35 Burst results for "Foster"

Tiffany Haddish Is Dating Common

Daily Pop

04:12 min | 20 hrs ago

Tiffany Haddish Is Dating Common

"Every, this is daily. tweet he with Justin Silvester, and Victor Cruz you guys Tiffany Haddish. She's found law. Now there's been a lot of speculation whether or not. She's really in relationship with common. Well, now she's sitting the record straight and some people are surprise on Steve O's Wild Rod podcast. She says that this is hands down the best relationships has ever been in. This I feel more confident in me not in. It's not him. That's doing it but it's Stable yeah. Way Happier in. It's like knowing that I got somebody that. Cares about me really has my back. Like. It seems like he does anyways I love I love you know. What are you guys think? Were they smart not to re eleven a relationship to now do you think it's a smart? I think something happened last night. She got it real good. It was a great night and she was in her feelings. I. Think it smart for Tiffany. Haddish to let this I think for her you know she finally found somebody who understands her who gets her and I think a lot of time. Don't realize you know this woman grew up in foster care. A lot of people that I know that grew up in foster care have abandonment issues. They don't let people in very easily. So that's why we haven't seen Tiffany haddish in these celebrity relationships after celebrity relationships. So now she founded you'd like common who goes deep with her who she feels comfortable with who empowers her, and she's like how I'm ready to let you guys know this dude is here and I'm writing with him and I think it's great. I think it's great to I think it's important especially for relationships that are like in Hollywood and are in the public eye I think keep it a secret a little bit I think that's why she kept it a little closer to the vest can just by saying that how much I love Tiffany Haddish. His bald head I didn't think I'd love it this much. But not her in common together it's like two EMINEM's being. What I love that she's like in love she's talking about she's out forward about it. After being asked one hundred times is you're gonNA have a baby if you're going to do this, do that with now that she's in something real and I think it's legit and I think and I wish nothing but. What am is me she said she lost twenty pounds and I think he'd lose about one hundred calories every time you sleep with someone side is. supposed. TO BE GAINING WEIGHT Is the time where people are eating lounging around. On the. Relationship Vic, she is working hard with Komen now cash wondering they did not make on Tumblr they met on a movie set and in the beginning, they seem to be joking around about relationship. Do you guys think this was part of this strategy die when they wanted to keep it private they may challenge the spot was there they moved in but like we just we just can't come out and be public about this. I think when you get to a certain age, you're not throwing every relationship up on instagram but we live in a world where people meet big on dates they get a coffee and they meet dogs three days later and all of a sudden we know their interrelationship these people are over forty. They're not playing this a love game like everyone else. Victim. Also say that we can. We stop letting social media validate relationships like just don't put your relationship online or social media on twitter doesn't mean you're not with the person anymore I. Remember every time I like post Rubio, post like her toe and the photo people like thank God you guys are still together. I got worried I'm like. Are you serious because you see her? Also. Keeps all the single people out there. That are actively searching right now because a lot of people have come out in a very lonely at the moment out of Oscillation Quarantine and I need to know who's available if you don't put in Karachi's talk, how do they night? Know but by the way when you're when you're not available is when they come. So that's why I always tell people don't Poche your man on. INSTAGRAM. Don't be nobody to your happiness because they only want you when you went somebody and that's the true nobody was victor until he got CARUCCI.

Tiffany Haddish Victor Cruz Steve O Justin Silvester Instagram Karachi Hollywood Tumblr Twitter Komen VIC Rubio
Hong Kong's new security law explained

BTV Simulcast

04:38 min | 5 d ago

Hong Kong's new security law explained

"Has denied attacking free speech after biting a dozen candidates from Legislative Council elections scheduled for September. The decision really does come a day after police arrested four youths over social media Post chief North Asia correspondent Stephen Angle has investigated the ramifications of this national security Lou in a new hour long documentary airing later. Friday. In fact, just over half an hour's time is hunger on aged to Steve joins us now with a look at what's in store for the opposition. After these latest move, Steve Well, Obviously, it's a big blow to the opposition if they have 12 of their candidates and potentially even more to be disqualified because, according to the government here, they do not necessarily meet the qualifications of supporting the basic law as well as the new national security law. So it is a blow. I mean, it is one of the biggest disqualifications. It is the biggest disqualification of candidates. Because four years ago in 2016 6 candidates were disqualified and I'll let you decide of the merit on those disqualifications in this slice of Hong Kong on edge, too. I honestly feel that at the end of the day at the moment, we're on like an airplane with a lot of turbulence. Everybody's holding on waiting for the plane to land. But in most cases the plane land safely or waiting for it to crash or waiting for it to crash, But I honestly feel that this airplane is not going to crash because China needs Hong Kong. They needed open Hong Kong. They're not gonna change the mode here. They just want to keep it safe. You want to make it stronger? Fei Jing Shirley, though, doesn't want a stronger pro democracy campaign. Before the passage of the national security law. Pan Democrat lawmakers have been accused of using disruptive and filibustering tactics while fostering anti China sentiment playing cards similar to those the U. S government put out in Iraq during the second Gulf War. I've circulated here, singling out the faces of pro democracy advocates, including the human rights lawyer, Albert Ho, the ace of hearts, There will be a lot of scaring tactics. Many people are being scared away. You know, they want to defeat you without using using any force or even waiting at a war that is That is the way that the Chinese play. You know the game. If I sit here and say no, I will never be arrested. Emily Lau. Were you born yesterday? You live under Communist rule. How dare you say? I've never said that even in 1997. But neither did I predict that. Oh, I will be arrested tomorrow. No, we live under Chinese rule. So anything everything that happened. It would not surprise us, because that's the way they behave to their own people. But we will stay and fight. I don't think I'm going to leave. Even though I know I'm facing imminent risk being put in jail because you know if I become scared All the other people were also more become u know where is scared that then the whole community to be stifled. Have? Nope. Random with Hong Kong and we need to fight until the last minute, according to the anti subversion regulation before the Nationalists created lot implement in Hong Kong. This in the field is legal. But after the national security law implement in Hong Kong, this interfere might be illegal. And not only arresting me even arrest you. Freedom of speech is limited by the new that made me The freedom to ever Uncle Independence freedom to advocate overthrowing the Chinese Communist Party. I omit that there is some limitation and freedom of speech is freedom of the press. Under threat. No, no, no unless they involved in succession, subversion or not terrorist activities. But do people have to be worried about what they post on Facebook? What they post on social media, nannies and their employees? Post war? Yes, I don't think you have judicious obligation for what you are. What criminal ofthings your stuff meets the department is if you are not involved with them. You have no intention to carry out succession, subversion and terrorists X Then what? What have you to fear about?

Hong Kong Steve Well Chinese Communist Party Legislative Council Albert Ho Fei Jing Shirley Emily Lau Stephen Angle Facebook LOU China Iraq U. S
Clean Beauty in the Era of Misinformation With Cosmetic Chemist Jen Novakovich of The Eco Well

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:45 min | Last week

Clean Beauty in the Era of Misinformation With Cosmetic Chemist Jen Novakovich of The Eco Well

"So we're really starting to see this awakening of cosmetic scientists within the scientific community. You know really standing up and speaking out against the wellness industry as you said, and clean beauty marketing on social media and on Youtube. So what are your thoughts about this movement as part of the movement does really bubbling up right now? I think it's Great I. Think this is one of the positives that is coming from the clean and wellness space or quote Unquote Green. Space it is frustrating scientists and we're now starting to show up in forced on social media. It's also fostering collaboration communication on. Its fostering creativity where now starting to think I know at least I am, how can we reach better? Can Moore's? That's for example, influencing the influencers in bringing them on our team so that we can make this information marks. So that's something I. Think is really interesting in a positive. That is coming from the misinformation that is kind of overwhelming Not, just in our industry, it's kind of overwhelming through air right and do you believe the word clean should be removed from the beauty lexicon or is there use for that language? I would love for it to be removed. It perpetuates so much undue fear. It puts a lot of blame on consumers. It reinforces the idea that. If something bad happens in someone's life. It's because of the products they were saying they were purchasing dirty products and then they eventually got cancer. It's your fault because you wrong products. That's toxic I personally think in really unhealthy, it gives people a lot of anxiety. And a lot of the Times. The anxiety is undo because the products are demonstrably safe. They're pulling fearmongering to capture that idea from consumers like we wanna buy the best things for our family. We WanNa buy things that are going to damage the environment. These are things that we're all. With good cause concerned about right and like. I would love for it to be removed because ultimately the movement. From what I've seen I, believe is underpinned by pseudoscience in how can we move forward to do better if we're not actually informing our decisions by actual scientific evidence your whole subject matter is all about scientific communication. So what about the words chemicals when you hear about chemical free and that sort of thing and beauty? Why is it so loaded? Well it is waving it on a play that they don't have that science literacy that I think we learned in high school. Maybe even grades little that things are made up of chemicals. Chemicals are the building blocks of life in. So it's perpetuating science illiteracy. And misinformation because everything Beta matter are made up of chemicals rate. When we're thinking about the space of wellness would like multibillion dollar industry now and I think again, this movement that's happening with scientists where they're like, Hey, guys, let's attack some of this misinformation going on. Do you think that there is still any room for anecdotal evidence in your mind like small batch brands that are coming out there like this whole line is based on Aloe, my grandmother used to use it on my wounds or you know real women are writing reviews, online or beauty journalists who have tried hundreds of products just being like I. Love this product like. Is. There any room for that anecdotal evidence? Because that's the only thing is sometimes I'm like you know, does that mean we should only listen to scientists or what's your take on that? No. I. Mean Anecdotal Evidence has its place in Michelle from lab muffin beauty science wrote a great blog, but she has an instagram post. I, think she also has a video on this but. I mean, you can't be so scientific about the stuff because a, there's not that much science to substantiate every single thing in life including in cosmetic products. Everybody's different surf. You like product, which you're GonNa like out of your anecdotal experience than you should use the product that you like. Reviews feedback from customers. To brands as I'm formulating I received anecdotal experience through a reviews from my clients to make a product. So it's important. It's just not something when we're making statements about, for example, this ingredient will interact with Awka pour in your skin cells to enhance cellular hydration. Various claim that should be substantiated with scientific evidence, but this ingredient is going to help or this product should I say is going to help manage Eczema or acting while when you're putting those names on the label. Probably, that's scientific evidence should come in. That's why these products are generally regulated as drugs in cosmetics, but only anecdotal evidence does have a place because that's what informs whether like me like something we don't in just because one product has so much evidence an Mike how much evidence you really have product, but just because it has so much evidence shouldn't. It doesn't mean that everyone out there is going to like it in. Every ruins

Michelle Youtube Eczema Moore Awka Mike
Friendship During COVID

Model Majority Podcast

05:51 min | Last week

Friendship During COVID

"Am your Co Host Tony Naga Tony and I am your co hosts Kevin Shoe and I'm your Co, Host Bang reappropriate build a little bit. okay. That is about as energetic as we're. GonNa get. Along. With. We're dying. We're done. Very draining times as well. There's tons of stressful stuff going on in addition to all the stressful things that go on in our daily lives normally so. But, it's been a little bit I. think a little too long since we've all gotten a chance to speak, so it's good to talk to you on this Saturday Sunday Sunday orgies today Sunday. Yeah, what is day? I don't know about you, but I have completely lost track of days earlier this week. I was trying to schedule a phone call for Thursday. I want to say and I was like the person was trying to talk about. There's like isn't this Saturday and they're like? No, it's Tuesday and I was like. Wow, this isn't just like you've lost like a single day. This is completely track of any day of the week weekdays versus. Morning versus I have no idea what's going on. I'm just taking it a day at a time. You got you got the keys region and is Tuesday or Thursday they do. Talk. I sorta there too as well Jen. I thought it was on Tuesday. I thought it was Wednesday now single time I. Think I know what day it is I. Think Myself Wait. I was wrong last time so now. I'm not really worried that I'm wrong. Be Wrong again. Yeah, yeah! I'm now at the point where I have to check the calendar every morning. Figure out what day it is. What dates it? Is I have one one or two standing weekly meetings, and that's the only way that I'm able to sort of anchor. My Week is just like. Is Today Zoo Meeting Day or not? Just keep going with this. Skip the INTRO. You know speed that we do that. Just keep talking because. You, know we. We talk about serious stuff wonky stuff on this pot all the time and they really important. You know we still have an election coming up. Hopefully hopefully, hopefully, hopefully, donald trump is president, and all sorts of things but I. don't know if there's one thing that I've been doing a lot of reflection on my own since the days. Obviously no matter either here is how much of this whole thing has. Impacted us as human beings in ways, as never really impacted us before and I'm actually just kind of curious out a very. Level! What has this thing major realized something about yourself that you didn't know before? And I'M GONNA. Put you on a spot Tony, just so I can think of a good answer myself. No, you're funny Kevin. Something that I didn't know before you know what. So to know something. In my business that I make money off of which is video editing, it has always sort of been the this given that. You kind of have to work in Los Angeles and and do those sorts of things and one thing that covid nineteen has I think really proven. Is that regardless of where you live? If you work in the entertainment industry, there are a lot more options than just. Being tied to one particular place. Just, because we're being forced to work remotely now and I don't see people necessarily going back to the office setting. In what March or April of next year after we have a widely distributed vaccine or whatever the the timetable is for Covid, nineteen and so. You know people were always sort of pooh-poohing me whenever I would be. The harbinger of automation is coming, and and also we really think about well. We could probably work from anywhere if we really really wanted to so i. know now for a fact that it is possible to work in many industries now that we couldn't before remotely and I think that that's going to have a lot of good impacts going forward on many different industries, because I think diversification and decentralisation is a good thing, philosophically speaking Kevin's wow, that's a good one. That's really big. One that we talk a lot about here in Silicon Valley because people have been. Pushing for that in various ways in profiting off of it to right lots of products coming out of it on that side I think Jason. That's GonNa come full swing from that. Push that we had a few years ago where it was all open open office design lots of collaboration, and like you know what I'm talking about right especially Kevin insists he can value whereas like the push was to get away from like closed offices, and even in the lab. Setting that I'm in There was this huge push to do sort of. Big Open lab spaces where the desks were in with the labs, and the idea was to foster a lot of collaboration, and I think to some extent. Those labs can really work, but I know that I way before. Kovic struggled with having a lack of boundary between different spaces, and especially for someone like myself. WHO WHEN? I'm really focused on something I just. Just, want to shut the entire world out and so I had a really hard time like that there there was seem to be this complete stigma towards finding, closed spaces, and closing a door like I didn't have doors I could close the world out and focus for like four or five hours, so isn't that kind of interesting now that we're now realizing that? To some degree, the social interaction the collaboration is really valuable. And we need to be able to I think once this all is said and done create spaces where we can go back to having those kinds of interactions, but we don't have to like anchor everything that we do so that that's the only thing that we foster. And maybe also swing back towards like yes, people also need private spaces and spaces to sort of be alone and focused, and maybe swing away from like everything has to be right on top of each

Kevin Shoe Tony Naga Tony Donald Trump Los Angeles JEN Kovic Silicon Valley President Trump Jason
Demonstrator shot and killed at BLM protest

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | Last week

Demonstrator shot and killed at BLM protest

"Sunday night Vigil in Portland, Oregon, after a deadly shooting at a black lives matter, protest to demonstrate a shot and killed apparently caught between gunfire from the crowd and shots fired from a car. We can confirm the identity of the deceased as a Mr Garrett Foster. 28 year old white male. The driver of the car fled the scene but called 911 and turned himself in for police questioning

Mr Garrett Foster. Portland Oregon
Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | Last week

Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

"Police in Austin Texas have released two individuals suspected of firing handguns, and a black lives matter protest in a facebook live video a car is. Is Heard Honking and a group of protesters when shots rang out for member station K. UT Danny Martinez reports, police say twenty eight year old Garrett foster was carrying an AK47 type assault rifle when he approached the driver's side window of a vehicle last night during a protest and was shot. Austin police chief Brian Manley others in the crowd began striking vehicle. Gun were fired inside the vehicle at Mr Foster. Chief Manley says it appears that foster may have pointed his weapon at the driver of the vehicle before being shot himself a second individual in the crowd than fired shots at the vehicle as it drove away, foster died from multiple gunshot wounds at a local hospital. Police are still investigating the incident

Garrett Foster Austin Texas Chief Manley Brian Manley Danny Martinez Facebook Assault
Garrett Foster: Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

Garrett Foster: Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

"In Austin, Texas have launched a probe now into the shooting death of one man at a black lives matter protest yesterday. Sheila Foster is the mother of Garrett Foster shot while officers rather seen monitoring protesters in downtown Austin. That's when shots rang. It was pushing Whitney through an intersection. And this gentleman had got out of his car and started firing shots and my son was shot three times. Initial reports indicate the victim may have been carrying a rifle and approach of suspect's vehicle

Sheila Foster Austin Garrett Foster Whitney Texas
TikTok unveils $200 million fund to pay content creators

Daily Tech News Show

01:15 min | Last week

TikTok unveils $200 million fund to pay content creators

"TIKTOK. Perhaps you've heard of that. One announced in new two hundred million dollar creators fund to support US creators at least for now, just the US who are as the company says. Opportunities foster a livelihood on the APP. That's a TIKTOK spokesperson told the verge. This is the first time the TIKTOK will pay creators directly for their content. They've been letting users monetize live streams beforehand, but this is this is the company saying we WanNa pay you to stay. The company didn't say how many creators could receive funding. They also didn't say how often payments would be made, or how much creators can earn, but they would to apply. You must be eighteen years of age or older. which that's going to actually be a detriment to some. Some TIKTOK graders quite a few of them actually also have to consistently post original videos that adhere to the community guidelines of Tiktok, and you also have to have a certain follower account. That's what Tiktok says although the company didn't say how many followers that meant you know it's got like Youtube? Saying you've got gotTA. Have One hundred subscribe or thousand subscribers in order to be able to monetize certain stuff. Creators in the United States can apply for funding, starting in August, and the company says it plans to offer global access at some point.

Tiktok United States Youtube
Chicago Area Man Accused Of Writing Homophobic Slurs At Church, Park

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:34 sec | Last week

Chicago Area Man Accused Of Writing Homophobic Slurs At Church, Park

"A weak man is out of jail on bond after being charged with writing a homophobe slur on a church and government property in the western suffering to the page County state's attorney Robert Berlin, the kind of slur allegedly used by 60 year old Joe Foster and facing a church and park benches. Will not be tolerated by his office and the city of Wheaton. Berlin says that on Monday morning star allegedly used a permanent marker to write a homophobe slur on a door and outside stone bench, too. Very United Methodist Church. That night, Buster allegedly marked up more than 10 park benches with the same

Robert Berlin United Methodist Church Joe Foster Wheaton Page County Buster Attorney
Washington, DC Council committee approves racial equity bill

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 weeks ago

Washington, DC Council committee approves racial equity bill

"Of focusing its sights on racial equality, getting closer to passing a bill that aims to improve it. I believe this measure Presents a very big step in the right direction tells Remember David Grosso one, the committee vote to approve the bill that that would would establish establish the the office office of of Racial Racial Equity Equity toe toe oversee oversee training training throughout throughout the the district. district. Government Government Council Council member member Brianna Brianna Dough Dough hopes hopes it it will will foster foster change. change. We said it's an acknowledged that despite being with third largest racial demographic NBC, we've never seen a Hispanic or Latino member of the council, and that's a reality. I hope changes soon. The reject still has to be passed by the full counsel. The log

Government Government Council Brianna Brianna David Grosso NBC
Police can't access Los Angeles PD gang database records after scandal

All Things Considered

00:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Police can't access Los Angeles PD gang database records after scandal

"California attorney general Heavier But Sarah is shutting down lapdogs entries in and access to the gang database after several investigations found That many of the department's entries were false and inaccurate. Here's KCR W's Jerome Campbell. The department's entries first came under screw any in 2016 when a state audit found some questionable data like including Children in the system. Then, more recently, and LAPD. The internal audit revealed false records in the system, leading to charges against three officers for adding them. More than 20 other officers are currently being investigated in the scandal. The accounts for about 25% of the database entries. The department has suspended use of the database. But critics say the existence of those records foster racial profiling. But Sarah has since called for other departments, toe audit their own entries, and that the data base must change as well as face greater screw Any this case your job is to Rome.

Sarah Jerome Campbell Lapd Attorney California Rome
Have Man United Improved Under Solskjaer?

ESPN FC

05:33 min | 3 weeks ago

Have Man United Improved Under Solskjaer?

"Craig and frank with US Craig. What happens to you and I said? Well first and foremost. Why it can play in the chat league, because the Court of Arbitration for sport overwhelmed ruling. Now you go! We went into the intricacies and say. Think well I don't think anybody's really interested in the factors that can play. So, annual. Mean Franken segments. I'm no bottle. Convenient if you like no right I. I thought. Were good for the point. You know we know. Got The call. But he started so sloppily and I was. I was really impressed. Foster fifteen twenty minutes walk. Ralph has say that with what he's working with with the budget with the place called the way the press. They really pasta, and they were good for the lead. Listen to to Sucker Punch of two or three minutes reunited with some quality. We saw Paul Pogba Leon needing a kick up these box me sleeping possession a couple of times I've got caught for one of the goals. I thought I thought they kept plugging up to know a strong that the star. The strong finish all be inactive down. To ten men with the head injury to two young Williams wasn't ideal, but it couldn't defend the call now. And so therefore, we were not deserving island thing of taking all three points at home this. Is Craig mentioned once. You've got those two goals united. Franco well that's done and dusted united going to go on and win this game. Yeah True I. Think it was the end of the story and. Was quite unfortunately for Saas on, because seeing the the hard work, they made no and the they went through to maybe try to get at least. Withdraw off time. They were two, two, two, two, one at halftime and I think when mentioned decided to finally play the should that they were better than the saints for the second half same problem. Still Sloppy and at the end of the day you know. You always have the risks to to see the. Getting goal, and then seeing you getting outside the stadium withdraw and these up very unfortunately, because we didn't got injured the play ten against eleven the last. Let's say seven eight minutes and kick, but you have to be strong. You have to your more experience. You WanNA reach the chimpanzee next season. You shouldn't consider goal on the corner. Kick if you want to if you want. Everybody thinks that's going to deserve to be in the chimpanzee. That's really two points relaxed stupidly from from Manchester United at the of the game. Done seems to be a law. People recently have gone tidal wave of all souls Lavin. And whilst they have. IMPROVED THERE'S NO DOUBT ABOUT The Bar was extremely low. There's an argument to be, said the F. as hotter manager, they might have already knew Detroit for and be in possession of trying to chase teams down. Let let me just give you some facts off. The back of the the lockdown. Enough talked this. They've only had one team. That's not in the bottom half of the league, and that Sheffield United today interest and start from. Leslie the Skykomish who's on the feed calms tonight with Jim Bergman. He said we must remember. Prior to this game. Points return and Premier League history on Chop without the fifty four points behind Liverpool. Last year, they finished two points behind the league champions. Manchester City some point out to me Ho this is a superb progression under only gonNa Solska, and as I said, some of the footballs been better, but we must, we must remember the V. could have been in the top four nil dawn with that scored hide behind the manager in charge, not setting fair four points behind Liverpool and scrambling around to get results against teams in the bottom half. The League that that's that's not opinion. That's fact you've got Kim credit for what he's done over the last few months early, Craig. But in a league season is over a few months that don't don't think the twitter crowed. A league season he's been in there. Before Christmas the year before you had the January transfer window at the summer transfer window. His second year in the job. We're talking about a full season. They are fifty four points of the league leaders. That's more than they. We're off Manchester City when the championship last season and I repeat the second points return and their premier league history to this before the game tonight. Tell me why it's a reason to be separate cited above Manchester. United I would be concerned that with him at the helm right with the hail golsby be able to negate the amount of points next seasonal decision after that. That does worry I would have United Fund not coming up here. All this is the greatest thing ever look at the results forgetting looking league table. Look at five bucks look at previous seasons. This is the worst they've been. In the last Chris Seasons in terms of the gap, even before source was the job marina wasn't that far behind on goal wasn't as far behind. That's factual.

Craig League Manchester City Jim Bergman Liverpool Manchester United Court Of Arbitration Manchester Paul Pogba Leon Ralph United Fund Franken Twitter Detroit Chris Seasons Sheffield United Franco Williams
Los Angeles County Looks to Save Job Training Program for Foster and Homeless Youth

KNX Programming

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

Los Angeles County Looks to Save Job Training Program for Foster and Homeless Youth

"Plans to identify funding to keep the program going that offers young people work experience. The Board of Supervisors this week approved emotion directing county departments to find up to $20.7 million in the supplemental budget to continue funding the youth at work program Each year. It helps nearly 10,000 vulnerable youth find work experience is that Lead to entry level jobs Supervisor Hilda So lease they really are future and they deserve the very best. Several people called in support of the program. Now more than ever during the Cova, 19 pendant like unemployment is disproportionately impacting Foster used for highly susceptible to financial security. The continuation of the program would provide falsies like myself equal opportunities to succeed in the workplace and secure means of financial stability. The board also sought to find opportunities within county departments where youth can assist in programs. Lated to the cove in 19 pandemic, Margaret

Board Of Supervisors Cova Supervisor Margaret
Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

Squawk Pod

05:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Procter & Gamble: Let's #TalkAboutBias

"Companies combating bias many American. Corporations are taking a closer look at their impact on employees and customers when it comes to issues of diversity and inclusion one of the most visible examples, the stop hate for profit campaign, encouraging advertisers to boycott facebook amid calls for the social media giant to better moderate racist content. We've discussed this initiative at length here on squawk. SQUAWK pod check out Wednesday's episode for our most recent conversation with one of the campaign's organizers, but one of facebook's and Google's biggest advertisers has remained uninvolved in the boycott. That's proctor and gamble the consumer-goods Giant that owns household brands like Gillette. Bounty tied down vicks crest. The list goes on, but while fellow consumer giants like Pepsico Coca Cola and Unilever have pulled or paused their advertising. Advertising with facebook being Jay has not even though PNG has a history of calling out big tech platforms about this very issue in twenty nineteen, the company spoke out against digital media platforms. SUGGESTING PNG could move its aunt. Dollars to services do a better job at keeping their platforms free of offensive content, and they weren't kidding. In two thousand, seventeen and eighteen proctor and gamble had boycotted. Boycotted Youtube for over a year after its ads showed up next to terrorist content, so why his PSG remained on sidelines in this boycott, the company's strategy has instead been to double down on its own approach to combat racism with ads like the look and the talk about conversations. Black parents have with their children in this country. The talk actually won an emmy a few years ago. You were not pretty slow blood. Beautiful period. Okay. I'll never forget that. This week proctor and gamble released another short video choice encouraging white Americans to speak up and stand up against racial bias as well as the Hashtag. Let's talk about bias fostering conversation about race between strangers. Everyone has bias as might be uncomfortable. Can you imagine that officer having his knee on a white woman's neck like that for ten minutes it all starts with biased. Each video is a powerful watch. Damon Jones chief communications officer at proctor and gamble joined squawk box this morning to discuss the strategy. Here's Andrew, Ross Sorkin Damn Good morning to you. The morning before we get into some before we get into some of the details, just just tell us how this came about and I'm curious about what kind of debate there may or may not have been inside the company about how to approach this. Will for years we've been using our voice and position as a leading advertiser to spark these constructive conversation on race and unbiased. You know back in twenty fourteen. We launched a campaign called like a girl to talk about gender bias and twenty seven be launched a campaign all the talk that really shine the light on the conversations that black mothers were having with their children. Children to prepare them last year, bid on a campaign called the load, and recently with the choice we wanted to catalyze even more conversation, giving all that was happening in the world so we know that a lot of the core evil that we're facing right now. Racism sexism than up over. They all start with biased and we can't tackle these problems until we begin. Begin to talk about them, so the challenge is always. How do you do that in an accurate way? How do you do that in a way? That really brings people voices by invite them into really become part of solution. That's our objective with the talk about bias campaign. You know it's an important message, but we're. We're living in contentious time, and amid what some people. People might describe a cancel culture and I. Don't know if you remember when starbucks many years ago, put together their race together program, which immediately drew criticism despite I think it's well intentioned, and my question to you is how you think about that sort of a mix in terms of how you approach this issue, and what kind of feedback you've gotten us for. Sure well I think what we know because we're all about serving consumers, consumers want to know the values behind the brands they buy everyday and as we consider these types of programs, we do it in a fear and accurate in a respectful manner, and we're very clear on our goals, and we want a society that fosters great public discourse, even when we disagree, so we bring multiple views to the table, and we handle those using a very responsible way were clear on the objectives were clear on the outcomes, and we acknowledged that eight. Not everyone's a disagree, but we want everyone to come to the table, bringing their lived experience, but also bringing perspective that are beyond. Beyond their own, so what we did talk about bias. Perish Rangers together right. People who were different have different lived experiences, White, black gay shrink all these dimensions of diversity, and we said let's talk about these things right and sometimes disagree sometimes you'll get a little hurt, but that's the proper process of learning. We've actually taken that same process within the wall to P. and G. writes. The were walking the talk when it comes to bringing people together and getting through some of those difficult conversations at the end of the day. It's not about a popularity contest, but it's about getting to the culture of respect and understanding that we all want to live in.

Gamble Facebook Gillette Vicks Crest Pepsico Coca Cola Youtube Rangers Damon Jones Google Officer Unilever Chief Communications Officer JAY P. Andrew Ross Sorkin
What will the next stimulus package look like?

Bruce St. James and Pamela Hughes

00:35 sec | Last month

What will the next stimulus package look like?

"It look like? He didn't offer too many details that Arizona Congressman David Schweikert tells Jr this one will look different than previous ones. We're hoping this one will actually have not only economic stimulus but through tax codes and regulatory codes, the White House Seems to also be favoring some additional individuals stimulus money, So we're seeing if that all comes together, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says. This package will also include liability protections for businesses, hospitals, doctors, nurses, colleges and K through 12 schools. Jeremy Foster, Katie Our news. Now let's get a check on traffic. Here's Monica read live from the Valley

Congressman David Schweikert Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnel Jeremy Foster Arizona Senate White House Monica JR
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

06:23 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature that. So going back. You said you've. been working in the industry, your entire life and that is very unique, so can you? Tell me about working for for your dad and doing the early fishing long story short so when I when I left Graduate School I was given opportunity the company wasn't doing really well at the time, although the tested then mandated by the FDA to replace the rabbit, it was still a difficult competitive situation so again for us. It was tough. That's why they wanted me to come. I was one of the first ones to get you know three or four o'clock in the morning and go gathered the horseshoe crabs. From April fifteen to end of June. We bleed only when they coming up at high tides, and mainly they come up at high types after dark. Full Moon and a hot crabs. You're going to be there, okay. The southlands in thousands in early days we couldn't handle all the crabs that were coming up, so it'd be kind of surreal I can imagine a beach full of crabs. It is and we you know. We had very selective fishermen that we work with because again. They a lot of them just didn't see the value of them. It took us a long time to get the get the attention of the commercial industry. Get them to realize the value of the crab. Eventually we did I would actually drive to the docks during shrimping season If they caught him as byproducts I would just leave our car business card and say hey, call us if you catch any byproduct I'll come, pick them

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper FDA Graduate School Europe South Carolina United States Wofford College Charleston New Zealand Jordan Linda NIH Carolina John Hopkins
From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

Sounds of Science

04:52 min | Last month

From Rabbit to Crab to the Lab

"Today. I'm joined by foster. Jordan, the CSV of Charles Rivers Endotoxin, Europe foster has spent most of his career, working with and around South Carolina's horseshoe crabs, strange creatures, whose blood keeps US safe. He joined to discuss how his career parallels. The changing attitudes towards horseshoe crabs as well as the future of endotoxin, testing and recombinant technology. Welcome foster. Thank you join the conversation. So, let's begin with you. Can you tell me about your early experiences fishing for her? She grabs sure it was funny, you said. My. Most of my career actually I kid people because it's only job. I've ever had Your career then. I don't even I don't even have a resume so. The way I got involved with this was my. My father was an investor in a small company called in safe back in the mid eighties when I was an undergraduate student at Wofford College. And I heard him talking about it. I was studying organic chemistry, and he had partnered with the person who had originally used the test for pharmaceutical application. His name was Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper. He used it at John, Hopkins. University, he was a a radio nuclear pharmacist who is making nuclear medicines and the test at the time for bacteria. Linda toxins was called a rabbit powergen test. You took a New Zealand. Zealand White Rabbit and you deluded your product that you were testing for contamination and sailing, and he's ten meals into the ear of the rabbit. You Monitor the ravitch temperature for three hours, if the favor spike more than three degrees that was considered a failed test, and that rejected the product, but you know these new nuclear medicines. Had you know half lives of their nucleotides pads of of only twenty minutes so the? The test was was ineffective for this. These rabbit tests just sounds so inefficient. How did we get from there to using what we use today? Yeah, so be. It was really I. Forget the time it was wasn't really about replacing. The rabbit test is about five minutes Dr Cooper needed for these nuclear medicines, and and and when he did it, and he made these first crew preps, and they were, and he published that. That in nineteen, seventy two. He was actually he was actually on a grant from NIH so it wasn't something that was patentable. it was public knowledge at the time public information because it was a h grant that funded the research when he published that in nineteen seventy two I. Don't think he really thought anything of it and as the FDA solve the the value of this test replacing the the rather. Test. They also realize it would be the first time that a an animal model, but whatever be replaced with a regulated in vitro tests, so they decided to reunite the test itself, and what's interesting is even today where the only quality control tests that's actually regulated by FDA and we have the same license. Our licenses eleven ninety seven. We have the same licenses of. Of biologics manufacturer vaccine manufactured right, and we're inspected by the twice a year. All our products has to be submitted and approved by FDA. So we're extremely regulated in the space, which is also important when you think about new technologies, and how will a new technology be developed when we're so highly regulated and controlled and the amount of testing? That was necessary to just. Show equivalency to the rabbit, but long story short as the evolution into safe. When I ended up in graduate school, I ended up going to a into safe working for Dr Cooper. We were very small. I was just four of us in the lab. And you know obviously one of the main things we needed. Was Horseshoe crabs. Charleston was known for having horseshoe crabs, but two things about Charleston one is the population or or South, Carolina population is very strong in addition to the the the largest physical more shoe crab. There is the. Female one time that from tail, the whole link. The female was basically a meter. Long thing so very long right? YEP, so so they're big, so you don't have to handle nearly as many to get the quantity of blood we needed, but back in those days the crabs were were a nuisance. They were considered pass. they tore the fishermen's nets ups, especially the fishermen, and when they were bottom, dragging which was warhorse, pass laced for ill and cough. That was a byproduct that they just didn't want to deal with many times. They would just throw them up on the bank. Let and die compost them. Grind them as fertilizer the only other commercial applications for them at the time was to be used as bait, but again thinking about just the pure amount of work, and it just wasn't worth the fisherman's time to do it so again, not very well like creature

Dr Cooper Dr James Cooper Jordan FDA United States South Carolina Europe Wofford College New Zealand Charleston Linda Hopkins Carolina NIH John
Culture Plating vs DNA Testing for Microorganisms in Cannabis w/ Kyle Boyar (From BTS #29)

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

06:12 min | Last month

Culture Plating vs DNA Testing for Microorganisms in Cannabis w/ Kyle Boyar (From BTS #29)

"I'll start with the ancient technology which is plaguing It's been around for some time, and basically this is where you take your sample. You add some sort of. Growth medium right DPW TRIPTYCH soy broth. Yeah Classic Classic growth mediums basically. You put that in with your sample. Typically a one gram sample. It really just depends on what state you're in other industries use lot larger sample sizes. Something like you know anywhere from five twenty five grams, or even upwards of fifty grams really just depends on what you're testing right, but since candidates is a very precious commodity. People don't want to give up their. You Know Ultra high quality stuff more than a gram, so that's typically what we see out there in the marketplace. But, basically you're, you're homogenising your sample. Usually the stomach or By hand massaging and then you're taking that and you're taking a small sub sample of that, and then pleading it as a basically placing that inaugurating the plate, and then you know streaking it or basically spreading it uniformly across the plate surface. And then you're incubating bat depending on what you're testing for, you may incubate it for you know. From Twenty five to twenty seven sees what's typically done for Aspergillus five seven days seven days type thing. But it's going to differ for every different microorganism that you're testing for and then you're basically taking whatever you dilute it at, so you're counting. The colony is on the plate, and then we'll play it by that dilution factor, and now you have a colony forming unit gram readout. That is typically your standard readout that you see in just about everywhere. I mean while QBC are is. Very commonly accepted now in the cannabis industry when it comes to things like total count tests, you do have to convert that seek value or cycle of quantitative will get into a bit more later, but you have to convert that value into something that is acceptable for regulators, which is that a few Graham Now plaguing. Good because it is only enumerated, what is actually viable within the sample, right? And so a lot of people aren't concerned about what's dead in a sample, or what was left over and so that is an advantage of planning a disadvantage of planning is that some of these things don't grow very well and culture It depends again. What type of mediums here using what types of Brasier using There's a number of factors that contribute to how well something cultures on a plate so I would say those are kind of like the high, A. The highpoints of pleading and the potential drawbacks of it but then there's molecular methods like Qpr. QVC are right, so this is quantitative polymerase chain reaction so for those of your listeners that are familiar with polymerase chain reaction. Now this is just monitoring that reaction in real time using different flora fours. And so you're basically typically QC are run is forty cycles You are looking at you know. How quickly does amplify so and then at the point at which crosses the threshold, so you set that threshold to remove any background, the point at which your QBC our signal crosses that threshold is what we call a cycle of quantitative, so that is the point at which. which it is crossing that threshold line and the actual cycle number so basically the earlier of a C Q, You have that means that the earlier or sorry. The the greater presence of your target there is because it's a amplifying quicker, whereas if it's amplifying later than that means you had less of your target, so that would be a higher cq. Value, right? And so I guess the disadvantage with QBC are is that you aren't just selectively? Amplifying is alive. You are getting everything DNA DNA. So you're going to amplify everything and some people push back and say well. Hey, isn't that to our detriment? You know. If you have a bunch of dead stuff on there well, why am I failing for dead stuff? That just doesn't make sense well a couple of things there right so in the context of things like Aspergillus or micro toxin producing. Well. If there's a bunch of that leftover well, that could be indicative that you have mycotoxin your sample now. Of course, many states have opted for mycotoxin testing things like apple. Toxins and ochre toxin. And so that that checks that box right, but still it's good to know and a lot of people have this misconception that because you're only. Oh, sorry, 'cause! You're amplifying all of these things, right? That you're gonNA fail more as a result, but actually we find that. At least in my experience, it was the opposite. And I think the reasoning for that is. and. I guess this is another drawback of planning that I forgot to mention in. This is a perfect tie-in. Well, there's a lack of selectivity. Typically when you're planning something. You're using right selective growth media. That are supposed to foster the growth of a particular class of microbial contaminants now. There's grows mediums. There's also antibiotics that are used for selection in this case, and as we all know, antibiotics are being A. Microorganism, becoming more and more resistance, these things and just because you select for it, based on an antibiotic or some sort of growth medium doesn't necessarily mean that off target organism growth isn't going to happen so what? The the publications that medicinal! Of have done of showed is that there is a significant amount of Tara growth happening especially in the context of police mold plates. And depending on what state you're in typically limits around ten thousand CFU's program. But if you're getting off growth, you're counting dots that are actually not e- mold. You're counting oftentimes bacteria, and so this of course leads inflated accounts, more failures, and so people have this aversion to moving toward QVC are because they think that's going to happen. More frequently, but really it's the opposite because you're using targeted primers, you are selectively amplifying only for the class of organisms that you're looking for. You don't have the potential for off target growth in that case.

QVC CFU Cannabis Tara Apple
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"And so the the field I'm trying to break into and the things that I'm trying to do, don't give flying fuck about about my soul. So that's how I view as like I didn't. I didn't have any impact, but like it's because I live in the bub I live in the bubble and I, I can't not live in that bubble because that's who I am, but thing about framing to see for example, but that's impact. And you would not have been able to do that without football. And so we have. That's what I said. We as a science tend to devalue the really the little things and you know to go back to your point, you were talking about, you know, happiness in the root and that that's a lot of the problems with the communities is. They're not happy. Yeah, but there's not a lot to be happy about when everything around you is so you know, dole and drum silent and awful agree. But also I think we have to. To the point we kinda made earlier was, I think we have to redefine. What it means to be successful because a lot of the times I think we're just or swinging shadows we are. We have to change. You know, often use. This kind of analogy is you know people people talk about people who are debating me on like racism, right? Always say, well, you know, like it's statistically they're saying that in twenty five years, like why people aren't even going to be the majority right? So racism isn't gonna exist anymore, such a falsehood, because what has been driving this world for the last better part about two thousand years has been a white supremacist ideology. We're again, the people who have been in controlling who have been powerful. I've been white male Christians and they have been the ones that have been sending the laws writing the rules dictating everything that affects people's livelihood. And so if you don't change, that reality, looks like the next group that is gonna come in is going to operate off of that same ideology where violence give begets power and. Power is directly correlated to money. So there has to be a change in how we not not just an individual change is to be a change in the community. That's why I'm such a big. Like when I talked to my kids, my kids know like I'm unapologetically black, but I tell them things all the time. If you don't value the person sitting right next, if you don't see that face as important, then it doesn't matter how successful you are when you look up and you're only one of you standing there. Negga won't matter. So you have to. And that goes back to what I was saying earlier when we go to counseling, you're told learn to love in value yourself, and you'll be the best asset you can to people. But when we apply that to a community. So when I say I'm unapologetic black nominal focus on on black people in teaching them to love and value themselves. People like, oh, you're racist, thousand percent, lack love does not mean why hate fan, but but the but the. But the part is in reality if you kind of were hearing what I'm saying? Yes, I talk about the institutions in the history and the things that have created that because I am a believer that you cannot change something if you understand why it functions the way it does. So those things matter. But what I always leave my kids with because my kids will get, you know, we'll learn these things in class. We'll have these conversation. They'll get very upset and there will be one or two. That'd be like, I, I don't understand why be? Why would they do this. What I will always tell them that if you walk out my room and the only thing that is in your head is anger at white people than I have failed you and your not doing what you're supposed to do to create change is not about them..

Negga football dole two thousand years twenty five years thousand percent
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Criticism to capitalism is there isn't a better system currently and we don't know of one, I can't think of one. I think the problem with capitalism is that. People who are for lack of better term. The devalues part of society tend to be people of color, right and grand. Our society in America was literally built in a capitalist system where black bodies were the property. So there has to be, again, kind of going to your point. There has to be more emphasis placed on the importance of all aspects of the machine for lack of a better word. So for example, owe people in there is in power. You'll see like this and that has to, and there will. There has to be a change in those things. And so this is my time. So when I do so. A lot of the work that I've done really like kinda told you earlier, took place in my college years, undergrad and grad school where I was able to directly affect age old systems of white supremacy because I refused to lower my stance or take a different sense, but I was I was opening negotiation. So I understood that at this point in needs to be all about what is the best in what is most beneficial for the black community? And then at some stages you need to be inclusive and include other press groups, and then you kind of need to know when, okay, we still need to bring the focus back here. That was an example. But one of the things that that we did, for example, my grad school, we pushed and we worked hard to Crete to have them add in a position that people that students had been asking for for. For twenty years and nobody was successful in doing it. And we when we were able to get that position in, it changed the dynamics up top. They had no choice, but to get rid of some people that weren't doing Justice to the school. And so. People are their jobs in that, you know, but they weren't doing the right things with those jobs. The people who were charged in look like the school that was being represented. She was the case in this country, man, and so, but and so that grass roots kind of constant movement in constant pushing in not backing down. One of the things that I will tell people who would come and say, Christina, really wanna to get involved. But I don't know how one of the things I constantly get is I don't talk like you like, I'm not as passionate as you when you talk about these. I'm not as my passion doesn't show. I'm not as confident about like I am causing people causing like, I wish I had the confidence that you do when you talk about these issues. That's how I talk. That doesn't have to be your role that doesn't have to be how you affect change. Right. So find that to the point is like for you, I understand. I know you personally, so I kinda know how you move finding that might have been your niche, but I. I know kids who are inspired by what you didn't who want to do better in their lives. Who are, who are you know, or even when in the classroom? When I'm talking about here, brother, he's play football? Yeah, this did. And then you see the subtle change in the body language, the putting the head done in the book and let me that's changed to. And so so that's I talk about you in the classroom time 'cause I get how kids are, but I will always tell kids. It can't just be one thing. Find what you're good at. If it's football and go be the best damn football player, you could be, you know, broaden yourself up to everything. Look at everything, be everything when you frame it like that. I guess it does. It does help. You have a role. Everybody has role helps from this because I think the double edged sword of of how I live in in a bubble. Right? I live in a bubble be and and that has been my catapult to garnering any kind of success in order I'd have had is because I put blinders on and I'm like, I don't care what people say or think of. Whatever. And so occur in my exodus out of football, I apply the same mind state. So right now I'm currently in a bubble and I have different goals and different life paths..

football Justice America Crete Christina twenty years
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"He represents black, but he never did. He's, he said it. He said it constantly. He said, I don't read books. Why am I gonna get my political views or hang my political hat? Or or or try to. Find representation from a man who doesn't read books, right? Fucking this kind of goes back to understanding the importance of education and an education. So I'm really big proponent of education, but it's not in a go to school cynic classroom, only learn type of things. Education needs to be holistic as so you have to have a well-balanced person. So you have to have somebody that can take a cognac listen to a cognac and then be able to decipher, like, let me go look that up for myself. That's why I didn't have a super problem with what he said. I'm I, I think you're talking about the slavery comment. Yeah, I think I think I think harmless. I think I think what he was doing was was was was trying in an odd way to one cell his his upcoming projects, but to say, listen, like we need to come together like if it's a recurrent theme in his music, so, but I think that the problem, but I mean, it's kind of it's kind of the point. Was it. As an entertainer, I understand the smoke and mirrors behind. And so a lot of the product people put out is not necessarily. Generated for. Genuine content. A lot of it is cultivated for profit, right? And so there came a time in my career now argue with people on Twitter about all the time that remember that whole Davis thing today was for people that don't know. He retired mid game, and people are killing them saying, he's a quitter in this and that and yadda yadda yadda. It's because we have romanticized this idea of an athlete being this hardened warrior gladiator, that's that's supposed to love the game with all he has and his teammates. And that's the biggest Crocker shit of winning. When in reality is a bunch of it's much niggers who grew up broke and they try to feed families. So I was like, yeah, we're tired when you want because I made his argument. I'm like, these fuckers are so passionate about it that I never had the same rhetoric from ex players that are that are that are that are defaming vantera I never heard of. Rhetoric like your when they cut players when it cut player. I've seen what about when you keep people out of games like the well, higher ups, that's a little bit of a false of quibbles, but I've, I've seen, I've seen cats get sat mid game, right? People are outraged about that because of contract incentives that they're about to hit. I've seen that have never heard cats get pissed off about that. So the the issue is this. We view all of these cats as these diehard gladiators. When the reality is it's fucking entertainment and this is a business and that's that's where I sit with it. It was it's just a business. It's just something I did, and it's something that I loved to do, but I'm not in love with it and that what I do understand is that shit is not going to affect anybody to the point of growth. And that's where I'm at with. I think some something like. The the reason why got super into science was not grass Tyson. Understanding like his book before the the Cosmo series hit. He had. He had another one that was really small, but I fell in love with and he started explaining scientists really elegant way in in in in a man that looked like me. She was important and I never really got into science like that before that. And so things like that is what drives -ociety in my in my utopia. Perfect. I say all the time, my perfect society is artists and scientists. That is a perfect society to me a place where scientists can cultivate in in their ingenuity in their and their and their technology to make it. So water is available for every mouth on this planet. Food is valuable for every mother and there's there's a home for every every every person on this planet. That way, people can just spend their time and their life creating and innovating, and that is the society I wanna believe in. That's why feel like what I did for a living..

Twitter Crocker Davis
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"You've been playing football life firm and really prior up into you retired and all this capper Nick stuff run. I watched football religiously, like football, such a big part of our life. And I, I like football because you can kind of. Is relatable everyday life. And so they're terminologies in things that I that I can use an and it is team sports. They do teach kids things I would agree. So I do think that there that are really, really important immigrant and I don't think you can discount making people feel good. I don't think that should have. I, I know I think we do place as a society. I will say this that I think we do place an overwhelming amount of emphasis on entertainers, but society is largely driven by black culture. And so right now, that's where the six Tema world world. But so right now, that's where the successes and I really do think that's a large part of why the emphasis there. However, that's kind of my point, but I don't think you can take away from. We need to. I think we as a people need to control those images more. I think we as people need to maybe how we kind of kind of trickle that back down into positive aspects of the neighborhood needs to be conversations you, you've literally made people smile. I mean, I mean, yeah, I just don't end and that essence. I mean in that aspect, I understand what you're saying. It's not like I'm not. Okay. I I, there is no other way to say other than just say, I'm I'm devalue in the work that I put in because I understand what it what I did, but I just don't deem my ex-professional valuable. I don't, and it's my worldview, Mike worldview in it. I don't look at Athy like even even music, you know, put out, I don't. I don't look at that. Why that's actually a little different, but but like to the point it was like, when that whole kind you was the buckle took off, right. I- arguable constantly of Joe just hit a cat out and the reason why people are so passionate about is because they put Cayenne pedestal of like, Joe, he represents blackness..

football Joe Athy Nick Cayenne
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"They grew up in third world poverty where there's some places in America that that that the mean you. I mean, I definitely we definitely had days without water as but no using constant to the point of, but what I noticed about his perspective of life and I'm pretty sure it's it's a subjective perspective to each individual. You know, African tribe around his his native country was that they had an overwhelming sense of happiness in family, right? I'm wondering because I think how you label and how you define success has everything to do with your overall wellbeing. And so I think a lot of what's happened is America is is the. The romanticizing of the white picket fence in the two point five kids and the romanticizing of this financial mountaintop that everybody's getting on. So it's almost as if the American economy keeps you in this perpetual state of, it's not. It's not enough. And so I'm wondering if you if you can kind of inject a little bit of that native. Anti materialism into our neighborhoods. Whereas if you talked to kids like, I don't know how many schools have been too, and they all wanna be ballplayers wrappers. I teach us go. That's what they do and they all. But I think it's more than just financial free. I think they are screaming for some kind of like, I'm not enough some kind of tension, but but but that's because what so for black people, what we see that has been successful in this country has been in the entertainment industry. That's what I'm saying. The aspect of what success even, but we as a whole. So this goes back to that definition of racism, right? We as a whole, don't define what race, excuse me. What success is it is defined for us and that's the country's a whole would agree success is defined by how much money you haven't, how much money you make every year and what kind of things you have that attribute to that status. And that's the definition. So then what happens? It's kind of like Stockholm syndrome that we have, and then you have people that are really trying to mimic their oppressors. So you have wealthy white particularly been who have been wealthy and white and largely Christian for the majority of for all of what this country has been in existence. What other examples do we have while now for black people? The only the only other ideology that has been the only other image that has been given to us of successes, wealthy entertainers. So yeah, it's not a shocker that kids grow up in in the only thing they can define success by to be an athlete, and I'm not saying there's nothing wrong with that because even within the classroom, I talk about you a lot in the classroom because I use you as an example of it. Doesn't matter if you play sports, you still need things after and doesn't. And I'm, I'm almost hate the fact that I was that's crazy. I was resented really as so crazy. I need to hear what. I really do because. I wasted. I think the prime of my years I say wasted because the trade off was. Enormous. But I spent a lot of. The prime of my problem thirty one thirty two. I I say, I'm fucking thing is ticking, but I wasted the majority of my youth. My prime youth. Doing something that as an eight year old man, I'm not going to be proud of. I'm not proud of it now. I don't look back at my career like I'm proud of of what it took to accomplish. The goal that I set out to to to accomplish. That's that's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about the actual body of work. I'm not proud of the six thousand whatever yards ahead. I'm not proud of the fifty plus touchdown. I don't give shit about, honestly. Don't care actually think it's actually detrimental to the society if you wanna break it down. I think I, I'm just entertainment and I and I take people away from the problems for three hours every Sunday, but I personally feel like you shouldn't be little that in the sense that don't think it's I don't. I don't think it's a, I don't think it's an admirable feat. I don't think you're gonna convince me otherwise. Welcome to. I guess it's to say it's not to try to convince you right, but for me, I, I was always very proud of you not just because you are football player..

America Stockholm football three hours eight year
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"McDonald's is on every corner in every you have closer access and proximity to McDonald's. Most things and people don't know that. And then when we get into that from a racial aspect, like food poverty in food, it doesn't justify people, but overwhelmingly black people are disparate. Affected by. And one of the interesting things I pulled out of my study was that in proximity to healthy food, actually, poor white people are in closer proximity to healthy food because they tend to live closer to wealthy white people than poor black people. Because typically what happens is a condition in black neighborhoods are so so bad and that's, you can't all do. You can't completely blame, but people for that. So we talk about vix, right? They don't own things or the suit that to the point. I've never like this. 'cause I. 'cause I hear that argument. And I do a lot of right wing watching, right. I listen to a lot of the, I do it because. One. I never thought the baby with the bathwater, right? I learned something, you know, there are solid points here, salad points. There's other points, but I do mainly to see, okay, how do they use? What are they? What are they saying? What is the? Because they have these? There's, there's, there's a narrative that that that's been in that same propaganda narrative that we talked about from hundreds of years ago, thousand percent. But what did you say? I had a point talking about food inequality, specific, the neighborhoods we victimize black people for the neighborhoods that. Okay. So a huge point that I have yet to see that side acknowledge is the fact that. And they'll admit this, they'll say, yes, black neighborhoods have some of the worst schools, some of the worst schools, and I'm like, okay, if if education is directly being affected. That is a trickle down effect to every other problem that you have black people, everything. So if so, if you're sitting here, we'll black people make up thirteen percent of the population, but but have fifty percent of the crime. Okay. Like these after school activities, are they available like, everybody knows. I don't. I don't. I don't. I don't time as the devil's playground and that's not by color. That's just people in general. But this is what I'm saying is like they'll admit that that that people have color, schools are majority bad, but they won't admit the effects that that has on a community that kind of goes into this narrative that America has as a whole in. It's that you know, you come to American, you work really hard than those things will change. I think to an extent to a very small extent that some of that is very true, right? You work hard things to change. However, it goes back to her if you do not have access. Or if you are not properly educated about these doesn't mean. And so these people in these neighborhoods, really what we're talking about is just a day-to-day survive. I don't even know, and I didn't like I, I remember I remember growing up and the none of this shit was met. Nothing actually mattered the mills that we missed the all of that I had blinders on because I wanted to do something with my life. But I like around me. I saw like I didn't know that there was this higher game being talked about played, I have no clue, but then you look at people that would use you as an example, right? So like we have come from extreme poverty and within that extreme poverty was a lot of other dynamics that really solely existed because of that prop that poverty from all the way down from our basic education to what we ate on a daily basis to our own mental health has been affected by that extreme poverty. And so then somebody would look at you and say..

McDonald America thirteen percent thousand percent fifty percent
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"And one of the things that I that I found when I was studying was when I first started kind of trying to put together a base for people in research before me, there was two people in the country from a scholarly perspective. Okay. That had peer reviewed articles that had talked about black food issues. That's just black people. So what was happening was it's getting lumped in as black people are kind of getting thrown in that people of color banner, and they were looking at it as that. But when we're talking about just how black people it really, really small. So so that in and of itself was I opening for me, right? I was like, Jesus, like people really aren't talking about this. Two papers, other space where black people are being talked about in food inequality is from is across the rest of the world. So we're looking, for example, people in Africa, which perpetuates ugly narrative in and of itself that all Africans are poor and it's America's, you know, we have all these resources. We really need to be giving to them more because these are still is a. That's a whole nother podcast we should do, but that was frustrating for me. And so when I really started kind of digging into the research and then doing my own research, so many things came out of that. And one of the main things that that I that I got out of it was I don't care if you have a community and you build them community garden and you put whole foods or what it not hopeful, but you know, restaurant are places that they could buy quality healthy food in their neighborhoods if they have for the past fifteen to twenty years only had access to a McDonalds, keep going. They don't know how you can get take a person and tell them, here's some vegetables, make a Sal. If they don't know how I'm being very, very basic, but that's the reality. This is the one thing about the fruit of Islam, if why the nation of Islam that I extremely agreed with an, I don't agree with a lot. The majority was aspect just be a period. So what they were huge on getting black people to understand that you need to start changing the way you eat because it directly affects everything every single thing. So I, but that just in America in general, we don't view diet as an essential part of like mental health. Right? But part of what I research found is that for for for black people who are poor, that access to that is so so let me give food desert right foods are really, really thinking. So for people who don't food desert is is you know, usually measured within attentive fifteen mile radius. It covers what kind of food is in your area. What do you have access to? So like how far away is. A grocery store. What kind of grocery store is what is a bailable in the grocery store and then beyond that which are access to that grocery store. I saw in a food desert is people have limited access to quality, healthy.

America McDonalds Africa twenty years
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"But that's what I mean. That's. That's what the kind of the power of representation and what it does when you're not used to seeing your image reflected to see it in a positive way to see is like, wow, and you kinda wanna hold onto those moments. I mean, I kinda go through that. So like I watch his show action on Oprah network called queens sugar and it, and it's it's all black, cast direct. You know what I'm saying? And they really touch on some really deep topics, all kinds of different things. And there's a character on their name is Nova and she's like, she's a social Justice advocate. She's a writer, she's and I find myself just when I watch it like, oh my God, that's me like that. Her the things she questions right, or how she moves through life or because she does social Justice work in advocacy work for black people, and she's real real unapologetically black and. She gets into these spaces where people particularly white people kinda wanna capitalize off of that and the struggles that she internally goes through with like MSN people, you know. And for me, I remember like one day I was watching it and I kinda was crying some of the things he was going to cause some stuff I'm kinda dealing with as I move forward in my career trying to start my own business and working on a book and all these things, and some of the frustrations and things she was she was presenting on screen. I was like crying because that's exactly what I'm kind of struggling with kind of settling some of those things with my own head. And then at one point I was like, it is so refreshing to see somebody on TV that I like literally can say, like, that's me, you know, and even the bat, I don't wanna say bad, but the the struggles that she has even when she brings him upon herself, it's like it's refreshing. It's a representation is such an important. It's a, it's a, it's a commodity that is. In a world and a world where where this is entertainment driven ecosystem that we live in America. And so in a world where so many characters are. Become a woven with societal customs. Norms were finally, like you said, it's it's something that's it's, it's it's misunderstood how important that shit is. Then that goes back to what we were talking about earlier. Right. So like the power of having black people in the classroom, you know, because whether or not that person is teaching me math or they're teaching me science. It's just a comfortable field to know that at some level, there's probably something you've experienced that I've experienced and when I get in comfortable in a classroom, if you are there as mine structure, you can explain that right, and that and all those dynamics play into how important representations all the way up to the White House, you know, and the people controlling dictate our laws in matters to have people that look like you kind of go back to in the migra Namara engine, go back to kind of what you were talking about earlier. Like this. I often hear especi-. Doing social Justice work that black people kind of hold onto this victimhood. Right. And that's, that's frustrating for me in the sense that first of all, we have classified. Victims as that's a we, we need to be mad at that. People are victims. They are victims of very real, very traumatic traumatic things. And especially when we start talking about this generational trauma that America's perpetuated on desensitizing people do. Yeah. So the problem with the community though, I don't want to say problem. It's really way to put it from me. But the thing is, is that a lot of us don't know how to move past that because, again, a lot of the representation and in the spaces one, a lot of us aren't. It is a very leaders. I attitude to assume that people have access to these things as much as they do and re having resources. I, I've kind of harped on this last couple years, but having resources doesn't mean shit if you don't know how to use them, I route. So let me give you an example. When I was doing my master's research, I was actually researching food inequality and black America to that..

writer America White House MSN one day
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"AT dot Robin Hood dot com. So here, here's where I have a bit of issue with. Black people as a whole or just. People of color have a on. Why I look look to the to the opposition I say, okay, as a solid point is victimhood mentality. Right is is it's at what point do we say? Okay. History happened now is happening acknowledged it, but let's bring it up in a way that's not. I, I understand too as well. When when you when you voice your concerns publicly, when you voice your concerns about a lot of these social issues that. A lot of it is a lot of the recipe back is dismissive, right? You get a lotta dismissive rhetoric back, but. Part of it is solid criticism when it says when when when somebody says like the polio by Bush mentality, I understand what they're saying. There's probably a little bit more of a dick way, but what the essence of what they're saying is and what I get out of it. It's just it's time to do for self in in a. In a broader way right for community for ourselves. And I'm almost like like on some segregation types ship by black. We all we all by black. I saw Black Panther like six times. Right? Just because they're represented. I. Probably modern day one on his favorite Renoir of blackness. One hundred percents was disheartening those. Like I watched the movie like recently again, because I bought it. It's an okay movie. Isn't that like. You're not going to give. I still. I guess six times I was like, this is fucking amazing after the hype and giving it was okay, I, I'm not giving Infinity affinity war. It was bad. We have done that. It's still marvel comment. This is when I knew, okay, this is not a post racist society because I saw that shit. Six times I took. I took kids that we packed out theater. I took a whole bunch of kids to see it. Then I went to go see it by myself in different areas. Right purposefully and what I saw was hilarious. I saw black people in the audience rooting for Black Panther. Rooting for Black Panther to the point of it was like, yeah, that's us. Like it was. Yeah, they were video that's us. But it was to the point of it was like almost like it brings tears the, no, maybe it was almost like they were kind of trying to point at the white people in the audience, like, yeah, we can do that. And it was really emotional. Be because. That's how I know we're not in a post. Gene, we're very divided still, and and and even this, this, this, and, and to that point, even more I went to go on finito war and affiliate wars, like all. So people that haven't. So it's like all the It's all normal. normal. It's all the marvel classics. So a head spider man, iron man, Black Panther, captain America. So this was funny part. The black people in the audience win. What kinda of drums came on blue. The fuck up and the white people started cheering for captain. America became a bat was they were going, but but that's, that's hilarious about it. And that's and that's the one thing I saw from the the, the white right in this country was when Black Panther came. They were like, I literally heard this from political heads, talking points or like what kind is not a real place. Everybody needs to calm down. I'm like, fam- you have had crypt on says the fifties g right. Let us have. That's why I wanted to bring black kids at because it was it was. It was a fucking experience. I was like, I've never seen that. Will anybody cultural moment? And then I don't know when when we you know I was hearing and then so mean brother went to see it. We took Ceron and everything, and that's my son and we, I mean, we did the whole now we dress. Guard. At the end of the picture, and and and and it was more than just. Oh, really? Was this unifying moment? And that's what I think was a power of it, but you know, so I have to watch the future wars, but just you know, to that it was a great movie. Don't get me wrong. I don't get anything. I, I think I've been America's wet, I think, but I don't think it has anything to do with race just like they're catching character..

America captain America Ceron Gene
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"So you have to understand that America is really unique. And when we talk about, I'm kind of going to take a robot. But when we talk about Americans ladies, it is the most interesting and you need of of how slavery is perpetuated throws really unique place. And one of the most unique things about racism in America was that we directly tied in race and laws. We changed age old way of doing things so that we could so that white men could benefit off of the economic gain of black bodies. Right? And so when you kind of look at that early on racism was really derived, it was a derivative of hate. And so I didn't like somebody because of the color of their skin. And it meant that I kind of like we've been talking about terrorize them. You know whether it was early slavery, whether we were enslaving those bodies, whether it was reconstruction, whether we were ensuring that those bodies did not have jobs that we wanted them to have did not have the right to vote, right all the way to the civil rights movement where I don't like you because what you look like. So you can't come into my restaurant. You can't, you know those things. So really for for, we have been taught that racism is just about hate. But what people often leave out is that that hate isn't just about hating summit. It's about the ability to control their lives. So racism has always been about the ability to control black people's lives. And those institutions have grown, they've changed overtime. So when slavery ended reconstruction happens because white people are pissed that they don't have slaves anymore and not only was it just we, we look at them as less than it was an economic decision. Now, I don't have my financial way of life. I don't have my find. Financial security. So what can I do to make sure that that still exists? So we implemented things like the share cropping. We implemented things that's the early starts. You see, the early starts on the prison industrial complex, and so what white people do of policing? Yes. And so what we what what white people in America did was that once there was no longer ability to control black people as property, they figured out ways institutionally to control the black body, and it wasn't so you if we can say today and say that racism is just somebody calling me a nigger right or burning across a lawn, but you can't and you, but you will look at racism during Rican reconstruction and look at things like the grandfather clause or Opole tax, which says that people couldn't vote on this. They had enough money to pay right in a state where you have right of arm in a country where you have the right to vote, right? So we look at those things. And if you can say. That's really hateful and the not understand how overtime all that's done is we've changed the face of those same institutions. So now you have the right to vote, but if I put you in jail and I take away your right to vote, you don't. If you are black person working in corporate America as a black woman, there's a, it's an August. There's a day in August that we celebrate called black women equal pay day where it takes a full year and a half for me as a black woman to make the same amount as a Whiteman a year and a half to make the same amount as them. That's hateful. And so people want to we have because of the sensationalism of things like Dr king in the civil rights movement, right? We have come to sensationalize racism as only being acts of violence without understanding that violence is not just an attack on physically, it's if everything I put in your neighborhood if I fled drugs in your neighborhood guns into your neighborhood. If I, if every image that I'm giving you a negative image. Of who you are, that's violent because you are perpetual waiting people again to live up to the reality which I know and you're keeping that reality really locked in a box. And that's why I say that racism, it's not. We have to stop looking at it as just a dislike, and just a violent act. It's more than just somebody calling you a name..

America Dr king
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"And the first step is it's not just acknowledge the pain and the things, but to hear people's stories. So go back to what you said. It's important. Is important to sit in, listen to a person of color particular black person what they've been through, what they spirits on a day-to-day basis because what we have to bury the racism that many of us, I don't care if you're the world President Obama, you know, the Brown, James, I don't care who you are. We, we internalize racism on a daily basis, but people in this country and so two in. So for imagine for like a LeBron James, you know him talking about the time. He got nigger painted on his on his outside of his house, how that felt, but imagine the black person doesn't have the financial economic said he doesn't doesn't have the platform that he does imagine was more. They have to turn off his what I say, what I want to try to convince people when they try to because there's so many like this cat I mentioned park has merely because he's a co, a big talking point for the right, especially the white men of the right is Ben Shapiro and his this like saying, facts, don't care about your feelings. And he uses that as if it's almost to weaponize into. To to kind of. Fumbling over words, but like the de-emphasized your experience, it's completely devaluation values who you are, it's it's dehumanization, but this, this is why I always tell them, you can't. Fuck. You cannot quantify motions. This is not. This is not. This is not mathematics. You cannot quantify that. So so for every police officer that has mistreated a personal color because a personal color, like how many times do think that has been reported to the station? It doesn't get just as much as we, we begin. We as black people, we normalize that behavior. It's expected, but that's. But that's why there's a river team in our community is like, fuck the police. That's normal here in that I, I remember thinking I don't like the police you, you had experience. I saw them directly mystery family members that rightly mystery people I love and it was it was heinous. It was really heinous like, but go to center that's terrorism. So you're not allowing people to live. A normal everyday life. When when shredded over them at any given time is the fact that you can in their life, whether physically now whether locking them up behind bars, destruction of the community cannot discount that as terrorism as terrorism process. You just can't. But and this is this is kind of what we were talking about this a little earlier on in our trip where whereas when you're trying to convey this to somebody when you're trying to say in all, well, it's not. This was not that like. You really dealing with people who are talking to different languages, right? And this is this is I see as a huge hurdle in our society today, and it's what that they kind of post modern Postmodernism. We talked about that, so like you're, you're of that ilk, whereas you feel like the dice bre has kind of evolved. The our lexicon has evolved in words, can Molden change in and I'm in agreement with that. Whereas I, I don't think words necessarily have definitions. I think they just have usages all words are is the, they're just. Caveats to are the the flag carriers, tar thoughts and emotion the best way that we can in language isn't do the greatest job of it, which is why there's so much conflict. So something like racism, the word and the term racism in your eyes has evolved? Yes. And the issue that I see in in today's world is a lot of people don't view racism the same anymore. So racism to their day average American is this superiority complex because of a race or gender, or whatever the case may be. And in your eyes, the definition has evolved necks plain to me the evolution of the word and explain to me how you justify a word evolving in a way that changes the changes, the the narrative of the way the word us. So to start, I will just give the definition of racism, like as I right. So racism is really any group that has the ability to control the political social and economic dynamics of an entire population. That's what what I look at his racism now, I think it kind of goes back, right?.

LeBron James Ben Shapiro President Obama officer Brown
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"And and there's so much of to to this day. I mean, I, I've. I have really has. And I say, I say that is because I have, I have baby mothers who are white, right? And we don't get along. And what has happened in in no way is actually, this is actually happening on Father's Day. Actually. On Father's Day, I got the police caught on me by one of my baby mothers. She called the police on me for whatever reason. Right. The dispute that we had was was nowhere near any life threatening or threatening at all. Right. But this is to your point. White people and white women weaponized the police look people of color all the time and the police came up. He's like, what's going on? Man? I was like this, like you're, you're being used as a tool right now. I said there's nothing going on. I was. I was livid because I'm like, now my kids have to see me interacting with the police and I have to explain to the situation and and if I don't explain to that to them in the situation, the correct way where they can internalize in the way that they don't either they're scared for their father or they see that they see that their father is the threat to them or them in danger, lies in the mixing of, but that's why I say that. You know, white women really pulled this because we look at for example like, you know what's been going on on like every time you know, somebody whites calling the police. Right, but it's good because he will be back. It was when it needs to to be understood that the police are not supposed to be something that you call your commute there just for white women who are upset because some black men are barbecuing in what she potentially deems annot barbecues on that day. Right? So that even the pollution never called on this, there's like a life threatening. Right. Goes back to what what we discuss even talking about, you know, within a jury, right? Like for example, gonna go back to again, like in the Trayvon Martin case, the tree was white women that matters that matters. Right because they have been trained. They have been. It has been. They have been taught that in order for white America to be protected, we must protect the white woman. And the black man particularly is a direct threat to the to the white woman. And so. You'll see like I show my kids pictures of old propaganda. Posters and book covers that have Blackmun literally depicted as these animals stocking white women. Yeah. And I mean, that was the justification really for for the KKK's creation was that there needed to be a protection because now that these black men are no longer in chains, we cannot corral them their animalistic instincts are so designed like they're going to overpower their humanity is not really human anyway, and on the one to do is rape and kill white women, and we got to protect our women. That's literally kind of how these things. So white women have learned to to weaponize whitening. And when you look at go back to what we're talking about, like the the judge cavenaugh situation, the majority of women who are defending him against these accusations are white women fifty, four percent of white women voted for Donald Trump, even and this beef that I have with with feminism as an ideology is that so much of early on was really derived by the fact that white women were upset that black men were given the right to vote before them. They couldn't handle it. They couldn't tolerate it. Yeah. And then if they started to to the started, the suffrage movement. Right. And which directly was a kind of piggyback piggyback off of civil rights them, they, they shunned black women from that movement and they continue to, you know, kinda push this white supremacist narrative where the first female Senator first white female center. I can't. I'm not going to quote it. Exactly, but you can look up the quote where she basically is like, hey, if keeping us safe is lynching. These niggers in Lynch thousand day, and she's a white woman who advocates for Justice and social equality for white women, but then was really okay with the destruction are bike bodies, black homes..

Blackmun KKK Donald Trump Trayvon Martin Senator America rape four percent thousand day
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"What does that word? I forget when totally blanking out right now. So when they say. It's not euthanize is fuck me. It's totally slip in my. So like when when you go to a, I'm sorry, like win. Instead of murders, they call it casualties of war. You fin. Euphemism folk me Jesus Christ. So they use, they use euphemisms in order to justify their. So like a casualty of what that's a murder. You murdered an innocent civilian, and they say, oh, well, that's just the drawbacks. I'm like, there's still like like I, that's what I don't understand about the the love of America. Like it's the indoctrination of of nationalism is so strong. It'll allow you to justify murdering your head, right? And we are always, and in the thing is, is that that that ability to justify, it always increases when that person is black. And so we look at, for example, you know, however anybody feels but like you, you know what's going on with the judge Cavanaugh. They're trying to kinda get him, you know, into the supreme court getting locked in. But now this woman has came out and she's said that when they were seventeen he sexually assaulted her, and now there's all this rhetoric from people who are who want him to be. On the supreme court who are saying, but he was only seventeen and look at what all these these, you know, you're young in your kid and you don't know what you're doing. And so we'll justify that. But then we look at like a Trayvon Martin or Tamir rice who is a ten year old boy playing outside with a toy gun and gunned down by the police. He that's different. Trayvon Martin didn't for most of the trial, didn't even get classified as a child they kept calling in, and there was a man that was a child who was coming home with skittles and a can of iced tea. And so we look at. See, I'm not even gonna give him that that I'm not. But I mean, we look at, we have learned to look at particularly white male. The actions that they take that are painful to other people and we can justify that. And this is why I feel like race relations are race. Identity is important in America. Race identity is important in America because Justice is contingent on a jurist bias. Right, right. And so for centuries in this country, we have been branded, a villain, absolute like, and so those those images, if are still in people's heads, I still get looks from women in in elevators that don't know me like they're nervous and they shouldn't be nervous. Man. 'cause you have a better chance of probably getting struck by lightning didn't rob me. Right. So the branding of. Accurate, but the branding of. Of of people of color in his country has been so prevalent people. So people don't understand. This is part of. So like I said, I teach history right, and my US history course when we get to the Jim crow era. So right after reconstruction, we get to the Jim crow era, and there's literally a pair crap that and I was in the actual textbook paragraph. So from the school board and what was so of course, I have the privilege of working at a school that I am allowed to supplement material in a way that has been official to the children that's not beneficial to children to leave Jim crow paragraph because so much of actually how today's society functions was kind of took place during that era. And a lot of that that propaganda, all it was really was shaped in that era because it was used as justification for why there should still be this legal separate. Action of white people from black people and that critically where where white were excuse me, where black men were concerned is that they were out to cause damage and destruction to white women. And so, you know, I say this all the time I argue I've argued with or not arguing this said, but I've debated with white women because my philosophy is that white women are actually the upholders of white supremacy the ideology. Right. And so when you look at throughout history, they have kind of piggyback. Yeah, that that their struggle. I'm not going to negate their struggle in their fight for equality with where white minutes concerned, but we cannot, you know, lessen the fact that they have actually used their whiteness as a weapon against the Barbie..

America Cavanaugh US Jim crow murder Trayvon Martin Tamir rice official ten year
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Attempt to tack races, they paint Martin Luther King. He would have said, all lives matter, like Jessica kills me like like they totally forget about the Martin Luther King that that pulled out the Dexin dictionary definitions of black ins how everything black was a negative connotation and everything white was kind of. And he directly. Pointed out how that is is immersed in our in our in our lexicon. It's in our, it's an everything that we are as human beings and so that unraveling needs to take place. So this notion that a generation after he was killed one, he would have been like, we're good, we're, we're this, we're, it's all things. Song, good. The water found thing we fixed it. It's all during the fact that like, you know, they killed him. I hate. This is a funny as it was on Twitter, and it was his dude was telling the stories that we was on. We were on the train and we were on. We don't train going back and forth from saying negative snigger that and there was he's some white lady told us. She said, I, I wonder if Dr king would be proud of the language that you guys would be using the day. He's gotta know your people go to. That's a really. A lot of the things that Dr king has said, have completely taken out of context. I think a lot of what he did is completely taken out of context. And I also think that kind of what has allowed that and don't necessarily it was a bad thing at the time, but what has allowed that is the fact that there were actually a lot of white people who did participate in in these movements with him. And so it's easy to take that and say, but look, we're working together into, that's I'm not saying they weren't beating, but there was there's so much more context matters. And so there's so much more to it than just saying, just that. And I mean, but we've done that. We've also done that. You know, in a different context, Malcolm x. we've billing nice him. We have made. There should be told there actually is unofficial Hollywood but natural Meshal pizza today. But. But like under. So we we have Vilnai's him. Same thing with the Black Panther party. We have Vilnai's have. Okay explained as to. I mean, because we have to our podcast brobeck explain that aspect of it too because the Black Panthers to me are are, are the current day will a part of it is a lot of what they did was just what the NRA is trying to do. The NRA they went to arm their citizens legally and the Black Panthers wanted to do the same day, but didn't they? They did there in and they also the black pants for they wanted to educate the community about a lot of the things about how to take care of your hair, but a lot of things. So what is the the, the villain as as she, where does that come from in modern day commented. So there's. The Black Panther party. First of all, anybody that disagrees with the Black Panther party. If you have a child that free lunch, you can think the Black Panther party. Okay. Most disagree. I don't have a child. Surprise you would be. Right? So there's this quote, let me read this quote. I got, this is great documentary about actually about bloods and Crips kind of talks about the way that the best the party. No, it's called made in America and integrate, and I love this quote because it kind of sums up what your ass you, right? So it says that that's been the one taboo that black people in other oppress. People in this country are never to use violence to achieve what it is they want. But this country uses violence whenever it chooses and then it legitimises that by and that's really what what was done with the Black Panther party. So you have this group of people who said, okay, there giving the second amendment, right? We are being terrorized in our communities, and the people who were supposed to be calling on that are supposed to be protecting us from that terrorism are actually a large part of the people that are communitarianism. So now we're talking about police brutality, right? And so the justification of American murder is we we, there's a way to..

Black Panther party Martin Luther King Jessica Vilnai Twitter murder NRA Malcolm America Hollywood Meshal
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"And so we were out of slavery, not even a hundred years, and then we went through this almost one hundred years of of Jim crow, to apartheid where who, and what we are was defined by everybody else. But and so what one thing that we were able to do successfully in that time was to create businesses and education systems and things that allowed us to define who we are. And so the black dollar particularly which is so important was able to circulate during that time at a faster pace because in the black because we were forced to, you weren't allowed to shop at white businesses or go outside of those by so. So it put us in a position where we were forced to do for self. And so that aspect of it alone was out completely beneficial. And that was probably the, I would argue. Time for black people where we really were in charge of who we were. Now, the only drawback to that obviously was the white terrorism that was taking place and you can't discount such a. It almost is when you say it's open when you say white terrorism, there's a part of me. That's like that's an oxymoron. You know this because of the branding of terrorism insane. And, and in reality, no, talk about this. I've talked about this. You know, on countless occasions, you know the mount. When we look at domestic terrorism, it's been white communities or white people, particularly white men and they're extremely reluctant to label it terrorism. And there there's not the same kind of -bility that has to be held to ending the terror really is what it is. So you can't tell me that somebody going and putting on a bomb and going and standing in a place for people is not equally as bad as dragging people out of their homes and lynching them, you know, and, and so it's terrorism's terrorism, we can't level the killing in murdering people where we do that very often, particularly with black people. We, you know, there's determined like teas were anti blackness, and it's where black people's bodies and life are concerned. We have learned throughout the society to devalue them, and so we don't look at that with the same impact that we do..

Jim crow one hundred years hundred years
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"I'm trying to do everything I can to compensate for that. And so during the training camp, you know, of course they, they want to keep it under wraps Afars what exactly my injuries are so you, but I have to just media and the media saying, you don't think you need training camp, yadda yadda yadda, and you have to play it off. I'm like, Nah, I don't think I need training camp. I don't think I need to preseason, which essence. I still kind of feel like a like a veteran running back, doesn't really veteran player in general, but so that that aspect of it caught your attention also had commercial with Under Armour, and it was it was stupid little play a little fun. Putting like not famous. Andy was a guy on there and I'm and I'm calling them not famous. Yeah, so so I'm a play the clip of you all. Yeah. Mind, people should know this. Go ahead. Wasn't on my local radio show on NFL is on workers, national TV and you you going in man. And so here is Terrell Davis asking Nick right about area force. After coming out. And responding seasons about match. And I think he got. Rave reviews, I performance and Erin foster, you know, he really didn't get things going last night. Do you believe is because he is he didn't get a lot in the preseason. I think if you things, I think area and maybe needs an attitude adjustment. I'm not someone that bangs on leads. I think there maybe unfairly scrutinized, but areas been to be fair. Something of the right word is mature for the last few months to anyone around the team video. And maybe at some point later in the show game, the Jacksons are driving for the win is clearly the better player yesterday joining on the field. Ben Tate waves thing. Ben, tater staying in the game and area is and almond all, and very clearly says some choice words that start with and then Bs and he's angry and that's fine. If you're down thirty five to three when you are coming back when Ben Kate is playing better, and when you gotta be a mockery of the preseason saying, it's not that important telling the media, you don't really wanna be a part of me that I think that's a bad looking every and has a commercial right now. Famous Andy and area with under kind of treated everyone around him like the not famous Andy. And right now that's not, I guess, in January too much goodwill in the community. Those pretty. All right. So few things if I may. Should be known. That was my first and last appearance on NFL network. That was not what Terrell Davis. Now that I hear the question, not at all what he really asked me about. Clearly something I wanted to say. That and the person that took the most issue with it in the in real time by the way you should know because she's such a loving lovely woman was your mother immediately came at my head on Twitter. Of course. I didn't know what the time that was your mother. I wasn't route or anything, but it was someone had to bring to my attention who who was talking to me MAs with declared. Here's what I'll say. I do think now I didn't know about the injuries and training camp. And I do think as I've gotten older, I've tried to be better about always knowing there's sometimes things we don't know that athletes can't tell us about or their teams I want to tell them about. So try to give the benefit of the doubt and is I said there I've never guy to bang on athletes. I do think there was a a time in your career in Houston where you were so..

Andy Terrell Davis NFL Erin foster Ben Tate Ben Kate Afars Ben Nick Houston Twitter
"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"foster" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Free just go to ziprecruitercom1130 that's ziprecruiter dot com slash foster when you or maneuvering and try to find you only sale uh how do you how do you gauge like that owe saying take the mean discard bone like how do you gave something like like kaya say be tags corny and price him he price at some other things i knew pride in iraq where but like at when you win win one of your mentors are are are telling you things a had a move in his game how do you know whether to take it for a light literally yeah only idle all really nauseous is fully you take a situation where situation lane of sand is not like i took that overly syria however nudges stop really just trying to do the beata the variety of room would i'll nauseous for like you just takes each situation as it comes in china learning take you know even if it is a piece of with somebody says lange's implement that into how you think in you know something has gone help you will to the next level you got very regrets and again i mean i definitely feel like never got to pick malta team a game you know saying like from when i got silguy just kinda go hand in ma hole infrastructure ma manager my business manager and all these things i feel like i didn't have a tire a point to bill with these people saying that resists like business being done but no real foundation universe and so i feel like i just wish from day one i had that party to gain more more planned out understood better is there a um so you you felt like you were kinda like a cog in in industry will you are just kinda a piece of it better than i mean just as far as from our own personal team like i just don't feel i never felt like i had a a focus theme like squad like we bought to go hard for hit boy in of saying i was always kind of working with somebody who was bigger to me at a time or whatever to cases soda focus was there you know what i'm saying right so it's i just on august flag i should have mall vision like super a long time ago even on.

china lange business manager iraq malta