35 Burst results for "Founder"

How Elites Try to Undo Our Founders' Vision With John Zmirak

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:36 min | 2 d ago

How Elites Try to Undo Our Founders' Vision With John Zmirak

"Back, talking to John's mirac about his article at stream dot org, which I put all over my social media and I hope you will share this is very important information. We need to understand how our government is supposed to work on the founder's vision and how elites have through the decades through the centuries now been trying to undo it. We're dealing with that now and John, you're giving us the history, you just mentioned Wilson and the president's trying to undo the founder's vision, folks. This is over a hundred years ago. They saw the constitution as this relic, this old creaky thing that got in the way of the best people losing the power of the federal government to improve the American people. Improves the people, for instance, through eugenics laws. In the 1920s, people like Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics laws that forcibly sterilized more than 60,000 Americans for failing culturally biased IQ tests written by wasps. So Italian and Jewish immigrants would come in and they'd be given IQ tests that were written by people who went to groton and choked. And they wouldn't know what some of the words meant because they were referring to like, oh, they're key cozy and you're croquet mallet. And they didn't know what these things were. Study failed the IQ tests and of course lots of black Americans failed those biased IQ tests and 60,000 of them were forcibly sterilized by the government. The last ones were sterilized in the 1960s.

John Margaret Sanger Wilson Federal Government Groton
John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on Slavery and the Civil War

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:14 min | 2 d ago

John Zmirak and Eric Reflect on Slavery and the Civil War

"Really understood that what the founders had done and what we had in this country was just so extraordinary that the only way that it could be destroyed would be from within, which is, of course, where the attacks have come from and where they're coming from today. So eventually you and I want to go through them because in the article you mentioned, go ahead. Yeah, okay. So yes, we had this system of government set up with a three branches struggle against each other and the federal government struggles against the state government. They're all intentioned together. It's this real Goldberg apparatus set up intentionally to restrict the power of the state over individual Americans and their families and their churches. A magnificent rare, almost unique historical creation. The only presidents are things like Switzerland. And immediately, of course, fallen human nature starts to chafe against it, corrupt elite start to try to frustrate and corrupt and pervert the system. But the slave power between 1830 and 1860 the slave owning elites of the south were the first, I think, arguably the first elite conspiracy to corrupt the political system. They used their power in the Senate to frustrate all progress in terms of settling the west unless they could spread slavery and spread slavery further and further west, even though slavery was meant to die out. It was supposed to die out Jefferson, Washington, all thought it was an institution that would wither away. The slave power, the wealthiest elites of the southern states who owned a vast plantations worked by slaves. They insisted on extending slavery further and further to the west. They wanted it in California. And as we saw during the Civil War, they wanted to capture Cuba and conquer Mexico and reintroduce slavery. They wanted to go down to Brazil. They wanted a huge slave empire. So we had those elites of the south basically fool the people of the southern states into seceding from the union, and we had a Civil War.

Goldberg Federal Government Switzerland Senate Jefferson Washington Cuba California Mexico Brazil
Founder Steve Maxwell Tells Us About CCDF-USA

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | 2 d ago

Founder Steve Maxwell Tells Us About CCDF-USA

"Joining us now is Steve Maxwell founder of CCD F USA and Jonathan houlihan, director of legal operations for CCD F USA in Texas, Steven Jonathan, welcome Steve. Why don't you take an opportunity to introduce the organization and what you guys are able to do and the points on the board you're putting up. Very good. Thank you, Charlie. Thank you for having us on today. Yeah. Organization was founded in April of 2021. And the main mission at the national level is to engage the citizens in critical counties in the country and empower them with the tools that they need to go after this apparatus. It's really trying to take our country down. So at the local level, they're focused on elections, anything to do with elections, education. We have a faith division. And also just follow the money. And then at the national level, we have a legal team of media team. We have information services where we can really do a lot of analytics analysis to follow with its money's going. And then we have an administration team that helps them with all the administration side of their local county operation. And since we've started Charlie, it's been we can only give God credit for the results we've had so far. We're just really getting going and we're really excited about what we're talking to you about today.

Ccd F Usa Steve Maxwell Jonathan Houlihan Steven Jonathan Charlie Steve Texas
Up 40% YTD, Bitcoin Is 2023's Best-Performing Asset

The Breakdown

01:30 min | 3 d ago

Up 40% YTD, Bitcoin Is 2023's Best-Performing Asset

"All right, Friends, today we are talking price action. Bitcoin is up almost 40% on the year. It is 2020 threes best performing major asset, and of course this being the breakdown, we are not going to dig deep into TA or anything like that. Instead, what I want to explore are the big questions. First, what's driving this Bitcoin and crypto price action? Is it a bull trap? Is it a mean reversion? Is it the beginning of a new bull run? And then maybe the biggest question how much is it Bitcoin and crypto specific versus part of a broader shift in market sentiment? And finally, to the extent that it is part of a broader shift how real is that shift and what might change the tides? In other words, are things really turning around? All right, so first off, let's talk just a little bit about where things are. Bitcoin's 40% gain has been its strongest rally since October 2021, which of course might not be saying much as markets were decidedly bearish after the $69,000 peak the following month. On the other hand, it could be meaningful that January's gains have outpaced all other bear market and relief rallies during the last year. Some technical analysts are pointing to the relative ease with which Bitcoin has cleared resistance levels as reason that the rally can continue. Katie Stockton founder and managing partner at fair lead strategy said in a note to clients this week that, quote, Bitcoin extended. It's sharp relief rally, clearing resistance near 21,000. The next resistance is more significant at the August high of 25,000. At the same time, however, Stockton viewed current weekly conditions as overbought and ripe for a pullback.

Bitcoin Katie Stockton Fair Lead Strategy Stockton
Gokhshtein Media Founder Says DOGE Is Breaking Out

CryptoGlobe

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Gokhshtein Media Founder Says DOGE Is Breaking Out

"5 p.m. Sunday, January 22nd, 2023. Gochujang media founder says doge is breaking out. On Sunday, January 22nd, 2023, entrepreneur David gossett, who was founder and chairman of crypto focused media outlet, goch time media, talked about the price action of Dogecoin doge. Popular memo based cryptocurrency, Dogecoin, doge was initially released on December 6th, 2013, as a fun and friendly Internet currency. It was created by Billy Markus and Jackson Palmer. Dogecoin is a decentralized peer to peer digital currency

David Gossett Crypto Focused Media Goch Time Media Doge Billy Markus Jackson Palmer Dogecoin
GTX Seriously 3AC Founders Return With New Exchange

Blockonomi

00:38 sec | 5 d ago

GTX Seriously 3AC Founders Return With New Exchange

"8 a.m. Wednesday, January 18th, 2023 GTX seriously three AC founders return with new exchange. Meet GTX exchange a controversial project backed by controversial figures. Rumors that three AC founding members jusu and Kyle Davies are part of a new cryptocurrency exchange, have circulated on Twitter in the past couple of hours. Accordingly, the two founders of the defunct business are trying to raise 25 million for their new. The post GTX seriously three AC founders returned with new exchange appeared first on block anomie.

Jusu Kyle Davies GTX Twitter
Reports: David Crosby, rock star and CSNY co-founder, dies

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

Reports: David Crosby, rock star and CSNY co-founder, dies

"Musician David Crosby has died at the age of 81, according to several media outlets, including The New York Times. I'm Archie's are a letter with a look at his life. David Crosby was a member of the birds until they pushed him out. He met up with Stephen Stills and Graham Nash for Crosby, Stills & Nash and sometimes with Neil Young. While CSN and CSNY had hits like sweet Judy blue eyes, our House and Woodstock, the song's Crosby contributed were more artsy. He said in a 2014 AP interview, he just wrote weird stuff. At first, you know, that was disturbing, you know, because I wanted to have hits like Steven hands or my grandma. I'm not ever going to have a hit. I've never had a hit. I will never have it. Among Crosby's claims to fame, he was the genetic father of the two children of Melissa Etheridge and her then partner Julie cypher

David Crosby Crosby Judy Blue Stephen Stills Graham Nash Archie The New York Times CSN Neil Young Nash Steven Melissa Etheridge Julie Cypher
Ukraine Private Shelters-Shelters intro and wrap

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Ukraine Private Shelters-Shelters intro and wrap

"Bunker apartments designed to withstand heavy artillery are being produced by entrepreneurs in Hakeem in Ukraine. Increased Russian attacks have increased demand for private underground shelters. Project scope is making self contained units with full amenities, kitchen stove, bathroom, and shower. Project founder Alexei Seuss lens says the shelter has an armored door. If there is an occupation, the door is one that needs to be blown up with explosives, otherwise the intruder will not be able to get in. Scoba is shelter in English, so slim says the idea came to him in the summer when work forced him to be apart from his family. Because they were afraid and hard he was still such a difficult situation shelling and shelling. So I thought, what do I need to do to have my family with me? And we decided to make such shelters. Production of one shelter will take about two months. The cost about $60,000. I'm Ed Donahue

Alexei Seuss Hakeem Scoba Ukraine Ed Donahue
John Zmirak and Eric Discuss the UniParty's Grab for Our Freedom

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:04 min | Last week

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss the UniParty's Grab for Our Freedom

"Welcome back, talk to my Johnson miraculous here from Texas show. John, don't you find it at least interesting that Naomi wolf, who is, was very politically liberal during the Bush administration. She was pointing out precisely the same things that you were pointing out. And people like me were stupidly drifting along with the Republican herd and not seeing the dangers inherent in what we now know is the uni party and the deep state what they were doing. What George Bush and Cheney and company were doing was not consonant with the American founders vision, but the Republicans went along with it. Because one of them, we were panicked and they used 9 11 to panic us into giving up our freedoms. George Bush, one of the only true things the man ever said was that a bin Laden and the Islamists hate us for our freedoms. But unfortunately, bush was, you know, the figurehead of the movement to revoke those very freedoms and to create a deep state that the deep state as we saw what it did to the president of the United States in office. What they did to Donald Trump. He could not control them. What they did to Matt Gaetz to Devin Nunez. When he tried to investigate the Russian collusion hoax, they turned all their power on him and made him seem like a Russian agent of influence. Congress can't stop them. The president can't stop them. The courts can't stop them. The Patriot Act and I did warn about this in 2006 in my entry in the war on terror in American conservatism and encyclopedia. It's a 900 page book. I contributed the entry on the Iraq War and the war on terror and a couple other things. I said, this is not so much a repeal of the constitution as of the Magna Carta.

Uni Party George Bush Naomi Wolf Bush Administration Johnson Matt Gaetz Devin Nunez Cheney Texas John Bin Laden Donald Trump Bush United States Congress Iraq
John Zmirak: If the KKK Had the Money, Joe Biden Would Work For Them

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | Last week

John Zmirak: If the KKK Had the Money, Joe Biden Would Work For Them

"We're talking about though, John, is this is like what we call a teaching moment in America. We are seeing the results, power corrupts, and the founders understood that that's a biblical view of human nature. And when someone is allowed to be in office for decades, it's very natural that the power increases the corruption increases and you have a guy like Joe Biden who over the decades just by being, you know, your average guy, okay? This is not like he was machiavellian and wicked. But by not being virtuous, you drift into this corruption where now your son is involved and you are on the hook with China and Ukraine. I guess what we're seeing is that the real horror of what it is not to be explicitly virtuous, not to have a view of America that the founders had where it drifts to is not mere mediocrity or some kind of neutral ground. It drifts toward evil and corruption, and that's what we have in this man named Joe Biden in this administration. I mean, you could there are so many funny things you could say. Joe Biden never held a principle that that was opposed to us because he never held a principal at all. He was always for sale to the highest spinner. He was pro segregation in the 70s. He was friends with racist senators. Now he's a 100%, well, if the Ku Klux Klan had the money to bid for Joe Biden, he would go work for them. He would be a spokesman for anyone or anything. He's literally a sock puppet who's gotten kind of dirty and they're going to throw them in the wash and they're going to replace him with another indistinguishable sock puppet, Pamela Harris, the mean lady from the DMV, who slept her way to the middle, and now will find herself floating to the top of the bowl.

Joe Biden America Ukraine John China Ku Klux Klan Pamela Harris DMV
Unpacking CES 2023: Where Was Web3?

CoinDesk Podcast Network

01:41 min | Last week

Unpacking CES 2023: Where Was Web3?

"How is CES? How is a consumer electronic show? What did you think of it this year? I didn't make it, so I'm really curious if web three was everywhere, or if it was anywhere. Great question. CES was a little bit of both. One, there were some amazing people, great conversations that were had. We interviewed, I think almost 20 people and did a bunch of great Sessions on stage. And so that was fantastic. The thing that I was most interested in is how much web three was not showing up on the show floor. For anyone who hasn't been to CES, it is really an expo show. It is a 1 million ft² of demo space for people to show off their new wares. There was like 15 foot holograms of Mark Cuban. There was all of this amazing sort of gaming and VR tech and haptic tech that we saw and tons of autonomous cars. But when I kept looking, I was like, oh, I'm not seeing much web three here, which compared to when you go to a south by Southwest or a can or even art Basel. You see what three almost everywhere? Here it was kind of missing. And so I'm just, I was a bit surprised because I thought I would see more from not being there, but seeing the news, what was your takeaway? Yeah, well, I was thinking about going and I've been to CES a bunch of times before. This year, just timing didn't work out. So I was following along the news. I was really excited to see what Raja for Mastercard announced with Mastercard's web three accelerator. They're doing that in collaboration with polygon studios, which I thought was really cool. That seemed to be sort of the biggest web three announcement in news, but a lot of what I was seeing was more hardware developments like L'oreal, unveiled some new technology on the applicator phase for people with accessibility challenges. I thought that was amazing. I didn't see a ton about web three though, outside of Mastercard's announcement with polygon.

Mark Cuban Basel Mastercard Polygon Studios Southwest Raja
LiquidityFinder Brings Advanced Social Features to Leading Institutional OTC Liquidity Information Platform

ACN Newswire

03:39 min | Last week

LiquidityFinder Brings Advanced Social Features to Leading Institutional OTC Liquidity Information Platform

"10 p.m. Sunday January 15th, 2023. Liquidity finder brings advanced social features to leading institutional OTC liquidity information platform. London, January 15th, 2023 ACN newswire liquidity finder is thrilled to announce the launch of their upgraded community driven FinTech platform to assist electronic trading businesses and institutional investors in discovering and connecting with well matched business partners to drive OTC liquidity. As organizations and the range of financial instruments they offer change frequently, providers seeking to enhance their liquidity services are in need of new tools to stay ahead of the competition. New entrance to the institutional liquidity provision space are emerging every month. Liquidity finder provides the tools to let the market know what their product range is, and makes them immediately discoverable. Consumers of liquidity products also need to be sharp about who provides what instruments at a fair price to enable their business to stay competitive. Liquidity finder provides tools to simplify this discovery, the new social, partnership, and research functionalities developed by liquidity finder aim to make it easy for brokers, asset managers, and proprietary and professional traders to keep up to date with the latest changes in the industry, leverage advanced research and obtain access to the best possible commercial terms for their business. The freighthouse features include complete user profiles and posting, industry forums, and partner matching and messaging capabilities to directly communicate with prime of prime pop brokers, and related businesses to optimize their trading. Users of the site can submit requests for information to brokers able to offer the services they require and for retail brokers. This means an ability to search and discover more competitive terms spreads and commissions than they currently receive from incumbent providers. Sam low, founder and CEO of liquidity finder stated, quote I am incredibly excited to announce the launch of the new liquidity finder platform. We have created an environment where any person involved in trading or FinTech is able to research and follow the best liquidity in FinTech providers in the market. Keep on top of the latest news and developments in the trading FinTech industry and share their views. Questions and comments in our secure forms to create engaging conversations covering the industry dot quote he continued, clothed through our hands and work with clients, we have been engaging with a broad range of traders and brokers to. Ensure that our new product meets their needs, speaking to senior executives at retail brokerage firms I know that there is a lot of room for them to get more competitive business terms than those they are currently on. The businesses on liquidity finder are hungry for that business. The tools we have created help bring these two sides together dot quote about liquidity finder liquidity finder is a community driven FinTech platform that assists electronic trading businesses in discovering and connecting with well matched and sustainable business partners. Our mission is to help traders, brokers, and institutions streamline their research and create frictionless partnerships that drive OTC liquidity more efficiently, accelerating their time to market. WWW dot liquidity finder dot com liquidity finder media contact Sam low liquidity finder 44 77 34 four 6 7 9 zero 9 visit us on social media Facebook WWW dot Facebook dot com liquidity finder Twitter hips Twitter. Dot com liquidity finder LinkedIn WWW dot LinkedIn dot com company liquidity finder copyright 2023 ACN newswire. All rights reserved. WWW dot ACN newswire dot com.

Sam Low London Facebook Twitter Linkedin
Polygon FounderLed Web3 Accelerator Beacon Hosts Inaugural Demo Day

Blockchain News

00:51 sec | Last week

Polygon FounderLed Web3 Accelerator Beacon Hosts Inaugural Demo Day

"7 p.m. Thursday, January 12th, 2023 polygon founder led web three accelerator Beacon, hosts inaugural demo day Beacon, positioning itself as the most founder friendly accelerator, started by Sunday nail wall and accomplished web three builder in his own right, hosted its inaugural demo day today. Graduates a Beacon's first cohort presented their ideas on various subsectors of the crypto economy, such as gaming, infrastructure, decentralized lending, and developer tooling this group, known as cohort zero, was described as the MVP of Beacon by the program's core contributor Sunday nail wall, cofounder of the polygon blockchain. Looking ahead, nail while plans to expand the program by running two cohorts of 2025 companies twice per year, read more

Polygon
Tron Founder Justin Sun Looking To Spend 1,000,000,000 on Digital Currency Groups Assets Report

The Daily Hodl

00:40 sec | Last week

Tron Founder Justin Sun Looking To Spend 1,000,000,000 on Digital Currency Groups Assets Report

"11 p.m. Sunday, January 15th, 2023 Tron founder Justin sun looking to spend 1 billion on digital currency groups assets report. Justin's son is reportedly eyeing the assets of digital currency group DCG. The parent company of embattled crypto broker genesis, and many other firms in the industry. According to Reuters, the founder of blockchain network Tron TRX and adviser to crypto exchange hubby is willing to allocate as much as 1 billion of his personal. The post Tron founder Justin sun looking to spend 1 billion on digital currency group's assets report appeared first on the daily HODL

Justin Sun Crypto Broker Tron Blockchain Network Tron Trx Crypto Exchange Hubby Justin Genesis The Post Tron Reuters Digital Currency Group
Ghost Python, Hoskinson Reacts To First Cardano Python Smart Contract

The Crypto Basic

00:39 sec | Last week

Ghost Python, Hoskinson Reacts To First Cardano Python Smart Contract

"8 a.m. Saturday, January 14th, 2023. Ghost python, hoskinson reacts to first cardano python smart contract. The cardano network could see a spike in the number of developers and development activity as the possibility of python smart contracts grows. Charles hoskinson has described the first cardano python smart contract as ghost python. The cardano founder tweeted this in response to a threat about cardano's first python smart contract trolling cardano detractors. The post ghost python, hoskinson reacts to first cardano python smart contract first appeared on the crypto basic.

Charles Hoskinson Cardano Hoskinson
Eric Welcomes Victoria Robinson of ReAssemble Life

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:16 min | Last week

Eric Welcomes Victoria Robinson of ReAssemble Life

"The joy of speaking with Victoria Robinson. She's a national pro life leader author. She's the founder of something called reassemble a nonprofit ministry which offers abortion education and after abortion trauma recovery for both men and women, Victoria welcome. Oh, thank you for having me, Eric. It's an honor for me to be here. Well, listen, this is so important. And you've written a few books. I want to talk about the books. One of the books is they lied to us, which shares stories from post abortive women and how that choice impacted the lives. I talk about this all the time that we're living in this culture that tells you. And it's an extraordinary thing that there's this narrative out there. It's a lie that if you had an abortion, you should be happy about it. It's the greatest thing, no downside, most women don't have that perspective, but you don't hear their perspective. Oprah never had them on to hear about how their lives were ruined or the pain or the trauma. You don't hear about that. And similarly, you've written a second book. The first one is they lied to us about women and their stories. The second book is they lied to us too, which is a compilation of stories from men who participated in the abortions of their children. I fall into that latter group many, many years ago, and so I take this all very seriously and I'm really glad that you have written these books. So where shall we start? First of all, let me ask you reassemble, where do you get that? What does that mean? The title of your ministry, the name of your ministry. Well, Eric, just like your wife Suzanne, I was a pregnancy center director as well for over two decades. And one of the things that I saw throughout my career and to this day is that people are broken. They're in pieces after an abortion. They've bought into the lie. They've been manipulated at the most vulnerable time of their life by the abortion industry that it's like getting a tooth pulled, which we know is a croc. And so I just decided to call my nonprofit reassemble because I've seen these people in pieces that are desperate to be put back together.

Victoria Robinson Eric Victoria Oprah Suzanne
Governor Pete Ricketts Selected to Fill Nebraska Senate Seat

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:49 min | 2 weeks ago

Governor Pete Ricketts Selected to Fill Nebraska Senate Seat

"Governor. You know, Mitt Romney was a governor became a senator. Joe Manchin was a governor became a senator. It's a very different way of are you used to slowing down a lot because you used to have to make things happen in Nebraska. Now you're going to have to watch things go slow. What do you think? Well, that's what I have been told that as governor, you know, there's a sense of urgency about everything you're doing because you've got to make things happen. The Senate by its design, right? Our founders wanted a body that would slow things down. They didn't want politics to be whipsawed back and forth. And so that's how they designed the Senate to work. So I've got to change my mindset with regard to how this goes. But it's certainly informed been an important institution for us over the years to provide that stability for our country. We can certainly see that when you're compared to say the parliamentary systems around the world that can change governments at a drop of a hat. Governor ricketts shouldn't be senator ricketts. I don't know if you've talked to leader McConnell yet. I am a great fan of leader McConnell. I think he saved the United States Constitution when he held open the vacancy created by the untimely death of Antonin Scalia. And I think he got Donald Trump elected, and of course he got Donald Trump's nominees confirmed. Have you talked to him yet about what you want to do and your priority? Yeah, I have as a matter of fact, I just had a conversation with him last night where he was giving us an advice. Not that due to similar to what you said. He was urging patients because the Senate moves slower. But I've actually known senator McConnell since I ran for Senate back in 2006. And I'm staying in touch with him over the years. So I'm looking forward to working with him. And I agree with you, you know? He is a very strategic thinker. He's really done a great job for us in the U.S. Senate as leader and I'm really looking forward to the opportunity to be able to learn from it.

U.S. Senate Joe Manchin Governor Ricketts Senator Ricketts Mitt Romney Mcconnell Donald Trump Nebraska Antonin Scalia Senator Mcconnell United States
DCG Responds As Gemini Accuses Company of Fraud

The Breakdown

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

DCG Responds As Gemini Accuses Company of Fraud

"Let's get into the meat of today. And that is, of course, the DCG drama continuing. I mentioned on yesterday's show as I was finishing up recording that Cameron winklevoss had just dropped another open letter. His second in two weeks. That letter ended up eliciting the longest response we've seen for months from DCG and its CEO Barry silbert. At this point, I don't think many of you need too much background, but the ultra TLDR of the situation is that genesis is a subsidiary of the digital currency group DCG, who also own coin desk, by the way. And genesis has both a lending business and a trading business. The lending business in particular had a rough 2022. They were the biggest creditor of three arrows capital after it collapsed, which led to DCG taking over that claim and the genesis CEO resigning. Genesis also had a $175 million or so stuck on FTX, and in the wake of the FTX collapse, genesis lending halted withdrawals. Among other things, that has trapped around $900 million that was part of Gemini's earn program, which is their consumer yield program. As time has gone on, Gemini's customers have been getting angrier and angrier and so too the public pressure from Gemini on genesis and DCG is also ratcheted up. Last week, that took the form of an open letter asking for Barry silbert and DCG to come to the table by January 8th, which was Sunday. That's the letter in which Cameron winklevoss accused silbert of bad faith stall tactics his words. In the wake of that, there was a bit of back and forth on Twitter, but nothing really more than that. Then of course, on Friday, Bloomberg reported that DCG and genesis were being investigated by the Department of Justice, which took the situation up a couple more notches. Well, yesterday on Tuesday, Cameron winklevoss dropped a second open letter and this one was even more accusatory than the first. This one was directed not to bury silbert, but to the entire digital currency group board. The big theme of that letter was that this was no longer just a public disagreement between business partners, but an accusation of fraud. The letter kicks off, I am writing to let you know that Gemini and more than 340,000 earn users have been defrauded by genesis global capital. Together with its parent company digital currency group, its founder and CEO Barry silbert, and other key personnel.

Cameron Winklevoss Barry Silbert Genesis DCG Silbert Gemini Bloomberg Department Of Justice Twitter Genesis Global Capital Digital Currency Group
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Did I stop thinking instead of saying, no, I think that makes your product look not very good, or it should be blue, should be pink, or I really wanted to speak Italian to me. I have no idea what people will say, but you just have to listen sometimes. In all of that stuff, that's really fantastic to hear how you were able to see a problem, work on a part time, get in a program and validate it so quickly in a very short amount of time, have a product with customers that are recurring revenues. If you look back at what you've done, what would you say to your younger self when you start on this journey is there anything that you would have liked to have done better or different or you wish you knew before you started? Yes, there are a lot of learnings, but the one thing that stands out is do more research before implementing. So sometimes it may seem like this is taking longer and you should just go ahead and implement it. You have enough data. You really need to know because when you go back and rebuild something that takes additional time effort and resources as a startup, you have small teams, you have limited resources, so you really need to understand and validate everything that you're doing. I'm sure for first time founders, things are first time and you try to do a lot with limited resources, but give enough thought to every action. And even if whether it's like acquiring a customer, try to understand a lot about them before reaching out before you send out fast email, you need to know if this is the right person to reach out to. You don't want to spend a lot of time on someone who is not going to be your customer, similarly on the product, you really need to. So you engaged with probably ten or 20 people in the beginning. Partner with them. They should come back probably after a month or two months. And show them this is what so they should be part of the journey. So when you come to a point where you're launching your product or your services, they should be the ones who are kind of like ambassadors for your company, you won't believe it..

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:57 min | 9 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Nice. So you had said also that so that tells me how you came up with the idea and you saw this going forward. But you also said you were part of the founder institute accelerator at the time. So when did you go from your idea to saying, hey, I need to join an accelerator to do something. We joined founder institute because both of us cofounders are first time founders and we wanted to understand a little bit more from experienced entrepreneurs. And that's the reason we joined founder institute. We were idea stage a little bit of working on MVP was happening at the time and that was January 2021 when we graduated from F 5 was a three month program. And after that, after three months of working on building the product, getting some wireframes done, tech stars invited us to join their cohorts. So in July, we were having conversations with tech stars and that was further validation that we were on to something. Given the traction, given the development on product and our pipeline, they were really impressed and they wanted us to join their cohort. So we started working with a lot of mentors from textiles as well. And that's when we actually launched our MVP when we were part of it. And thanks to the entire textile screw, like it's a global community. It's not just the tech stars mentors and managing director. It's like the global community of the founders who are part of the entire ecosystem. They were ready to work with us, help us, wherever we needed. And that's where we narrowed our focus. So we were like, okay, this is a note taking platform. We do some data insights. We capture that. But soon enough we realized this is a this is a problem with salespeople as compared with marketing or probably product or project managers. And we saw the real problem..

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

04:49 min | 9 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"So we were just trying to explore if there's something and how brilliant this technology is, given it's been more than a decade now, people are working on it, but how mature this technology is. So we will just having some conversations about it. And when we got this problem, we were like, let's explore it for them. So it's really starting to look casual conversation. And then turn into the idea and then business later on. At what point did you know, with all these conversations that you said, something's really here? This is really real. Like it's not just everybody saying, oh yeah, that's a problem we had it's nice. You know, your baby looks nice. It's pretty, yeah, we agree. It's a problem. Go fix it, right? When did you really know this is the right thing to solve? So that's the thing. I have talked to more than 400 individuals in like three to four months after we realized this is a problem which is prevalent. And as I mentioned, it's not just salespeople. We were talking through a lot more individuals to understand if this is a problem because we wanted to identify if this is an immediate problem or it's good to have. Like they can still live without having any solution to that. And that's where this product market fit conversation started happening. But at that time, we were part of founder institute, which is idea stage accelerator. So they encouraged us to go and talk to as many potential customers as possible. But we realized there is a problem here. People were like, if you give me this, this will save me one hour, two hours every day, which is like in 5 days. It's going to save me like ten, 11 hours. And that's a lot of revenue. If you look at sales of marketing and in frontline managers, if they are dealing with direct clients, if you talk to project managers or if you talk to other profiles within a company, maybe they have a lot of calls, but they don't need a solution right away because they are not dealing with any conversation, which is like very critical. I won't say critical, but something that's directly impacting the revenue as supposed to the salespeople who need it because if they are having back to back conversations, they need something like that. So that's where it started. But soon enough we realized it's not just the note taking. If we are talking to 14 individuals in a company and all of them having these conversations, then they required something which is called analytics. They wanted to understand if 20 sales representatives are talking to their clients. What kind of conversations are happening if a company is losing a deal, or if they are winning a deal, what are the reasons behind that? So we started gathering information about when we talk to sales leaders and sales represented different conversations. And we quickly realized there was more emphasis on understanding the analytics behind it. So if you're having a conversation, can we use conversational AI? And kind of extract those are other things that are unspoken words like sentiments like engagement score, inquisitiveness, curious. If those things can be extracted, then sales leader can better understand if they can close more deals in a month or in a quarter. And with data..

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

01:39 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Can always check out our site. If you are thinking about raising capital, it's simply founder suite dot com. That'll have that in the show notes. So we'll get that. And that'll be great. And then I'm at Nathan at Verizon dot com and then on our social handles, it's just like Twitter slash founder suite Facebook slash founder suite..

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:38 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Investor angst when the founders clearly haven't done the research. So that's step number one on this. But in the time to build that list, and then I guess step number two is just making sure your pitch is really, really, really good. I think I see a lot of pitch decks. I see a lot from our customers, and probably 80% are just not ready for showtime. It's hard to build your own pitch. I know that because I even struggle with building our pitch deck when I was raising capital, your pitch has to be crystal clear, super simple, have a nice story arc and I still founders, make sure you've given your pitch ten times to friendly fire before you go out and talk to real investors. So those are two things to kind of concentrate on in the early days. Yeah, very nice, yeah. So really, really know your the investors and what they do before you approach them, otherwise that you're wasting your time. And then have a good pitch. So maybe we can delve into just a little bit on the a good pitch piece. Good simple story with a good simple story arc. Is there what does that really look like? How do I know that it's a good story and not a bad story? I do this talk, it's called pitch deck archetypes. And we've kind of categorized, I think we have a dozen, but we focus on like 6 of them, mostly, but there's like a dozen little story lines you can use. Okay. For example, I won't go through all 12. Like example problem solution, very, very common storyline. Here's a problem we've identified in the marketplace. Here's our solution and then the rest of the story is like, here's the team, even here's our progress. That's when story arc archetype. Another is let me think of a few popular ones. There's the crystal ball, right? So it's not necessarily a problem to be like, hey, here's what the future's going to look like. Maybe it's web three or metaverse or what happens with blockchain 5 years from now. And here's our plan to kind of build towards that future, right? So that's an interesting story architect. There's a bunch of these. Yeah, are those available? Do you have those published anywhere, those 12 types? I do. I think we have it on our, and it can send you a link if you want to include it. I think we have it on our YouTube. We gave a talk to a school in time on this and recorded it. So it's pretty interesting because you get to think about your business and which storyline really matches your business. If you're really hard, deep tech, you know, the storyline might simply be about your technological breakthrough. That's another story archetype. Like here's our technology to break through. We have a thin film display that's 20% thinner and more flexible or whatever, you know..

YouTube
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

04:31 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Yeah, it's free. And you can do a lot with spreadsheets, especially if you're pretty good at spreadsheets. But it's just because of the wheelchair. Now, the sales focused CRMs are often very focused on sales, even just the design. There's a hundred little nuances to fundraising that even though fundraise is a sales process, there are a lot of little nuances that don't really apply when you're doing sales as simple examples, we have some little tags in here where you can put tag this investor, do they lead rounds or do they only co invest? That's something that doesn't apply in sales. But once your fundraising, you actually, and once you get a lead investor, you want to sort your pipeline and see all the people who co invest. Things like that. So there's a lot of little nuances that are specific to fundraising, which is why I think there's a justification for having a dedicated CRM. Of course, people we lose competition are things like HubSpot and stuff like that and we lose people to that because they're already familiar with it or whatever. But it still is. I think using the right tool for the job is I like to say sure, sure, yeah. I'm sure you can use just about any CRM, but then you have to customize it to do all the stuff that you have to figure out the process. And by the time you figure out the process, she's raise your money and you spend all that time customizing the process. And so you could shorten it if you just know, hey, I should short. I should sort my investors by lead versus follow on. Where I should sort my investors by. Seed or precede round a and how do I figure that out? Kind of makes sense. So as you've worked with different both the startups, all the early stage companies and then through founder suite, what are some of the top issues you've seen with first or second time founders?.

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"And oftentimes they'll have an application process or ideally, maybe you get referred in, so you'll have to network a little bit. But there's probably an angel group. There's probably an Orange County angel group. I would guess. Now, having said that, it's also quite relevant, especially in today's world with zoom and everyone working from wherever that there's no reason you have to be limited to the Cincinnati angel group. You know, finding people who are who get your vision, your business, regardless of where they're located. Yes, absolutely. And it's really become even in the last two or three years, more acceptable to kind of be pitching from anywhere and doesn't really matter. Location agnostic, I think, is the phrase I'm looking for here. So yeah, I would look both locally and just look for people who have an affinity with what you're doing. Yeah, I certainly have seen that shift with COVID that you can pitch from anywhere. There's a lot of pitches happen on Clubhouse. It's just audio only. You get those introductions. You can get large numbers of people in the audience listening and reach out and connect, I think the process to me for the fundraising is you've got to talk to a lot of people. And they've got to be aware of you. There's the old adage. It's not who you know. It's who knows you. And most importantly, who talks who talks nice things about you when you're not in the room. And building that relationship of trust takes a long time, the more you're out there producing your vision of the future, this is what I'm building and this is the problem I'm solving on my hut and I'm not going to stop until I've solved this problem. That goes a long way to attract people to the business. And I agree wholeheartedly with you on the, you know, don't start with the whining, I need the money that's not going to get people very excited when you start with, hey, I'm going to solve this problem and I'm going to take no prisoners until I do. We want those people, right? Absolutely. Now, how did then you come up with this idea around founder suite, what caused you to say, hey, you know, instead of working in the system, I'm going to build something different in extra to the system. What was the problem you were trying to solve? What was the problem I'm trying to solve? So after.

Cincinnati angel group Orange County
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:01 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Yeah, so we're starting to go with that, is that it's great to bring investors along on your journey a little bit. Identifying relevant investors and that takes some work that takes some time and effort to, as I call it, put together a target list of investors or build a target list. These are people who invest in your space and your sector. And you want, you know, potentially you want to get them funding your company. So building the list and then reaching out to them, getting an intro if you can. But even reaching out to them, you know, 6 to 12 months before you plan a raise capital and just kind of tell them, hey, this is what we're doing. We just launched our MVP. We've got some interesting early traction or market feedback on this. You know, I would love to keep you keep your apprised of our journey. Can I keep you up to date with the progress we're making so you get to know us, get an early sneak peek of what we're building here. And you basically start that dialog with investors. Maybe you even lean on them, ask them some questions or feedback, if they're willing to have a quick chat with you or zoom or whatever it may be. But basically, short version is getting investors kind of following along in your journey as you're making progress. Now, if you're not making any progress, then that doesn't work. You've got to do these things hand in hand, making progress in the business and keeping the investors updated, communicated, communicating with them. Got it. So you said something, you know, finding relevant investors. Can we unpack that? What does that really mean? Is that just calling uncle bob and aunt Mary? Well, of course, it depends on the stage you're at. So at the very earliest stages, if you, if you have $0 in your bank account or you have no revenue or income to start your startup, you know, you would typically lean on uncle bob. You would lean on friends family and fools, right? The three F's. Friends, family and fools to raise whatever it may be. 50 K, hundred K to get things going. Now, those aren't always the best investors for most startups because there's always the risk, the likely risk that you lose all that money and now you're dealing with the family gatherings at Thanksgiving and uncle bob's pretty angry at you. So I don't always recommend going after the friends and family. But once you get beyond that, once you get something going, you got a little momentum, then you're looking at angels. Angel investors are coming all shapes and sizes..

bob aunt Mary angels
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Think too? And the investor immediately says, well, come back when, you know, so in your course of when should a should have found her really start thinking about capital raising and talking to investors and how should they go about doing that? Yeah, good question, lots, lots to that question. I'd say, you know, one of the things that drives me crazy and I think is the wrong way to think about it is when I meet founders who say, if I had some money, then I could start this business, right? If I got, if someone funds me then, I can do this. Bad way to think about it. Like real entrepreneurs, get things going on their own. One way or another, and there are a lot of different ways to get things going. But you have to have it in motion before investors get interesting. Interested in you, right? That can mean either learning how to code and building a site yourself. That could mean like in our case. I'm a business guy. I can't write a line of code to save my life, but I was consulting to companies taking the revenue from that consulting, sending it to Poland to some engineers in Poland to build our MVP of our site, right? I mean, not paying myself for two years, basically, while my wife was supporting the family, you know, entrepreneurs get it, get it done, get it going in some way or another. And then once you've got something going, and ideally, when you found some even rough idea of product market fit, where people are signing up for your product, people are using your product. People are coming back to your product to your service or your site. But then I think it's interesting, potentially interesting to investors. If you can go into investor and say, hey, I've got this bare bones site. It doesn't do that much, but what it does, it does pretty well. And we've got this many people, this is our funnel. We've got this many visitors coming per day. This percent sign up. This percent of those actually swipe their credit card and they're coming back every month. And they're engagements increasing. Now I'm ready to go raise capital, really scale this up. That's pretty interesting to investors. I think that's a good time to really start thinking about fundraising. When you have some momentum going. Now, having said that, I think it's actually good to initiate the dialog with investors even before that. So one of the things, one of the great tactics I like to tell founders is just a second. We'll come back to that. So we recap what just the recap for everybody. The old premise, if I had money, I could make money, is a really flawed strategy. Entrepreneurs have to learn how to be scrappy, get something going and prove that they can do something. Once they've proven, they can do something at the point that they can start proving they're attracting people or ideas or social proof, something to themselves, then they're generating momentum. I think that's the three things three things that you said. And then, but then you're going on to say, if they're doing that, how they talk to the investors while they're.

Poland
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

03:30 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Hello and welcome to the savvy founder. I'm Philip topham, your host, and I am very happy to have Nathan Becker here. Where are you, where are you calling from today? Falling in from Marin county, California, which is just across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco. About ten minutes north of San Francisco. Very nice. It's a beautiful area. Close close to the red Woods, close to the wine districts. The Napa Valley just a little ways away. Yeah, not too far. It is nice if you keep going up the coast, there's dramatic coastal scenery. And if you go inland a little bit, that's for all the wine country is. So lots of fun places to explore forever out here. Yeah, so you and I got connected, you've been in the startup world capitol world for a really long time. And have learned a lot about raising money and capital. So why don't we start off with that giving you a thumbnail of how did you get into the whole startup ecosystem fundraising process? Sure, alternative to go back too far, let's see. I grew up in boulder, Colorado, great little town, and wanted to go to the West Coast. That's all I knew, wanted to go to the West Coast. So my dad and I rented a convertible car many years ago. We drove from San Diego up the coast to Oregon or Washington, stopping at little universities all along the way. And somehow ended up deciding right in the middle to go to Santa Clara university, which is kind of in the heart of Silicon Valley. I guess the southern end of Silicon Valley. So that was kind of the first exposure to the tech startup world is just going to college there and doing internships. And then afterwards, I went out and worked for a little while on investment banking during the dotcom bubble, boom, boom slash bubble, and that was helping companies, many of them, two year old companies, one year old company, go public, which was a crazy thing. And so got an exposure to that. And then went on and worked at piper Jaffrey and JPMorgan's private placement group, helping companies raise later stage rounds. So kind of just kind of fell into the startup world really love working with startups and the energy around entrepreneurship. And developed an expertise in fundraising. That became my sort of skill and trade and then that's what led to ultimately founding thunder street. Yeah, great. It's remarkable as I keep interviewing different people in the industry, how everybody. Has a different story and a different journey and together we can share all those stories and get a good picture of what's going on. And so I'm excited to chat about that. You've seen a lot of things from, like you said, the dot com dot bomb, whatever you want to call it, to today, one of the things I've always seen with startups and startup founders is the very first thing whenever I go to an event, they're always looking for the investors and they're always going, hey, I'm John. I've got this great.

Philip topham Nathan Becker red Woods San Francisco West Coast Marin county Golden Gate Bridge Silicon Valley Napa Valley piper Jaffrey Santa Clara university boulder California Colorado San Diego Oregon Washington JPMorgan John
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:45 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"And so responding to people on Facebook ads and video format or putting a video post on Amazon Alexa, it's just a different way and probably a more meaningful way to bring people together. Without getting throttled without having to deal with a whole bunch of issues. And so I think the trends are really in that direction. How much of a connection we can build between two individuals for the purpose of business. And how easy can we make because Clubhouse really allowed for that, right? Clubhouse grew so quickly because people were siloed, they're stuck behind zoom screens. As soon as the computer shut off, they were alone again. And all of a sudden on Clubhouse, you had millions of people around the world feeling the same way and conversing another. I heard people crying on the call on some of the Clubhouse rooms. They've got a very emotional because the pandemic really knocked a lot of things as we took for granted. And so I think in Google web stories is another example that we're now working. We just finished WordPress integration. How do we get more visual storytelling within search results? Well, Google web stories allows for that. And a whole new way than just seeing text results everywhere and then clicking on them and seeing if that's the right post. The thing that you're looking for. Got it. So what are the other things that new founders always ask me and they always say, how do I find my great cofounder? How do I find a great people? You even alluded to bringing out some people and then having to say idios. So how do you find great people for your business? The thing is you just have to do trial and error. And I believe in the law of attraction and I think it's the way you treat people the way you think the opportunities you present yourself in front of or even have the ability to recognize them through positive thinking, people will just come to you. I mean, we've been through the wringer in terms of everything. And I think the people who now work with us, some of them for years now, they came in through just not looking so much, but then having a certain idea, having a certain kind of need and at some point, just one thing led to the other and some people became friends, some people looking at colleagues, some people who came both. It just does happen..

Amazon Google Facebook
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

04:22 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"Help. We can give them, we'll do a whiteboard session with everyone on the call and help them out or make your introductions. And then, of course, on top of they can do one on one calls with me. It's really as a community of small business owners that we call them underdogs. And that not only helps them feel empowered, feel welcome, but then it's a great community raise capital off of. It's going back to equity crowdfunding. That's the first place we go when we launch a new campaign and be promoted is our Facebook group. Basically, you know, being a small business often is you're alone. And so you're creating an opportunity so they can be a community of peers and that are people just like them. Exactly. And that's the goal. Very nice. In the process you said you did the crowdfunding route. Did you ever do the fundraising and try knocking on the doors of the beyond friends and family and the professional investors? What was that like? Yeah, we probably speak to dozens of people every month in terms of potential investors, potential funds, and some of them are later states on their earlier stage. We got introduced to these individuals, usually through. Warm intros, and so I guess the point is, all this will be pitching, always be talking. But at the end of the day, equity crowdfunding really saved us. I mean, we've raised nearly a $1 million and that allowed us to build a business. If you think about it, we raise overall 1.31 .4 million. We've done about 600,000 in revenue. The equity crowdfunding itself was about a $1 million. And when we had to rebuild a company and everything, about 25 months ago, we relaunched the company. Most of the difference between one and 1.5 actually didn't even go into developing the new platform. So if you think about it, 600,000 revenue about a $1 million in investment..

Facebook
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:18 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"I'll give them $5. For everything officer. Chief everything officer to listen to me and talk to me and giving feedback. So we had like a dozen, maybe two dozen customers in the very beginning. And once we turned on app sumo, that brought in, I think, about a thousand, 1200 customers, and then we turned on ads ourselves, because then the partnership usually lasts about 30 to 90 days at last I think 65, 90 days or something like that. And then after absolutely was done, we actually start producing cash pretty positively very quickly. We've always been positive row as every dollar that goes out all this produces more back. And so we kept increasing. I think I'm spending like three to 5 K in the beginning. We're now spending 45,000 a month. And you just have to test. We try a whole bunch of other channels. We have other channels that are actively running as well, but Facebook is by far the most important for us at this point. Let's drill into that. Quick things you have to test, right? Yeah. When you say you have to test how many tests did you do? So if I'm a new founder, how many tests do I do I stop at three tests or 50 tests, ten tests? What do I need? Every day. We're still testing our funnels. I mean, we've built funnels for a $100, $300, $500, the latest funnel is probably like a 125, $150. But it's produced nearly $600,000 in revenue for us. And every button, every text, all of that matters, mobile versus desktop, we see customers buying on mobile, getting the code and everything, and then going on desktop and using the platform. It's a little bit of everything. And you have to constantly do that a B tests and use Google Analytics. See the flow. And of course, make sure you have your pixels install, so you can make sure your ads are actually producing positive row as with iOS 14 or at the new iOS updates. You need to make sure you have conversions API install on your website for Facebook. Just do all the basic stuff. This will help you really scale. You want to do you want to lay out the groundwork for scalability. So like 25 months later, 26 months later, once we've been public in the market, we see the benefits of doing everything that we did 30 months ago. During the rebuild. Nice. Yeah, it's those little things that are scalable that build habits. So you can really know, oh, this is how we do it. You don't gloss over it perfect. Wonderful..

Facebook Google Analytics
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

05:32 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"And the technology, and I realized, wow, this is definitely here to stay because now you've got a Clubhouse, you have now the lookalikes, Spotify bought a company called green called greenhouse. A green room and then a first Twitter spaces and everyone else. And so it was really interesting that audio was here to say, consumer habits have changed. Now, it's kind of gone down a little bit in terms of adoption for Clubhouse, but that's just because we're hybrid now between in person and at home. But people are still selling and making money on Clubhouse. It's a medium here to say. Yeah, absolutely. And I certainly like that you're empowering the small businesses to stay in touch with their client base. Because so many of them, so much of America is small business and it's a small community. It's not a mega community. As much as people might think, the fang is going to take over the world, the big Facebook Amazon Netflix and Google that I leave out, probably somebody. They're not going to take over the world because they're still going to be the guy down the street that repairs your car or does your taxes and all that. And so those people are always going to be there. So I love that. Anything in that part of your growth in your company, you want to comment on before I come back to the crowdfunding yeah, I think audio and even the new stuff that we're doing like Google web stories, which is like an Instagram product, but it pops up on the search results of your Google search essentially. I think it's super important to keep that in mind because if you're keeping up with the times, if you're keeping up with the trends, I think you also have to have a love for sci-fi because I do. I love Star Trek. I love warp drives. I was designing different kinds of engines and concept coming up with different concepts. And I was a teenager or a kid. I kind of have that same approach as where can we go next? What is the next bold new phase that we can go into? And so we have an augmented reality app, which is completely done now, and it can actually, I mean, if there are turns your entire living room interior office into our office into a storyboard session. So you know, like in the old days, when clients came into agencies and they saw walls upon walls of storyboarding, mood boarding, whatever you want to call it. You can do that in front of you by just using your phone and have clients from all over the world looking at the same virtual augmented reality, just by using your phone and have an audio conversation, drag content from the library to the calendar and schedule it. We call it a timeline. So none of our competitors even have an augmented reality department, a data science department, an audio marketing department, we're so cutting edge. It is baffling. So I do think sci-fi helps. In business. Yeah. It's that fearlessness to try something that's new. Like always applied, you know, I'm sure you're always applying technology to a business problem. You're not just like everything. In a university just writing a research paper, you're trying to figure out how to use it every day, right? That's the mother of invention, right? And I was going to say, sometimes drives my Friends insane. But I will apply tech to ingredients that I'm using in my recipes. So for example, something in data science, it's called complex network graphs. And so if you Google food, complex network graphs, you'll see the use of certain ingredients with other ingredients that are used in other ingredients..

Google Spotify Netflix Twitter Amazon Facebook America
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

03:11 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"How did you know that the pivot was right that you put all your credit cards on the line? Like, how do you really know? Because there's probably another founder out there that his running out of their cash runway and they're going, is this a good thing? Am I smoking something or is this a great thing? What is it? So help the person out there understand what really was going through your mind because you said, you'd already proven the product a little bit. You knew you needed a big computer screen. So what was the deciding factor? The answer is we had no idea. This was all a chance. I mean, most startups, I mean, this is the most riskiest class of securities or type of investment you can ever do right. So definitely do your due diligence and know how far you want to go. Nice. In my case, I really didn't have any sense of precaution or conservative. I knew that the business had to exist. I knew that small businesses needed our help as well. And the competition was doing a really bad job at it. In fact, one of our one of our competitors is publicly traded. They only do social. They grew from a billion in market cap to nearly 8 billion market cap. Their stock has gone down a little bit since the sense of recovery. But the point is, they grew really fast to go to digital marketing. But they only did social. They don't do audio. They don't do blogging. They don't do Google web stories. They don't have any AI. And so I was like, that's interesting. I mean, there's so many points to continue to build this business into a big business. It made total sense. Because Elon Musk probably called the same way when he put in the like $200 million. He was like, I spent 50 here, 50 or a hundred there, or something, this is a breakdown. And he had to borrow money for rent. I mean, the point is no one believed in a new automobile company. No one believed you could take on NASA as a space company. And no one believed that you could build a forward around solar power and solar panels and really make it, but sometimes that's what it takes. If you say no, it drives the founder to do even more. Yeah, no, totally appreciate your authenticity and sharing that story because but I will say that sometimes there's the trend there that you just see, like the audio, right? Like the Internet's out there, everybody's doing Google searches, everybody's doing social media, everybody's doing Facebook and mobile apps, right? There's an app for that in a saturated and there's little blogs, blogs moving to podcasts, just like we're doing today in the spoken word is continuing to increase. And we saw that last year, I wasn't even on Clubhouse when we started building the Amazon Alexa capabilities. That came about in the middle of 20 21. And I got on Clubhouse in December of 2021. Excuse me, 20 yeah, 20 20 actually. And it was really interesting because all of a sudden, we could see the evolution of audio all of a sudden. And we had started working on the speaker before that..

Elon Musk Google NASA Facebook Amazon
"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"During the summer of 2019, we were auditioning for a TV show called meet the drapers. If you guys don't know, but meet the drapers is a TV show by Tim Draper, who's a billionaire investor, very successful. And in fact his whole family has been adventure capital for generations. His show, we were auditioning for at the republic office, which is an equity crowdfunding platform, probably one of the top ones in the world. And we were turned down. They said we were too early. Or on the same time, we had just signed the deal with app sumo, which was a flash sale website where they take software companies, do a promo. Right. And so they were actually looking to have us launch immediately, but we need a couple more months to polish everything out. So we ended up launching later that year. A few days later, after all this happened, my dad called me up during the first week of September and said, hey, you need to come down to New Jersey. Your mom's been taken to the hospital. And I was like, okay, what happened? And he wouldn't really tell me. She ended up passing away a few days later, but before that happened, I got an email from meet the Draper's team saying, hey, we reconsider, we need you on the set immediately. I also can you beat out there in California. Long story short, that collaboration between the show and republic was actually what's set off the whole idea of crowdfunding or equity crowdfunding specifically in this case. And we let our customers invest in the company. We let total strangers who were interested in helping small businesses, maybe they were running their own small businesses themselves. And to date, we raised nearly a $1 million of the 1.31 $.5 million be raised overall. So that basically consists majority of the capital. The people have invested in our company. A $100 at a time, some customer put in 5000, $30,000. But nearly a $1 million has come in from something called equity crowdfunding. And so the metrics are very simple. And this is what I really encourage small businesses and founders to talk about or consider. In our case, the average lifetime value based on calculations is about 650 bucks. The average investor in equity crowdfunding, if you take the total amount of investors and you take the amount of capital we raise, give or take. It's about 300 to $315. So it's about you can argue that the lifetime value is almost a $1000. Our cost of acquisition is about $97. It used to be $50, but as the prices have gone up, we started going into different regions and different segments, the cost of customer acquisition cost has gone up. So remember those numbers, nearly a thousand LTV, and a $97 tac. Typically, and this was in the words of our one of our investors, you want to see a three to one ratio. We're almost seeing, if you forget the investment part, we're seeing a 6 to one ratio. If you add the investment by we're almost seeing a ten to one ratio in terms of the and so that is actually how we've actually turned the business model around equity crowdfunding to be sustainable. Most people treat it as a blank check. I recommend you doing it this way. And then it really makes sense for investors. Yeah, absolutely. There's a lot to unpack there. And so I would start, I've come back to the crowdfunding piece. But one of the things that struck me was..

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"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

The Savvy Founder

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Savvy Founder

"You doing? Fabulous. Hello from New York City. In my opinion, the greatest city on earth, but it's been a good day. Thank you. Yeah, it's a great city. There's a lot of good cities in the world, so I'm not going to, I'm not going to play favorites. I'm going to go visit them all and enjoy the food that they all have in the great entertainment. So yeah. So let's just write dive right into it. So you've got a great business and a great story. So first, let's bring the audience up to speed about hello woofing and what is hella wi and how did it, why don't we start there? Yeah, that's a great question. So it's all about founders. It's all about small businesses. It's all about the underdogs. We like to say it's smart marketing platform, for underdogs. My dog happens to be our theme. He's on my shirt. He's on my head. He's everywhere. It's a Maltese puppy, but going beyond that cuteness and how adorable he is. We really set out to build a platform that could help and will help and gives hope back to small businesses to really take back their time, build a community, and it goes beyond social media management. We started the business focusing on social media management and just scheduling posts around different platforms. But then we realized that blogging, something that was very needed in the last 24 months when people were not going into stores. They were Googling you and being searching you, AOL searching you, whatnot. And if you weren't ranking in the first few pages, then they didn't even know that you existed, especially at the local scene. So we realized that blogging, super important, Google web stories, the new thing that we're now focusing on for local businesses, super important. And then beyond that, we also realize that, boy, a lot of smart speakers are being sold left and right. You see three behind me on my left side. One in front of me, the echo show. I've got two in the living room. Three in the kitchen. Which is a lot. But the point is, there's so many in the world. They're about half a billion. Question was, our small business is using those devices to reach their customers and the answer was very, very, very few because it costs a lot of money to build the app and skills, takes a lot of money to maintain them and boy, you need to know how to code. And so these are working with the Amazon team, the Alexa team to build a very simple wide label solution. And so there are a whole bunch of things we can talk about. But at the end of the day, smart marketing for underdogs. Nice, yeah. Even my parents at 83 and 84 went out and bought a smart speaker. I won't give the brand, but yeah, they love it to check the weather and check the news and play jazz. So it's great. When we got connected, one of the things that fascinated me is that you started your business without doing the Silicon Valley dance and going to raise a bunch of money. And so what did you do to get your business started and how did that idea come about and then how did you decide to go all in? Yeah, I mean, in the beginning, when we started the business, we put in a few $1000 to build a prototype, get it out into the hands of customers and users..

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