35 Burst results for "Forty Years"

Spirit Week (MM #3475)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Spirit Week (MM #3475)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation back in my much younger day. We used to have Spirit Week in high school. It was usually around football homecoming or maybe when this whole team went to the state tournament, but these days I've noticed something and I see it through my Facebook timeline that grade school kids are celebrating their own versions of spirit week. I just kind of shake my head and I noticed it a lot the last couple of weeks are in Facebook. Now, I realized covid-19 has changed everything. But if we're just this year, I wouldn't think anything about it. But I've seen it over the last few years. I saw a picture of one of my friends kids who were maybe seven eight years old. I think they're in first or second grade. It was spirit week and they were dressed in their favorite decade the eighties, you know, the one that ended thirty years ago and started forty years ago. I'm thinking of myself. What does a seven or eight-year-old child know about the 1980s? Okay, maybe mom was born in the a teenage Mom dressed him up that way but why are kids celebrating Spirit Week in grade school now, maybe if I had kids would understand and I don't have any problem with them doing it. It just doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It's really strange to me. I got to admit dead.

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Ashleigh's Battle with Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:54 min | 5 d ago

Ashleigh's Battle with Alcohol

"And welcome to the goodbye to alcohol podcast my name Janet Garand I'm the founder world without wine and I'm your host for this podcast. Thank you so much for tuning in. Today's interview is with Ashley who came along to a workshop back in August two thousand and eighteen on trees and recently celebrated her second soap Uva. Serie well, done actually on say proud of you. Now. This is quite a long conversation because it made so many interesting points and we have such fun chatting couldn't quite bring myself too much. So, let's get straight into the conversation without further ADO. My name is Ashley and I live in Cape Town in city bowl luckily now if case. I'm forty years old I'm currently in a relationship with really amazing person I. Can Yawns Iona an art gallery contemporary gallery. So yeah, we work with artists from Africa. And Southern Africa primarily and and work with the number of international museums. So. Let's go back to but actually went. When did you first thinking that? Maybe we're drinking of it too much in you want to to change what was going on. I started experimenting with alcohol when I was very young. So actually I probably should have been thinking about cutting down on my drinking when I was about fifteen but. following my first expulsion from school with drunken disorderly behaviour. But that was kind of a yeah that was just A. Precursor didn't really carry on stronger now but I think I guess I think quite a long time I probably probably from my kind of early sixties. thinking. About. Kind of starting to moderate my behavior, I mean you come out of? Your twenties and clubbing and partying and. Cocktails and world events in everything and and then I guess that that kind of. The gloss after work and. All of going out it just becomes kind of habitual things I, I think that they were signs you know that I probably should have. Begun to realize that that Okola taking a bit of a too much of Santa Stage in my life. But of course, it's very easy for that to become justified because it's always a you know it's very normal to be drinking at a wedding or birthday or at a funeral Lauretta was function or at a baby shower maybe I shouldn't have tied too much so much to drink party. Will you know maybe it was over the limit when I drove home that night to dammit again, all you know all of those little signs old things that you would have thought. Yeah. So unfortunately took me if he is to actually do something about it. Did you actually tried to did you do dry January's? You know I always used to read those those things about a you're only supposed to have. Whatever it is that you're supposed to have like seven units alcohol in we can like your. Yeah. You could have heard me like snorting in hysterics rolling down the aisles because I mean basically that was me. You know that was like one now, which wasn't tiffany wasn't alone in that I mean you go to a restaurant and they give you A. Three glosses equivalent of what you thinking is one gloss of. Local whatever. But I did I did once or twice I did I think I did it once I don't know what it was I think it was just sober terrible one of these things but I mean, really it was like knuckle it was like white knuckling through the month and everyone you're doing with doing it because obviously gang for mutual support is thinking Oh my God is call wait till we get to the end of this month so we can just God and get splashed there was like, yes. Pondo defeats the purpose, but then you do those things in using Oh. Okay. We'll. I could go you know. I but I, mean you you often you would find yourself. Okay. You know. Offer particularly heavy night will whatever would having gone off dinner with friends and head Two bottles of wine instead of wine all three bottles of to at between the next morning you thinking just God accompaniment we did that city you know we should have we should stopped a little bit earlier and at the time it always seems like a really great idea but then you then comes the kind of I'm GonNa. Need drink on winds on Mondays and Wednesdays. I'm only gonNA drink on the weekends or AMMONIA GONNA drink when I go out with friends socially for dinner. The fact

Ashley Janet Garand Africa Pondo Founder Southern Africa Cape Town Okola
'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:29 min | 5 d ago

'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

"We're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying

Prostate Cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Mr Eighty Julia Michelle Testosterone Boston BJ Novak Taylor Anthony RON
Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 6 d ago

Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

"The federal government has executed its first black inmates since president Donald Trump resumed executions Christopher B. although was nineteen when he abducted robbed shot and killed Todd and Stacey Bagley a religious couple from Iowa visiting his hometown of clean Texas he was convicted by a federal jury of eleven white and one black and sentenced to death during a campaign event in Jacksonville Florida president trump talked about his denying clemency they came to my office today and the death penalty for clemency I said what was the crime the crime was so horrible in his last statement the forty year old B. although ask god to comfort the families of those he killed seven inmates have been put to death by federal authorities since the summer in the fifty six years before that just three federal executions were carried out I'm Jim acquire

Federal Government Donald Trump Christopher B. Todd Iowa Texas President Trump Stacey Bagley Jacksonville Florida
Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:37 min | Last week

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

"By, the end of this hour we're hoping to inspire you to pick up the phone and reconnect with a friend. You've lost touch with just a phone call, but hopefully a new start for your friendships and hopefully those of you who haven't made the call in six years ten years twelve will get the nerve from this show to pick up the. Phone and reconnect as one woman wrote us a true best friend nurtures the soul and that couldn't be more Trooper Anna and Regina their bond save their lives during World War Two they help each other survived the Nazi death camps and they were only young girls at the time, and now as women they a bond that so strong they consider themselves sisters. I came into the camp was eleven was nineteen, ninety, two I was a long line I don't know why. CAN'T And side. Little go nothing. It was the beginning of a friendship that would last for sixty years in the midst of death and suffering in the concentration camps of Poland and Germany. They were two little girls reaching out for each other that was looking for somebody. To. Be Nice because I didn't have no matter no more I didn't have no fad I. didn't have no family look for each other one could. We're not supposed to go from one back to the other sometimes I, would go in they say hi and then she would be afraid they're going to do something to me. She would succeed give up give out the two girls were separated several times when one girl was shipped to another camp heard it like animals onto cattle, cars, but fate drew them together each time we'll want so many cans wouldn't again too wide. Say Anything of course we should communicate. Was, then to Bruce I had. Half Time. So I was. So Hang I was yanked I needed food. Sites. To Steal from the dog, Regina had smuggled a loaf of bread with her and even though she was hungry, Regina risked her life to share it with her friend. When I saw I rapped the play. Talwar to hey. And votes. killed. I forgive put we went to well. I so what? People just Within weeks they were scheduled to be guest but liberation came I lost in the chaos they never knew if they would see each other again they were separated once more they both married and began families, and after years apart fate Ju- them together again, they discover dot only had they both resettle in the united. States. But actually we're living in the same Boston neighborhood just blocks from each other. Clam to the same street. Trout Chink hours so We're boats that shock. After the war was over a wonderful friends, their friendship grew deeper as the years passed we cannot sit and talk about those things to allow the people's because even even to my kids, this is the bond between us. It's concentration. Can I cherish? Come forget what? What fifty sixty years. If I before she dies before we we're gonNA still love each out. And an-and Regina stories featured in the book. Best Friends. Now, where's Judy night duty I, hear you had a best friend since you were what? By five five years old but you haven't seen each other more than thirty. Thirteen thirty years, thirty years really cracked and the reason for that is. We just don't find the time. I. Guess We make excuses for it and we've just never. Merged our time together to make it work. What you do talk you do communicate we communicate through letters. We've been pound pals for over forty years. and. Where does she live and where you live she lives in like Huntington, New York and I live in Naperville Illinois. Wow. Never a Greyhound bus between you. Never, would you recognize her if you saw her on the street I would hope so through photographs but I don't know. What does she look like? Last. I knew she had long blond hair. Very pretty face does she look like anybody here? Not that I see right now okay. Stand up look around take the audience know. Right there. Say. Anti.

Regina Bruce I Trooper Anna Boston JU Judy Germany Illinois Naperville Huntington Poland New York
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last week

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:29 min | Last week

Judge dreadthe fight for Ruth Bader Ginsburgs seat

"On Friday US Supreme Court. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died of cancer at the age of eighty seven. A candlelit vigil was held the following day outside the Supreme Court. Justice. GINSBURG was only the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court after being nominated by Bill Clinton in one thousand, nine hundred. I. In. Solemnly swear he was a champion of women's rights, and later in life she achieved restore status especially among young women. Now her death has set the stage for a divisive battle to replace her on the court. She was born in Brooklyn to an immigrant Father Dad was from Odessa in in Russia and to a first generation mother she was Jewish John. Fascination is the economist Washington correspondent and she was a trailblazer throughout her life. She was one of only nine women among five hundred men at Harvard law school, and when she arrived. Erwin griswold, who was then the Dean asked women in the class to stand up and justify taking a spot that could have gone to a man. She said the reason she took the spot is it was important that she understood her husband's work that would've made her husband Marty last Mardi was tax attorney well known in his own right he predeceased her but they had a famously loving and productive and equal partnership. She had a relentless work ethic in. Twenty five years in the Supreme Court she never missed today she's arrived four bouts of cancer before this fifth one killed her it was only after she got sick that she called by phone to oral arguments. I. Think People often have this idea that Supreme Court justices are sort of Stentorian wizards ready to shout down lawyer who they disagree with justice. GINSBURG was not like that she spoke very slowly very deliberately, which mirrors I think how she wrote and how she argued and how she thought she was meticulous. She was precise she she was not a showy justice. She came onto the court actually considered a moderate. There are a lot of people on the left who were upset when she was appointed because she was considered sort of two centrist. But as the court steadily moved rightward during her tenure, she has found herself the de facto leader of the courts liberal wing. Junk she spent a long time on the court. What did she achieve? Well, she was on the Supreme Court for Twenty seven years, and before that was on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, which is widely considered the second most important court in America for for thirteen. So she was a judge for forty years I was age sixty when I was nominated in some people thought I was. Too Old for the job. Now I'm into my twenty-seventh starting my twenty-seventh year on the courts on one of the longest tenured. Justices. So if you worried about my age. It was unnecessary. Before that, she argued six cases before the Supreme Court and she was involved with thirty more as the first director of the US women's rights project. The first of those report court cases was in Reid versus Reid for which she wrote a brief arguing against the law in Ohio that preferred men to women in naming executive estates. She won that case in her first oral argument before the Supreme Court. She argued against the military policy that denied many husbands, officers, the same housing and medical benefits that automatically provided officers. Wise. The thinking was that women are somehow inherently more dependent on their husbands and husbands on their wise. Now, in that case, remember she effectively represented the husband she represented family but she represented the shoes argue in favor of the husband's benefits and she austin said that she was not arguing for women's rights she was arguing for the constitutional equality of men and women. Her death is come at a critical time in American politics. It's just six weeks away from the election. So what impact does that have? Well I think it's a little too early to say that definitively. It looks as though both sides are gearing up for battle, but they seem to be quietly circling each other in two thousand sixteen. The Supreme Court is central to Donald Trump's success I think because. There is an open seat in two thousand, Sixteen Justice Antonin Scalia died, and Mitch McConnell who is then the Senate minority leader rather than hold a hearing on Barack Obama's chosen replacement for Justice Scalia whose Merrick Garland he came up with a rationale disguises the principle which was that the causing election was coming up the speech beheld open. So the voters could decide now that had never been done before it was clearly a power play. It was a live sort of issue for Republicans impelled I think a lot of them who otherwise would have held donald trump at arm's length to decide that just had to vote for him this time I. Think Donald Trump is hoping for a similar effect this time, but he also wants to get the filled as quickly as possible. For Democrats donations had started pouring in, they have been pouring all weekend. Democrats seem riled up by this. I think in their view if Donald Trump managed to get a successor onto the court, this'll be the seconds effectively stolen seat right? The I was Neil Gorsuch. who was given the seat that was held open by Mitch McConnell, and the second would be whoever donald trump nominees to replace justice GINSBURG who gets the seat because Mitch McConnell did not follow the principle he set up in two thousand sixteen. John Do you think Senate. Republicans have the numbers to they have the votes to get in trump's nominee through before the election. Well this is the question on everyone's mind. Right so far Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski Republican senators from from Maine Alaska, had said that they will not vote for replacement before November third they have said that the president who wins on November third you choose the replacement now that only gets Democrats to forty nine and they need fifty one because in the case of a tie Mike. Pence cast the tiebreaking vote Lindsey Graham had previously said he would abide by Mitch McConnell's rule from twenty sixteen. He has now gone back on that apparently because he's angry Democrats didn't roll over for Brad Cavanaugh Chuck. Grassley, who's a senator from Iowa has also previously spoken in favor of McConnell's precedent. I, have a very hard time imagining that when push comes to shove, he'll stand by his. Word and so there really is nothing Democrats can do unless they can persuade two other Republicans to come join them, and if they can't persuade those Republicans and tip the balance what happens. Then what are the consequences for the years ahead on American politics? It's clear that what McConnell did in two thousand sixteen was a tremendous violation of norms I think it's not a good principal to. Uphold I think arguing that this is now how Supreme Court seats should be awarded that in an election year, you effectively have to hold the seat open until the end of the election is a bad precedent but I think there's a difference between saying Republicans should be consistent for the sake of consistency and Republicans should follow this principle because that's how court seat should be given out now. From the Democratic Base, there's been a tremendous push to threaten Republicans with repercussions if. Retake. The Senate and the president in that includes making Puerto Rico in Washington DC states, which would effectively at least in the near in medium-term Give Democrats four senators people have also been talking about expanding the court. So the reason they are Nice Ring Court justices is not constitutional legal. It's just a statute. So if they were minded and had a majority had a president who would sign it into law, they put eleven or thirteen justices on the supreme court. The problem with that for Democrats I think is that it sort of shifts the terms. Of the debate that they are now winning I think the way Joe, Biden has pitched. This campaign is on the one hand. You have the sort of chaotic destructive Donald Trump on the other. You have Joe Biden Palm known figure who will get us back to normal. If, he comes out and endorses expanding the court or State of DC in Puerto Rico, which to be clear he has not done. He is actually a opposed expanded from court but if he comes out if Democrats threaten this, then the debate becomes a lot murkier. Then it becomes the radical change that Joe Biden wants to do right take fifty, two states and putting thirteen on Supreme Court against Donald Trump will keep things as are I think that debate does not play out very well for Democrats. John Thank you very much time.

Supreme Court Donald Trump Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Mitch Mcconnell Dc Circuit Court Of Appeals United States Joe Biden Senator Senate Justice Antonin Scalia Democrats John Bill Clinton President Trump Erwin Griswold Harvard Law School Brooklyn Puerto Rico Odessa Washington
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | Last week

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
Episode 12; Listeners stories from the 1980s - burst 01

The Old Man's Podcast

01:31 min | Last week

Episode 12; Listeners stories from the 1980s - burst 01

"This. Say. Sanity. Gross. Welcome to the old man's podcast in this is episode twelve, try something new. On this episode, we're going to have a listeners stories episode. So several listeners, many different listeners of sentence stories or comments directly related to the Golden Pandemic Free Age of the eighty. Nine thousand nine hundred eighty was a different time. Sure. That was thirty to forty years ago everything about it is different than spun interesting to go back reminisce tell stories. Pens where you're at your life now that the eighties might have been. Maybe your favorite time in your lifetime. So. I hope you'll enjoy this I'm going to read a number of stories from listeners. And that's going to be what this entire episode is about though I think you're gonNA enjoy it. Let's get it started.

Why Is My Pieris Plant Turning Yellow?

Your Gardening Questions

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Is My Pieris Plant Turning Yellow?

"Bruce asks about his piracy plants he has to. A says parts of them turn yellow and Brown, and die back every summer they're in partial shade and I give them acid fertilizer occasionally any ideas on what's going wrong Well, not really It. It is a plant that wants established like any other plant. If it's internal growth now, by that meaning some twigs that are on stems clear back near the the original growth then those stems can sometimes get pinched out and die off as well as the material on out toward the plant toward the edge of the plant I have one only that is oh my. My eyeball heights and probably five and a half feet or so across now it's getting thin. Just. I think because of as because it's been there for over forty years but. It does not seem to do what he's describing however, if it's only a small portion of the plant, let's allow that he is doing things right being in partial shade is good. ACID fertilizer definitely is good I. I, would recommend that rather than occasionally he'd he'd be a little bit more active with that not excessive but active to the point that it says on a package of acid fertilizer X. amount per plant a certain size. I would use one half of X in March? Decent jacket type day, and then I would use the other right after boom period in June. Sustain that might help, but it sounds to me like it's just perhaps age or aging where twigs or dying out. Now if a whole Greek portion of the plant dies off, then I'd be looking for critters such as voles chewing on the bark, right at the ground line something of that nature. But if it's if it's only small areas, I would recommend that you you just cut them out and let the plant grow over that spot I'm hoping it's not too big spot or spots, but Sounds. Like he's doing the right things maybe just be a little less than casual with the fertilizer. Do it each year not as I say not excessively but because it being Eric Ages Planet can well, it has to have fertilizer that has acid either the ad they acid otherwise or whatever but any as long as he's doing that. And would kind of upgrade that process and keep the plant moist because dry shade can be nasty and a summer like this where we went for several periods of considerable drought. it depends on what's where so on but it could be just simply lack of water the plant suffering some from that and the portions that are the weakest of portion of the plant simply die off I mean that's just kind of normal of attrition but I tell him it's been the right place, upgrade the fertilizer a little bit and make sure it doesn't get dry and that late June July and August period I don't mean sopping wet now but but every two weeks a good thorough soaking will sustain that plant otherwise he's in good shape in terms of what he's done.

Brown Bruce
Wyoming Doubles Down On Its Long Support For Carbon Capture

Environment: NPR

03:35 min | 2 weeks ago

Wyoming Doubles Down On Its Long Support For Carbon Capture

"US coal production is down to its lowest level in half a century, but the country's largest coal-producing state is desperate to keep the industry going with support from the trump administration. Wyoming is investing big to try and clean up Kohl's carbon emissions. Wyoming public radio's Cooper has more the largest utility in Wyoming Rocky Mountain power has found. It makes economic sense to start retiring. It's coal plants early, an invest heavily and renewables across the West. That isn't going over well in a state whose economy is tied to call. At a recent public hearing county commissioner can't Connolly said when a plant is shutdown, it's not just jobs that are lost by lose. Fifty percent of the taxes is just as simple. Connolly says it doesn't have to be like this coal plants in Wyoming could stick around if utilities just considered retrofitting them to capture the carbon they emit we will change how goal America. There's no doubt about it we'll get. The idea a coal plant would be retrofitted with new tack. Its emissions would be removed and then sold, but rocky mountain power says right now that technology is too expensive and not proven utilities rick, link says its decision is an economic one. Is Driven by. Changes in the heart condition even so Wyoming is doubling down on its long support for carbon capture. This year lawmakers mandated that by twenty thirty utilities produce a certain amount of electricity from coal plants using carbon capture technology ratepayers bear the expensive that the trump administration is also trying to boost carbon capture. It's passed a federal tax credit in his funding research projects. Holly crude cut oversees several through the University of Wyoming. She envisions capturing co two emissions for a variety of profitable uses including turning them into new products. Building Materials asshole replacement. The problem is many others think the moment for Carbon Capture to help Cole has come and Gone Arizona State University's Klaus Lochner remembers giving presentations promoting carbon capture to the coal industry twenty years ago without that, he warned that climate change would be the industry's demise. Is it look if the comes around, you are not going to be allowed to build a new new coal plant because every bank in the country will know that they will not get their money back. So you bid or buy twenty trinite have the ability to build power plants that. Completely carbon neutral but that hasn't happened Energy Economists Rob. God. Says part of the reason could be politics the Republican Party which strongly supports coal actually may have hurt the industry by downplaying climate change climate change doesn't exist. There's no justification to develop low-carbon technologies like carbon capture. So in an ironic way, the Republicans, kill carbon capture as much as anybody else only one coal plant in the US created a successful business model for carbon capture. It's called Petra Nova in Texas, but that fell apart after the pandemic led to an oil price. Crash analysts, Dennis Wanstead with Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis says he can no longer imagine utility saying, Hey, we really WanNa do this. We really want to build a carbon capture facility and we really WANNA put it on our thirty five year old forty-year-old coal plant improve. It's GonNa. Make Money Wyoming Governor. Mark Gordon isn't put off though he points to wind energy, which also needed help early on, but is now a fast growing industry. He says that means you don't give up for NPR news I'm Cooper mckim

Wyoming Wyoming Rocky Mountain Cooper Mckim United States University Of Wyoming Mark Gordon Connolly Commissioner NPR Holly Crude Dennis Wanstead
The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

The Double Shift

06:18 min | 3 weeks ago

The Social Science on Women, Work, and Motherhood

"Julie Kohler. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Thanks so much for having me. Well, I'll just jump in and ask because obviously, this cove nineteen crisis feels totally impossible on so many different levels but this family crisis that you have written about, you argue that it didn't really have to be this way in America that this particular crisis of feeling the strain as profoundly as we have in our families that that's not actually a byproduct of the global health crisis can you explain? Yeah Yeah. But what I think is happening is that we are now experiencing a level of. Discount Verge and seeming impossibility with a situation that really had begun long before the current crisis and it is simply expanded to include more and more families. Those families especially middle class upper middle class families that maybe were getting buys sort of at the margins by our fingertips. I've really been thrown into a different milieu post Cova. So on its own terms, we are living under the economic system that has failed. There's been less growth less economic security in this country since nineteen eighty than in the forty years prior. But this economic approach has become really politically sticky. It's kind of existed or endured as Zombie ideology some have said, and that's because what they've been successful. An is expanding this notion of what constitutes private family responsibility and enshrining that is sort of a reasonable bipartisan consensus. So the article was really designed to kind of unpack the family norms that. At the root of this failed economic approach that's often called neoliberalism and one is sort of an economic assumption that families will provide for their own little public support and nested within that are interrelated with. That is a cultural assumption that the two parent nuclear family is the optimal structure to do. So and I really believe that at this moment were big changes are possible. What we need to do is not just. kind of raised the policy solutions but explicitly critique and dismantle those norms that lie at the heart of the dominant economic approach. Can you lay out some of those norms that we're talking about because the thing about norms is normalized we think that they're normal and that's the way things are supposed to be. So what are the expectations of this private family unit that you talk about that maybe shouldn't be expectations on us. Right. Well, I think what's kind of so ironic is there's been this kind of idealized family type right? Kind of a two parent traditional nuclear families still is kind of promoted as the best way of doing family even though many families no longer fit that structure in any way. But then itself was a social creation of a very specific time in history, it was really kind of the mid twentieth century postwar era and it was enabled by massive government spending. So it was only able though for a certain group of families largely white. Families especially and with husbands who had unionized jobs. So those benefits massive investment in housing massive investment in higher education for white men who were returning from the war and could benefit from the GI bill. All of these public supports enabled this kind of family ideal. Now, in the forty to fifty years, kind of sense that is beginning really in the one thousand, nine, hundred eighties we've dismantled all of those forms of public supports that made that kind of family possible and yet we still have the expectation that families are going to be providing for their own. So it's kind of a catch. Twenty two families they're forced to believe. It's their responsibility to provide for everything for their kids that can assure a middle class life for economic security in the future families have to pay for childcare to all the kind of enrichment activities that accompany middle-class life these days to higher education, which is increasingly financed by families or through massive debt that families have to incur either college students or their families on their behalf. So the economic burden for families has increased exponentially over the last forty to fifty years, and yet we remain locked in this family ideal. This notion of what families should look like. That simply is not possible with the economic burdens that we now have. I'm curious. Besides you know us feeling stressed and. And people having less and less money like what sort of the result for society of that. Yeah. Well, here's what I think is kind of interesting. So this economic approach was facilitated by two parts. A partnership you could say between Neil Liberal economists. So these kind of economists would a specific idea about what would lead to economic prosperity and social conservatives especially, Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives, and the case that Evangelical Christian Social Conservatives made about the innate superiority of the two parent nuclear family like that has not actually one out in the court of public opinion in this country like. People today are far more accepting of a wide variety of family forms and they were a generation ago. So we're at a very different place in kind of what we think can constitute a good family and yet at the same time because of all of these policies because of these economic shifts. Individuals are more heather to families through wealth in debt than they were a generation ago. So it's almost as though the economics has done the bidding of social conservatives for them. They haven't been able to succeed in winning the ideological war, but they've wanted on the economic

Julie Kohler America Cova
No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

The Frame

06:12 min | 3 weeks ago

No Going Back to Normal with Guillermo del Toro, Zack Arnold and Laine Trzinski"

"Welcome to our podcast. It's where we asked some of the entertainment industry's brightest minds how Hollywood might reinvent itself as it comes out of the pandemic coming up filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. But first, we ask our guests in every episode, what they would do to fix Hollywood and we've talked with actors, directors, executives, and writers. But, what about the people on the frontlines the below the line workers as they're called in the business, they do vital work behind the scenes and they have a lot to say about what needs to change Hollywood is going to thrive after the pandemic members of the gig economy people that are creative professional's in. Hollywood, we're essentially chewed up and we are spit out. We are treated like we are widgets we are commodities that can be replaced. That's Zach Arnold he's a film and TV editor. He's worked on shows like empire burn notice and glee he got a lot of attention for a blog post he wrote about what could happen when production resumes the title Dear, Hollywood? We don't WANNA go back. To normal normal wasn't working. It had come from me having hundreds of conversations with people that all said the same thing because of the pandemic I had this immense amount of self awareness of how much I hated my life before all this started. Now that I'm not driving I realized how much I hated my commute now that I'm not working eighteen hours, I realized how much time I lost with my children and I received hundreds upon hundreds of responses I'm still getting them, and I still can't sift through all of them. Arnold's blog is called optimize yourself and gives advice about work life balance, which is really important in an industry that is notorious for grueling hours with no guarantee of steady employment. Arnold shares a story that he heard from film editor Walter Merch, he worked on the Godfather and apocalypse. Now, it was a famous story back in the mid to late seventies about a film that was vastly over budget and had very tight deadlines and everybody was just getting pushed to the limit with twenty hour days and they went to one of the heads of post production at Universal Studios and said, we have to do something about these demands. Everybody is dropping like flies and the response was get more flies. Nothing has changed in the last forty years. It's all about everybody having to create a miracle such that today's Miracle Dust becomes tomorrow's expectation and whatever it takes however many people it takes to figure this out they throw people at the problem and as soon as somebody can't deliver anymore they find somebody else that will and I think this is a systemic issue that needs to change, and if ever there was a time to figure it out I think it's right now the most immediate problem with that get more flies solution is that if someone on test positive for coronavirus, it isn't simply a matter of replacing that person one infected crew member could shut down an entire production. And the safety protocols that you need to prevent that that requires time and attention and money. So what we can't do a separate, the conversation of safety from the conversation of ours because the two are inextricably linked. If you're going to have a safer set, you need to have people that are healthy that have strong immune systems that are not sleep deprived. That are working regular hours. I don't know why it has gotten to a point where. We do work such long hours when honestly to have any sort of life, we shouldn't Laney trubisky is one of the many industry gig workers who read Zak's blog post she's a hairstylist and she's been in the business since nineteen ninety-three. But back in March when the pandemic hit her work stopped Gosh, it's just been ups and downs my feelings change every single day I'm not sure if I even willing to remain in the film business. Because the film business, we had before very stressful and was very hard on a lot of families and people and things have to change their for sure the hours for her makeup teams some of the longest onset they have to be there before the actors arrive and can't leave until the actors are done. Laney says the norm are fourteen or sixteen hour days, and she has worked for twenty four hour days in her career, but she's hopeful. Things will get better. There's so much time entailed in getting our disinfecting right before we even get to work and get to working on the actors that the film business is going to have to slow down I. Don't think it has a choice anymore, and I, think it will be beneficial for all of us. Laney's work requires her to be on set but people like Editors Zach? Arnold. Well, they can do a lot of their work from home. As long as their bosses sign off, just had the conversation this week with an assistant editor who was told that in order for them to be able to keep their job, they have to work in the office and they have to go into a screening room with ten or fifteen directors and producer. They can take notes because that's just the way that it is in its quote unquote impossible to. Work from home we've now learned that's not the case and people are just making these excuses number one because they don't want to put in the effort or number two because they don't Wanna spend the money but guess what disruption is uncomfortable, it is painful but this is the point where we're going to have to fix these issues because you can't just say to somebody sorry informed the standards or we're. Going to hire somebody else while it might have been possible in the past for the people doing the hiring to point to a pile of resumes and say, if you don't do this job, someone else will arnold says that's changing. Now there's nobody on that stack because nobody's willing to go in under these circumstances and that is why I think Cova such an inflection point for post for Hollywood generals that. Before whenever we've thought about what are the consequences? Well, it's going to be really long days and I'm going to be really sleep deprived and something might happen. But what are the chances now we're literally talking about losing our lives if we do this wrong and I think that is the big change that we're seeing just emotionally the groundswell is people saying your entertainment is not worth me giving my life.

Hollywood Zach Arnold Laney Trubisky Editor Guillermo Del Toro Universal Studios Cova Walter Merch ZAK Producer
A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

Plant Strong

04:00 min | 3 weeks ago

A Visit with the Main Street Vegan, Victoria Moran

"I. WanNa start off by asking you. So your brand is main street Vegan. Why mainstream? Vegan? Well it's a story actually rip I went to a pita fundraiser late in two thousand ten and they showed videos and I've been seeing videos like this for forty years. It took me quite a while to get from. Vegetarian Vegan back in the day. So I've been around this movement for ever. And I've seen those videos about things that humans do to animals but that night, my heart was extra. And all I wanted to do was write a check for one hundred, thousand dollars in hand it to the pita founder Ingrid newkirk and say here, go fix something but the check would have bounced. So I got on the train thinking okay. What's the plan B. and I literally had inspiration I don't know how to explain this. You know you could say God you could say angels on what all I know is that it came to me very clearly okay you don't have one hundred, thousand K. spare but what you can do is make your. Next Book Main Street Vegan, we want it to be geared to the young woman that you were in Wheaton Illinois in nineteen eighty three when you finally stopped messing around and became a one hundred percent fulltime Vegan it needs to have forty short chapters with a recipe at the end of each one and I'm just kind of taking notes in my head of I could do this, I can do this. So my wonderful literary agent sold the proposal to torture Penguin and the editor called to say so happy to have you happy to have the book. But. We hate main street. You need to change the title and they'd bought it. So I had to do something and I'm coming up with these other titles and they were so boring. But I kept trying to write and then I had a begin miracle and I really do believe that this is the age of those believed that this is the time when all these other ridiculous diets are going to go. The way of the dinosaur plant based is going to be the only thing that sensible people are interested in and the idea that we are killing our fellow beings and destroying the planet is going to start to look like are you serious people really did that? So my Vegan Miracle That day. Was Walking up Broadway. We saw somebody so famous, you can recognize him from the back and that was Michael Moore Now, he had liked another book that I had written a weight loss book fit from within, and so I just handed my card to the woman who was with him and a few seconds. Later I hear Victoria there is Michael Moore, following me up Broadway and we started talking and then we started talking on the phone and on one of these phone conversations I said the book that I'm supposed to write should be called mainstreet Vegan publisher hates main street he said they're wrong. Let me talk to him talk to them so. In a three way call with an Academy Award winner my editor in me he convinced her she convinced the higher ups and when she called to say Main Street Vegan is your title everything else started to pop and I've been given my mission for the rest of my life. So why main street because this thing that we do whether we're coming from the health or the environment or the animals or whatever this is for everybody this is not some elitist thing. We don't have to be rich. We don't have to be leftover hippies or punk rockers. We can just be who we are eat reasonably and love more and to me that's Main Street That is mainstream nuts. you landed on something that just resonated and you knew of his right thing. And I grew up two blocks off main street in Kansas City Missouri. So that may have had something to do with it and mainstream Vegan was at your eighth or Ninth Book Because you've written. Now Than Books Right I've written thirteen. So Main Street Vegan would've been eleven. And

Michael Moore Mainstreet Vegan Editor Ingrid Newkirk Kansas City Victoria Wheaton Illinois Academy Award Founder Missouri Publisher
Social Media Risks Parents - Especially Of Girls - Should Know About

Legacy-Dads Podcast

07:40 min | Last month

Social Media Risks Parents - Especially Of Girls - Should Know About

"For us for US old fogies it's probably going to provide some context here. So let's go back and some of you remember this back in the early days of social media like around two, thousand, three, two, thousand, four. You've got social media back then like friendster my space. Really. Wow. Did you have a mind? Is Account somewhere out there. Too Much excalibur. And facebook was really so the facebook but it was mainly, you had to be a college student on a college campus, they have access to facebook. and. These were actually it was a nice place. Social Media was very tame back then. It's kind of like, Hey, look at me here's some pictures. Here's the bands that I like what I'm listening to here's the links to smile into my friends. You know everybody remembers here's another meeting right now at this restaurant look at this great meal. and. That was kind of the first few years of what social media was. There was no censorship. There was no you know multimillion dollar corporations coming in and taking over. And there was no political groups spreading outrage or propaganda on social media. It was not really a destructive environment back. Then it wasn't toxic wasn't a toxin environment in any anyway. So then some big changes starting to happen in the kind of the mid to late two thousand. So facebook. started. To allow anyone to join, you didn't have to be a college student. So anybody can create an account and then in two thousand nine. facebook introduced the like button, and now for the first time everything and everyone can be graded and ranked, and now everybody is rewarding or punishing everyone else by simply clicking a button whether they like or dislike you you know Lance I can totally hear some of our listeners right now saying who cares if you get a like or not and I wouldn't be surprised if listeners say facebook, what's that? But because of for mature adults, we are more developed in don't tire identity to social media but in this is critical because for younger adults or children social media has now become a popularity contest. So now, speech isn't just you and me talking openly it becomes how do I get more likes and approval? So other platforms like twitter come out and they introduced the re tweet button yet, and now the things that I'm saying that we're saying right here on this podcast that you're liking tend to be the things that are going to make people emotional or even sharing my frustration or anger, and then you or anyone compress re tweet and spread that. So now my frustration and anger can go to thousands or even millions of people within a day that share or want to have the same expression and like the way that somebody else says it. You're correct in an I think between two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, twelve kind of this is the next step when when the news media mainstream media began to realize, hey, the social media thing is not going away and it may even overcome and overtake us. So the mainstream media begins to adapt to this new world in which people now and they're not going to CNN. They're not going to the New York Times for their information as much. They're getting their news and their opinions from social media and often I can tell you without fact checking anything. It's like well, you know. God bless my mom but I don't know how many times she's like well I saw it on facebook it has to be true. It must be true. If you're rushing spy putting it on. I'm like. So now we can we can go down rabbit hole on how social media and also creates echo chambers and in confirmation bias because one of the things that facebook switched over to it used to be that you would get everybody get all this information. And it was kind of random. Well, facebook started optimizing that to where they're GONNA only gonNA show you social media is only gonNA show you the stuff that they think you want to hear and like. So this changed in became more of an engagement focused thing. So now, you this confirmation bias because now we can only we can choose to just watch and listen to the point of view that we agree with. and. Let's get an. So that that's a whole rabbit hole. We go down I don't WANNA do that. You can go back and listen to somewhere where podcast we talk about that. But let's get to what this means for parents and specifically for parents of daughters so. T this you know this is probably relate to a lot of our guys out there. So in the development process boys. Are. Our maturity are hierarchy or or the the Alpha male is kind of based on. You know things like our athletic ability are toughness. Our ability to dominate or insult can competition teasing. You know drinking soda through your nose with a straw. Those are the things like middle school boys are. That's important to them. Things like that. Now, I'm not. I'm not Dourson this behavior agreeing with this saying that you know what this type of behavior is admit just that's just what it is. It's the scientific fact that this is kind of how middle school and high school boys move through their child development process. We could argue that. I would argue this Dante that some boys never develop out of the state and we have thirty and forty year olds who are still clinging to this. Alpha, Male, I'm the toughest I can dominate an insult you model. By that. Maybe, fifty year old. That's me later there. But but for girls and for daughters, this is specifically different. It's about who's in WHO's out, who is included, who is ex colluded who's friends with who who knows who secrets. And so the Female. Tends to be not physical like boys like they're not going to wrestle and fight it's relational and it's a Lotta drama. girls don't bully each other. You know generally, girls don't bully the each other physically so much. But what girls do is they gossip and they damage each other's relationships and again, we could argue that they're grown women even in our churches that still cling to this model now again. Not. dosing anything. That this is we agree with this behavior and I'm just I'm just regurgitating medical science and facts kind of the development process so. Around two, thousand, eight, two, thousand, nine when we start seeing smartphones coming out, the iphone first comes out and now you have social media is in your hand and in your pocket at all times. Okay. So with girls and daughters, this multi by this multiplies, a girl's ability to be able to damage each other's relationships enormously. So in some homes and in some cases. Children Girls They have access twenty, four seven to this device in which their thoughts emotions and images can be reported can be rewarded or punished by. Clicking a button and so if you had a fight with a girl that day in school, she can get on there and spread nasty things about you and you everybody's not liking you or making fun of you via anonymous social media on a phone and while adults adults, we might shrug things off and say, what's the big deal I mean who cares but you gotta remember girls in this vulnerable stage in development middle school high school they're looking for approval they're looking for inclusion and they're being they're looking to you know being seen. As beautiful as much and they're much more susceptible to anxiety depression, self harm and even suicide this you know approval inclusion in comparison that they're dealing with is that make sense Dante?

Facebook. United States Dante Friendster Development Middle School High New York Times Twitter CNN Lance
Tens of thousands of people rally against Lukashenko in Belarus

Monocle 24: The Globalist

12:15 min | Last month

Tens of thousands of people rally against Lukashenko in Belarus

"Where Can Belarus President Turn Now? Thousands of people were back on the streets protesting this weekend still angry at what they believe was a rigged presidential election President Lukashenko who claimed as he returned to power with an eighty percent approval rate responded by flying over the protesters wearing riot gear with a rifle slung from his shoulder. Well, drained over is L. Editor of Belarus Anna Leasing at the University of Brain and I'm delighted to say she joins us on the line now Auger a very warm welcome to monocle twenty four. These absolutely bizarre scenes of President Lukashenko yesterday. Well. Yes. I was actually also quite as to see you know him banning public with a gun and also his fifteen year old son campaign him so to say so it's the definitely assigned for me that he he's kind of knocked children confidence in front of the people who through testing by his residence, and it's also not you know not that Jerry. Addict from me because the protest is peaceful, protesters will not trying to receive this residents in the state needs. said the wall spread the information that there was some attempt to seek the? Residency so it's quite an emotional psychological reaction from him. I would say and will. Nobody. that. So it's also very strong sign that there is now readiness of from from the official from the state site for any kind of luck that you know this new to build coordination committee by Dehaan Oscar and she team is is trying to do initiate and I think everybody most notably people. In Belarus itself have been absolutely taken aback by the brutality of the reaction by the the Lauren forces to the protesters and the fact that Alexander Lukashenko was was dressed up in riot gear suggests that he doesn't have anywhere to go other than a violent approach. Yes I would also I would also expects it. You know what targeted repressions and they're ready started last week and they continued this week. So what what would serve now is definitely not base wave of unprecedented repression that we. Saw Three days and nights after the elections but still there are targeted repressions and against. Most active people are also criminal case has been initiated against the newly built coordination committee and people. People are invited to some talks with KGB officials until also people actually also bill will try to strike there actually threatened. By the direction openness of the state owned enterprises that they would lose their jobs and so on. So observe already targeted pressure on people, but this wave is still not to the tide because you know. So what international reaction was so the state drives, you know just show from the one handed, it's not ready for the data from the one hand there is the rest of. You know not not to let this protests spread. Within the country how much do you think that's what the foreign observers of said about what's been happening in Belarus for the last couple of weeks is actually forming any decision made by Alexander Lukashenko at the moment. Well I think that it will quite an important aim has been achieved ready and that we actually we have understood that he's not legitimate within the society right within the boat society and I think also problem was that he really did not understand that. Shortly after the elections or before the elections so and. Actually. I think that the reaction was not is at least that. He and his circles really have the distended. Okay. He doesn't have any majority in society, but it has not led so far to his readiness for dialogue just in the all the way he kind of supports the security structures in internal, Misteri Ministry and actually he even gave you know about three hundred medals to those who are actually responsible of for for this incident violence. So he kinds of stresses that the security two structures military is. Actually the most important pillar his powerful for now for the moment, the Steve Kerr show is joining us now he's policy and advocacy. Directorate. Freedom from torture and author of St Spirit Steve. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Hey On monocle twenty, four Olga a moment ago mentioned the fact that the secret police is still called the KGB I mean, what does that say about the level of influence at Russia's still has in terms of the way that Belarus's going and whether Russia just going to sit this out. Yes I mean I either it reflects influence of Russia, which is August is certainly, very great or it's just almost bizarre retro element to to better under Lukashenko. He doesn't mind thinking in those terms I think it is going to be. So Russia will certainly be an important factor and but at the same time Mosca really doesn't want to be. Getting, further involved in in a very direct since that's going to be difficult for Russia as well. So I think that Lucas. Is playing a very difficult game. If he was giving small confessions, I think he might have some a little bit more success in some homage to blunt things but so far at least the violence has had absolutely opposite effective people become more and more angry the fear obviously quite rightly the last Sunday was absolutely crucial. I would argue that the US huge threats of on ahead of Sunday hoping that people. Would back off and stay at home and actually it was a big rally than ever. So not particular face off. There's no question that Lukashenko loss what happens next we'll still see I'll steve has suggested that Sunday was a pivotal moment some people waiting for what is described as a tipping point when an event causes things to go one way or the other would you say that Sunday was part of that? Tipping Point. Demon this Sunday last Sunday. To Sunday. The Sunday. Just gone when tens of thousands of people came out onto the streets to set by a threat the first Sunday directly after the elections. Yes. I it just completely I mean people never any. Okay. What we're talking about batteries and Ballard who's says, Chris it's not the first Sunday that actions pulses side will have to admit that it also not to the extent that people actually being tortured eating the prisons will have also. took a beast fag, but it's for the first very time that such vast majority of people. So it with their own is is of their families or friends in stone. So you can imagine how many are nets were the strategy when they're where our seven seven thousand arrests. So it's it's quite a big part of the country said it's really I would agree it had an opposite effect and it's also for the first time that you know this special. GRANITZ or gas or a also rubber bullets on there were actually used against own population. It never existed in the history of Belarus in October election protests, people widget shocked and I think it was a shock from the both sides because the state net expected to such mass protest before also before three weeks before the elections would be solved by. About two to five or even six percent of local population came to to railways with Hannele. It's also unprecedented thing was kind of shock from both sides and of course, people people were also by this eighty percent because nobody really believes that anymore I mean. People also really did not quite believe that before I, would say people heading out some kind of feeling that president steelhead had a majority maybe not eighty percent maybe fifty five, maybe sixty but this feeling was there and this style with completely different. So quiet in Jersey, you know quite a big part even I think I would say the majority of people just didn't believe that he actually has any kind of fifty plus and that was the problem that we still have this eighty percents I think people would just. People were just humiliated by that of course, activate shortly afterwards by this unprecedented wave refreshing stave when we look to the further history of batteries, which is being written right now when considering what sort the former eastern bloc countries of have seen in the last three decades. When regime ends, it's generally quite a peaceful affair actually the deleted. is of removed from office. This is unlikely to happen here. Isn't it? Well, I mean, sometimes it has been an sometimes it hasn't been. So when I was a journalist working for the independent, I was the East Europe during the eighty nine revolutions and also join me the fall of Milosevic Milosevic in Serbia and cover dot and there a number of those leaders were ready to use very significant violence and what I'm fascinated by very moved by what was seeing with the courage. A better as protesters today is to see that they are defined vence in the same ways that work very effectively for example, in East Germany where people were threatened with extraordinary for someone particular day in Leipzig in. October nineteen eighty-nine the fact that so many people came out meant regime which had publicly declared its loyalty to force actually back down in Romania I very much. Hope it weren't turn into remain, but we do already see that there are splits within Belarus at the riot police remain loyal. The moment we've seen a number of police units splits off. We've seen a lot of establishment figures putting off in the same way as also does something happened in in Ukraine and the Orange Revolution, and once you see security forces a different security forces splitting away going like enough already as August said, I mean the eighty percent. Claim was was absurdly insulin and the degree of the virus even Grayson seen before and I think this is really interesting. It might end up in huge volumes but I think Lukashenka would lose very very badly that to happen I think it's a regional issue. How if you like bluntly how crazy you are Milosevic. For example, he survived on one occasion ninety seven by giving some concessions and then re clamping down and people just got tired and went back when you use real violence I think it's really difficult. It was a great book written by Richard couple the Polish off I was written about the Iranian revolution. Charlotte. Charlotte's but very much reflected his own country Poland which forty years ago. This month solidarity kind of a huge opposition movement didn't call itself opposition challenge the regime and unthinkable circumstances laying Brezhnev for the very reactionary Russian leader was still in power. They managed to become successful and he said the moment where people stand in front of eastern threatens violence, the pre curry signing backstops, and instead someone stands there and doesn't back down he said, this is where the revolution begins, and after that in effect is the exact the precipice. If you're to violence, you make people more angry if you start making concessions than people go. We have lost our fear and in a sense the certain moment difficult to prediction events but describable. There is no way back to the regime and it still seems a little bit early to say but I think it's very, very difficult to see how Lukashenko come back from this. If he steps back more gently than, of course, it will be peaceful. The protests have been fun tastic peaceful and very, very consciously so far the extended even cleaning up rubbish because I really vary consciously very civic. Minded. So he might just go off and disappear off to Russia for example, and as it will live happily ever after but he tries to bring out all of the guns. Then I think you know all bets are off but I don't think it was a good ending for him whichever way it goes Steve Crozier and Elga agenda over there. Thank you for joining us on monocle twenty four.

Belarus President Lukashenko Russia President Trump Chris It Steve Kerr Jerry St Spirit Steve Milosevic Milosevic KGB Editor United States Anna Leasing University Of Brain Auger Steve Crozier Misteri Ministry Dehaan Oscar
How to Survive in Sales During COVID

Daily Sales Tips

02:13 min | Last month

How to Survive in Sales During COVID

"My name is Hans Hansen. I'm the founder of starboard commercial real estate in San Francisco. I've been in sales for over forty years and experienced three previous downturn markets. I want to share with you my best sales tips for working in a down economy think outside the box. Since Kobe nineteen traditional sales is over whatever you were doing before is no longer going to lead you to success today as salespeople we know that through any. War Economic Downturn were health crisis. They're always winners and losers and a sales people we have to start thinking outside of the box. Ask Yourself. What are you going to do in the next five years to sell? How can you take advantage of the current environment and not let it destroy you you need to think outside of the box. I look at your current business model and understand who benefits within your model currently, and who does not if no one benefits then you need to start selling something else if it is junior model to see that your clients do need help. Then you need to ask how can I help them and how can I monetize those services? Then, you need to ask how big of a market does this represent for me if it's marginal need to think of more ways, you can grow your services to produce solid sales results. This is my four downturn market since, covid. I have started a new real estate advisory in Development Company hired you sales manager and upgraded my staff. I also reintroduced an service was very successful in assisting businesses to sub leases in the DOT com boom market called trade addresses, Dot Com, and I'm still expanding and upgrading agent pool. You too can think out of the box and thrive in this environment. Whatever business you're in studied the trends and look for the opportunities change your mental state because this pandemic could create a boom market for you for years to come

Hans Hansen Sales Manager Kobe San Francisco Founder Development Company
Alone, Together

Israel Story

04:39 min | Last month

Alone, Together

"I was born burst shave I grew up in Beersheva that's God defeats new today. God. These a fifty years old but forty years ago when Gandhi was just ten UA sent out on an errand that basically landed him where he is today. Major said to buy milk. Find the puppy and just take the puppy, bring it to my mother and she said, no, no. No, he's not going to stay here. Sorry and she took me together with the pappy today shelter. Bersheva the SPCA or southbound clean is the society for the prevention of Cruelty to animals. They mainly give shelter to abandoned an injured cats and dogs and try to find homes for them. They also have a lot of educational activities and raise awareness for the wellbeing of animals. The Israeli chapter was actually founded long before the state. In, one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, seven during the British mandate. With route anyway God the mother stepped into the local bill chef branch in God couldn't believe his eyes. Remember was shopping so so many dogs barking and barking and I was so sad like I understood it's a good place for them. was begging begging to be they want to say come in and play with them and talk to them, and maybe hug them. So dennehy I realized that I. Need to come almost every day, and then I start to come almost every day after school instead of school. Saturdays and holidays. That was my oldest childhood. Gaddi became extremely committed volunteer leaving the shelter working with the dogs around. Selling cookies and lemonade to make. Sense for the dogs and cats everything everything. Really, see my heart I don't know something that I always say Kenneth See animals suffering and they need help and not to do anything and did you convince your mother to Let You keep the dog I try to but didn't success but after. A she they agreed that the we have a dog, we adopted a dog. A in Bursch Chevron and we have a dog but. The first one that you said, no, it's changed my life. I think. I think she today's vca. You knows maybe take me there got the ultimately left bill ship and moved to Tel Aviv. But one thing hasn't changed from then I did leave the. For the last twenty years he served as the organization's spokesperson and let's just say he's been pretty busy since the pandemic struck into Gerona time. It's starting very bad. A lot of people start to abandon. The animals was scared at what what's going to be now going to have so many animals that people want to throw away people are scared if they can bring this to them, you know the Koran they the Koran out they I don't know just Keb ages not contagious people. Emphatically, it'll be the number of abandoned animals spiked and amid all the uncertainty and chaos of those early days. Got The and his colleagues tried to reassure the public retell. The people don't be afraid it's not contagious from. To human beings and for you. Don't be afraid. And then something happened suddenly spca shelters around the country were packed but not with abandoned animals instead, they were packed with people. Seeking to adopt a quarantine companion, you know people want to adopt dogs and cats in the time I think the virus Gerona did something great for the abandoned animals almost all day shelters in Israel are M. T. now adoption adoption adoption option option adoption, everyday adoption, lot corruption I. Never See before never never never seen before unbelievable it's something that. I don't know what to say thanks Kona while it's very good for those indicates that they don't want the corner state for sure I. Don't want say they want the dogs cats find good place

Gandhi Beersheva Tel Aviv Major Bursch Chevron Gaddi Dennehy Kenneth M. T. Gerona Israel
"forty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Stopping point forty years from that's the fire right well if financial independence retire early retire early well yeah I mean you know we can put the fire in your restaurant that he sort of speak but yeah I think this is this is very very true we see this kind of trend with people right now that they're saying you know what you know retirement I maybe I want to semi retire maybe I want to continue to work but but but that the most important thing is is that I want to join my life I wanted would be able to create more free time I want to be able to have the the funds and the ability them the means to enjoy and do the things that I can do one while I can do them in other words by my health is good well you know my family's together and while I have the opportunity to really you know reach some of the goals and objectives and the dreams that I have and so how do you do that well you have to have the ingredients to a proper investment about school as you pointed out the rat I mean when you talk about an investment Stolar retirements to all we want certainly we want social security we want to have you know about three or four different sources of income coming in perhaps an IRA four oh one K. or four oh three B. or T. S. P. plan that I've had and then maybe the brand strategy might be another source of income or perhaps our investment income from like a you know rental properties and so forth and so on so you won't have multiple legs to that school and but you also want to make sure that you don't sacrifice your retirement school for a thought process that's probably not really within your objectives are your goals like paying off your mortgage does that even make sense at all because a mortgage actually and number five here on the list the right mortgage is all it not only the it doesn't provide that you the unique benefits of a mortgage with taxes and so forth any ability to stretch out payments and everything but it's also a hedge against inflation all right home mortgage with a fixed interest rate can be a hedge against inflation that's because the amount of the mortgage payment is the same every month but the value okay of the money that you're paying that mortgage off with falls over time due to inflation right you know because a problem and and also you may your income will increase and now your house name is the same and so really that does make a difference there you go and you know this is very very important one of the things about the restaurant edgy if that is that it also hedges against inflation internally in the restaurant you there's a thing called arbitrage okay so even as you're taking money out of the ranch strategy that money technically can still be working for you in other words you can be creating interest on money that you removed and are using for other things outside of you know of the counseling maybe taking that money you're using it for a child's education are you taking that money in your you know by doing improvements to your home or or or you know buying a new automobile whatever you're doing you can still continue to great arbitrage with the money this is explained in the book and in all of their the literature that we provide and it's so self evident when you see the illustration we want to get your copy of the book.

forty years one K
"forty years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Changelog

"What was that forty years ago because again it's people problems and we haven't changed so these are still the things that were facing but we have we have this kind of you? Know Day was talking before about this <hes> adrenaline junkie aspect of our work where we want the shiny new thing so we have this kind of Amnesia in the industry that Oh well surely we've solved all those people problems. We've got we've got Jira. We've got agile techniques. We don't have people problems anymore. You just kinda skate over. It and it's like no doesn't work that way. You still you'll have these issues and you still have to learn how to work around them and learn how to work with people and get things done. How do you feel about empathy in today's workplace? I feel like that's been in the last twenty years. That's the thing that separated most before we were far more co located aided working together and over the last twenty years we've been separated more and more now we use things like zoom or skype or slack or whatever might still be cool to communicate and the ability to have a face-to-face person to person interaction is is lost and therefore it's hard to empathize. I think that's a a really astute thing and it's not just in the workplace. If I look at my kids <hes> I would say the majority of their interactions agents who their friends are online yum they yeah they see them sometimes but most the time they'll be sitting there you know chatting with them. Online somehow and I think that does actually impact everybody's empathy not just developers but the entire world as we move away from face to face and reading body language and you know basically just sitting quietly with people <hes> I think yeah definitely impacts the world and could be the reason we're seeing a more aggressive apparent society than we have you know for a long time <hes> well look down your table of contents. You mentioned that a lot of the things you cover his people problems but not allow the titles of the these sections really describe what I might find people problems. The thing there is that the the symptom is not expressed as a people problem <hes> the Kohl's is so <hes> it with many of the tips if you're she go into them. What you'll find is yeah we'll talk about? I mean there's definitely very technical tips in there but in a lot of them will be talking about how <hes> for example fictional on naming things <hes> actually talked about research that says about the idea that the names you give things actually changes the way you think about them. <hes> that's a people problem right and you know the idea of naming is it's incredibly important yet here of of clarity not just clarity when you name them but clarity that helps you think about things better. That's a people problem <hes> it's all it's all to do with you know various psychology and physiology and other kinds of allergies that are are to do with our failings as human beings or are made us Laurie word no failings. Maybe are <hes> <hes> ambiguities and our our weaknesses weaknesses. I'm still back on the Nesia bit myself and Andy. I was just curious. If you have thoughts on how we solve these problems because we do have this we do have this issue in our industry where there's a lot of wheel it'll reinvention sometimes it's experimental and in the name of progress but a lot of times it's making the same mistakes as people that have gone before us. Obviously you can write a book. That's one way you can pass on knowledge. But how else do we either institutionalize is or community is right into our culture the passing on of the knowledge from those who've come before us so that we stopped making the same problems we can go out and make some different problems well. That's a really good question <hes> and I. I wish I had a Glib answer to say. Oh just do X._y._Z.. But yeah it's it's kind of I mean it's sort of <hes> you know endemic to the way that we work that we kind of throw out the old code..

Amnesia Nesia Laurie Andy twenty years forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

Mental Illness Happy Hour

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on Mental Illness Happy Hour

"And I for forty years, it was just like by must have enjoyed it. Yeah. I must've enjoyed it. And I don't know if that was at play with him. But it's it, you know. And then sometimes. Women will orgasm if when they're being assaulted. You know, so it's like there's so much stuff. If your brain is gonna turn on you and get mean to you. If you've been assaulted. There are so many things that can use to just tell you, you're making too big of a deal, or you wanted it or cetera cetera. And it makes the healing, so fucking difficult. Now Massara cut you off. No. Okay. Well, then I think also you just lived with it forever. And never told anyone. So this was a big deal that he finally told me and I told. Our dad, and then he talked to or dad and like a boat like both or parents knew and stuff. And I was I was still so naive. And I was like, oh, so excited for our family. Our family is gonna heal now that the secret town to open. We're just going to all talk about it, and we'll just get to the bottom of it. Everyone's going to feel better. And that is not how it happened. It people were very hesitant and. My brother didn't appreciate their reaction that my parents, gave initially and I didn't either. But I wasn't as like a fended by it as he was a, you know, it's a lot worse when you're in his shoes, and he thinks, I, I finally told the secret he wanted everyone to just rallied to his side, and the parents have a tough choice there. They don't want to. It's hard to believe that you, it's, you know, kids, you raise could do that. And you you wanna try to explain it. So I think some of the very first words out of my parents mounds were like are you sure man like or maybe it's not the way that you remember it, maybe remembering it wrong. And that's all it took for him to shut down and not talk about it for a couple more years. You know, that was really hurtful to him us just he. He took him data's. But they didn't know they had no idea what it's like to hold something like that in for so long. And finally tell someone. And so I kind of took it my role to be his champion and I was going to be one hundred percent on his side, and I- gone from being the guy who had said, like, hey man, could you be nicer? Could you be nicer term that night I said fuck her will you never have to see her gin? You never talk to we won't talk to her now then she's done. She's cut out fucker forever. And that's kind of the position that I took, and I also was kind of like a mediator for the family for a year or so, where I had to like. Take in all of his emotions because he wasn't gonna talk to anyone. But me and then I would have to try to help my parents, understand where he was coming from, and help them understand, like you're never going to have all your kids at Christmas again. So stop it because like even like nothing changed after he, I said they took years for my parents to change. They still wanted all of us to be together. And he saw that, as a huge in salt, retain, like you're, you're inviting my abuser. The person I hate and fear most in this world to come home for Christmas, which means I don't get to have Christmas. I'm not gonna come home because that's that's awful for me. So you're picking her over me when you do that. And they didn't see it that way. They felt bad that, you know, she couldn't come home, and I said, who gives a shit, you know, I, I don't care. And so we kind of. Fought for a while as a family. And I got pretty depressed. A for the rest of the time, I was at BYU. I was really deeply clinically depressed my last couple years, it took me so long to graduate because I just kept taking fewer and fewer credits every semester and instill failing those credits. Like every every semester be like, you know what the solution is, I'll take fewer classes. So maybe I won't be a fulltime student. I'll be three quarter time and I bet like you know, I'll have enough.

Massara BYU one hundred percent three quarter forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Veterans Helping Veterans

Veterans Helping Veterans

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on Veterans Helping Veterans

"Forty years. I can't hide. So I know where. Yeah. Yeah. I wouldn't make a good Bank robber. Not locally anyway. So yeah, it's. I I don't Siri planes. But I'll tell you. I haven't last one. Yeah. I don't know why. Whether it's just because I have the recipe or or whatever he is. But those three elements that we preach to you Theresa's beats if I've preached we all have said at one time or another three elements from judge teams just mom just thinking to happen. And that's the only recipe there is and you follow that recipe. You get all three ridi it's not two and a half or g was sounds like he knows what he's talking about. Or this internet articles Sharada convince the judge don't work that way. No. Yeah. You gotta have that medical stagnant. I am I am. He's. I don't know what. I don't know what the the other people charged do this. But I don't charge. My clients anything to go out and get the independent medical opinion. At all. I don't charge them anything to do all the paperwork, amass it started a dropbox account transfer all stuff over to the doctor is gonna write the independent medical opinion. It's a flat rate of thirteen hundred dollars to get one. And that's exactly what I charge the customer. I don't Mark it up and say, well, there's dealer prep and destination bees and fuel surcharge on that. I am most. Two thousand now. Yeah, I gotta pay for the waiters. Sorry. I just can't you know? I don't see where it's fair to do that to veterans. I tried to. You know, just drives and see. That's what it is. And there's no markup. Now, I've had a couple of in that game to me is don't have a pot of biz in a window to throw it out. And they don't have fifteen hundred dollars in back pocket that they spend on something like this. I'll just take it out of my own pocket. And and I win I deducted or ask them to pay me back that. That. For that fifteen hundred dollars. And you know, what I just wish they'd been somebody there to do it for me nineteen eighty nine and ninety four and two thousand and seven and two thousand two thousand two thousand four. Somebody there to help me. But thank God. I learned how to do it. You know? I I remember who who said it, but you know. Demand. Fish you. Feed him for a day. Teach the mand fish you feed him for life. Yeah. Not everybody can learn how to do this. And I don't know how lucked out and figured it out. But the bottom line is I'm gonna go to my grave with a pen and one and BB m s on your screen. Well, that's good. And nothing gives me good here. Now, I mean, you know, that's kind of catching on I'm earn more and more bearable and.

Sharada Theresa fifteen hundred dollars thirteen hundred dollars Forty years
"forty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"A job. Professionals. Forty years. A lot of players got traded on Thursday. Guess what's going to happen? Next year. A lot of players go get traded. You know, a lot of players will stay home. Talk to our guys place. That's all that matters. We're heading toward hopefully getting into the playoffs. So that's a part of. NFL or the NHL automated league baseball. You could hear his phone go off at the end imagine Jonathan he's got the heart of a killer, though, he masks it with that that gigantic smile, but he's right now magic was superstar didn't have to play anywhere else. Retired before he wanted to because he was HIV positive, and you either may or may not remember that part of his history. Dashi talk about a story that rocked the sports world, not just that. But transcended the sports world. Anyway, he is a killer at heart, but he'll smile at you while he's cutting you. And he just lays it out there. It's a business. Lots of guys got traded lots of guys had to change uniforms and change franchises and change cities. It's reality. And guess what? It's going to happen again next year. It's part of being a pro athlete. So don't expect Magic Johnson to feel sorry for you. Although he did mention playoffs at the end of that initial statement was stacked on a different.

Magic Johnson HIV NFL Jonathan NHL baseball Forty years
"forty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Forty years. Cloudy, breezy and cold low down to thirty three degrees for the rest of your Wednesday. Look for a mix of sun and clouds. It's going to be cold. And it's going to be breezy. The high getting up to about forty-one an independent victim's compensation fund is now up and running. The aim is to provide a little bit of help to survivors of thirty abuse here in the archdiocese of Philadelphia the story from KYW Steve tower grand claims administrator Camille Byron's disclosed for the first time that they sent out three hundred forty two packets two known survivors in the archdiocese of Philadelphia who submitted credible allegations, the archdiocese has committed to us that they will pay whatever is necessary for us to resolve these claims mediator Ken Feinberg who along with Byron's handled a similar program in several Catholic diocese in New York says. It gives victims some degree of validation for their claims do not underestimate the importance of this acclaiming who for years decades may have been whistling in the wind about the legitimacy of a claim the programs victim support. Facilitator Lynch shiner acknowledges, it won't bring closure make victims hall or restore their faith in the Catholic church. It's about acknowledging the pain the unjust harm and the archdiocese failure to prevent that harm. Steve Taiwa, KYW NewsRadio. Philadelphia was prepared to give Amazon a lot to come here. But they didn't escape y w city hall bureau chief, Pat Loeb, John Grady of the Philadelphia industrial Development Corporation says the city's tax increment financing incentives were aggressive, but responsible we felt that their investment would drive somewhere in the neighborhood at conservative of six billion dollars of new revenue, and we offered about fifteen percent of that the state was prepared to be even more aggressive. It proposed creating a new. Performance based program based on income tax revenue from the project for twenty five years if Amazon chose either Philadelphia or Pittsburgh, it was also prepared to spend one hundred billion dollars on transportation improvements. Mayor Kenney was disappointed. It didn't work but emphasize the positive input Philadelphia, national and even international spotlight is increased visibility to other companies and demonstrate our ability for other.

Philadelphia archdiocese Philadelphia industrial Develo Camille Byron KYW Steve tower Mayor Kenney Amazon Lynch shiner Steve Taiwa Ken Feinberg New York bureau chief Catholic church administrator Pat Loeb Pittsburgh John Grady one hundred billion dollars thirty three degrees
"forty years" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"I've been married forty years. I love this woman. I'm never going to get married to somebody else. But she needs to be put away. They come together. Ongoing weather because I don't want to be with anybody. And the communication thing. Doesn't get easier. It gets harder. Because. Here anymore. There's an entire arguments in our house with one word what why why? What? Am I alone? And the longest most intense argument you will ever. Starts with this dialogue. Why would you like to go to dinner tonight? I don't care. You are liars with starts on. Oh, well, then let's go to that wonderful being placed not. Why? Because I drove past there the other day, and I saw a cockroach in the middle of the road. What does that have to do with the bean place? He might have come from there. Okay. Let's go to JJ's JJ that waitress. What about the waitress? She spoke to me with a tone. Would you like to go? I don't care. What do you do you either end up at each other's throats? Shootout your nose. Think of this. We've been married forty years, and she's still after me, you don't communicate. So what are you talking about communicate? You don't let me know what you're feeling. For forty years. We don't have failing. We have in motion. What kind of emotions? Communication. What's happening inside? I want to know what you're feeling. I don't know how to do that. We're down in Jacksonville drive into Florida. We're.

Jacksonville Florida forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on Ari Shaffir's Skeptic Tank

"You cannot have been. He has Redbook. He didn't. That guy was. Absolutely right called blower because he was being blow herb. Yeah. Complete. Dan, completely misconstrued your. He said, you're an expert and you believe that it was looking Christie school comedy over here. Okay. Hit your main would've shot Kennedy for part in a web series by the way. Okay. Have a good one. Take care. He was. He knew more than I thought for sure. He knew more than I thought. Yeah, but he, he believes the same thing again to continue to characterize his position is at the government had no wonder, laws are three relationships. Yeah, the Tim, like once we're done with this Timothy, go, fuck Sean Trump's and it takes me go, fuck Tim. And then when Sean intimidators either go fuck. That's the real conspiracy. You guys get like invested in one side of a conspiracy theory. When you hear one you like I want to believe that I decided to believing that and people don't anymore. I don't need more. I used to really shit no sense of pride attached to know there's. There's one thing I did get mad about people. That's why I'm glad rod and general. I'm glad Sean, read the because some of these people start talking about something I make the, I don't feel like they know as much about as they think they know about it. That being said, I don't have any investment in anything. Listen, I would like that. I would like to believe that the government is in testing drugs on people assassinating link. It would be nice to not. I don't wanna believe any of that. I. I don't wanna believe that's a ski like I don't wanna look black Wall Street and see a this community of the mobile black people just destroyed by our government like, I don't want to believe any of it. It's true. I don't wanna look at the private prison system of criminal Justice and be like, you know, at the end of the day, like fucking, you know, we, we have judges with financial incentive to just fucking house. Non-violent drug effect ruin their lives. Got forty years. The judge you got forty years. Forty kids to prison on a real straight selling. Something like a petty theft, getting three years in prison, you ruining. Google it because I don't know this Pacific term, but it's like outrageous the terms here, I'll I'll read them to. It was so bad and so agreed that was ruining people's lives in at the end of the day, it's like. You know, that's a guy. Will you like this is this guy's like an evil person like he doesn't even care. He's an e. The point is they're all fucking guilty when they come in. I know they're all on. I don't send up anyone who has, I think is party probably tries to justify it in his own head, even though it's all about fucking money and it's horrible. But he's probably trying to say that like, yeah, these kids will learn this will you know. But he's just ruining people's lives. He saddling them with these felonies, you can't get a job, you're you just the the mental and psychological burden and strain of being in a fucking prison for three years when you did nothing, ROY sounds like nothing because it's in prison terms, but three years of your life to have no freedom is a huge percentage of your life..

Kennedy Sean intimidators Sean Trump Redbook Dan Sean Google Tim Christie theft Timothy three years forty years
"forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The neighborhood for forty years this it's very close to our studio and it grew from being this lido market rosary star to being big bar where people hang out and it's a very bohemian bar where a lot of artists and writers and actors come and we we were drawn to this environment when we started coming here and we liked this interaction and this mood of the place them walking as well right because it's super close so it's it's one of the few chances we have to leave the studio serio people see daylight walking which is a good exercise our profession is very is not good for your health not back so every chance we have stretching out and walking is good whenever you're watching something do you ever think this could be a comic do you ever feel inclined to either no finish that up or start drawing what you're seeing if we don't have a star if we have a story like why are we are working on a story everything can read but if you're not working on a story over our own dan those ideas those feelings they are kept on hold for the next story you were drawing since he was small children right it had a special appeal to us because it was something that we could both do you could both be there on a floor with crayons scribbling that created that facility created a bond between drawing and as being together so we drew on the sand we drew on the walls of our bedroom we drew on the books that we have people were reading to us we could be drawing all the time and we were trying all the time because it was something that had that connection that are this is what we do together was there a point where you thought well this can actually go somewhere we could actually make we want to make a living out of this i've been giving the changing point is when we realized we could tell stories not only draw so when we started creating stories that that were copies of the books we will reading the comics during by the time we we're like eleven or twelve that was the time we got a little more hooked up on making comics you didn't plan or do we didn't know how to make it work we just wanted to do that you're listening to in the studio with me camilla kosta i'm with fabio moon and gabriel bah the brazilian twin brothers who have made a formidable reputation as comic book creators it back from lunch and in the quiet of the studio the work begins again and the focus is on how best to draw car wants to draw fifties american model arriving at a nightclub but he's having trouble finding the right angle this character is saying something like can i take your keys because his his developed it's the basic elements so i can see if the dynamic of the panel works i'm seeing that it doesn't work right now i'm seeing like this because there has to be this illusion of death in the foreground is the car and he's has believing the car going towards the place in the background in the middle of that there's the valley who is offering to take the keys their car and the shape of the cars too small so it doesn't give the foreground this this illusion that's in the front everything and he's too big for the car proportions are wrong so the dynamic is wrong so the placements wrong so if i'm having trouble with the panel i asked him if it working and he can give me tips saved my life is it working perspective is wrong he's a little too big for this car you could move everything more the center in have the door open no the door open because he no valid exists just barking front of the club and getting okay would make the rise online year you can have that below.

forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Men In Blazers

Men In Blazers

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on Men In Blazers

"With the first time in forty years here the object and him yes isn't that who it is victory by death jefferson dj eric food you've got a see video to believe it us soccer players dancing topless on the beach and a cameo from o j simpson google it now once you over the size of their six packs the thing that stands out to make its joy and their innocence recorded victory with def jef and dj eric beach in malibu yeah yeah john hawkes a midfield that would movie star good looks the camera loves him i mean you'll see all over the video he's the one doing the running man on the beach it kills it yeah it was it was pretty interesting you know i think the federation was like all all in like let's get this game out there let's get it on and we're on the beach in malibu shooting this this video shirtless yeah yeah i mean beach roger we do these we have beaches in america don't like rocks and pebbles later he and sharon mike in the recording studio ally we are the world i think it did give us a little bit of more exposure and gone interviewed and we have the video shown for a little bit and then it was out the door that was done.

america soccer john hawkes sharon mike forty years
"forty years" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on WTMA

"The left is very upset about this they don't want ms thirteen called animals aren't they amazing and then something funny happened yesterday something funny happens every day something funny happened yesterday fox news has the story ns thirteen gang member known as animal sentenced to forty years in prison for the murder of a fifteen year old boy a member of the notorious ms thirteen th street gang how dare you call them notorious you racist you're calling all immigrants notorious member of the notorious ms thirteen th street gang known as animal who admitted to the two thousand fifteen killing of a teenage boy in mass art chusetts because tight was sentenced to forty years in prison officials said tuesday now officials said tuesday like what do you think they're making it up he was sentenced to forty years in prison he's with ms thirteen he confessed to the stabbing murder of the fifteen year old boy and his nickname is animal it's doubtless tattooed oliver body us attorney's office in massachusetts in oh because it's a border state to with it's so close to central america you can see why it would be a problem in massachusetts this because the democrats open door policy the red carpet policy the gift basket policy the free in state tuition policy the free everything policies of the democratic party the us attorney's office massachusetts announced that twentythreeyearold joel martinez who went by the street name animal will be subject to deportation once he's released from federal prison well that's good so he'll do forty years what does that cost us more than harvard i think so we spend eighty grand a year to keep the animal in a cage because the democrats have an open door policy and they want more of this rather than less of this and if you point your finger at them and accused them of being animals well then the democrats attack you because they don't like that kind of language you nazi racist bastard say because they don't want any incendiary rhetoric to be a part of the political discourse in america you deplorable misogynist islamaphobia you you know how dare you call ms thirteen members animals just for hacking children to death and burying them in shallow graves martinez pleaded guilty in december two reco conspiracy and admitting to.

fox news murder us attorney massachusetts america democratic party joel martinez harvard forty years fifteen year
"forty years" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Please have they had their day no but seriously have you taken into account have used putting buckets the fact that monogamous marriage the most lasting and effective form of cohabitation yet discovered i was monogamously married for forty years of full adult children of all be monogamously married for an average of twenty years and counting all twelve grandchildren not geniuses but delightfully well adjusted jio supporters grandfather but he says that a christmas stars i'm away grandparents olsen greenwich yet but you dig your jds ecrime heard you folks sorry cadet they fun to be this great to relate to sell of the great majority of our friends we peace brightly told that they were dead when have you been those will be three and what are you missing all trying to prove but then he signs of enjoy your visit to her hill owlry but he's he admits he hasn't it he does admit he hasn't ready he's just use angry about the title that's just he's made it and what so interesting is a century ago as a provocative who i've been provoked perot of at a success at rule to when it's nice to get less guilt amount may be right but can you give it side so that doesn't make me stop and think soul not enough books in the world and i says monogamy is excellent ways his thirty to talk about think about it or rationalize or otherwise anyway trust here everything you already knew goodwin christmas young that's would hold things where riots broke who had chris was young change any of them or look at how many of them secretly working but we pretended they were shame is grandchildren a morons.

perot chris olsen goodwin twenty years forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The next forty years of her life the one day with her husband cow she did something quite bold choi ten of like store he had since he was a teenager and you know these controls work is insecure work you go birla benefits one day joining his friends at ask themselves what is essentially day you know they liked that allstar race extolled the bikes they quit and they opened up by extolled runs on a different principle it is not a cooperation with the boss it's a democratic cooperatives so they take all the big decisions together they both on they share out the did tasks and unless good test and no one gets stuck with the depressing jobs and they shed the talk that someone thinks it was it's not saying anything to me totally in line with will protest a moment found is how many of them had been depressed and anxious before oh but will no longer depressed in an environment where they were no longer control as just put it to me there's no reason why any business should well there's a topdown corporation is used to it's about told that is a really recent invention in human history and he's making us feel terrible right imagine how many people listening to this person anxious to the mainland we're still district needs they knew that that would go into work tomorrow to work place that day controls with their colleagues waste as a bossi's elected he's accountable to them you know they set the priorities you regained control of your life as of now the person forget my interrupting a yard with that we had about a minute and a half left bomb you mentioned shared profits i'm guessing that their income went up and anwander ya i'm old enough to remember what life was like before reaganomics and thatcher nominees in the uk and neoliberal policies in europe um the the lifestyle of working people has gone from really healthy in the '60s and '70s two hanging on by our fingernails for for the basic stuff at the bottom mass lows pyramid you know housing and things yum the might that be a very very large factor to should we i mean just bring you back virginians and raising wages we know it is because when they piloted a universal basic income and canada in a town code doe find in the.

bossi reaganomics uk europe canada one day forty years
"forty years" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"That those rules that have been long cents established you can find it in fact goes even appoint the constitution that says it's their their response ability to make sure that they in i laugh at it because if they actually used that and they were ernest about at half of mud f aleve i just think that we got to be very very careful when they come up with an emotional topic which is what they've done to note nobody would endorse or condone the activties that they're accusing her mouth but why they wait forty years why get alarmed people on the moves all at home you don't understand the feeling of it i don't i get that by the way on that note we oughta mentioned the fact that men and women see these things very differently i've never felt and i've had i've had superiors at were women that desired a relationship with many years ago but i never felt like i was being at men and women it's just on honesty men and women see this topic differently i get that also but forty years for a guy that's been famous or infamous depending on your view of his politics multiple times and now we're thinking about trying to destroy him and the other point of this and then our two miles a mud mudbrick here but the last point i want to make is that the alabama gop who knows this man they've known him for years and there are angry with the rmc there are angry with washington dc and in the folks in the senate because that's their guy there supporting them they're not backing down that's important bank these folks know him we're all i'll outta state looking at him repeating emery regurgitating what we're learning from all these crazy they have a judge viktor if an agenda folks is not a very the death at grass roots are at odds the civil party all was the state party with that in alabama band knows him we're excellent that hole in higher point as we are going through the primaries when the trumpers were going against crews in it was coming around grab in all of trump's uh delegtes i i get your position but my position than that hasn't changed the folks that go to the state caucuses and state conventions are typically because they've purposely volunteered to be more involved but they've got a closer view to the topic they're.

gop senate emery viktor trump alabama washington forty years
"forty years" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"The title i'm curious whose job it is to figure out when an actual title has value and where the title style you lies that's a great question and something that came through in the focus groups that that that title was an old enough titled that it it was not a significant value at the launch campaign but um you know anna maniacs an amazing stories is our and there's tremendous value to that uh i think i think it's a learning curve and gauging the marquette beloit coupling if westworld had been cold eastwest west land were something that wasn't a movie from forty years ago would it have had the same value that's a good question i think you know obviously because westworld specific it was it was a small following but it me attracted a certain audience but i think that's a really good question i don't know i mean i don't know that it was significant enough i it wasn't just fans the movie who came to watch the series obviously at the big show for us and so and i think people watch it and i'm like oh it's a movie twos who was a let you know there were enough new audience eyeballs on it but i i think it with helped but didn't it's not crucial no curl when you come at this from a different perspective because you work for you one which is an international we face company and so you had sort of the sense of what the international marketplace's are for these how much would you say that international is.

westworld forty years
"forty years" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Okay but here's the thing they were down forty to ten with three minutes to go in the third quarter up forty four to ten yup and they just roared back and scored thirty five unanswered points i've been watching football for forty years i said i think it's the greatest comeback i've ever seen i didn't think anything would ever topped the ninety six u e game they were down in that game they were down seventeen in the fourth quarter they tied it got it over overtime and skip hicks one it double overtime 48 forty one but this was better by the numbers that is the secondbiggest come back in the history of nc aa football and again it happened so fast down any didn't involve any turnovers no fumbles no interceptions no kickoff returns for touch it was all rosen through three three and a and by the way if i watch it and i thought man if i if i had the first pick in next year's draft i i might take him i i just think he's brett far of heat you're going to iin and this is why am excited what you say this year he's going to have a five interception game but he's going to have a five touchdown game and we're never going to be out of it it's kind of it's kinda like when you knew when we add kkob on the lakers in his prime even if we were down 25 and never gave up and in both the cases of the esi new sagan this weekend there was a good lesson there that's why particularly in college.

football lakers hicks nc rosen brett three minutes forty years
"forty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Ship and alex pan out for you i'm reading your bio and yuban in in this business for forty years how just survive in candy business for forty years rupaul he the owner actually i'm the choice of the public relations gals candies okay so how has the owners survived for the last 40 years the candy business it would seem to me to be a pretty tough business the may get any got lots of competition out there you're absolutely correct a lot of perseverance a lot of good will have a extraordinary employees as wallaby need some very good business news for sure that's all he has sustained business you're in a way you know we're hearing a lot in the news about better paying jobs and so forth you're in a pretty expensive area have he found that you're you're you have to pay for the quality of those employees i know i did when i had a company absolutely be truly believe in taking care of our employees not only through the european but through the benefits as well and be sure that the other really good please worked at were every blend comes to work because they wanna come to her and the enjoy working now what would you say lance that that sort of sets you apart i mean i always look for points of differentiation with businesses those of us that of owned businesses we can't be like everybody else speakers if we're like everybody else has got the most money to advertiser whatever ends up squeezing us out what sets you guys apart besides this great benefit plan and your terrific employees in a very careful about her expansion on besides our first year in hilo factory here and he look we'll have one others your and that's on the island of rock who other in doubt you'll be small partnerships with the dfs with disney but other than that that's the only that you can bind our audits so we don't expand we rather keep in control of our continent the short kwong our quality is always there and we don't want to stress all are our our employees as well so newark mostly on a wholesale basis with businesses or do you go directly to the public we go direct to the public for.

lance disney newark alex pan hilo forty years 40 years