35 Burst results for "Founder And Ceo"

The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

Code Story

02:10 min | 10 months ago

The Creation Story of Bounce With Co-Founder, CEO Cody Candee

"Outsourcing network of local businesses all around the world big cities we operate different services inside of these businesses for the main one where the bulk of bounce is all around luggage storage. When you're traveling. Now let's check in check out day. You might have all your things in place to keep them with. Bouncy can open our app or a website and find a place to go and leave your thanks for the day the businesses that we work with make extra revenue off that after traffic and travellers all day of their vacation or business travel or whatever it. Is we see leaving golfer. Events wilson launched another product this year package acceptance rate on top of our existing network. You can send your packages to about slow pitch and help with traveling or if he lives in a city doorman i can't be around. Two receivers earned delivery so yeah sorta long-term and we'll be building bounds to help these small businesses make more money and then on your side we exist to basically keep people from not having to plan their days around there things anymore so luggage storage package. Acceptance tools will add more in the future in two thousand fourteen. I was working in san francisco. Some friends some co workers in the scrap. Some drinks after work. Someone said i'm going to join. But i'm gonna go all the way home. I drop off my bag and being minimalist that i am. You know living by this lawsuit that you're thinks she hold you down. I thought crazy how common it is for people to literally go way out of the way to plan the whole evening around there. Things spend extra money on taxis or the ubers and yeah it's crazy. So how can we solve problem. That night i was far. And i took the back of a menu. And we're just like writing all radios that came to my head including inbound that first day and the big vision is can we build a cloud computing infrastructure for the physical distributed storage everywhere. I mean you go with your thanks to you

Wilson San Francisco
Different Methods for Structuring Teams in an Agency

The Tropical MBA Podcast

02:20 min | 10 months ago

Different Methods for Structuring Teams in an Agency

"I think dan if i was agency today i would hire a bunch of specialized people. I don't think i'd hire jack-of-all-trades you know. One of the common positions that people come to us and asked us to help them hire is an operations manager because it's kind of last holdout. Most founders are like the operations manager. They are the person that holds it all together. They're kind of the hub in the middle of this wheel and then they have all these spokes so the most sincerely hey. I'm kind kinda pulling the team together. Like i have all these contractors. But like i really need to go out and do something. Higher value generally as business development or sales so. I need somebody to come in here and do this operations role. One of the things. I think is interesting. Is this concept that was brought up in the forum and spin written a lot about on the web is are you going to have a hierarchical structure or a pod structure and of course there's like overlap between what the two things are but typically a hierarchical structure would have that founder. Ceo and then the operations manager. And then say you'd have an seo group with like the top seo person and then you know seo assistant number one number two and there'd be these sort of this hierarchical management of all the seo in the company goes through this like seo lead and then there's this alternative concept of pods where you have like an seo person designer. A sales lead all in one pod and then that pod manages a certain number of clients and at least for us as like bootstrapping a relatively new service business. We've only been sewing recruiting services for twelve months. The pod concept really resonated with us both from strategy perspective. You look at what you're able to charge for your service and then you say okay. Well you know ballpark. I'm trying to get my labor cost to less than thirty percent of what i'm delivering the service for so that you know. Have a margin leftover after all your expenses of executing the service and so then you figure out like what that fraction analyzed pod is going to be and you try to get your costs there and this is the way you can sort of brainstorm new businesses. So i think it's kind of interesting if you look at like a traditional agency you'd say like a recruiting agency say all right. Well i sold this to a client. Now i'm going to have a recruiter. Do all the work and like day cost this and so your rates are going to be a lot higher than if you had this cross functional pod that can essentially split up the work and do it for multiple different clients.

DAN Jack
eComm's False Equivalency For CCPA & GDPR With GetEmails Founder/CEO Adam Robinson

MarTech Podcast

02:40 min | 11 months ago

eComm's False Equivalency For CCPA & GDPR With GetEmails Founder/CEO Adam Robinson

"For anybody who is new to the podcast and hasn't read the hundreds to thousands of pages of regulations. Walk us through the cliff notes. Version of what. Those two pieces of regulations actually say. So they're both about disclosure to the consumer of data that's being collected about them. They're both about setting up infrastructure that allows the consumer to see that data setting up infrastructure that allows the consumer to have that data deleted. And that's kind of above all else the spirit of both of them by the way marketers. I'm sure shake their heads. The sort of ops people the way that all of that was decided by the governments that it had to be achieved. It's just huge infrastructure pains in the acids right so everybody went through that. Gdp are and a lot of the stuff that you had to go through on that side of things on the disclosure side of things was the same for ccpa where there's a big difference is gdp. Art is actually a consent for first party data collection on the internet policy. Meaning it's opt in period in order for anyone to collect data on a european citizen. You must have a first party. Opted to collect it to use it what that is simply not the case with. Ccpa in cpr in cpr is just like the second sort of evolution of cpa is not in optimum for data collection policy. It is opt out policy. The consumer has the option to opt out of you collecting their data. But it doesn't touch. This issue of optimal marketing does not touch this issue of opt in to sort of have my data shared. It doesn't touch that stuff at all so listening to what our service does which we basically pass our customers plain text emails of people that visited their website but didn't fill out a form. A very common reaction is while. How is that legal in the weeks. Explain that is legal. I can't spam sanderson people say well it's definitely not ccpa compliant well. It actually is if you make the appropriate privacy policy changes on your website for most people what they did to be compliant with gdp are suffices in by the way. I'm not a lawyer so this is not legal advice. But the biggest difference between the two and the biggest confusion. I see people making is the assumption that since gdp are is opt in in ccpa is the gdp are the us. We have to do the same things that we did for judy. Pr we may not have made the changes for for us audience. We have do the same things for our. Us partner website. It's just not true.

Ccpa CPA Sanderson Confusion Judy United States
The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

Code Story

02:30 min | 11 months ago

The Creation Story of THRV With Founder & CEO Jay Haynes

"Jj haines has always been interested in tech just like his dad in nineteen seventy nine. His dad bought and brought home an apple two plus though he was using it for his business to do spreadsheets. Jay began writing code so he could play video games for free riding his games and basic. It's worth noting that this was back when you had to pay a quarter to play video game. His dad was a navy pilot and hobbyists sailplane flyer which j. flu as well even to thirty thousand feet in the air as he says he got grounded as soon as he got married and had four kids early in his career. J. got into finance and quickly became familiar with using debt to get equity returns however he was always interested in the core innovation of why customers buy new products and why they switch throughout his career his time at microsoft schooling start obliged etc. He found out that no one really had the secret sauce innovation. He started evaluating new ways to do it and came across the jobs to be done theory which became the foundation to what he's built. Today this is the creation story of thrive at thrive we build enterprise product management software for product teams are software is built from the ground up around methodology known as jobs to be done and jobs we don in its very simplest form. Is the idea that your customers are actually not buying your products. What they're doing is hiring it to get a job done. If you're on a product team and you want to create a product strategy and a product roadmap that is going to be successful. meaning it's going to generate more customers and it's gonna get customers to switch from your competitors to your product to build that kind of product strategy you should think about your markets in terms of the job. Then you're costumer is hiring your product to do rather than just your product in your features. We mentioned music before. Because i view on eight tracks cassettes cds. What's interesting about that. Market is a great example. Job done so the job. There is to create a mood with music. That's what we're doing whether you're using a record seedier streaming service or string quartet you're trying to create a mood with music and that job is the same. It's never gonna change. So the power of the method behind our software is it gives teams stable target to aim at and try and

Jj Haines JAY FLU Navy Apple Microsoft
Maed in India Founder/CEO, Mae Mariyam Thomas, Breaks Down India's Growing Podcast Market

Podcast Movement 2021

01:28 min | 11 months ago

Maed in India Founder/CEO, Mae Mariyam Thomas, Breaks Down India's Growing Podcast Market

"In the last five years podcast growth has been on an upward trajectory and twenty twenty alone podcast apps like spotify ghana and gio salvin saw a forty two percent increase in time spent on their platforms. But what kind of parkas are in listening to well. Most media people in india no the basic. Abcd astrology bollywood cricket and devotion. And not that. It's very different in podcasting. But some of the most popular genres are definitely spirituality and religion sports particularly cricket india is also a nation that loves storytelling. So sean ras like romance and crime and mystery also. Draw an active listener base. Now podcast listening also has a relatively young audience. Geo salvin released a podcast advertising playbook last year that said that ninety two percent of their listenership was below the age of thirty five. Their playbook also said that they're streaming incites suggests that podcast listening is a companion activity. Where it kind of takes place throughout the day. Two and five listeners stream shows while doing household chores one third listen while working one and five while driving or commuting and there is also data that shows that people are listening to podcast just before they go to sleep.

Gio Salvin Sean Ras Cricket Geo Salvin India Ghana Bollywood
"founder ceo" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Some flowers at united is if people who the games the game because negi masters are they right the dungeon rienzi the game the roots of play some of these game. I'm not very fond of the for me. But then drive-ins we have the rules of the game master. Recall the playmate girls or facilitators. Happen at right. So the integration with the community that has the games has a community of people around the games. That's super important. So i'm looking forward to getting the feedback from people. The original doing on the school. Golden the product managers are perfect. Fateful boats blame the role of the playmaker. And i'm sure that a lot of them right now getting excited thinking okay. This is really cool. But you know my see. Us z. or going to be an cutting the show. It's what would be the guy. Can we get a queen. How can they help at least adopt some of these best practices so other members of the team can get body right away without having to overstate this to the cfo. To sign a contract will are allows for that. We can get started by building up the thing. Especially if you are part of the bronx community ask someone loves someone to could you sort it and the real with is like yeah. We have this set up a ha moment. How building moment. In our awarding our growth mullen and the realities like we always. I would say to people like recurring revenue comes after regarding imbibed and comes after recurring boarding. So i'm here company. Want to make money the number run right. We are them really or gypsy will say so. Right now is like we need Formation so we are changing brightening budgeting to allow for removing friction in the beginning. When it comes to financials to make sure that you go to that moment and how it formation because in are software why as far as we call it up with that coming to mural more properly super copy some years are being and then they drop and it does all of the project and it's another the bridging. We didn't do a good job of showing all of the other used as neuro for i. So we're getting better at that and that we want to give stations to our our folks so that then it could be the Then once used these three four times per month as a theme gear about wiki active deep work week once per week deep. It's really easy to make his case for riley bit ibm economic impact report because like a bunch of actors our gays after a bunch of brain in but of course we did a bring bergen him but i regard run yes. Tonight's other but thank you for being the show dreaming big with us. It's really fascinating to follow your journey. Remember many years ago when we met. We're talking about some of this note of my growing the mold growing terrible. Well let's give billy the future Thank you so much for your time. Thank you for listening to the product. Podcast if you'd like this episode don't forget to leave a review on i tunes for more product incites head over to product school dot com..

negi mullen united Us riley bergen ibm billy
Trying Trends and Investing in Staple Furniture Pieces That Aren't Boring

MAKE SPACE — A Home Design Show by Never Skip Brunch

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Trying Trends and Investing in Staple Furniture Pieces That Aren't Boring

"And getting new six quick tips for furniture. Purchases with no regrets. Okay so furnishing her home can totally be a process. Usually start somewhere between hand-me-downs in ikea and you work your way into three pieces and box stores and then you might end up learning your lesson on where to splurge and save and start investing in some higher end or custom pieces. So i'm going to share some tips to hopefully make navigating this process easier. No matter where you're at tip number one splurge versus save is as easy as trend versus timeless. So when should you buy an expensive piece of furniture that has the look want versus invest in something that might last you a really long time. You should do both so some pieces in your house are going to be pieces. You use all the time in love for years while others are gonna look outdated sooner so an example might be a couch that comes in a neutral color classic silhouette that lasts you years when you swap out things like pillows and throws to keep it looking fresh but then other pieces like a coffee table or an accent chair might be really trendy and they could start to feel dated sooner so the simple solution is to spend your money investing in pieces that will last an opt for cheaper or thrift options for the items you might find yourself swapping out more often either because the style changes or the needs in your space change so when i say you know classic pieces like you're looking for something to invest in classic. I don't mean just traditional style of furniture stuff. That's boxy like boring. I mean things that have stood the test of time. And there's tons of different eras of design that have done this from mid century. Modern art deco to farmhouse to all kinds of styles. That basically have occurred once in history have been brought back in various ways in their things that if you love them they are

Ikea
Older Adult Independence with Carlos Montero-Luque, Co-Founder & CEO at Huginntech

Outcomes Rocket

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Older Adult Independence with Carlos Montero-Luque, Co-Founder & CEO at Huginntech

"A little bit about hugging attack and how the business you're building is adding value to the consumer and the healthcare ecosystem. Yes so a little bit about the the name of the company. It's a cool back right. I love. I love your share it so it's back from hugging which is one of the ravens that brought news to about all the in biking salt and the idea was that you know we looking for ways in which remote us or remote members of family units and actually being involved with their loved lots regardless of additions time songs how our lives are salt with we built this a bathroom or howie and how he also has a discharge are we. I'm from that concept. The notion of an extended family in hawaii which is not just the blood relatives but also a community or acidic earth's and that involves carrying for each other and in this case the purposes mentioned the health and independence. Some older adults. Who are meeting along or stalls but But they have the unit of the community that would to be better part of of their lives so it might case for example. My parents live in staying in boston for new years. So three thousand miles away sister lived in brussels. Now's losing else again. fire way. My brother was the one who's also medical doctor. He was the one black sleep care their health and supported them more. Even though we are a very loving family we're very close together etc so as we saw at. We don't see that there's a real solution that helps families integrate collaborates in non effective ways of bryce care to be out of this chain of air any ball also healthcare system in other social services etc.

Ravens Howie Hawaii Brussels Boston Bryce
The Secrets to Making Your Company More Profitable with Dr. Hannah Stolze

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

The Secrets to Making Your Company More Profitable with Dr. Hannah Stolze

"So when you're looking at an organization that you've done all this research and you've seen these case studies. The has a clear purpose. How does that show up in the way that they're communicating about that. What are the cause. You can have something on the wall or the founder. Ceo can have that written in. It's an adjustment where ba. What are the critical pieces of making sure that purpose is infused in the organization appropriately in a way that actually manifest is more productivity more profit etc. Yeah this is great question. It's really central to the research. I've done for the last ten years. So thank you for this question. Yeah i'll try to narrow it down to less than ten your answer so it's so interesting when you think about how. How do you articulate how you actually execute purpose. That goes beyond prophet right. What does that look like. And you know the older models the focus resources were scarce money was scarce labor was plenty and land was plenty and now we live in a world where you know thanks to bitcoin. It seems like we're just creating new currencies bitcoin and live on mars. If this keeps scaling up exactly we're gonna have robots because layers now scarce and lands now scarce we need to go to mars to get and use robots one big. Can my grandkids can. I'm not gonna go either. So in the meantime what we can do is in order to kind of infuse purpose. You know it's a lot of Socialization and a lot of times when we talk about like employee engagement all of that we think within my company. Like if you're the leader of the company you know. How do i engage my employees. How do i get this culture this purpose infused in my own organization by in in my book a little bit about this prophet is a is a starting line and business standard prophets of starting line. It's a starting lining permission. Play right right your business if you aren't profitable in some capacity wherever that profit comes from he's still have to have more than you spend or you won't be in business long

"founder ceo" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

07:31 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on The Commercial Landscaper Podcast

"Using just house without for process. All i would highly recommend using zap here and just building that funded up steam night enid automation linden automation us happier to connect bring all the information into irritable. Appreciate like air table than using your different. Crm or something expire as to Before the mainstream than downstream you can have The big old these that you can automate even downstream. You can have all the goals that you're doing regarding them. You can transcribe them in. Do actual cuny Type of a script fast script using author or today or double d e dorte. I'm familiar with that. Yeah so it's a cool tool And stabbing videos and So yeah you can clean that up and use dr consistently i treat on your sales script Adding onto objections that Engines finding out. Yes it's toke so us again for their listeners. Here are still kind of catch up here using altered. Two hours to transcribe previous videos. Previous calls you'd identifying through the transcriptions some of the potential objections. And you're using that information to then Tweak your scripts your seal sam messaging to overcome some of those subject Fear yeah absolutely something that's essentially is Something that's essentially is ogling god's on zoom zoom. Let's record them so that you can dig that video feed And then see how. Many people actually their transcript If there's any insight on someone managing objection effectively than everybody should know about gates and yeah you can start spitting that knowledge sales knowledge doorsteps but effectively to two. We've got a couple more minutes left but just took him about what. What type of your how long you been doing this. Really styling your campaigns I've have been added since that. I did standard gordon emailing for a while but actual crm using that integrated zappia website on the dunes since december. So i mean just to give people an idea perspective to have this information but tom and you know. Have you seen your clothes. Reek or chrome aseren percentage up to a higher percentage just because of all this automation. Ceo's messaging in the objections have Tell me about some of the results. I think The transcription factors something that you have started Anybody centuries of yet to I would say that listening back on gloves and mortifying the scripts so the best. Three months definitely changed some experiment with Closer initially what fifty sixty percent drop down to thirty. And i'm seeing the increase again. Once i'm picking up experiments that And putting them into action so going back up haven't checked but definitely improvement this month problem of the badge And does getting the leads. I would say at a conversion on the loser visiting our website. religiously had limited traffic on the website. It will be very certain about conversion before before we even implemented the system and after being so v. seen a booking rage of something like boo percent on our landing bitch ridges Nice on Numbers yeah i mean duberstein and the landing page. It's hard to get do personal email campaign. They're probably percents For most convince right Lincoln campaign any gorge like a twenty percent looking Amazing yeah so. I think a lot of that was related to nord. Buzzing about settings in blissed was not hundred. day Food was doing it for me kind of it lord on the message. I knew that. I would just need probably an hour to set this up through the southeast Countless great great numbers. Yeah i think Some good information for people to assume it's what you have that campaign in place. It's not just a piece of leaving ruin your spurs you're constantly checking it you're thinking with your tweaking it just to chose not something you could style in income back in six months it always looking at you and tweaking it. Yeah yeah robotics. Literally like i've been at a gun and i'm fighting and changing the gun as i'm fighting with the message. I'm changing the bullied. I'm changing the gun. It's it's it's all the time so every week and that's it is looking at what happened and see what kind of The field this week. 'cause i hear people talking about doing campaigns and this terrible results i owned it. Had this Just give up. Do spend any more money. But i think that's the worst thing you can do. It's just a case of keep on driving and tweaking it finding the results and seeing how you can do bats are absolutely i mean if bill gates lessons you linden immunes juba hundred blairite so far by gold email and messages is just that resonate with so to wrap up here ucar you know people want to learn about the your your sales funnels your systems or automation or even about your your sites recon company. What was the best way for them to contact you in train that more. So if you want to reach out to us Visit our website. I've pundits are decidedly going. And if you want to know more about the finals and the and lebanon robert was gesturing. Do you can go to youtube. Page on youtube channel. Sidetrack on engine find that webinar there And yeah you'll be able to see all the alleged In order to glory all the connected And use that as a build bill. No very impressive. Death recommend people where they are just just blows me away. Just how you've taken a time and effort to to dial the alive but not without share it with people so they can learn they can understand do best in their own business so now. Let's great will again. Thank you for your time today. Thanks for your knowledge really accused appreciation for your sponsorship of the commercial landscaper podcast. And we look forward to having you again again here soon. I go back in deflates. Nice says the ball the eagle that you just didn't know i thought your dinner awesome job so thank you a great day. You cash utilized. Thank you so much for having by. Hopefully that was pure brilliant for you today. And we've got some reached secrets for your business and your personal life. This robot clinkenbeard along with david anderson. And we'd love to get your new french to join us on our journey to creek things before you go listeners. Check our websites. The commercial inskeep or dot com. You can subscribe. You can share with your friends. More importantly check out your sponsors. We have cited recon. You're going to help to capture measurements on your property and a really streamlined process. And we have company cam who make it dead. Simple to communicate document and problem solver guys in the field. No matter where you are. Thanks everyone cheers..

david anderson thirty youtube fifty sixty percent december twenty percent today six months Two hours Three months this week tom french hundred. day this month inskeep Ceo zappia an hour robert
Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

Outcomes Rocket

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

"Today i have the privilege of hosting the fantastic josh commander. He's a co founder and ceo and president of ao. He's just doing an phenomenal job. At the company it's a full-service non emergency medical transportation brokerage designed specifically for healthcare vail uses technology to better manage and emt which is the the non emergency medical transportation and emt benefits for medicaid and medicare programs state governments and managed care organizations today. We're going to be covering this in doing some good learning with josh so suggests such a pleasure to have you here on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much. Beat your soul. Appreciate it absolutely josh. Before we get into baeau near company. Talk to us a little bit about why you're inspired to work. In healthcare. i started. I can walk with cla. Health really healthcare family. My my dad was a family. Physicians now retired out a registered nurse. And that was older brother going into medicine while but definitely was part of it was kind of part of my family's culture going up and you know really part of our core values in to the people that i respect the most roller my parents. My dad's asser never ending cluster desired. Really improve the human condition and show compassion. I personally was drawn to. The clinical aspects of health care is always been more of attack nerd and i love technology and inventing things. When i was a kid ended up going into computer engineering studying software design but always wanted to figure out how to prevent things to make the world a better place and as it happens by career really took me in this direction to really build a better any md at her a healthcare logistics system to really improve the healthcare system or work to improve a part of the healthcare system. Statically and so. I'm just thrilled that this company point my career in thinking about how we make the healthcare system work smarter proved human condition. improve lives. proud comes on. I think also systemically. I'm just excited Run this collision course of healthcare costs in our country. And i think more. I've learned about it and studied it and i think really the only way out of it has to make our system work more efficiently work smarter and i think this is one area in will be called population health or social determinants. That that really inspires me to make the system work better for

Josh Medicaid CLA Medicare
"founder ceo" Discussed on Bellwethers Podcast

Bellwethers Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Bellwethers Podcast

"You cannot do this by yourself. So have that sisterhood. Have you know someone you know. Constantly checking it on you and saying like how are you doing this feed Just stabbing that and making sure that you're held accountable for what you're doing is super important. So that's that's my word of advice. That's that's amazing. You just hit on a lot of fines over there and you know now just like you said you not have faith and you know take leave or make make the jump that said you know. I just had to try it out some. It may or may not work. But that's like the secondary question is always going to be detri- You know You know i mean personally. I don't wanna be the guy who actually takes off his ideas to the grave. When i die you know people say you know okay. What ideas he have died at one. It'd be that. I know. I always wanted to be like i at least tried and i can die in peace. Okay i try. And i think that's the whole point of everything but anyways you know. I think that's that wraps up on a lot of staff you know guys so just like you know. It doesn't matter where you are at life. You just like you heard his story where she was in a time. This desperation in depressed all all alone. Like bad and still. She thought it was done. But god's broke through like a low light breaks through into a darkroom. god's brought her out of it air from the darkness to back into his light and and he changes her life forever You know the the fact that she has right now the faith and you know she said okay. I'm not gonna deliver life on a nine to five job. But i want to do something different for god and she took a step and that's what she did and she just did the jump and had the faith and i think that's what most of you.

five nine secondary
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 1 year ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

"Hello and welcome to muscat. Etv cly this morning. We're going to be joined by anthony. Stevens found the ncaa of six. This rise five million dollars. So we'll found out. Sort of the six clicks story and what they're gonna do with the money and then we're going to be crossing to the us. How should be logging in Greg ostrovsky at who is the original. Ti guys at don mx and stephen elliott program bonds president with day. Say so we're going to be looking at their application late security and then get some epic market insights from they say is wells but let me bring in anthony stevens search and founder of six anthony. Thanks for joining us. Thanks chris grads vanish wonderful and it was not so easy to get you on as well so i appreciate you coming on Five million dollars. What are you gonna do with it. Now let's start with them. It's quite a bit. We can have a really. Let's let's start with six clicks the platform that you put together and Yeah then now once you sort of rising the top of money. It sounds lucky. Ready to to expand out in the way fan at six backing twenty nine saying Mission was to was to build a technology platform to help businesses with risk and compliance particularly around Major issues locks obscurity privacy. So we did that. What mike sue platform particularly unique is the fact that it's been designed to be used by vases as well so We had a fantastic twenty twenty securing a number of partnerships with some of the biggest names in town saab pure security. A number of Oversight weaver is rice capital now to to global expansion. Is this your first rice. Is it like a series. I or is it privately. Funded years privately-funded. We've raised To win a million becca july last year so we sort of saw that as as precede round so you could call this a lodge saved around or early series. I am not as there's lots of different is described as things but yeah so it was probably founded. We were we were subscribed within a wake side Fantastic support and kids coming incentive pickle interested to invest and get part of what we're doing one of the taglines in the media release was on your whites becoming a unicorn. How has your you'll night is that just a pi. We'd been something in there. I think looking we've got. We've wasted a huge amount of opportunity here as amazing. I think it's way proudly as buys to and supporting the innovation sector in sort of technology around the world Uh think if we continue as we are we've got we've got every shot and i think is You know those sorts of aspirational goals I only have Up sawed in my experience you modest well shoot for those things and if you will join you probably doing pretty well to look at ways. Six has come from because it is a pretty good story. Considering launched in a few years ago twenty teens. So yeah that took a story the platform what you're doing and yet and then there's a bit of here is will. Yeah so we Sipa fully sort of founded a business at the start of twenty nine saying we spent most of the twenty nine saying period in product development developing us strategy looking at the market. Where can where we wanted to focus. launched up product in the market basically around christmas time. Twenty nine saints the twenty twenty and as we all know why I wake or ten weeks later. We were we were into And during that period. I think we Fantasies into position where we really need to focus. And we focused on the saab security improv. Assi market is i Big area of focus ferguson and looked and said the largest plasma successful plaza and the highest profile applies in that market not identified united. The locks of Security trust wide number of allah's Focused on establishing ships with is organizations to help them streamline This livery model. But also the provide technology today clause to help their clot sweets uplifting. Saab security Themselves that proved very successful for assaulted and thus partnerships were suitable september last year. And from there we've just with tons of demand and set up offices in the aci which is in the us as well. We've come from top full fem. Which obviously gave you that market in saw your sounds like a very well connected as well. So that's obviously helped. You already had those relationships moving forward so they kind of knew what you were doing. Yeah yeah i was. I was only pot. Chief digital officer at kpmg in my job was to think about the intellectual property across the fame. Likely globally and hal. We would back into software as a way to provide innovation to clients. And i guess that experience i and Appointed you around science technology. Lock zero has done for the canning industry where businesses use zero as an accounting system. But i also engage with it accountants to help them in that process on the same platform and it became clear to me that we needed when they did something like that. For risk compliance and helping organizations and advises shift off united spreadsheets and word documents. And stuff like that. So

Greg Ostrovsky Don Mx Anthony Stevens Chris Grads Mike Sue Anthony Stephen Elliott Muscat Stevens Ncaa United States Sipa Saints Ferguson Saab United Kpmg
Digital Product Transformation for Healthcare Companies with Jonathon Hensley

Outcomes Rocket

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Digital Product Transformation for Healthcare Companies with Jonathon Hensley

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez is here and today. I have the privilege of hosting the outstanding jonathan. Hensley he is the ceo of emerge interactive a digital product agency where he works with clients to transform. Businesses strategies user needs and new technologies into valuable products and services. He's an accomplished writer speaker. Jonathan has lectured on topics such as the connected consumers impact on business creating value through data driven experiences and user centric approaches to innovation in two thousand twelve. He was recognized in the portland business. Journal's forty under forty as wanna portland's emerging emerging professional and community leaders under jonathan stewardship emerge interactive has committed to a simple the loss affi the relationship between emerge and its clients should exist to create real and lasting value to change the conversation to move people to action to inspire and motivate a team to focus on what matters and we wanted to get jonathan on the podcast today to talk to us a little bit about what they're thinking about digital as we look to transform the way that we touch our communities our patients our customers through digital transformation. It's such a great time to have. Jonathan join us so jonathan. Just want to say big. Thanks to you for for making the time to be with us today. Well you so much for how we saw absolutely so before we dive into what. You're up to within healthcare You know and the work that you're your conducting there and thinking about what is it that that inspires your work in digital overall. Well i think what really inspires me about digital. How technology is fundamentally changing. The way that we live our lives day to day in the way that we work i had the opportunity to grow up in silicon valley and so i was surrounded by incredible people constantly. Innovating looking at how technology could permeate the way that we live and think about our daily lives interactivities and how we connect people and then seeing look how scaled out in really the foothold has taken businesses and innovation driving our economy and our conversations is just continued to inspire me in so over lost. Twenty two years. It's been the same motivation that's really driven and keeps me excited With this constant pace of change of how technology can continue to bring value to people dan. it's It's amazing right. I mean what we could do with whether a campaign to dry behavior or just you know how people access certain things technology can really help. And we've faced a lot of challenges through the covid pandemic and healthcare has really been more open than ever this type of change and this type of digital transformation. Why don't you talk to us a little bit about emerge and what exactly you guys are doing to help. Those of us in in healthcare. Yeah so one of the big areas of focus for merge is healthcare over the last fifteen years and we have really been working with organizations to not just embrace digital as a marketing tool or embraced it into how they can improve patient experience for support caregivers or support the relationship between patients and payers but really to come in in. How do we look at technology through the lens of empathy. How do we drive innovation. That can have sustainable. Long term impact and so a lot of our work is helping our clients wherever they sit in the healthcare spectrum to look at that empathy layer into really focus on digital as product a lot of time digital becomes this disposable thing where it becomes a tool and it is an essential tool but it needs to be managed out the product to drive continuous innovation and serve the providers and the patients that are out there and so i'll give a really quick example. Today's website for any hospital or care provider is essentially your front door in kobe. Just amplified that said okay. Well with a social distancing and being more where we need our websites to do a better job and i would argue that. Most websites are dramatically underperformed. Because they're being managed as websites that are more of information resources than they are as critical products. Meaning how do i help somebody. In an emergency navigate the services we can provide when they're in a state of distress burston being overwhelmed by how much information being presented. Or how do i help somebody or a family. Member find physician with network knowing their available understanding their expertise. And what does that look like provide end to end care. And that becomes very very complex as we all know when we start going from general practice into specialists and moving through the healthcare system.

Jonathan Jonathan Stewardship Portland Hensley Marquez Silicon Valley DAN Burston Kobe
"founder ceo" Discussed on Bellwethers Podcast

Bellwethers Podcast

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Bellwethers Podcast

"Media run news from india and he's also the co founder of impulse india as well so appears goes welcome to belvedere spot. Guest two hundred honored to have you here. thank you do them so excited Yeah so Do you mind actually telling an award optimistic citizen and in bosnia. sorry it's optimists citizens optima citizen and both is all about incident gonna eat Very short description and we can get to the questions after that show so. The optimism is india's thorley Newspaper publishing when busted daily news in optimistic to these new ideas. Do you know any shoot. End stimulated some kind of positive actions by bothered in studies. That's the optimism season than impulse. Which is again a abass. Applied from that field started back Which is basically to put out you know. Five days insulation in digitally compelling match because we have seen over the years did so much content out death Difficult for people to comprehend issues like national missions Politics so i try to do. Is we try to break. Donald raise in language. Cadeau do people who find it difficult to understand. Be otherwise Doug next language that did. That's actually pretty amazing. What you guys actually doing. And i think you actually hit up your fiftieth issue for the optima citizens. Recently right yes is. It's amazing journey. I think you know when i look at you guys you five years fifty issues and not lot of things any. I'm not breaking any suspense. But i think as we get to the crisis. I think we'll be able to explore the story of peers. Growers and the optimists citizen and also the founder steve and imposed the. But so yes. So let's go ahead and if you're ready we can go ahead with the first question that all set all right here. We go so the first christmas. They pretty much About this station. So in an era of of so much different news. Sources out here so we have like almost everybody has a distance as right now and know..

Donald bosnia Five days two hundred india Doug christmas fiftieth issue both first question five years fifty issues steve impulse india first thorley belvedere
The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

Outcomes Rocket

04:33 min | 1 year ago

The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting sherry palm. She's the founder and ceo of a pops. The association for pelvic organ prolapse support. She's the author of three editions of the award. Winning book pelvic organ. Prolapse the silent epidemic a pelvic organ prolapse patient advocate battle and intimate health activists international recognized speaker pop key opinion leader and prolific writer regarding pop. Which is the pelvic organ. Prolapse will using that acronym pop Emotional social sexual fitness and employment quality of life impact. She writes on all of these things and today. We're learning more about pelvic organ prolapse how it affects folks. Why and what we can do about it so sherry. Thanks so much for taking the time to be on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much for this opportunity. So i really do appreciate the time. Share information with your following absolutely and so sherry. I'm excited for our chat to before we dive into your organization. I want to learn more about you. And we'll catch you started in this. Healthcare dernie well is a classic case of discovery diagnosis with a health condition. You've never heard of. I was a diagnosed thirty and had done everything. I could to change the dynamic of my life. I was told. Mb wheelchair-bound short timeframe. And so. I did a lot of proactive engagement with what i can do that. Optimize my health and it worked. What i've done did work so moving. Forward into my mid fifties. I started to notice symptoms. And i was a little curious what those symptoms meant not give you the condensed version of it. I'll you of tidy for your when i would go to the bathroom. I've always worked to sixty hour week. That's minority and go the bathroom to he and after about three months old noticing. A bulge down around my vaginal area got a little bit curious and god a hand held mirror out to take a look to see what was going on down there and discovered a walnut sized. And of course your brain goes to tumor right away when you think about on So i was. I wasn't freaking out. Completely because i had no pain with it. It was just something. That was weird. And i knew it wasn't normals had to be addressed so i sent an email to my buddy who happened to be a doctor. Lucky beam and she's combined. We'll do a pelvic exam upon examination. She told me very matter of factly. You help pelvic organ prolapse. I will fit you with a pessaries and if you're not happy with the past three. I will recommend a highly skilled euro gynecologist to address it surgical angle. Why never heard of any of those terms before. So i was a little coffee this to say but she for the past three. Which is actually an incredible device that you can but in that kind of like the diaphragm support your internal organs and backdrop is leaving harper's and prolapse. I is a condition. Where is the organs in your pelvic cavity. Start to move into vagina and push their way down and out. All of the vaginal canal as your pelvic muscle isn't strong enough or is damaged and cannot support those organs from underneath them anymore. So i am home from that appointment and did what most people will do by dr google. What up with that. And on tons of information about prolapse and everything that i read said the same thing. It's so common and my take away from. That was how come i've ever heard of this before. But so common so within a very short timeframe my curiosity turned to anger and frustration. To be honest with you. And i knew that if i didn't know about this condition at other women didn't know about this condition because i had been so proactive about my health so i moved into action quickly. I knew that it was only one way to really optimize getting information to women and that was during a book and have any knowledge about writing books but it just felt right so i went off in that direction and with two weeks after was for that test. Pessaries from my doctor. I realized that that wasn't going to work for me. I mean she great job you re different on the inside as we are in the outside and so what position fits omen for pessaries. Sometimes go through two or three or more tries to get the right fit with me. I was lucky. I had a great doctor. She got the right fit right. I'll shoot and i went home and i was happy. I could take it out in nighttime and embrace of insert in the morning and it worked wealth me at provided support from april. But within two weeks of doing that. I recognize that. I just didn't have time to deal with that.

Sherry Palm Association For Pelvic Organ P Sherry Marquez Harper Google
Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

Epicenter

05:40 min | 1 year ago

Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

"Now. Let's talk about five point. Five point is the incentive layer that kind of brings it all together. What happens another would say. I am someone who wants to retrieve some content that i know is somewhere out there so basically what would happen. Whom would i pay. Who's incentivized by. What's what are the economics going on. Here yeah so basically you're saying hey like let's walk through kind of the the life cycle of data and kind of like follow it and so on Yeah so maybe. That's our with a three. So i that think about adding capacity to the network than adding storage. So you know a client hiring hiring a minor to its data and then the third is a another client retreating. Something that exists there so the first case A minor that has sort of provide. And i walked up to the network and up pledges. Certain amount of sectors and a pledge is a commitment to the network that you're going to store a certain amount of addison capacity and you're going to produce some proofs for that capacity and you also have to of because this is a relief to consumers. You have to have something at stake here. You have to discern conditions in which the might eat. Certain kinds of you could play That includes kind of eighty positive. A falcon A minor add smart of the networks some actual capacity than gets a random seed from the network to start Some data and kind of to produce a kind seal. What is right now. An empty sectors know capacity. And this is a kind of a sector today thirty two gigabytes and then there'll be kinda size actress in the feature on in what they might or might walk in with satire by or something like that you're by terabyte into you know thirty two gigabytes segments Any now Seal all of these segments in the ceiling processing in a reputation that you actually have that capacity to provide the network and the minor you have now signed up with an hour to for the this capacity in addition to monica sets a an asking price which is how much they're still is going to go for when clients are going to hire less storage What go right now. The sort of a global ask bryce on minor mostly use cases. Miners have one price in that set. In the future winters debate we want to have a flexible and fluid ask model where minus can have many different prices for different tiers Looking to stuff But for now sort of a very simple one price for all the storage so that point kind of the minor has committed to to of this and now other parties can can view it so now along comes a user client and says okay great like i want to store this data. And so the data they can just added with. There's different kinds of tools. So that can i get a hash or they can add with a five win with the latest client which is kind of look at the one of the main pump implementation's or a bunch of other tools. That that speak these protocols like exile arrogate or slate which is consumer lincoln application. There's a bunch of different kinds of things and that was the You can now hire. You can kind of create a deal to hire minor to back this backpack this data and that deal is of a relationship between a client and it client in a single minor and a single piece of data just kind of like the unit of of agreement as a. You probably want to do this with multiple minors because he want to replicate your data with multiple different parties and and so you now sound good data over to find these miners in the network by you. This number of ways you can either a numerate them from the blockchain you can find them in a buck explorer this much tools that can show you what miners what prices they have and so you select which minor you want and you could be maybe presented but you might also take into account other important details about the minor so for example they're kind of reliability. There's a different kind of schedules features about the minor that tracked by the blockchain and can score ran others. There's no emerging score the everybody's using yet but you could put these kind of like rating style numbers from the kind of like a very simple way of selecting minors klein right now. Uses a minor and sensor data over to the source provider one source brighter receives that they the deal is completed and the minor. Alicia the deal into the network. There's a bunch of operations that happened underneath a hood in order to like actually making that make that work this in preparation of the data that has to happen in order to make it easier to prove on and so on and definitely a different sizes of the data really matter writes a few set sending a little. Bit of the nsa. A few megabytes few kilobytes megabytes. That's going to be the kind of distribution very different than if you're sending gigabytes or terabytes and so for example in the smaller scales that just a very simple protocol where right away i can just over and make the deal and whatnot user Completely hidden from you. You know the client and the mine are doing this. This software is doing this under hud users themselves. Don't have to be exposed to all of this going on but it's kind of like a like a bitcoin. Transaction in theorem transaction. There's a lot going on happening under the hood where transaction to move to a certain place get validated execute on. Not but all of this kind of hidden from from the actual users

Addison Bryce Blockchain Monica Klein Alicia NSA HUD
Critical Practices Your Sales Team With Membrain Founder & Ceo, George Bronten

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:58 min | 1 year ago

Critical Practices Your Sales Team With Membrain Founder & Ceo, George Bronten

"Let's get into membrane. And so that's part of your solution is member in so tell me a little bit about membrane and how. It's different from other solutions. So what i what. I visualized that the point was eight. Nine years back was a tool. That was very visual. And it guided the salespeople through the entire process and i to say sales process. I'm thinking about b. two b. complex sales cycles right a month or longer month to a few years maybe sometimes multiple stakeholders multiple milestones. One example was the one with the stakeholder by that was an obvious thing that sales people were missing in the sierra. There was nothing really saying that. If you skip this. You're gonna kill the deal. So the visualization of the process was really my main focus in the beginning so member and i would say the a differentiator is that we. We've we create sort of a checklist on steroids so you can see not only your stages but also milestones since actions steps that you have to do and inside of those milestones. You'll we can also put educational content so sales enablement content like okay. Let's say the first step is a a research step. What does that mean like in your previous company of meant one thing but in this company might mean something else right. We want you to do research like this. Abc etc so you can have the sales leader in that step in a video. Explaining this is why we do research this way. This is why it's important and these are the main things you need to figure out unless you already know them. Really guiding Guiding is a keyword for us when we develop the each view needs to be visual and have guidance for the sales person. Stop you so you've built in a lot of the coaching and the training Kind of right into the product for your customers. Yes although we don't really built in so it's not like membrane has it all. I mean cookie cutter ready for you but we make it very agnostic of the customer or the customer sales coach or sales trainer will put that type of content inside of the tools we make the tool. Various economic methodology pulses but just enabling that content to be at exactly where you need it at the right points today. I think you're doing sales training. And then you'll get access to an lms like learning management system on the side after the training. Nobody goes there anyway. So you need to have it right in your face when you're working near deals

ABC
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

"Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. Cam Maybe, we could just start with. The decision that both you and I made not. Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. Well, my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it so. Wasn't even the novelty I just found. The options that we would given. If we wanted attending things in person, we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. Come on a room. That's a surprise because you know at the early. Onset pandemic, we were talking about Sasha demonstrating graying potentially. Some shows never happening again. You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, but this has been an education in. So many ways a pop aside from the fact, I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. It doesn't kind of. Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. You know the as so many people said, and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. To cross-references and to. and to be entertained as well. I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. You know we've had a couple of. Dummy, runs that went. Wildly convincing. And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that anyways. Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, very different game I felt. Yeah. You also got to spend. More time with the designers because. So much more I. Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. It reminded me of. When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. You know half hour forty, five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. It was a novelty for them to be talked to, and you would get people. You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. Meanwhile, the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, this is in a funny way. This is what it was like that. You would be having quite you. You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. I guess.

Imran Ahmed Tim Blanks Schizo London Sasha Editor Jeff Founder CEO Matt Elliott.
Interview with Bethenny Frankel

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Bethenny Frankel

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of coca nineteen. Today Bethany Franken joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Skinny Girl, a company that offers lifestyle solutions for women, but you also know her name from her time as a cast member on the real housewives of New, York, and as a guest shark on Shark Tank Bethany we have found your career for years. We are so excited to have you with us today welcomed to skin from the couch. Hi thank you so much as we're GONNA start the show with our question that we open every show with which is skip your resume for. Cod a resume. I've never really I haven't had a resume in so many years but I would say entrepreneur author. Mom Philanthropists Entertainer I guess TV media personality PODCAST PROPRIETOR One thing we wanted to say actually from the beginning was that our chief of staff is from Puerto Rico and her family is there and she wanted to thank you for the work associated with be strong and she raised about. Thirty thousand dollars for the global empower mission and just wanted to thank you for the work that you did there. So wanted to make sure that I said that from the top. Oh, that's amazing. We promise the I. Would Tell You. So obviously, for those who have like Danielle, myself who've watched fear years on TV and studied your. A businesswoman, we feel like we know everything there is to know about Bethany, but it's probably impossible. So what is something that we can't Google about you or that we haven't seen on TV that we should now. I think people I don't know I'm seen as a homebody. Pandemic has been that different for me from. The landlocked being home perspective at all I say on ninety percent home by ten percent lunatic. But it's really probably ninety five percent homebody that was one of the things that was probably good about reality TV for me. It gave me a reason to wear my clothes. It give me a reason to put makeup on and I think that you fit in really well with Daniel and I are also big homebodies and our lives have not changed that much. I'm not really that social. I'm sort of antisocial in a way I have a very, very tight circle and I like it that way and I really don't let people in I really don't knock would get burned and I just don't spread myself too thin I don't I don't connect dots. It's so funny people people are dot connected and they don't even realize they're like, Oh, I just saw this person and they were doing that and did you go there of did use it like people always want to know what you`re Doing what information and connecting dots about you and I'm not a doctor at all I just don't need to provide any extra information than is required. I love that phrasing 'cause it does describe a lack of people that I know. So one of the things that I think is you know you've been so on us about is how you grew up you spoken about your childhood being raised around the race track and you've talked about how that upbringing influenced your understanding business. How did that frame the hustled that you clearly have? I mean it's only what we can speculate I can't know because I didn't live any other life in any other environment but I know that I grew up. Very quickly, I was going to nightclubs and I was thirteen years old getting myself in handling myself. I used to go from I have some island into the city and take training and. I was just living like an adult when I was thirteen years old but handling myself, I worked at the racetrack. I was a hot walker which meant that when the horses come off the track after they've exercise I, would you walk them? You give him a bath and then you walk them around the shed row until they cool down and so I was working I was a hot walker the when I was like. Seven if I had to get six seven until later in my life and I used to. Spend the day at the racetrack. Around gambling, going up to the betting window myself meeting all kinds of crazy unsavory characters. This isn't like the fancy wearing hat Kentucky Derby part of the race struck with the backside. My father was a horse trainer. So you're hanging out with jockey agents and bookies, jockeys, themselves grooves, and it's very gritty. and. The race track itself is about gambling and that's the whole thing. So that's how they make their money. So you're basically growing up growing up casino, and in fact, we used to go to Vegas again when I. was like thirteen years old and I would be going to the craps tables and so I just had a very nontraditional life very, very young. And it was really well that I knew a lot of violence in my house and you know drinking and just fighting and just being an adult as.

Founder And Ceo Bethany Franken Daniel Bethany York Danielle Google Chief Of Staff Puerto Rico Kentucky Derby Vegas DOT
Your Most Powerful Asset

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Your Most Powerful Asset

"Over the years, the accelerate your business growth podcast has enjoyed inclusion unlisted the best podcast to listen to for sales business growth of small business entrepreneurship leadership. We've just been really fortunate to just the on a ton of lists, and that's because of the guests. These are folks who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me for a conversation little. Chat. Where they share that expertise with all of you. That way you can get the information age get connected to these folks and you can do better things in your. Business. Today is no different. My guest today is Chris Yoga. Christmas the founder. CEO of Yoga Company. Chris focuses on helping people in the organizations they belong to pave the road to a more Utopian world. He empowers heroic organizations to build a champion, those styles using their most powerful assets, their web presence. Chris an expert in Web design accessibility. Digital Marketing. Company culture and Social Responsibility. His Gold for HIMSELF THOSE HE AIDS is to be driven by a purpose beyond Prophet Excel much for joining me today Chris. From Yoga. I am thrilled to have you now I would love it. If you would explain to the listeners, why use say that our web presence is our most powerful asset? It's the one. Then you have that's speak can speak to everyone similtaneously knocker taking phone calls. If you're at a meeting a conference, if you're doing sales inbound sales, your, you've always got some limiting. The chemical equation of your success that is install eggs out whereas your web presence is. Similarities available to everybody and is also worldwide so. Used to have local footprint canals international footprint. On it. Okay. So He said in your bio that you are looking to these organizations pave or. Pave. The way toward a more Utopian world which I love that purpose at but understand how my web presence makes the world a better place. So. It starts with thinking about the organization itself. So the folks that we help tend to all into one two buckets, it's people who know and already calculate the type of impact they wanna half, and then there's those organizations aspire to have a positive don't really quite know either what it is or exactly how to accomplish it and It's interesting because let me see what persons can help boost in the latter case with relation that already knows the impact that wants to have. It's a matter of execution the more fun one in the one that might be worth likable. Your listeners is the wonderful renovations that are still trying to figure out exactly what they want that to look like, and that is where I think about the value of the web presents not only as your marketing tool, a communication tool, a chance to interact with clients, but there's also whenever you go through that process of rebranding redesigning a website specifically. There's a window. Right there's a certain amount of almost like vision boarding that happens where. I kind of figured whenever you start to plant that flag as renovation. It's almost like somebody who stopped smoking where they're like, Hey, I stopped smoking and it's like okay well for how long for four hours. But you got. The same thing with with the website whenever you say we are organization that does these things. Maybe that only lasts. You know it's been four hours since you started that put that out there and it starts to become true and the way that we find it tends to really impact organizations with Joseph Campbell's Hero's journey. Now I'm not okay good deal. So just the Campbell, an amazing offer this book called out hero with basis where he breaks down all of these tales from the Odyssey the end all the way up to storm wars wizard of Oz Harry Potter all of the movies stories you likely love follow the Hero's journey, which is that the hero goes through these kind of same twelve steps and it starts with. You know the call to action understanding. There's a need for change not really wanting to address it of being reluctant going through it as a path of self transformation with happens and that sell transformations what enables bureau to go out and. which the beast find the Elixir, whatever the case might be, and then better impact their community or Kasa characters around them, and then ultimately transformed the world, and what we find is when you go through a brand update or web transformation, the right way and with that kind of attention -ality, it serves as that vision board that is essentially like a crucible cell transformation. So you start to change yourself your team sources st like this is how we impact the world. Now I kinda have something uncrowded show Hama data show my spouse. I'm proud to show my the work I do does this kind of impact? So it's not just about the dollars and cents it's about making impacts. And now I'm a little bit more excited to tell that story people that land on our website. Begin to hear that story. It allows us to transform ourselves before we can then transplant relationships we have with our clients ultimately grow hopefully or more clients and a broader community, and then subsequently through the were affects we all have a world create a better world starts I believe with that what presence that I can happen food multitude of levels but I think one of the most important is being able to find that kind of vision and crucible assault transformation were.

Chris Yoga Joseph Campbell Social Responsibility Aids CEO Yoga Company Assault Founder
"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

06:48 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"This is all's fair on Iheartradio I'm your host Laura Wasser and were speaking about all of this today with girl, boss, founder and CEO Sophia Russo Fia. We are discussing the girl boss mission how it aligns with the evolution of disillusion, which is what we do at its over easy and redefining the way people think about things whether those things be divorce business, etc, tell us with. With the girl boss mission is so the girl boss mission is really was born out of what it is that our community has for the wouldn't exist if I just made up an idea and was like. Hey, all spelled a community hits a need and so grow. Boss exists a redefine success, so explore what that concept means across our personal lives. Our professional lives work wellness. Sunday through Friday who we are on weekends because we live at the intersection of that today, broadly, it's millennial women, but we have women who were sixty years old attending the girl boss, rally and women who are sixteen years old, flying out for the girl boss, rally and women from thirty one countries and forty states. WHOA pretty wild. It's pretty global and we're. We Really WanNA provide tools and connections and utility, not just inspiration and connections, but like we WANNA give you concrete tools advice to level up your personal finances. Your Business Finances to. To teach you how to build a profit and loss to get a job. Ask for a raise. All of those things we're talking about, and those are all things that women are traditionally really under served and with so when I google i. don't know something about investing I. End upon Investo. PEDIA DOT COM right? It's just like agnostic advice for just everybody and when you tell her that for women and gives them you know we have. We have a different experience in were up against different things, and that's what Karl boss. Is All about. I love where it says. Johnny did a breakdown of the girl boss values from your website, and they are humor, resourcefulness, vulnerability, curiosity, inclusivity, the the last two are my favorite. I love curiosity. The website says we are eternal learners ask them questions, but never treat others, ideas or questions dumb, and we are comfortable throwing things at the wall. That's amazing and then pair that with I mean like the other three to don't get me wrong, but inclusivity because I love like you just said the. The diversity the value of the diversity, the age, the ethnicity, gender, religion, ability, experience, class size, and all those other things you drive that through the organization and I think that's huge I. think that's amazing and you include men, too. If need be, they have things to offer. That's important, but really making women young women millennials feeling like they've got something to offer and something to take. That's really I I love that. Thank you, yeah, so vulnerability Welna so, in terms of inclusivity and curiosity, right? I'm a community college dropout from Sacramento there there wasn't a lot out there for me to learn how to start a business and making sure that we include women in every stage of her life, women at every income level and make sure that we are serving hers, really important to girl boss, and the only way to do that and the only way any of us learn you know we can deliver advice or content or resources, but it's only through curiosity that you're going to learn. And there's curiosity, but there's also putting yourself out there and saying like hey. What is a KPI mean key performance indicator I. Think Oh, you're going. GonNa say what? What's an okay are? Oh, it's objective. Kinky results right like we sit in a room. There's an intern in the room and on their behalf I make sure that our team defines what those things are. When we say them out loud, assuming everybody knows them right and the only way I've achieved what I have is to raise my hand, which a lot of people think is embarrassing and say like what? What does that mean right That's a really scary thing for a lot of people, but it disarms other people for one when you're not pretending humor also does which is one of our values. We're not pretending right when you don't come in and to act like whatever you think you're supposed to act like an meeting. Obviously, there's a certain amount of decorum that you WANNA. have in a meeting. But when you ask people's advice, right and that's that's vulnerability and curiosity when when I go direct to someone to ask their advice would, it says to them isn't like. Oh, you're burden. It's I'm an expert right. You think I'm an expert. Will thank you I'm so flattered. Right like it's actually gift sometimes to ask people advice and really thinks that being the person that's giving me advice, also you have to really be not only vulnerable, but compassionate about giving it like. The fact that you will sit in meetings and will define what some of those anagrams are. That's huge because I. Know so many people who are really riding high on that wave of being the expert. Somebody asks you. They kind of say you're my person. I'm asking you this advice. Don't be a Dick give them the information and more and keep an eye open for them at the next meeting to be like him by the way there's this I think a lot of times. We as women are not great at. Taking other women under our wing propping them up, etc, if not us who's going to do it? and you know when we. Agree and. When I define an acronym in a meeting for example. I'm speaking to the girl who I was when I didn't know those things and to have that kind of empathy for your community or your team or your user. Whatever you WANNA call, it is extremely important because you're speaking into the listening about only way you build a business is to speak into the listening if or sell into the listening if people don't want. dumpy Moos don't sell them dumping Moose if. If you know they're curious about something. Even if they are not asking that question, providing those answers for them and being able to anticipate what it is that ask, someone may not know I. think builds a great culture, totally absolutely I want to quote you from the La Times interview that you did after Nasty Gal. No feeling is final. I love that and we used that and I. Want people to listen to it because we are so about next chapters here at all fair. No feeling is final I. Mean I guess your last breath might be final feeling, but then you're dead. No feelings final I, mean, and until you are dead. You need to have feeling those feelings. Cultivating them and changing them and evolving them. We're always going to get past whatever it is. We're experiencing right now and I tell people to just look back. Put themselves a year in the future and look back and know they're going to laugh at whatever it is. They're experiencing Because we do and we all do and I shall shell pass..

Laura Wasser Sophia Russo Fia founder and CEO La Times Investo Karl Johnny Sacramento intern Dick Moos Moose
"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

05:31 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"And a month later, Netflix series came out about my life called girl boss, depicting a woman named Sophia. Building a company called Nasty. Gal, and how did how did you like that I've liked it I mean. It was canceled after one season which to me, it was awesome thing to have happened, but just having the story of who you were ten years prior weird. Hold while while you're trying to start over. Is such a mind fuck. I'm sure say that. Yes, you can say that. It was really cool. I kind of intellect AC-, and maybe it's just my ego or something, but I've like left a trail of things that exist longer than I do, and Netflix's one of them. It put the girl Bosnia into one hundred and fifty million homes in one hundred ninety five countries so as marketing. Dot alone I'm really proud of IT I like to show I. Think it was really a Hugh Britt. Robertson okay, and did you meet with her? Did you talk to her? I? Yeah, absolutely she, like she got shadowed me and I think she did a really good job. Charlene Darren. Produced IT K Kannan who did pitch perfect pitch perfect to? Was the show, runner and writer on the show, so we had really a Primo team. Re Paul was a character norm MacDonald way north was on the show. He was my boss okay in the lobby. but it was. It was a great run. It was bad timing because. It was a show called girl boss four months after trump was. and. We were held to a standard of this has to be a show. That's an example of women in the workplace, and it was just like an angsty like white girl right in San, Francisco, an ebay store, right so I think boss was you know had a certain amount of responsibility to depict women or a woman? In a certain way that? Maybe we wouldn't have a year prior way and it was four months after Vanities Fair said you know the. No, no, it was It was four months after all of the press and wall. Street Journal covering right downfall of nasty gal, so it was just like it was just bad timing, right? Right well, it's still super cool and what you said about legacy, and even ego like that's fucking cool I mean it really is. Let's talk about girl brass rally a little bit. I did it in two thousand eighteen. Johnny and I loved it I loved the energy. I loved the young women. I love being able to talk to people about it. This year's theme is find your support system, which is why I'm talking about that, but it's also kind of our theme at all's fair, and it's over easy. Why did you pick that this year? Yeah, so it's what we've seen in our community is yes. We're here to learn and exchange ideas and educate one another and provide the resources, both within the community in from girl boss, to level up in our work but also personally and without relationships. We can't do either of those things, and so we built a social network less than a year. Year ago. That's a girl boss Dot Com now and what we've seen is women connecting over not just what they do, who they are nice and that's where a girl boss really lives at the intersection of so spiner support system is yes, you're coming to to learn a lot and hopefully take what you learn at the grow boss rally into your life immediately. Right Inspiration is table stakes. Stakes but relationships as you know women who've gotten as far as we have in our careers have learned which may be, we didn't know earlier. Careers are everything. Yeah, totally everything. I'm still in touch with Tracy Gray. Who I met at the girl boss rally. She's on the podcast like she's so wise I, so enjoy her I. think it was her was her birthday. I don't know if it was. Was Their fiftieth fifty fifth birthday when we were there, but she's just amazing, but it is true relationships hanging on them. Particularly Women now can men attend. Men can attend. Okay, so we got okay. We had one man speak at the first rally, and it was the founder of instagram which is pretty cool, so seven Kevin System Very nice of him. We've some really big names that were announcing You. Can't like scoop there. No, no, no, you're team contract I tried okay, so you guys know it's twenty fifth. That's quixote. Studios here in Los Angeles. You do want to New York as well. Yes, yeah, we'll do one in New York later this year and we're planning. Actually have an announced now. It's a big deal for me announces, but we'll do a third rally for the first time this year. Oh, cool. We normally do to, and where will that be I don't know. Another city, different city, and back to relationships right both with men hold the keys to so much. There's someone in conferences can feel like so awkward and cheesy and. into the girl boss rally gives opportunity for women who may not be invited to fortunes, mouse, most powerful women to attend conferences, but the you know the few very selective about attending or have been over the course of my career built some incredible relationships. I found investors. I've found confidence I've found you know other entrepreneurs I've collaborated with new given me incredible advice and I met. Someone not named Joe Markazi, and I don't know if I'm fast forwarding here, but that relationship. Has happened over the last five years. he built a company called True X, which was an ad tech platform sold to Fox. Disney acquired Fox while he was at Fox. He was the head of advertising, so he did billions. He sold into the super bowl well, so he was responsible for driving billions of dollars of revenue for Fox. Network's not Fox News. Which is now called.

Netflix Fox Fox News Bosnia New York Charlene Darren Vanities Fair Dot K Kannan Joe Markazi Dot Com Robertson Street Journal Hugh Britt Los Angeles writer Disney head of advertising
"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"He's been a huge. And exclude INSTA- photos to he does for me all of his. That's an important. That's an important characteristic in partner. A hates it. He's like. Can you just be present on a trip or whatever and I'd be like as soon as I post the this is part of my job like if I only post branded content people are gonNA. Think I'm a scam, so I have to post Evergreen Star like me, right? and the between ones are really good. Thanks Putin was amazing but I built an incredible network mostly drinking over the decade that I was building Nasty Gal had incredible access to thought leaders to the women who had been on my podcast, which I launched Gross Radio in Twenty fifteen, so this was a good year, and a half after I launched my podcast, and just had this incredible alumni of women who? Were there to support me. and even through Nasty Gals I dunno collapses the worst word ever. Everybody was there for me. Nobody dropped me right. I felt like damaged goods I was like I'm like thirty and a divorce. Say like that word just kept ringing in my head like divorce. Say like who wants to date a divorce. Hey, and who wants to marry someone for the you know their second mar whatever I was just really hard on myself, and then people were starter marriage starter marriage, as like whatever that's so modern but yeah, it was it was. It was a tough time. Well, there was a lot of. A lot of people there for me. That was in twenty mid twenty sixteen. Okay, so that was I was on the cover of Forbes in June of twenty sixteen. Okay, and I was allegedly one of America's richest self made women on paper on paper. And senator. Yeah, good furniture overpriced furniture I'm just GONNA. My house like a mausoleum will never like replace that furniture, because it's so expensive to amortize time. Yeah, yeah, and then a month after the Forbes cut cover he left, and then maybe five four months later. gallon belly so twenty sixteen was a really rough year. Tell us about that because I think some of our listeners, they might know who you are from girl bars and stuff, but they may not have known about the resurgence. So how did IT GO BELLY UP? I mean it was doing so well you at institutional funding. What the fuck happened! A lot over the course of some years, so I wrote Girl Boston I'm writing my next book. which I'm really excited about 'cause I think even crazier. Shit happened after I saw six years ago, then wall happened in. That was already a crazy story. We raised it a almost like a tax valuation, which in retails like we're not dropbox, right? We're not technology. The opportunities scale retail business. What is like you know? There was a so so the time ZAPPA's right. We did sell multiple brands, but we weren't competing on delivery or price. We were a brand right when the end there was no Amazon or there wasn't Amazon. Yeah. Amazon is born in Nineteen. Twenty. Seven? No. You just didn't know about guys. But it wow today. By fashion on Amazon Book by Book and now I buy. Spray and But it. We raised a really high valuation months after girl boss. The book came out. We had our first round of layoffs. We over hired. We over invested in the business You know we didn't get to over one hundred million in revenue as fast as we thought we would. We burn through a lot of the cash, and my evaluation was so high that to for my investors to be pleased with someone coming in and investing on top of that, or even for sale of the company they wanted a multiple of three hundred and fifty million dollars, which you know retail multiples to. If private equity came in which was the kind of investor who had come in at the late stage growth stage that we were at after venture they were paying like one and a half or two times revenue right and that was. We were still way too expensive for them. Company that makes like urban clothing for young people offered over four hundred million dollars for the business, and we turned it down. Go owned eighty percent of the company. Oh my God, so. I just WANNA point out. Okay, without doing too much stroke this this young woman what she's talking about here. She doesn't have an NBA. Did you go to college? No, she didn't go to college and she's. She was playing with the big boys and girls. She is talking about things from a very realistic standpoint. What somebody comes to you and says we gotTA GO AKA like how how you knew things were kind of struggling had some dead we had tried. We could have sold the company if we had taken a lower valuation like two hundred, million, two, hundred, still amazing. Investors would have recouped some of their investment. They would've taken quote. Unquote dilution, which is like their investment would have been worth less than when they invested. It's better than zero right and We tried to sell it and you know deal after deal. Just kinda vanished and we got to a point where you know the responsible thing which is crazy to say is to you know. Not Keep not paying your vendors. Pushing out. Right Right and so that's that was a decision that was really challenging to make after months and months, and honestly years of you know few years of miserable struggle with the business you know having difficulty fundraising and and it was. It was really the right decision. I had there was all this momentum with girl boss, which I, never anticipated at a certain point, gross became louder than nasty. Count Nasty, also a huge business. And this is late twenty sixteen. The book came out in May of twenty fourteen, so it was years of momentum. That I hadn't really been nurturing of a podcast that took me hours a week I was in building. Girl bosses anything while I was working on saving Nasty Gal. But today girl boss has over eighteen million uses of the Hashtag on instagram why it became. Part of the geist four timing was for and women's movement. I'm not taking any credit for that, but there was clearly some i. mean you were part of this this this happened especially for young women especially for young businesswoman. Because as you said nobody was doing this, we didn't know we could yeah and Nasty Y'all filed for chapter eleven. The day trump was elected and girl bosses. Mission was even more clear. Yes, yes, okay, so two thousand and two thousand sixteen beginning in two thousand seventeen. Not your best work, not your best time. However, I shouldn't your best work because what you did was and I get now. How because of what girl boss was doing you were able to. Make your peace with the nasty gal stuff an probably also with the divorce and say okay next chapter. What where do we go next I? Mean? It was so painful to put myself back out there after all of the negative PR. And just just so much had happened I was just so shell shocked, but I was like. Gorbaz an amazing opportunity losses. Really special people won't grow. Boss wasn't really a choice. I couldn't take a year in between Gross Nasty Oh. It needed to happen so I. I kept moving in this is. You know nasty all happened early. Twenty s late twenty, sixteen. By march of twenty seventeen and thrown the first girl boss rally conference. We're about to put on our six. To five hundred women sold out event in downtown. La had fifty speakers I. Don't know how I pulled that off. had sponsors like AMEX and squarespace and it was marginally profitable..

Amazon Forbes Gross Radio Putin partner NBA America senator ZAPPA La AMEX geist squarespace
"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"Didn't I didn't leave the stage. But It's kind of like it's. It's like being a Barista died, and it's very like sex positive, and not that sex was happening for me. You know outside of my relationship, even than with a drunk Wade and Wade but I learned a lot from that experience, and then I left drunk Wade and moved back to San Francisco and that was in that. I started getting real jobs because I got caught stealing in Portland. And I got arrested. And this is where we put pipe in the Jane's Addiction Song by it here I actually my court date, and I've never really revealed us and I I might like my next book whatever it's not like breaking news, but the real low point of like twenty years old was, and I was like underage working in like a Bar Strip club at. At certain alcohol by the way right was when I had to go in. Basically, my court date fell on the same date as my point at a women's clinic for an abortion, and that is not a good Dan. The abortion clinic sent on sad note to the Court of why I just couldn't be there that day and I was very very lucky winning the. DISMISSED IT Had some sympathy, stupid petty, little crime in poor kid anyway. moved to San Francisco and I you know I cut my teeth selling stolen things online, and then eventually after a string of Shitty jobs started selling vintage clothing online, which wasn't stealing, but it felt like it because I was buying stuff for five bucks, and put can put it on Ebay for. Nine ninety nine is a starting price, but eventually my auctions went up to a hundred and fifty dollars on average and I guess going back a couple steps I got the idea when I was killing time for twelve dollars an hour, working in the lobby of the Academy of our university at Seventy. Nine New Montgomery and San Francisco as a campus safety host. Okay, checking people, student, ID's and sign it having them sign their names, and in directing them to admissions on the second floor. Floor and was getting friend requests on my space from Ebay, sellers who were promoting their vintage clothing businesses and was like I know where to find vintage. It's pretty much all I wear and Holy Shit the prices. These girls are getting like I think I can do this. And I bought a used laptop at the time. I had the Dome Mac Yeah Mary McNamara Waco early I MAC, and it was kind of it was just kind of on its last leg bought a used. Mac Book and discovered photo booth and took all kinds of I. Don't know what they're called. Parallelogram you know photos of yourself or your faces like reverse just. Did that in my car. The second I bought my used Mac book and just took a stab at it, and so we were originally doing on Ebay like when did you? Start Your own site called Nasty Heroes, not for another like year and a half, okay that I started nasty, Gal like that I left Ebay and went onto my own website, which was a really big. Risk what year was that? Started selling at the end of two thousand six, I, mean you. Do you guys realize how far back twenty? Everybody you were a baby, but you always had a good eye, but to be able to like start me. A lot of people do that now and the real real and in all the. Sites guilt and hot look and all those, but this was before any of that Sophia you were told. Lou Buying staff ends you just take your own pictures of it. Put it up, and then they would bid. It was like Ebay or would you. When I was on Ebay, it was bids bought a chanel jacket for eight dollars once at a thrift store. Wow, in zolder forever thousands if you WANNA talk about cash flow like it was a positive, it was a cash flow positive business for until Basically Venture Capital Cayman unbelievable. So when did that happen? When did you? Okay and I didn't go out and raise. They were like we heard about this thing. That's exploding because I had gone from Seventy Five K. my first year on Ebay. Shitload of money. Dad Myself because I didn't want. Things don't even know what luxury wise right I think eventually had a blackberry Pearl really fantasy. Volvo and I lived in a pool house for five hundred dollars a month with the hot plate and. Satisfy a lot of market and drink a lot of starbucks. Then t soy chide no water, no foam. Every day an upset my stomach. Prior back upon it, the fact that this all started so. Early on for you and your life, but also in the life of this kind of business. Is kind of amazing. Thanks, so then. At what point at what point did you decide to do? The Not side? They came to you again. TV Show Book. Come in all of this stuff. Nasty Gal is like huge still Liz. Yeah, yeah, I did it for ten years twenty two to thirty two so I'm like. I'm glad to happen. Yes, I was also kinda trapped in a business where I couldn't quit and it couldn't be fired right? 'cause I had raised money so twenty twelve venture capitalists came knocking because they had watched or somehow heard about a business that did seventy five to fifty K., one point, one six and a half, and then twenty million in profitably with strapped, why owned one hundred percent of the company and twenty twelve index ventures came in and said okay. You're doing twenty eight thirty million in revenue. We're GONNA value you at three.

Ebay San Francisco Wade Bar Strip club Portland Mary McNamara Waco Mac starbucks Basically Venture Capital Caym Volvo Lou Buying Dan index ventures Liz Sophia Montgomery zolder
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

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"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

09:56 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"And culture think things gotta get better. This country was built and I. It's a cultural central. Tried to be more just and it's not about in Oh meets about us On the first Olympic. But no. It's always do. We always tried to give the food pictures of what it choose. What is Dale part instead of innovation? Why would they really matters? And is a big part of the big story in in all seven factors but as equity everybody on you give you give equity employs. Everyone mean I mean anybody from company Integrity So they feel part of it and it's about company meetings. Will you emphasize what each one does. But it does anybody else knows what each one on does so everybody sees the picture and and so Kvant atmosphere so far being professional and and executing correctly and Delete which is supposed to being a comfortable just bombed and without being nick at four and friendly and positive There's always a big challenge of trying to somehow fight it negative politics. A natural situation in a way is negative politics. Aw and for people to know us you as the CEO others the way to confront each other so you have to wait for energy or the fighting in the south Keep open communication between people When people come through and and start saying that guy so bad because does that not not you know become part of that to join that but the opposite figurative? Okay got it so one more question with with excellent and then we'll go into fresh off and then from there we'll go onto what you're doing now the white you step down. Seo Did you feel that you want it you time you know. Let me give it to somebody else could do do other things within the company or was being burnt out. What was the? I'll get a lot of people that do that right. I know Dennis Crowley who's on the show from foursquare. He stepped down after a number of years and you know he ended up just focusing on the RND and development and he said it was a great decision in that sense that he could really help to build more products at etc.. Actually the big trigger was accelerator which his viscous Company in Komeda wanted which was a really good decision for me to move to. US With my family. Which I did and my wife was amazing? Came with me and did his anyway but starting with by she wasn't happier and Co was in stock and I felt birds. It's unfilled for me to be the When she's unhappy that I thought that you know some do i? Do you know a good job in the company of the time could find somebody who's is going to know a job that in actually four thoughts multiple do an amazing job and I was pushing the ball for that and ended up and accepting my mom commitment accommodation which is also being good with external trim. That's great here that so you're saying earlier in the show right so connecting the kitchen you. Why did you get into to decide to really make that shift from ethic into something totally? I O T in the kitchen are pretty far from the tech world. Basically failed the not not want to be in by not only at Dick and bench. Not good things about at that. which by the way becoming even worse now without the favor on site to find something new and don't think by the way I dilettante smart way they mentioned I had to deal with a great idea? Started executing it so it's not such a but after being in the industry of supermarkets in was this actually was disappointed initially was supermarkets not guilty After being in that space for many many months really begin to learn that space facing status and then followed looking in all around and singles GonNa which began picking up. I did come up with this concept. which book concept to connect anti into supermarkets? So I've been off from experience markets to compensate you. The did make sense of this initiative initiative you so you know. The MODEL was what for the supermarket. Stuff to pay you for the the the supermarkets factor. That can win win for everybody. President factors it was a big deal because it gives them kitchen presents. I mean if you think about we make decisions about buying groceries. Most of them have been indication. Simple your milk is out Tabei milk so being able to execute decisions the benefit consumers and of course big supermarket Arkansas John Incentive as has become incentivized to get into the kitchen. They won't head depress manufacturers themselves. MM set have been in places into the kitchen start becomes interesting. The plasma factors under this busy had both Pinkus us both the president factors and markets. And so you know the market size. Did you realize how big boys when you started like you. You know when you're thinking about it did you see yourself. Did you know that the manufacturers would come on board or did you realize that you know martin pain to in the kitchen or did it come at when you start. Do you have a different idea. Mind I mean this. This concept physically. Getting the supermarkets to the constant presence in the kitchen was quite news. It was no numbers Saying you know you couldn't understand that they should be kitchen just minute up sense since and by the way pretty soon if the we began doing another little company figured out made sense Supermarket put into the kitchen which has ECO system with Alexa. which they know in America but I Cathedral shortly before in the field with traduced the concept of for example shows. You Know God if my yeah manning. The voice in the agenda does this stick undertook barcode. So just made sense. And that's why US and other companies began offering guy and so you have fresh up when you when you merged with I can. Was it merger aquisition I mean it was. I mean they can be equity pisses. It's emotional yeah. So how many people did you have there at the end we had. I mean when we began basically the peak we are not so many eighty people. Uh but but then when we begin Jonah's income competitor charge you to to secure funding branding because invisibles boom to invest into your competitors especially when Amazon's and then when we took that merger a juror path actually wind good down a little bit.

President sense Supermarket Olympic Dale Dennis Crowley Jonah foursquare CEO Kvant Seo Komeda Dick Arkansas nick Amazon martin America Alexa.
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

08:04 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"Hunt people and did you. You know building the team at growing it and this is over. What four or five years or longer it was longer it was launched in two thousand seven? Okay actually the last week or so six and and Dan. I was founded on sale for the first first four and a half years and Theodora then in two thousand eleven and then the government will quickly we almost. Every month was recalled months or for the ten thousand seal We made like fix real quickly. How did you bill well? How'd you scale that there? I mean you know you so you brought your co founder from or already. Did you find other executives. Did you network do you recruit I mean how did you build the wellbeing and Mexico. Okay was the sale all we use the according of the day we got funding for me. Commend ventures on became the active chairman MHM. Then we use the quoting from mark. US wouldn't family. Did it. Then executive in America and he was a good is it time at God n show. Was it hard. You know. Go to be a CARAMEL. Was it hard to raise the funds early on like where people skeptic of of the adequately skeptical of the New Orleans the marketplace at your building in a sense. We're like well you know we just don't see it or you knew that was happening. Was You saw. Aw is that the issue on investors is pitching very different than you believe in the they need to see. The vision is what I think was very positive with. I'm at because the great reputation so I took was not an issue as a buzzword thing. It's always tough. Though say compared to my other government does maybe the easiest round but it was tough anyway. Most people in all did not believe this concept like some big questions encouraging maybe considered to John DOE panels sitting called. How do you look back and see many small businesses big name uses? This is no. It's nothing let me just walking in and then we do next company. It's based off before I saw things turn out so don't be in college by smart people walk but this is this a lot of things you can just believe everything. uh-huh yeah I mean so as you're closing and building the company you had partnerships dealing with you partner with Google Yahoo Nielsen icy with with a hard to sign them up or they were just coming to you. Want is what you proved that once you put the marketplace things tend to. There's always proof right. Everybody wants to see a working product etc usually usually ah those liberal companies. Come to maybe willing to listen to do to engage. Do if you walk into other we companies when you have enough brand improve on but usually you the small company have the you company and how is it chase. How was the? Was it hard difficult time so long. It says on business is an art. You can over pressure but you have to be persistent and you have to find opportunities to know cooperates of the play the corporate game you have to understand the politics Yeah Yeah it's out that takes time to muster Bu- The again focusing on those two aspects persistency and over pressure those two actually concepts a lot of I know that of other. CEO's they tend to want results like they expect you know okay. Can we deal especially with the become visit. Visit Your partner partner with interstate time to close closed. That deal as well So I had to come about all right so you know you pretty much the two rounds you both the company you know Twenty fifteen here. You're doing well how did you do you have. Do you WANNA WANNA get out or the opportunity came upon you. We we as the bold gut to suit with the decision that the company we fear that you know the complexity had somebody supporters and and and we thought you know and we saw the market maturing and numbers were great lighten with position and felt in all of the the somebody came to our went pushes. Some kind of uh-huh wake up call where we have a bit of serving. The company process took a banker the then in all which Delta Marquez in everything by the Book Bank job and there's a by the way well auctioned client early on I for many years Actually they will be dependent on us because we did it off of them more in partner. There's some old economy type company the wound so home so digital and so we will in a way the digital arm and we offer digital capabilities to them so the way they needed us and and that also numbers to this competition the cellphone four companies but ended up being two companies competed increasing and all the things on one sixty two million to complete. Yeah it's always nice feeling. They did a good job and process in Bandung. Isn't really you know basically really squeezed out. You know. It's not at all and happy about it but then don't onto extremely happy. Basically numbers we gave them ended up. Doing one hundred percent from those numbers and will to the best of Nixon did until now we'll an exit is a big part of nuisance on separate entity. That's the good part is exit area. They also ended up doing very happy. We squeeze them out in that competition with unhappy. uh-huh okay so two more things here so you know you have a company culture you built an did you feel that. There's a culture you know. Did you have any mindful culture. Just came natural.

partner Theodora Dan MHM New Orleans Mexico active chairman co founder Bandung mark Google Nixon executive America CEO Delta Marquez interstate Book Bank
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

11:12 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"We come back to that that is well. It's not a problem. That part about about the the recent example of farm fresh up basically you know we saw the mark terms changed physically. I do WanNa now like John. Wait over jump up the pressure will go back up on my jump around and basically After an attic space freshman which was in the IOT space basically collecting supermarkets walking with the plasma factors to make it possible for people two older and it will update shopping cards from the kitchen. Schulman's out in buffalo you can use voice and update your shopping cart and also was stolen and challenges and but we were strong company with big big supermarkets on nuanced in your pocket with us Customers any loved US made nice revenues but they and became actually competitor of ours could begin doing both thinking over in the way the kitchen appliances and the homeschooling with the assistant and the other things and also they became like the service provider for supermarkets. Basically doing what's called Google expressed which is solving online charges for supermarkets so both inside devices in the kitchen and collections which made them competitor and Google is not a good so I think at this point. We realize that even though we had a beautiful company on it's probably a good time to sell the company and look for a way. Well we will fortunate to find good exits of Donald Gould Anyway. But the thing that you have to all the time around figuring out of is the son you know. Is this about a direction or not but you have to go forward because many times you WanNa give up and it's hard but it's not to give up because there's always a struggle so that tension between when it's time to switch to people to sail and when is it a good time skip fighting in keep building the wall until you break it you have to figure out and learn about in always looking to be long. Aw I am I am. I wanted to give up now because you know todd all three list logicoop because the decision to give up gone and so we'll come back fresh you know later on in podcast. Let's go to excellent so after you. You know pretty much sold to break on. Why back then you know you started actually right you we did? What did you take downtime? Did you jump right in. No why'd you say like. Oh okay I just finished one. I worked excellent time. I I just had the tickle back like what what he didn't want to take any time off so negative on and off because they started the excellent actually student doing gone again was done with the boot is concerned. Actually on the show. Those in the Wigan got equity in Excel. Excellent was sort of spin off. Sort of a spin of for me Arabian so it was done in pilot a I would say the aftereffects rated it took off rush up. That's I commended. And don't cheat you serve you can do it and don't think that You know the the embarrassment stuff you know do something else. I specifically studied the awful you but you know do whatever makes you feel pretty good but very different from lunatic. It would help your career would help the company with your family life. I I know commend taking breaks from. Today's you can but anyway and always started. We started launch. Tom Exit from within Vinh way down. And and we're GONNA find this data again becoming an interesting element and important asset in ethic and we saw this opportunity wanting to quit the company that enables Zahn industry to have more there. It was data. I think it important take from that is that it's always very big advantage to think of companies and build companies where you have an expertise. We've when doing something for many years That's a good place to come up with ideas and billion companies on it's extremely challenging bill the company and to get funding and and to figure out the right business mothers and so many challenges. At least you have to come equipped as much as possible and they sense a quick means equipped with the knowledge college and relationships and so on cementing him people want to infants More and you idea and and jumping new field where they have no previous experience and and I would say that. That's that's a big take and beyond the big takes studying coming thick framing new relic. You can really try to build something or you have some advantages got and so did your your experience at a ringing help you excellent did you. Do you feel that okay. I learned some things that happen. I'm building new the company I see the market. I've been in it and you say okay. I'm GonNa do this differently now. And how did you build you build from within. Did you take a lot of people from already into excellent. If you start from scratch you know you know. How long did it take you to get your first custom research that I mean a lot of questions but we'll go back to subsequently absolutely it was a big advantage to fit with molitor had took a lot of both both in all to identify the paternity and then relationships for example as mentioned right media which was a big player so they'll Gresham and their will the first big powerful affects it so that of acid able to bring to start up when you studying in a field that you are already in those relationships sign advantage of that is it took a few people from the dame again everything was done with the and consent is down there but he got those shares in next right So it took a few few people from the team actually. The CO founder allowed was walking in the end of the timing now with to accelerate in Kim but as I mean so did you when you started out you have the vision of what you wanted excellent to be very clear vision John Okay and and excellent example. Actually that vision was really what ended up happening by the way when it started to live at the start for example to finish up and the vision which turned out to be done to invent it. Because I did do the field. But he'll send you the bill. The will which really made sense to be. So what was the vision. The vision was what the marketplace for their data be become become began becoming an asset on. And then you had those companies who had a lot of data and are you getting the data from different websites and you were in different. I mean if you analyze the intimate before you know they. Google guests and their stuff in different full-face bookings on so then the big data was concentrated under a small number of websites which didn't have massive traffic so think about traumatized in price line those companies and didn't think think about you know the the auto calls like Ed Malls and causes of call and so on Saturday those specific verticals with was viable and uses. Those were there but not to use not too many expressions and impressions and then there was the other part of internet which was accompanied the works website which had massive traffic and Muslim views. But no there was to link make between in all those websites. The ETTL's data with with with traffic on the website the data always also very expensive. CPM'S APM's expensive rates and the website to reach had noted at very low to say the mentally and there was a few years the GO-TO expedia. And then if you're gonna go to live in an article somewhere you sit user and hopeful if people we're going to pay fifty zero scipion only when he will expedient you'll stairwells that out of money not only five cents when you go to and I was young. Yeah so basically in this marketplace and then have expedia on and caused the comb become the sitters the mass media websites become the buyers then and other ecosystem players like the agencies and the ad that walks says ads and disconnection between the settlers bias of their data. And show you know so you help pretty much with relation with the right media and you know. Did you win Amdi people in the world where it was a company one hundred hundred people.

Google Schulman John expedia Donald Gould Amdi todd Wigan Tom Exit ETTL Zahn industry CO founder molitor Gresham Ed Malls Kim
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

06:54 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"I can't take in June two thousand nine Erie. Currently is the founder and CEO of defying Erie. Welcome to the show. I hope I covered everything I know. There's a really really a lot that you've covered today so if I missed anything I'd feel free to fill in the blanks. Thank you and I think those that was a good overview and yeah okay so we'll jump right in and this where people I've known earing for really almost ten eleven years or any when he was actually living at the time as well so okay so from teaneck so so starting your career I mean you know before no it was really so you were an ethic before actually it was. So how'd you get started in there. What was your first? I thought actually before everything happens you. They started being ninety six in a way I started thinking about the first thought of actually the friend and technion student taking on and my friend in actually invited to join startup. Not In another fund will willing to that is quite a new dating in the Internet This new thing. It's prior to. I think when Yahoo was ninety five but on when the stores may be created. John Thought it to me look exciting thing nobody did startups. No there was nothing there. But you know it's on made sense to me to do dating Internet so I started doing that within the French left. then he left dating concept builds it was called in the club built a little bit necessarily need to cough. You didn't have any money. So I moved to beating websites and plug which was successfully did some big websites for the government of the corporate rate. This there was using zip. Tips on fire is now is weighing down no zip at the time took maybe like half communities still the ball I was thinking old should should be adds to waste of dying. ADS began to happen. Due to Nathan said came to meet with Allison software applications A new building startup ecosystem. Nothing those on ninety seven when that idea came up but started building dot and the loud into I dust cider the radon which was in two thousand seven to buy electrical after a bunch of different changes and developments whatever for the process became the adviser for because ah which became the most popular download amid a lot of money and some other stuff in the industry came into challenges. When are the record company? Burqa sued Kazaa. They began aggressive stuff. And putting our was called down spy will into the program which reflect negatively take on the phone industry so we moved to change the company become successful again and seven gun show prayed to company to company called White Brent Walgreens Indian morphed into break COM- com- e- so from that experience. What did you learn What was one of the challenges right when let's say when all of a sudden the Spiro came that was really a big issue back then it was for people that I would say who aren't old enough to remember devils? was everything before he was speaker. So slow. Tom had software downloaded and with it back doors and everything right so that was a major issue. I think privacy issues were just starting right to really bubble up there. So how'd you Adad. You rebrand yourself in saying what was the. That must've think to yourself. Oh my God like this is it can be disastrous. So how'd you get around that. Yeah I've learned a lot. Maybe one figure that you will. I learned from this experience. Is this tension between just keeping on doing what you're doing that giving up and finding adding both on the charges because you always have to fight The attention of saying okay. That's not a good direction and and you have people in. It's really very hard on sit. was I really keep on rising distraction with. Ask yourself should I continue the same path. Should people attractively looking at. It was a good decision to people that I was bunch officials spivey I wish was also the development of of the Internet And then the decision to pivot to Dirksen where we had ad in meaningful assets which is advertising in continuing to being the attic space which which was a good thing just moving from software to mall gentlemen websites and then analyzing the market in finding the lights niche community community time remember the Real time bidding began right media Otley and by for exactly so we were able to the first series play all that and likely they walked with and got the two terms from them defy. Then you know the the choice in of course we did in a way where we had to away brand name Lebron everything because the SPA will issue in stockton everything that was often so good way to move the business got it so one of those are like this was also you know that you fill that or you had. I had a really big challenge early on that. You're that you had an ED. You overcoming.

Tom Erie founder and CEO teaneck technion White Brent Walgreens Yahoo Dirksen Kazaa Lebron John Nathan Allison software devils Adad stockton
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"This podcast is part of the C.. Suite radio network turning the volume off slow business. Hello and welcome to the plugged in podcast where we talk with founders and CEO in order to bring you the real stories of failures and triumphs highs and lows. They've experienced based on their journey towards success. We will go in-depth with our guest to give you insight into how they have taken an idea from concept to realization. Making those spurs key hires into building the right team scaling revenues how they overcame obstacles and much more as we learn how they achieved success. This is the podcast and you want to subscribe to if you want got to learn how to succeed. Hillary welcome to another episode of plugged in. I'm Elliott Obama Industry issue veteran who decided to do more than just listen to podcasts. But actually start one in which people much smarter than me this episode. We're speaking with Aereo. Har- Serial Entrepreneur innovator always is at the front Forefront of technology and world renowned ethic industry expert here. He's a proven authority or started star strategy business modeling and strategy excusion. His family led comp- and completed accessible excellent to Nielsen. In two thousand fifteen or redeemed to WBR. which is now I think? Break Com two of the largest and most prominent Internet companies Moseley led the merger fresh up to a leading provider of smart kitchen commerce technology. Oh Gee with..

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

14:58 min | 2 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Stuff going out your doors as you better make sure it's all correct and Within your company purpose and values I understand the need to have to constantly produce content because audience audience so splintered and you don't know who's going to see what etc I'm just overwhelmed by the amount of content that we have in the world that I can keep up with a small fraction of it. When do you think that will just keep going? That will just keep having all this content and it'll be more and more and more or is it will there be some I'm sort of Plateau at some point. I think humans in browns are going to produce content and they have been producing On ten forever we are creators at the or so. I don't think that's ever going to stop but I do agree with you. That there's an issue. She also quantity over widely and the moment a and I would go for hunting the quality I rather than quantity and two. It doesn't matter to producing less content but it's beginnings a huge effort for your team in both situations. You need to think about operation questions you need to think about. Structure Your team. How could you robbery? What should teamwork look like For Your own organization so the problem is still there with Quality over quantity. Thank you for saying that by the way as someone who owns a creative shop. I've seen that it's just so much. Content is not as just here. Let's put some bullet points in this. There's a really old saying old ad guy though Burbach. He is my favorite quote about advertising in. It was this when a person talks to himself. We call him crazy. When a company talks to itself we call it advertising and I think a lot of content is that let me tell you how great we are? I think good content takes longer to develop than sometimes people are just in a hurry to get something anything out. Yeah I totally agree there. There's an old by at think. Mark Lean something related to the fact that he broke the law because he didn't have time to write off in mass. The that's right. I think it was in a letter hero. They said Apologize to the link this letter. I didn't have time to to make shorter. Obviously this platform form that were multiple can look at it and evaluated may commented streamlines that process. Do you ever run into the flip side of that where you'll have the client saying move this make this bigger and and making design decisions when in fact they don't know about design and what I'm getting to his. I've found often when creative is presented. People understand the thinking and why things are the way they are but we moved so quickly. You can't do that. They just it just gets sent back and forth and then people make it comments. So how do you think that sort of back and forth affects the the actual creative content. I think the way we it incredible is that it's so flexible. They can build whatever way of working again he need whatever way of working comfortable to Kim. you move. E Year type of funeral teeing dead justice extremely nimble annual fee ship context ass and you can make that for yourself so it feeds very well into the type of work so marketers have in different in different companies. I fear the type of Human wants to take time and explain that to the client. You can do that as well. You can eat showcase the work the client when you're ready going back to your e book for each team member. You include the primary responsibilities in review them daily weekly and monthly which seems like a lot but now that you've mentioned it you do need some sort of governance. DD recommend that people create some sort of governance in review it that frequently in terms of what should and shouldn't go out content wise. I think it really depends on your so So you know there's brands that Atlantic Grand Plan Mafia recommend planning more than a month ahead. Dennis streaky not real time at all. But I think he's really depends to your specific low on the way you build content but it's it's extremely important to do this. Type of analysis says like to look into Hoggart gains working and to audit everyone's responsibilities. What everyone is doing day today because that's GonNa give in strengthening people you have to have a clear understanding of what everyone is doing? This part of your entire arche effort. WHO's in charge of publishing? WHO's in in Georgia? The creative science charges strategy. And so on those committees have to be very well-defined because otherwise it was time you have a new person in we have some more than Li very cards. Just entire system. Auditing the way your team works and hopefully looking into your team works takes a lot of time you know. It's a big deep dives and time. Consuming disciples initiatives. If you don't do it you're not gonNA find bottlenecks. LX You're not gonNA understand. What are the issues that you have in your e able to truly seeks to improve your process tend to send was working and the more the more you accumulate what I call this operational debt? That means that it's GonNa be harder and harder for you to work together because because those issues are humiliating and this debt is increasing. Get to you need to do as early as you. The Angel how have you seen the plannable and its technology transformed. What's it before and after look Mike is brought into an organization? I love that question so I think before plannable a lot of the teams were using includes like a spreadsheet and emails and they had a lot of Mesh national tools of phone calls texts emails else. Bedsheets somewhere using trello somewhere using slacks more using Google Docs or Microsoft office tower using neutrally Whiteboards stickies on on a wall. You know a lot of meetings two meetings. I think those tools. It didn't work for them. That's they switched flammable and and made them more productive a lot of our clients answer stating that. They're saving percent of their time on those tasks that they are using and they're not stressed and overwhelmed as they were before her her. Everything is really really organized that radically year and they have more visibility on what's happening and communication has improved can occasion between themselves internally but also communication with their clients. They don't know inundated with emails. Taymor so I think things have changed a lot for some of the people that switched for Animal so what do you think think is next in the evolution of plannable in terms of technology. Because obviously any technology you have to keep or what are the next Maybe goals or things that you see maybe incorporating into the platform big all this just raise the productivity of marketers everywhere doing for social media content already but we want to move into law formats contents. I think that's the next step for US edition. Taking collaboration to the next level Dhingra during the FERRUGIA job with improving the way teams King members collaborate. You want to do that as a lightning speed. This is collaboration and content formats. Our two biggest goals were some of the big barriers that you hit when you go and try to pitch to people. Teaching is is hard but he has to do it allowed. This is a founder Yokich Pitching to to customers as well so he change change itself is hard people are used with the way they're working anything that's the biggest barrier to just make them understand that it's a problem and that we can really sold that problem that they might have not thought about this. He convincing people that have already identified. That problem in the works. Always stays consented. Solution is simple rights. Bring everyone on the same page. Engineers wants to go to those other chosen. You've been abusing but for those people that are you happy with their current workflow even if they we haven't identified that it's actually not their productive and think just shining some light dot. Problem is the biggest barrier here. Okay that makes sense. A lot of it is automated. Correct a lot of plans on made your technology. What aspects of content d think are are things that ought not be automated or automated? Think all the tedious mechanical tasks should definitely be automated identity. Creativity aspect of concert. Production can't be automated and at the moment and my personal personal opinion is that it. It shouldn't either. I think it's such a human base and amend based function the amputee the OC communication skills psychological aspect Or buildings like the cultural aspect of building content dined. I find it hard to be one day is going to be able to automate and that I can't imagine that in the next few decades AIDS and I don't even know if I wanted that research that was honestly a loaded question because that's what I wanna do to say there. You go these seeing some trends and content at UC happening better bitter exciting. Yeah I think He turned in on in in in our future Knowing it's probably nothing new for people during following chance but storytelling VR AR is probably you know one of the big transparent can happen in the future because it's just again creek very nurses its contents experiences. It really takes a lot of time to think about them. Invest Energy resources in producing experiences like that. We're probably not going to st those types of storytelling in yard stories. Having any time soon just because of the type of Requires Yeah and they're no more than the girl that are more in in overseeing Interactive Video Nets pioneering that with their shows Contracted you think it's GonNa take off once Just going to be more flexible to allow that in the end it's up to the platforms when we can produce live with us. There's obviously he has been surge in like the production the same you know with three hundred sixty Images and it just really up to the bathrooms two tickets fan Dan on those formats are emerging. But I think attracted Vigo's this is one of the the next ones are really gonNA conquered the space Khakbazan Here requires a lot of Structural contents to build ready personal experiences with chat bots. So so. That's already here. The LEGO case study where they created a chat bots to help parents choose the toys for Christmas for their kids. First first of all solving problems so parents can It's personal experience. Asking all those questions about your kids in order hard-edged help you select the right product. Those are very useful Type of of endure engaging content experiences that are already here. Here and then I hope more interactive video and maybe being the future of three ten weeks near maybe and UH. None of us will have time to work. We'll just be absorbing this content branded content so of all the changes you see in marketing a next year or two three to five years. All changes do marketing. What excites you the most and what concerns you the most? I think what excites me the most host and scares me the most at the same time is this deep deep personalization of content can have the effect of being very useful and very efficient where the end users. Because you're getting exactly what you need but at the same time in this queasiness effect dead you might get with the personalization. I think one one the trend for the Senate's for I've heard other people and I have the same concern. It's yeah and it just creates this burn we're GonNa play on your giving personalized content in debt. You're asking yourself. Where did he get the data? Just crazy Roya annoying around that. It's fun it's useful to it's creepy. Yeah Yeah thank you so much. This has been such a wonderful people treat me. I've I've learned a lot and enjoyed talking to you very much. Well thank you so much. Slow with the glass yeah..

robbery US founder Yokich Pitching Burbach Georgia Mark Dennis streaky Taymor Li Kim. Microsoft Senate Mike VR AR FERRUGIA Vigo
"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"He he is the founder CEO project veritas and I don't know I think this is a bait probably there's there's going to be a lot of fallout for this you know sixty three thousand searches on Google per second I mean that that is insane yeah Google's ad revenue amounted to almost ninety five point four billion dollars he and wife just the year or twenty seventeen alone you know Google loans two hundred other companies you know they have twenty seven percent of the share of the global email client market when is a massive company and you know you look at that and then you say well okay well now they're going to censor content a conservative is not going to decide not to run things a politically that they disagree with that's a problem yes I mean John indigenization reinforce several times Google's imperative to quote prevented xtram situation quote prevent it from happening again quote being ready for twenty twenty by training algorithms for a different outcome using machine learning fairness I mean it sounds like something from nineteen eighty four thank you for wasn't just the year I was born this great book by George Orwell I mean it's just it's just shock the conscience of the end and when we got a week we got of tickets that's what they're doing I think the question is you don't really get any attention to to the people I don't know what Congress is gonna do trump presidency people I think that the next thing that needs to happen is more people needs to come forward project dot com slash brave and there at times at proton mail dot com if you're on the inside if you want to be a patriot if you want to tell stories I mean people are not going to New York Times The Washington Post John that they're coming they're coming to project veritatis now so we have a responsibility to keep informing people about what their intentions are as it relates to twenty twenty right these videos we have posted exclusively apparently they can't take them off handedly dot com or project tosses website but apparently it's off of you too but other places as well but you got to watch him for yourself and you're saying that now you have a lot of other insiders a Google reaching out to use so I would expect is going to be more follow up in the days and weeks ahead yeah we're we're releasing some more documents here imminently today about some censorship and there are some people to reach out to one side by looking at some of the messages right now shop with it again I just want to remind your audience they've taken us off YouTube you take us video red bandana this is the moment it's it's all happening I don't think they'll be able to silence us I think that that the fight is gone to public to hide and it's all happening now nothing's going to stop we're gonna keep exposing the truth I thank you Sean for for being one of the first people out there to push the story and and and thank you for your for for helping us exposes truth Odjick veritas the CEO and founder James okay thanks for putting in neck out there as usual when we come back Jonathan and Danielle they'll weigh in on this crazy lunatic debate last night don junior weighs in on that and his brother Erik literally spit in the face in a restaurant in Chicago we'll get to that and how the rest of the family's.

founder CEO project four billion dollars twenty seven percent
"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"He he is the founder CEO project veritas and I don't know I think this is a bait probably there's there's going to be a lot of fallout for this you know sixty three thousand searches on Google per second I mean that that is insane you know who rules ad revenue amounted to almost ninety five point four billion dollars in what just the year or twenty seventeen alone you know Google owns two hundred other companies you know they have twenty seven percent of the share of the global email client market when is a massive company and you know you look at that and then you say well okay well now they're going to censor content a conservative is not going to decide not to run things a politically that they disagree with that's a problem yes John indigenization reinforce several times Google's imperative to quote prevented xtram situation quote prevent it from happening again quote being ready for twenty twenty by training algorithms for a different outcome using machine learning fairness I mean it sounds like something from nineteen eighty four nineteen eighty four was just the year I was born this great book by George Orwell I mean it's just it's just shock the conscience the end and when we got a week we got of tickets that's what they're doing I think the question is budget beritahu you don't really give ammunition to to the people I don't know what Congress is gonna do trump is gonna sue people I think that the next thing that needs to happen is more people needs to come forward project veritatis dot com slash brave and there at times tips at proton mail dot com if you're on the inside if you want to be a patriot if you want to tell stories I mean people are not going to New York Times The Washington Post John that they're coming they're coming to project veritatis now so we have a responsibility to keep informing people about what their intentions are as it relates to twenty twenty right these videos we have posted exclusively apparently they can't take them off handedly dot com or project tosses website but apparently it's off of you too but other places as well but you got to watch him for yourself and you're saying that now you have a lot of other insiders a Google reaching out to use so I would expect is going to be more follow up in the days and weeks ahead yeah we're we're releasing some more documents here imminently today about some censorship and there are some people to reach out to us I've I'm looking at some of the messages right now shop with it again I just wanna remind your audience they taking us off YouTube they will you take us video red bandana this is the moment it's it's all happening I don't think they'll be able to silence us I think that that the fight is gone to public to hide and it's all happening now nothing's going to stop we're gonna keep exposing the truth I thank you Sean for for being one of the first people out there to push the story and and and thank you for your for for helping us exposes truth all right project veritas a CEO and founder James okay thanks for putting in neck out there as usual when we come back Jonathan and Danielle they'll weigh in on this crazy lunatic debate last night don junior weighs in on that and his brother Erik literally spit in the face in a restaurant in Chicago will get to that and how the rest of the family's been treated ever since they his.

founder CEO project four billion dollars twenty seven percent