things that really into the news because there is a lotta noise around. It's very hard to make sense of it there. Everyone when denning opinion like what's going on. I won't do really highlight. I flew points and really give respective again just because I think it is a lot of noise right now so St John's is a viable business model. It's not an for several reasons now. Let's go point by point to over a few things that we might want to look at when it comes to to we work now we work was at ease was a private company actually still a company that will strain to actually get a go through an IPO was trying to become a public company and the one thing which is interesting interesting is that we work adjust two thousand eighteen. According to several kinds of valuations at our company was worth more than forty billion dollars which which is a lot breath so now one question getting comes to mind Isa are we actually going through a private bobble in terms of private companies education because what's up rent now. It seems that at least in two thousand nineteen the company's got listed as they didn't manage to actually we have a successful appeals and actually manage to go to a really excitement of the market doc it around those companies now. What are the reasons behind it and you know when talking about companies that I feel I'm thinking about companies like Uber or lift or other. There are other companies that are really field this year now. The the the party said I mean look at the the we work financials the one thing that you know this race that of course company now but he arrived from two thousand eighteen eighty two to nineteen with talking about the first Amancio Manso year but this time he also improved. It's expensive quite substantially there things to take into account. If if we work was going to wipe with buzzy the numbers you can imagine that we wouldn't have oldies noise that that he's right now and one thing is also about timing timing timing. It's betty white important as you imagine it can really make or break a company and in in this year that there are the worry about recession that increasing freezing you you can imagine that for a company that could afford to actually go through an IPO without having a viable business model l. A. Becomes very hard when you go through a decision at his video especially when your primary customers are companies that actually are stuffed upset if we go through a decision would be the first companies to actually suffered from it. It's very important also delighted that we work as a really so you know improving its enterprise customers which we're getting that those might seek if we go through a recession but at the meantime on the other end if we think we interbike customers by be using we work as a really an expansion buckner so we'd ally on we work as enterprise company because we're trying to expand the operation with one free since I'm just thinking in terms of me me as a as a potential enterprise customer we work so instead of relying on internal resources and expanding geographically because he may be a recent too risky ASCII because then it becomes harder to to to to cat space and stuff we we use we work as a partner for so again imagine that if we both rotation diseases diseases. I sorta viable which will get cut so again recession. He's hard because for especially for a business model which hasn't proved viable yet yet. It's it's very hard another aspect that you know this when you go through the. We Work Appeal our attempt IPO because it was if you following the news right now you know that the company has withdrawn so far at least delaying the ideal so in might reconsider near enough in a few months things are stopped workout free since death thinking fire quite a quite a few employees but one thing that you know these when you go through a dealer of the as one which is the forum that companies as companies to meet when they after will probably could tell there to meet these form to the SEC has the Security Exchange Commission. What is that. There are a few quite a few buzzwords so so there are many things that we work is is doing that again if the company was a viable business model if we were in a timing where things were working properly. We were not going through are probably the people were not expecting a recession to come. Those things will be steep paths. I think again for many passwords you might use if on the other end you have Saudi auty business that there's nothing that can save you a if you look at the financial companies like starbucks that had somebody uses the buzzwords him in the culture of the company and in many cases companies themselves are caught who are really cultures. Really you know they really try to emphasize. This is when Bet Katcher dating. That's what makes them special even again. Companies are businesses that make money. They need to make money consistently so fittings things had come out to mind when we go to the one we worked. His first world. We work is trying to really redefine a new sort of model which is which combining goals space as now. If you know how commercial real estate works you know that usually what happens is that you ran an office our RSP's commercial space for your company and all you do is really you pay the rent and then free since the end of the year you might be the so called the Camman on Adia maintenance fees. which really are the shared the shared expenses that that the you know the lender the landlord might anticipate for for the commercial tenants? Annan's Gadiya switched. Dan can be spread for for the Commercial you know Florida Florida the the the people renting those commercial spaces at the end of the year depending on the kind of contract that you have of course you can pay the quote the pulmonary maintenance in different ways but again these these important for the landlord in which is a running business because he can actually get back a few of the of a did the expenses that he had on no commercial property and it can be also used as a leverage when you have a contract with a commercial tenant what happens is a union see something like okay. I'm going to reduce the KOMO Nadia maintenance fees. If you WANNA be free since then I amount of money now we were starting to redefine this space by actually adding more to it so that a a company sparked of the we were community that will be using the co working of a company actually would be a retainer so be a monthly Italy fee a subscription fee and that's where the space has a Saturday's comes to police now if we were also voted species said listen if this is. GonNa turn are now to be a viable model. I mean we we're going to look at it in in the instagram and I think it's fine you know people arguing whether accompany bunny can come up with these new analogy and just get we did. I think he can if he has a viable business model again here. The point these I is that the company is in bad timing and in these bad timing where we're going through a recession it's using up the bats words and it's not showing showing a viable business model because again those same words that we're seeing today that were used a back in two thousand sixteen seventeen when we work was considered one of the hottest companies around and valued over forty billion dollars. I think what's making huge difference. He's the fact that the company right now is a very bad timing go there are also that aspects like of the corporate governance had the fact that the recent the the the founder CEO Newman as been having a little control and managing teams out not transparently from from the way it was you know leasing space to the company and also the fact that the company Bunny at Bush's including each for technology company even though again we work a main attempt is really to form a commissioner real estate contract which usually again it's it's a it's simple contracting something which is more on on on Saturday space where you know it's common in software as a service speeds in all the other services industry that we have today in in the in the after throughout the Internet the area where you can just fight several kinds of surveys you leverage on data technology another savviest easiest to actually have have the company spot from being something on on a daily basis now aiding said. Did they really again another another keeping the thing it's about the addressable market where the company argues that had he said these these these market that which can be I think over over three years or something like that tight remember. The exact number is not the when he comes to this will markets cadets beak big question mark when Gumbiner essay these going to be these album is going to be the market in ready the how how do you even know because that depends many variables and you can be really sick as possible or you can dream big but hey at the end of the bench about how economy is going to evolve and you know. It's very a hard to predict so again. is we work a viable business model. It's not and it's not because is not showing yet a bottom line which which it's going to work. ability heats a it's really a bad timing where the company still using buzzwords in a time where you need to be more really sick we're going through and so there are more people which are skeptical about what's going on any future customer base which is made of startups of course the risk is that you're gonna be the you're going to be the first company which is GonNa four once the recession comes and then if you know we asked whether we work is a fraud. I mean if we look at the business itself. Of course it's real business if we city whether the numbers are if we rely on the numbers they gave plus in the financial statements with these these further not something that you know there's going to be an investigation or something things will will you know would would be figuring out right now. It's really understanding that when you don't have a viable business model and you're going through a recession and and you're keep using the male that you'll be using in the past to Pamper your valuation a private market which is less than spying compared to market reasoning to change your mindset need to make sure that you understand that probably market it takes a different approach Yuguang through our session unique understand the context so really for me. This is a lack of understanding on the context right now so that we went through recession understanding that at the same model that used used to get to a fifty billion dollars relation is not the same to actually keep their valuation and five there and that actually when you have a viable business model. It's very eddie easy to argue whether the company is going to work them much or more

Denning Starbucks Bet Katcher Dating Yuguang Fraud Partner L. A. Italy Komo Florida Florida SEC DAN Gumbiner Annan Founder Ceo Newman Security Exchange Commission Commissioner
The Founder/CEO of Inspired Living Talks Building Influential Brands

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

10:08 min | 1 year ago

The Founder/CEO of Inspired Living Talks Building Influential Brands

"Not gonna wait for someone to validate what i wanna do where who i am and feel like for so many of us extraordinary ordinary women. We wait for someone to tell us. We're good enough. We wait for someone to say you've got this. We wait for someone to say. Go do this instead of. I'm just saying i've got this in that that inner critic when you when when you made that switch right i mean you had that inner critic showing up. I'm certainly uncertain. It's like it's okay. I'm gonna i'm not gonna do this anymore but this is this <unk> that you made. How did you really hush that the inner critic and step into it anyway. You know i think because i lost it all i had nothing left to lose. I had people saying horrible things about me i i had you know my what i felt my reputation. My ego was crushed to as you get older. At least i'll say hey you know i stopped caring so much a mode other people think and i was more on fire about sharing message than i was being perfect and what i look gleich and i feel like when women come to me and they can really make that shift and realize that to make the impact you're here on this earth to make take you have to be willing to let go of eko and that the women out there that we that we feel are leaders and visionaries generes and and you know leading great movements never once is at about what they look like you don't look at oprah who was told by the way she does not have face as i say oh you know what i listened to her. If she looked like this or he or she she'd be so much more successful. If people fall in love of assault not faces cami love you for that yes because when we when we just show up authentically as who we are instincts can start to shift for us right. Yes and that's <unk> sounds like what you did right. It's like i'm not going to be in that room full of bikini clad models anymore. I want to go be me in your own business then yet the third business but there is v i have to tell you it has been the most fun the most successful the most liberating i asked. I was a single mom for three years. You know it's like i just i really single mom in the mix of all of this like me. I got pregnant at at forty four so my daughter's four now so molina last year. Have i been in this beautiful relationship. I mean it's been in two years but we lived together for the last year <hes> and it was you know i moved out there so inspired living at that time was is growing tremendously and i figured out i'm having a baby. How am i. I have no family around me. Let's do this but it but i have to say it it made me even stronger and my message even clearer and my vision even more bright and yet i was so scared scared of what other people would think of me too so it's <hes> i'm not gonna say. I have a steel wall around me because i'm human but i feel like you kinda get over or yourself and i know who i am and i know that if you don't like me it's okay. You don't have to buy into what i'm doing because i have the right people that do now right so you teach people how to release show up authentically in their business and you call it the it factors that s. so tell us more about that going up entertainment. I swear to god. I heard that word all the time. Oh yeah did she have the it factor yes and and then i remember when i own the agency we had these open calls which every month people could come in and audition for the agency and cami. It was so funny because i really we saw this it factor at play where someone would come into the room as clean as could be right no resume no experience and man they had equality about them that was just captivating and it had nothing to do with what they look like. You're so right and so i remember hearing this. It word and i feel like we all have it like. I get asked all the time you know. Is it something you're born with or. Is it something that's developed. I think it's both i think some people are in just born with this natural <unk> qua- this spirit that you're drawn to i feel like other people can work through the the limiting beliefs and fears that keep them. I'm from shining and ignite it and that's where my training is called. Ignite your factor because when you really understand who you are and i feel like most of us. Don't take take time to figure that out cami. I would say probably ninety percent of people on the planet. I love where you're taking this because i'm just going to throw this in here. You're going to check out this so i talk about building your brand from the inside out so it's like who are you at your mary essence. How do you build your brand from the inside out and my book is called fired answer so there's is the fire were originally yes in. My event that i do in november is called ignite. Girlfriend are literally soul sisters here yes we we are aligned. Yes i couldn't agree with you more. You know it's like yes. You wanna look great. You wanna feel great like i teach people how to dress. You know how to do their makeup. All of those thanks but that is just it's just icing on the cake the cake scott to be good by itself and you have to love the recipe you have to love putting it all together and so it it really is all of that and it's so much fun. It is so much fun when in in seeing the transformation that these women have and it's like oh my got i finally have permission. I finally get it. I in that is just fire right there just so excited and so we work with them yes on what he thinks of the camera he says is our for finding that transformation i get. I think it's a bit of inner knowing. I think it's acceptance. I think it's really realizing what you're great at and not being ashamed or or feel bad when you say i. I'm really good at this. I think women have this tendency should not ever wanna toot their own horn. I can't stay on this. A guy will call him america's best any day right the guy out there and then i also i think so it's it's an inner process for sure but then i think also when you start really seeing the results that you have other people get and you do that enough. There's just the confidence that comes with that where i mean. I have no doubt about it. We're really great of what we do. We're actually pretty or amazing what we do and because i it's proven it's true i've seen it over and over again and i think that sometimes when people are starting a business. They lack confidence because they haven't done the r._n._d. They haven't seen the the results yet and they're still trying to find the message or find the client and i think once you do that and you see a track record of success. Those two things that inter knowing acceptance and then results are so powerful. That's awesome. That's awesome. So is your business. It primarily focused on video or is there. Is there more expansive as tommy. Tell me a little bit about that. Oh it's so much more significant people come into and do us for the video day like that's the front door of our home writing as they come in for like the video training right what we often find cammie when people come into the house is is that they have built a business that is sustainable. They're often working-time for dollars. They're still doing everything on their own. They're so fearful to get support and again. I have been there. I have that t shirts. No we have we comes. We have to cut two tracks in our business. We have have the in front of the camera and then we have behind the scenes you cannot be amazing on camera and put yourself out there and not be able to scale and have systems in automation and teams or you vice versa. You can't have all the systems and team and have no one coming into your business because you're not found anywhere right so it really is this beautiful center g. and and cross kind of like building of the outward and the inward. Yes people don't come to us for that. We don't market that side of the business so much because so many people are already doing that. Were very specialized on. I like your model a lot because is it is break people in in in that front door but it's it's it does take all of that to be able to bring <hes> wholeness to a business sustainability lead to a business right exactly and can i say that most people are trying to market too much. You know i think because women were so multifaceted multi talented i. I'm not kidding one of our clients who i love to death. She came to us as a celebrity event planner iraqi healer and a yoga instructor and i'm like what in her and her site. You couldn't even figure out what she did really like. What how do you market yourself. Like what are you how does one into the other and this and that and i feel like that's kinda. Rare people come to us. Look like here's the whole plate and people just don't even know if they wanna bite yet you know and i think that especially because they're so much content right now in there so how many people online you have to be able to uniquely differentiate yourself and i find that when people come to us they're so afraid to niche down mike mike but that's the only way you'll grow out. I don't know if you say that because nobody tony i mean that's people who are trying to be too many things to you know to to many different people and egypt. You just can't be all of that we can't you can't add good message. You can't have good connections. You can have real strong teachings. If you're if you're too many things to too. Many people and people can't say to you don't know if you're talking to them. You know confused. Mind will never buy so stop confusing think

Oprah Assault Mike Mike Molina Egypt America Scott Sustainability Lead Cammie Instructor Ninety Percent Three Years Two Years
"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"He he is the founder CEO project veritas and I don't know I think this is a bait probably there's there's going to be a lot of fallout for this you know sixty three thousand searches on Google per second I mean that that is insane yeah Google's ad revenue amounted to almost ninety five point four billion dollars he and wife just the year or twenty seventeen alone you know Google loans two hundred other companies you know they have twenty seven percent of the share of the global email client market when is a massive company and you know you look at that and then you say well okay well now they're going to censor content a conservative is not going to decide not to run things a politically that they disagree with that's a problem yes I mean John indigenization reinforce several times Google's imperative to quote prevented xtram situation quote prevent it from happening again quote being ready for twenty twenty by training algorithms for a different outcome using machine learning fairness I mean it sounds like something from nineteen eighty four thank you for wasn't just the year I was born this great book by George Orwell I mean it's just it's just shock the conscience of the end and when we got a week we got of tickets that's what they're doing I think the question is you don't really get any attention to to the people I don't know what Congress is gonna do trump presidency people I think that the next thing that needs to happen is more people needs to come forward project dot com slash brave and there at times at proton mail dot com if you're on the inside if you want to be a patriot if you want to tell stories I mean people are not going to New York Times The Washington Post John that they're coming they're coming to project veritatis now so we have a responsibility to keep informing people about what their intentions are as it relates to twenty twenty right these videos we have posted exclusively apparently they can't take them off handedly dot com or project tosses website but apparently it's off of you too but other places as well but you got to watch him for yourself and you're saying that now you have a lot of other insiders a Google reaching out to use so I would expect is going to be more follow up in the days and weeks ahead yeah we're we're releasing some more documents here imminently today about some censorship and there are some people to reach out to one side by looking at some of the messages right now shop with it again I just want to remind your audience they've taken us off YouTube you take us video red bandana this is the moment it's it's all happening I don't think they'll be able to silence us I think that that the fight is gone to public to hide and it's all happening now nothing's going to stop we're gonna keep exposing the truth I thank you Sean for for being one of the first people out there to push the story and and and thank you for your for for helping us exposes truth Odjick veritas the CEO and founder James okay thanks for putting in neck out there as usual when we come back Jonathan and Danielle they'll weigh in on this crazy lunatic debate last night don junior weighs in on that and his brother Erik literally spit in the face in a restaurant in Chicago we'll get to that and how the rest of the family's.

founder CEO project four billion dollars twenty seven percent
"founder ceo" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Is the founder CEO project veritas and I don't know I think this is they probably there's there's going to be a lot of fallout for this you know sixty three thousand searches on Google per second I mean that that is insane you know who rules ad revenue amounted to almost ninety five point four billion dollars in what just the year or twenty seventeen alone you know Google loans two hundred other companies you know they have twenty seven percent of the share of the global email client market when is a massive company and you know you look at that and then you say well okay well now they're going to censor content a conservative is not going to decide not to run things a politically that they disagree with that's a problem yes I mean John maintenance should I say she reinforced several times Google's imperative to quell prevented xtram situation quote prevent it from happening again quote being ready for twenty twenty by training algorithms for a different outcome using machine learning fairness I mean it sounds like something from nineteen eighty four nineteen eighty four was just the year I was born this great book by George Orwell I mean it's just it's just shock the conscience the end and when we got a week we got him to confess what they're doing I think the question is you don't really give ammunition to to the people I don't know what Congress is gonna do trump says gonna sue people I think that the next thing that needs to happen is more people needs to come forward project there are times dot com slash brave and there at times tips at proton mail dot com if you're on the inside if you want to be a patriot if you want to tell stories I mean people are not going to the New York Times The Washington Post John that they're coming they're coming to project veritatis now so we have a responsibility to keep informing people about what their intentions are as it relates to twenty twenty right these videos we have posted exclusively apparently they can't take them off handedly dot com or project tosses website but apparently it's off of you too but other places as well but you got to watch him for yourself and you're saying that now you have a lot of other insiders a global reaching out to use so I would expect is going to be more follow up in the days and weeks ahead yeah we're we're releasing some more documents here imminently today about some censorship and there are some people to reach out to us I've I'm looking at some of the messages right now shop with it again I swear remind your audience they've taken us off YouTube they will you take us video red bandanas this is the moment it's it's all happening I don't think they'll be able to silence us I think that that the fight is gone to public to hide and it's all happening now nothing's going to stop we're gonna keep exposing the truth I thank you Sean for for being one of the first people out there to push the story and and and thank you for your for for helping us exposes truth Odjick veritas the CEO and founder James okay thanks for putting in neck out there as usual when we come back Jonathan and Danielle they'll weigh in on this crazy lunatic debate last night don junior weighs in on that and his brother Erik literally spit in the face in a restaurant in Chicago we'll get to that and how the rest of the family's been treated ever since they his their father decided to run for president.

founder CEO project four billion dollars twenty seven percent
Fear

Go Beyond Disruption

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Fear

Networking For People Who Hate Networking

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:41 min | 1 year ago

Networking For People Who Hate Networking

"It's not what you know. It's who you know, like most cliches, it's popular because it highlights and important truth, but it's partially false. Look, there's no doubt that who you know matters. We have decades of evidence that the right connection can get your foot in the door for jobs promotions and board seats, but the mere thought of networking can stop us in our tracks. This was true in one experiment, where some people are asked to think about making friends at a cocktail party, while others imagine trying to make professional connections. Afterward the one to envision networking felt dirty to the point that they actually rated soap and toothpaste more positively and research shows that no one really mixes it mixers. Anyway, we might plan to meet new people usually end up hanging out with our old friends. So how should you think about developing your network? You don't have to start by building your contact list. You can start by building your skills because having expertise to share sets you up to connect with interesting people just ask Pasia. My name is page. Mine ark landed three miles from here. San Carlos seven hundred dollars bucket when he came to the US from Iran in the nineteen ninety s he barely knew anyone. I didn't know what to do. I think the only thing I knew I was in love with the girl in Iran. And I thought I'm gonna lose her. So I should call her every day. So this is nine hundred ninety two I had to have this bag of quarter everyday going to pay phone, and it was like three or four dollars per minute. So I spend the whole seven hundred dollars in like two three weeks. He started working in California car wash. And then in a yogurt shop relived in the attic to save money. You couldn't walk stand up because it was short no air novato one night. While watching a Persian TV channel he signed for a high end rug gallery within a couple days, he visited the shop and talked. Way into a job. I work seventeen years ten hours a day. Six days a week today. Pitchman knows a lot about rugs. But he spends most of his time in a different career. He's now a successful venture capitalist in Silicon Valley the company's he's invested in our worth over thirty billion dollars. How did page mongo from selling rogues to investing in startups? It has to do with the power of building your expertise. Perriman was selling rugs and Silicon Valley in the early nineties, right? As the internet boom was happening which gave him a chance to meet some pretty important people. My customers are founder CEO of tech company. Venture capitalist lawyers bankers, and I build a close relationship with them. He built these relationships talking about rugs all day long sharing his insights in his showroom much like

Perriman Silicon Valley Iran San Carlos Novato California United States Founder CEO Seven Hundred Dollars Thirty Billion Dollars Seventeen Years Two Three Weeks Four Dollars Ten Hours Six Days
No Plans Of Leaving: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Fires Back At Critics

CNBC's Fast Money

03:55 min | 1 year ago

No Plans Of Leaving: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Fires Back At Critics

"So you're not stepping down this chairman. That's not the plan. That's not the plan would anything change that. I mean. Like eventually over time. I mean, I'm not going to I'm not going to be doing this forever. But, but I certainly not currently thinking that that makes sense. That was Hayes CEO Mark Zuckerberg standing his ground on CNN last night amid the controversy surrounding the company, but it's not just sucker brook who's been fighting back. The stock has actually rallied in the past two days. Even as a broader market saw red so quick this mean the worst is over for the company. Karen, yes. Well, I hope so because I am long the stock kudos Tim who's been reading a lot of editor on that topic. I think I think Mark Zuckerberg is the right person to lead them out of this. And when I think about other CEO's that have been able to, you know, really take some punches but turn around. Oscar Munoz was only ten or eleven months ago, we were all pretty negative on Oscar Munoz and his ability to lead. United Airlines turned it around Steve Jobs, the most famous probably right left, the company came back. And now look at apple one sixty could have been to thirty but whatever and then Howard show. So I think this kind of founder CEO not Oscar Munoz, but is is really important to the business. Plus you can't vote him out. Right. He owns Dunkelberg, quote about this is a real board though. Right. They don't have some it's out a tesla kind of bored. But that that must controls. This is a real board. I know you've got Ken Chenault, an Erskine Bowles and Susan. Desma hellman. This is a real board. So I would be very very very concerned if they kicked him out very, I don't think that should happen at all. I liked that the stock is rod in the last two days, the valuations very cheap. I think earnings will come down for sure. But that's in there. Mark Zuckerberg may be the CEO and may be there forever because there's voting share structure, but these are these comparisons really comparable only because right now, the company is facing potential legislation regulation that would change the way their core business fair for business operates. I'm so so let's say let's say Starbucks for some reason lawmakers were infuriated by how they brewed their coffee and said, you gotta be this x y and z to you know, to make sure that the caffeine contents not is not too high or whatever I mean, doesn't that sort of change that will change the model somebody I mean? Radha moment where you're thinking is the model going to change the motto could change, right. That could happen. I mean think about Microsoft facing a multi year antitrust the motto could change here. This is not a crazy price for this business. Even if it is chopped up. I don't even know exactly what the best way to do that would be. But you know, the multiple is not high the cash is enormous the businesses still very solid business with I understand the margins are coming down, but still significant margins here. So, you know, but you wonder when crisis management, I mean, this stock is crashed effectively. I mean, if you look at it, we can say what we want. But it's it was two hundred and five dollars stock six months ago straight in one hundred thirty seven dollars. Now, that's pretty significant move. And then when you have the Mark Benny off of the world calling it basically making a comparison to nicotine, that's a real problem. So I don't think most Zucker Brooks made himself a lot of friends, and I think people coming out of the woodwork now to take shots. I just think that this. This is a crisis of trust. I think it's, you know, here's let me say something positive about Facebook. They're not alone. But I do think that Facebook whose core product is being held into question is being singled out the most. And I think they should be when I consider corporate governance, and I think about how people should be thinking about a stock which core product is been at risk this entire time. And they haven't disclosed that to us. I think this company deserves a bigger beating I think also investors need to start evaluating companies Naveh different investment metric in their toolbox to be assessing cyber risk at companies, especially technology company.

Oscar Munoz CEO Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Ken Chenault Zucker Brooks Chairman Desma Hellman CNN Starbucks Apple Steve Jobs Mark Benny Karen Microsoft TIM United Airlines Hayes Editor
Amazon raises minimum wage to $15 for all US employees

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:01 min | 2 years ago

Amazon raises minimum wage to $15 for all US employees

"Now Amazon we made this announcement yesterday after they made their announcement that they're going to raise the minimum wage for its US employees to fifteen bucks an hour. That's a move that could force other big companies to follow the on. Online retail giants lead. Amazon also said it's going to push congress to increase the federal minimum wage, which by the way is currently seven dollars and twenty five cents an hour. So compare that to what Amazon's paying company has been under pressure to pay its workers more, and it's founder CEO Jeff Bezos, he said yesterday, we listened to our critics we thought hard about it. And what we wanted to do. And we decided that we want to be the leader whoever. Amazon also be raising salaries because with unemployment low companies are having a lot of difficulty finding workers. Amazon said the move will benefit more than three hundred and fifty thousand employees arly employees are already making fifteen dollars an hour. Well, they'll get a raise to about that. So the national the national minimum wage the federal minimum wage seven dollars and twenty five cents an hour compare that to what Amazon

Amazon Ceo Jeff Bezos United States Congress Founder Seven Dollars Fifteen Dollars
SEC suing Elon Musk for securities fraud

24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

SEC suing Elon Musk for securities fraud

"There's something new for Wall Street to think about regarding the founder CEO and public face of tesla. Securities and Exchange Commission accuses Elon Musk of misleading. Investors with his infamous, August, seventh tweet about taking tesla. Privates and is pushing for his removal and a news conference which would have received far greater public. Attention. Had it not been for the hearing on supreme court nominee Cavanaugh yesterday. The SEC alleged Mosk suggested the four hundred twenty dollars per share price for taking tesla private because it's a reference to

Tesla Elon Musk Securities And Exchange Commis Founder Ceo Cavanaugh SEC Mosk Four Hundred Twenty Dollars
Tesla, Bloomberg and CEO Elon Musk discussed on Bloomberg Markets

Bloomberg Markets

00:11 sec | 2 years ago

Tesla, Bloomberg and CEO Elon Musk discussed on Bloomberg Markets

"Day at tesla to top executive bail, founder CEO Elon Musk is seen on video puffing. Putting sipping whiskey during the two and a half hour long podcast interview with comedian Joe Rogan, Gordon

Tesla Bloomberg Ceo Elon Musk Joe Rogan CEO Greg Jarrett Gordon Johnson Director Executive Founder Eighty Eight Dollars Nine Percent