35 Burst results for "Forty Years"

James West on invention and inclusion in science

Short Wave

09:04 min | 5 d ago

James West on invention and inclusion in science

"James west was born in nineteen thirty one and grew up in prince edward county virginia in before we dove into his research and work as a mentor. I wanted to know more about little kid. Jim and his relationship to science the desire to know how things work and why they were was my biggest motivator and i Completely forgot about this on purpose. But i took my grandfather's pocket watch support hundred and five pieces zenit. But i couldn't get it back together which resulted in rather severe punishment but it didn't tear my desire to know and understand how things work and so i was told that i could only take things apart that weren't working and that was the wrong thing. Say to me. Because if i could break it i did so i could get it. Why caesar now you're you're breaking stuff you're like look it doesn't work so right. Okay i mean were you. Were your parents. Supportive of your interest in in engineering and science absolutely not i was going to be the doctrine brother the data stove. I swear versa. They didn't care which would went. Only that it went in one of those two directions and When i told my father that i was changing my major from biology to physics He introduced me to two black men who have. Phd's and chemistry that were working in the post office score poem order on the railroad because the best job they could get was teaching at high school. And that didn't pay enough to support their families and he thought that i was well on the way to becoming one of them because You could be a preach at teacher lawyer doctor. But that was about it and terms of professions or black people and prince edward county virginia but in the face of all that jim stuck with it he graduated from temple university with a degree in physics and then went on to work at bell. Labs for more than forty years and his big invention with gearhart. The foil electric microphone didn't come from trying to solve one specific problem. I didn't. I don't think sat down and looks invent a better microphone. That was not the motivation at all. The motivation was why does nature behave in the way that it does. And and if i can understand that then how can i apply my knowledge to improving or to make things work better or lasts longer in this case. Oh to increase lifetime right okay. So so mu- because my understanding of this gym and you can. You can grade me. And i'm i'm worried about my grade but so basically this is really basic but microphone convert sound into an electrical signal right and it needs power to do that and you. Youtube found a material that you could basically be kind of permanently so you know basically permanently charge so instead of like necessarily needing an extra battery in there you know. You've you've got it without that. And that material that you found was essentially teflon foil urinate less. Okay okay. well now. That i've got my a plus in science. Let's let's talk. Let's talk more about bringing people new stem the thing. It's the thing that you're passionate about thinking that i'm passionate about so you know in your experience what works or if you feel like it's more importantly what doesn't when you're trying to bring people into snap well i think honesty is is The the very important role. It's not all roses so we get some thorns to nature. Doesn't always behaving the way that you you'd think it should. And and i think honesty's important because you want to succeed and and if you know that nature is not always going to work the way you'd think it works this gives you the fortitude to continue to your investigation will continue looking for a solution to a particular problem. In other words. There are two sides stored the glory side. And then there's the the grunge side but even more important science and technology got us to where we are and it's the only thing that's going get us further or out of whatever difficulty that we have a global warming all these problems. We need more diverse teen stem. diversity has been shown to be have an advantage. I used to worry about brainstorming sessions. Where all the white guys over here. And i was over ear but guess what solution west somewhere in between. And this is what. I learned that. Even though i taken same courses you know the same disciplines. I think differently as the black man than white males to yeah but this diversification is what makes this country great and what is very disturbing is that were not taking full advantage of our natural resources in human beings that can work and be productive in the field and this is the reason that i continue to push to make it available in. Jim's been pushing for a long time you can trace his efforts back to nineteen seventy at bell labs. Winning helped form the association of black laboratory employees all the way to jim's work today with his graduate students at johns hopkins university and nonprofit called the end genuity project. They offer math and science programs to students in baltimore public schools. Jim told me a story about joining their board of directors. Back in two thousand fourteen. When when i was asked if i would be interested in joining booed i wanted to know what the program's really all about and what i found. Was that the majority of students in the program mayhem and that. This did not represent the demographics of the city of ballroom. So i said looking. Put me on the board. But i'm going to make some changes. I am a change agent here because this does not represent city baltimore and not enough black people and women in the scrotum but today the program is eighty percent underrepresented naarden winning big shift. Not only that are the last time i looked two years ago. We graduated one hundred students all of them. Fellowships and scholarships seven were admitted to johns hopkins. And by the way these changes were made without ever touching the requirements for the permanent. Okay so what does this say to you. The says that they're talented people out there that we're not taking advantage if we can make that kind of change in the city of baltimore within a finite number of years with this is certainly an indication to me that there are underrepresented minority and women who are in love with science and really really look for opportunities to get in and and genuity project made that offer and they they took us up on it and i'm so glad they did. Okay so jim. I hope you don't mind me sharing this. You just tell me if you don't want it in the episode but by the time this interview comes out you will of turned ninety congrats birthday. Well thank you. So what's your advice for young scientists for young inventors who may be see themselves in you. What advice would you give them. Well there's so many things that i can think of. But i but more importantly is to follow your star you know. I'm pretty sure that whoever made me said make a scientist and a not fulfill that responsibility us. Oh i think that the happy people those people that are doing what they love to do. And if it science gray but in many cases you don't know whether it science not because you haven't had the exposure right that would tell you whether the something you think you would be interested in doing so Museums of books on and on and on learn. Learn as much as you can as early as you can. And the only major major advices learn all the math that you possibly can because it

Prince Edward County James West Virginia JIM Gearhart Temple University Association Of Black Laborator Baltimore Youtube Bell Labs Johns Hopkins University Genuity Johns Hopkins
Interview With Kimberley Cook

Your Life Program

05:44 min | 6 d ago

Interview With Kimberley Cook

"I have a very special guest who's had Very traumatic life. She was raised with forty years of emotional abuse from a narcissistic mother but through her heart. Perseverance and determination. She's found her way back to a fulfilling life today. Joining me on. My show is a very special self love coach. Kimberly cook who has used the skills of resilience emotional intelligence in self awareness to create a twenty four seven support system and step by step process to help survivors become thrive hours. Kimberly join us on the show. Today you're welcome. It's great to be here. You're here all the way from australia. From adelaide yes yes. I am so welcome. Welcome welcome I wanted to ask you if you wouldn't mind for the audience telling us about yourself and your story in how you became the self love coach in how you have the self love project. How did that all begin. I'm will growing up I didn't realize. I had a narcissistic mother because it didn't know what the word was you know growing up a was just emotionally demented by her Throughout my life. Until i was thirty six she sort of set me up to file in law. If i didn't i didn't have boundaries You know she didn't teach them to me. She made me live by them. But not allowed me to have my own voice and and stuff like that and You know a be thirty six years old and i. I just couldn't take it anymore. She had completely try to control. My life You basically fell in love with my husband tried to do my children and Just took them and just cut off contact with my hometown. Family which then led to me for many many years after that to Leaving out a self abuse. Because i didn't know what was wrong with me. What i deviated to learn a lot about nazism. And and then i just went through the process of Of healing myself at the tolerant knowing what to do and Dimona ten forty nine was not living on this anymore and i it would break my heart to see people suffer through united just being bullied or getting into a relationship that they could get out of. That was unhappy and many many people live with you know without so flow because we were talking back. Then you know you've got to do things for others and put others before you can so clogged was really thing. It was locked tough and often Not i believe that anymore and so flood is very confusing to people. That aren't really what it is. They should be doing To release their trauma and emotional baggage. Because it's very heavy. Yes very very heavy. So let's let's back up just a moment for the audience who might not really understand but because your years of figuring it out you now know what is a north narcissist pathological narcissist. What are some the traits that if someone is in a relationship that's abusive or heart and they don't know what Had noticed the signs explain. What narcissist is well. You know it someone huge encroaches your boundaries or. Do things for them that you don't want to do and they have no consideration. And but it's a continual thing it's Something that although law though tell you a blatant lachey face and then although tell you something and you don't hang on a minute and then you feed that back to them and the dow you know they'll be lucky. That's not what i said. Or that's not what i did or and so then you just become long magor mart laar crazy. Did i just make that open. You know and then when this happens all the time you know you really end up questioning very own self. you're your you're your mentality and There's a different level of narcissism having as a parrot because they're the people that bring you into the world you know other is someone who gave birth to you so you would think i'd be the one to protect julian Not you an and teach you to be strong and You know my mom didn't do any of that and make bad choices and then not pick narcissistic men. So i want gain on. I couldn't have a voice and was A choice alcoholics And things like that and so the stock who just sort of went on and you know when when when someone is emotionally abusing you and putting down and Barking orders it. You and stuff like that. What happens is you. You didn't turn laws and so you instantly emotionally abusing yourself

Kimberly Cook Dimona Kimberly Adelaide Australia Julian
The Game Before: One City's Soccer Obsession and Its COVID Crisis

ESPN Daily

03:23 min | Last week

The Game Before: One City's Soccer Obsession and Its COVID Crisis

"Same. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me baba so last year in february around this time the american sports world we were watching the coronavirus from afar and in march as we know the nba cancelled all their games and most of the other sports followed suit at that point too but around that time that same time the story emerged out of italy where corona virus cases and deaths were extremely high and the headlines. There they called this one soccer match in particular game zero and it was linked to a very severe covert outbreak and a year later sam. Frankly wanted to know if that was true. So we called you and you started digging and digging and you found an answer but also what feels like a much more interesting story. Yeah that's right. Pablo in the end. It's really a story about a team and the city that loves it so i want to start with that team oughta lot. Tell me about them. Okay so as you listen to this story. Pablo there's two important things to keep in mind about atalanta. The first is that this is a team deeply deeply ingrained in its city bergamo italy. The club is founded by a group of students in one thousand nine hundred seventy. Choose to name it. After the lava a heroin from greek mythology so for more than a century ought alana's been part of bergamo's fabric And you know what it reminds me of. Have you ever met someone from green bay and heard them talk about the packers. That sort of attachment. Like if you give birth to a baby and burgum. Oh the team they send you this tiny jersey and two bottles the formula. Imagine pablo the piazza in bergamo and strollers going this way. And that and every baby there is wearing a blue and black atalanta jersey atlanta's bad and batting atlanta but is no difference. That's a guy. I talked to you for this story. He's great his name's fabio piano. He lives in new york now but he grew up about a two minute. Walk from atalanta's stadium and says if you're from bergamo. Pablo it is your birthright to cheer for atalanta fabio's in his late forties now and when i asked him about memories of atalanta games he had a very very deep. Catalog probably was a nineteen eighty-two and atalanta a similan in bergamo remember that incredible crowd of people from land milan's the nearest big city. So bergamo was always in its shadow and was also incredible score because the match finished two. And you know it was my. How can you say the first time with me from motown facing against a big name big city vividly recalls the game would think about this a game from forty years ago. It's a tie not even a win. Just tying milan team to to to to lifelong memory for of fan.

Bergamo Pablo Italy Baba Atalanta NBA Soccer Atalanta's Stadium SAM Alana Atlanta Atalanta Fabio Green Bay Packers Fabio Jersey New York Milan
Patience While Waiting on God

Joyce Meyer Radio Podcast

03:16 min | Last week

Patience While Waiting on God

"First of all. Let me tell you what patience is. And what it's not. Patience is not just waiting on god. We're all gonna wait on god. Everybody whites even nature weights flowers. Wait trees wait for the sunshine in the rain. We're we're all waiting for the provision of god but patients. Listen is how you behave while. You're waiting time to wake up how we behave while we're waiting on god to do what only god can do says so much about our character and we need to have real stable godly character. Not just a fish on our bumper. A man and a hawk. If you love. Jesus bumper sticker we. We need more than that. And we need to do. More than just go to church on sunday and thank. We've done our little bit. We need to get out in the world and behave as jesus. Would you know the bible. Says we are his representatives. That god is make listen to that they got is making his appeal to the world through us. You may be the only jesus your neighbor overseas and so it's very important that we have some of the same situations in our lives that they do but we handle them in a totally different and godly way. Your example is very important to the world so the bible tells us that we're going to have to wait and that we that we need to develop this fruit of patients and patients comes from a greek word. That says it's a fruit of the spirit that only grows under trial. So you you know. That's why i don't like to pray for patients because they know they're gonna get trouble but do know how wonderful it is. Not that i've arrived but a little taste of it. I've been at this now for forty years so hopefully imperfectly. You learn little something in forty years. And i've still got a long ways to go but god has really changed me and i have stability in my life now. At least most of the time. I can behave the same way when things are going. Good as if they're not going so good and that is so important for each of us to realize that we can't just go up and down. Our circumstances go up and down and be motionlessly. Moved by everything that's going on in our life. The bible says we walk by faith and not by sight. So that means we're not supposed to live according to how we feel and according to how things look are how they same but according to the word of god and god tells us that he could. He is to be trusted that he will take care of us. I want you to listen to me today. God will take care of you.

Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

04:54 min | Last week

Ibram X. Kendi And Keisha N. Blain On The 400-year story Of Black people In America

"Professor planes. You've got the top box. I'm going to start with you. This is a different kind of history book right. It's a history book where some of the ninety writers aren't even historians collectively who are the writers. And why are their voices so important so we asked an array of writers to contribute to the volume. And as you point out so many of them are not professional Journalists to contribute we asked philosophers to contribute We asked creative writers to contribute as well as poets end. What we wanted to do was really grapple with four hundred years of history. And not you know. We really didn't want it to feel like a typical a history book. I and of course asking ninety historians Would have i think a taken away from the the sort of you know tone that we were trying to set which was bringing together a diverse community which met people coming to the history writing about the history from their own experiences but also from their unique trainings whether in the field of journalism are in the field of law and so it was important for us to create something new something special something original and that meant bringing in writers from a wide array of backgrounds. Professor professor blaine just talked about the fact that you have poets in the book and you write quote sometimes. History is best captured by poets out. Some more there's anything. I've learned in my time writing history. That is that it's deeply complex. Variegated story that in many ways. We have to imagine things that we don't have a speculate on on on decisions that we don't have a specific for that we have to stretch archive especially when writing on on people's particularly working class. Americans certainly working cost black folks who haven't left an archive who haven't left on speeches and and necessarily written records and so you know. Poets have the capacity to really show the depth and complexity and the imagination and creativity of humanity. And and so when we when that comes to bear on history. And i think they were really able at the end of each section to really flush out and contextualized. You know forty years. When i was in school. Professor blaine We're going way back like the nineteen seventies nineteen eighties black history The way we're talking about today just wasn't taught. Slavery was a chapter and not exactly told honestly the accomplishments of black americans were diminished if they were even acknowledged so has anything changed since the seventies in the eighty s. What needs to change. So i think some things have changed You know when you look at how history textbooks written. We're certainly at a place where the textbooks that are produced today or even in the last ten years i think are better than the ones that were a public. Maybe twenty years ago does not mean that we still don't have work to do. In fact we have a lot of work to do. Especially i think in the last two or three years. We've been talking about textbooks in places states like texas for example where they're still a debate about how you talk about the civil war and how you talk about slavery and like you. I certainly encounter textbooks. That didn't really flesh out are the nuances. You know an even the trauma of of the the experience of slavery in often times a glossed over eight or or perhaps had a little box to focus on martin luther king junior but other than that not really center a historical figures i and so a lot has changed in part of that. Change is directly tied. I think to the work of a professional historians. We've been working very hard odd to excavate the history in in in order to help people better write about the history. I in a way that reflects the richness than the complexity and diversity of the black experience but particularly in a way that centers black agency which is key that black voices appear. That black ideas appear in. These textbooks are still some work to do. But i think we're making progress. I think four hundred souls is certainly the kind of texts that would help us move forward in that direction.

Blaine Just Professor Blaine Martin Luther King Texas
Can You Explain (MM #3616)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Can You Explain (MM #3616)

"The with kevin mason. Here's a weird one. I was pondering the other night had to go run an errand so instead of just pulling up spotify or my sirius. Xm or the car radio. I decided to plug in my plex server my old items music library if you will which runs bluetooth can run through my car. I can listen to all of my music collection and an album popped up from the nineteen eighties by one of my favorite bands that i hadn't listened to in years. It wasn't a hit album. It wasn't a big album but the songs came on and i started singing along with them. I couldn't tell you the titles of the songs. But i knew every line every lyric every word so i ask why. We have the ability to sing lyrics to songs that we haven't listened to in forty years. It's amazing those little strange things that just stick in the back of your mind that you can hold onto and you don't understand why it's very strange to me that we can remember those weird to song lyrics or even stranger trivia but can't remember sometimes the important things in life. I know it's not serious and no. I didn't forget valentine's day. Just one of those things i ponder. Can you explain that to me.

Kevin Mason Valentine
Can You Explain (MM #3616)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Can You Explain (MM #3616)

"The with kevin mason. Here's a weird one. I was pondering the other night had to go run an errand so instead of just pulling up spotify or my sirius. Xm or the car radio. I decided to plug in my plex server my old items music library if you will which runs bluetooth can run through my car. I can listen to all of my music collection and an album popped up from the nineteen eighties by one of my favorite bands that i hadn't listened to in years. It wasn't a hit album. It wasn't a big album but the songs came on and i started singing along with them. I couldn't tell you the titles of the songs. But i knew every line every lyric every word so i ask why. We have the ability to sing lyrics to songs that we haven't listened to in forty years. It's amazing those little strange things that just stick in the back of your mind that you can hold onto and you don't understand why it's very strange to me that we can remember those weird to song lyrics or even stranger trivia but can't remember sometimes the important things in life. I know it's not serious and no. I didn't forget valentine's day. Just one of those things i ponder. Can you explain that to me.

Kevin Mason Valentine
The Hollywood Ripper And The Hollywood Slashers

Drowning Verdict

04:43 min | 2 weeks ago

The Hollywood Ripper And The Hollywood Slashers

"Hello and welcome to drowning verdict. I'm chip mahoney and you're listening to my true crime podcast. This is a podcast where i talk about cases out there that fascinate me and go more in depth with the case. So thanks for joining me today. You might found me on my youtube or twitter which is a good way to check out the episodes. And if you're there on youtube i'm doing full episodes their format c-can sub follow and always get the latest episodes there You can also find me by the way on just about any where you get your favorite podcast whether it stitcher spotify apple Whichever platform you prefer. I'm there you can follow share with friends and come back for more. Because as i often say to listeners of the podcast try to deliver something New and interesting a unique angle if you will. I'm an author. I like to talk about story connections and maybe from time to time finding some truth here and there especially on something that's Say a cold case and can be No excuse me a case that's been solved. That was once cold and that can be applied to something. That's open and active something to be learned if you will so in today's episode I've got a interesting thing to talk about One is a recent case that is Been in the courts last couple of years and has finally come to justice. The other is traveling back in time about forty years nonetheless. Same place of activity crimes. Which would be los angeles area sunset strip hollywood and you know not the bright lights and and fancy stuff there the underground the dark underbelly and also i have a fun fact for you Maybe i should backtrack there. It's not so fun as much as it is an interesting fact but you tell me What you might think of it now. If you leave a comment you know Ted bundy you know the name and in america. He's the most sensationalized killer of our time. There's probably no less than fifty movies and books on that guy. And he wasn't the most prolific if you will if you're keeping stats I think it was samuel. Little died recently. He was near ninety three victims. So he's not like that guy but nonetheless you know his name and the serial killer world he reigned supreme which is an interesting thing and a sad thing at the same time because in america we like to keep stats so very strange about us folks. But here's a fun fact for you if you will. There was another serial killer in the united states named bundy with the same last name. And furthermore wasn't a guy it was a woman and her name was carol m bundy and she's a focus of Part of today's episode. Along with her partner in crime men name doug clark and they were coined the hollywood slashers. They did their dirty work about forty years ago. So today's episode. I'm talking about the hollywood ripper. Which is a recent kind of case that's come to being closed. And justice brought to their and then the hollywood slashers going back about forty years and just to talk about these two Cases and maybe learn something for the future. So let me talk about carol bundy and doug clark before i get into the ripper. Who came around. Oh probably about twenty five thirty years later and was most recently convicted. So those two somehow each other in the dirt and grime areas of sunset strip area in those bars and they got together with her dark ideas And found that they shared some some dark fantasies. If you will on some sick fantasies

Youtube Mahoney Hollywood Doug Clark America Ted Bundy Twitter Carol M Bundy Apple Los Angeles Samuel Carol Bundy
Strait sets: Djokovic dominates Chardy again

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 weeks ago

Strait sets: Djokovic dominates Chardy again

"Reigning US open champion Stan may also occur in Dominic team shook off a lengthy code quarantines to make solid start to their Australian Open campaigns both reaching the second round with straight set victories Serena Williams dispelled fears about an injured shoulder that was a fifty six minutes straight said stop conceding just two games on the way through that keeping alive who linked the quest for a record equalling twenty fourth major title the forty year old sister Venus also advanced as did men's number one that a calculation women's number two Simona Halep I'm grandma goes

Stan May Dominic Serena Williams United States Venus Simona Halep
New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen urges Americans to unite in Jeep Super Bowl commercial

Overthinking It Podcast

02:48 min | 2 weeks ago

New Jersey native Bruce Springsteen urges Americans to unite in Jeep Super Bowl commercial

"I guess like another one. That was interesting to me. In in this respect was in the respect of the issues that we're talking about was the bruce springsteen ad did did i mean. Did that speak to you at all or was that like an interest was a tough one. That was a tough. It really was wasn't it. The tough one could so the notion is that. He's he's from. The mid point of the united states like the geographical center of the rental united states from new jersey. Now here's he was. He was there in the commercial right. Well i mean the point. There's a meta. There's a meta setup right. Which is bruce springsteen doesn't do commercials never has and that like this. This is new this commercial numerous for the boss you know and that light. It's an italian car company. Mean yeah i suppose now it is but it's cheap for an american brand owned by i mean. But they're they're like he didn't pitch a product in the thing like and it was like the last thing was like brought to you by jeep. That was the that was the thing like he. You know he wouldn't actually endorse a product I guess some gps appeared in the ad but they were particularly focused on. You know they weren't do. Yeah exactly if they weren't new then. I didn't notice it wasn't like the new jeep wagoneer right like it wasn't anything that they were sort of dusty because they were out in the roads of but like there was no. There was no one else that was the thing it was. It was a thing about like comedy of man you know the thing about sort of fellowship and like brother and sisterhood You know treating your neighbor like a neighbor and not like an enemy The like an end to the you know an end to these troubled divided times In in all the scare quotes But like no one knows appeared in it was very it was very weird and the landscapes in it were were very beautiful and very beautifully photographed. But we're desolate like And i guess we're sort of pegged to some of the copy which was like we will make it through the desert which was like a really like you know wander forty years in the in the desert right like guy kind of narrative we will make it through the we will make it to the promised land but like the the. The america that it showed was like very Forboding kind of unwelcoming seem kind of unwelcoming or or hostile to to being to being lived in

Bruce Springsteen United States New Jersey America
Rod Stewart reaches plea deal for Florida altercation

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Rod Stewart reaches plea deal for Florida altercation

"Rock star Rod Stewart and his son have entered into a plea deal to avoid going to trial and battery charges in Florida Rod Stewart and his son were accused of pushing around a security guard at the posh breakers hotel in Palm Beach Florida during a new year's day event last year a security guard told police the now seventy six year old rocker and his family were making a scene trying to get into a private party without authorization the guards as he put his hand on forty year old Sean Stewart's chest and the younger Stewart shoved him backwards while the older Stuart landed a punch in his ribs police say security footage shows the two stewards were the primary aggressors terms of that plea deal were not made public hi Jackie Quinn

Rod Stewart Posh Breakers Hotel Florida Sean Stewart Palm Beach Stewart Stuart Jackie Quinn
"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:53 min | Last month

"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

"In a couple of days for top five movies. We are most excited to see out of sundance this year. That'll be our top five in a couple of days until then We have to say. Thank you for downloading and listening to this say experimental. I would say new new for the listener are going going now or is that going in the top. Five next told you before the program. Yeah i told you that. In the programming meaty brand come on industrial. I normally to now check twitter during those great okay. Well thanks to your friend who played dylan His band what what does abandoning. Can't cameron duck it and the band. This pisces party. Also thanks to saas alito canyon vineyard go to sas alito canyon dot com use t for twenty percent off thanks to matt. Rick snyder for Putting our ko to eighty one in front of us you know what i said that i put a link last week to the youtube. Just just go on youtube and do our k. to eighty one. You should watch this movie. it's it's good. Yeah pretty pretty stamps. And i don't know. Is there anything we should think. Gio definitely think Jordan wolf and damage burns because they assemble the The listener list or the top five now talking about fantastic fashions. Yeah so just. Mitch burns Jordan not yet. Nah next ironing out the kinks. We'll get it down kids and then what else. What else. what else. Oh you know what we. We should do the gambler. We're gonna do the gambling on top five the gambling at the end of our top five so got to listen to that to know what we assigned each other for next to compete. The you had to listen to this. No we're gonna talk about next week. All right right well until next time. We don't prevent.

youtube next week last week Five twitter this year Rick snyder twenty percent dylan matt Jordan Putting our ko to eighty one Mitch five movies eighty one top five canyon vineyard each alito canyon sas
"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

01:40 min | Last month

"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

"We do you can do so by going to sausalito. Canyon dot com and using promo code t. v. for twenty percent off any of your wine purchase on china's very cool. You get the twenty percents off just by using sausalito canyon. dot com. Sausalito is a bit hard to spell. So just google it. I'm just google wherever you think. Sausalito it's the word sauce it's word sauce and the lido ally vineyard sorry sausalito docked by that said vineyard. I fucked it all up by saying vineyard that sauce alito canyon dot com and brian will we'll be swirling and drinking their in. I'm sure very one hundred story. I went behind your back. And i emailed this guy directly and i was like man because i just got the email you know two days before recorded. Hey i would love to try your wine. Is there a place in l. a. distribute. I'll go buy some and just drink it on the air and tell me what i think was like we typically distribute you know in the san luis obispo area a close to. There's any value stuff so if you happen to be around there pickup the wine otherwise go to the website. They can ship to sausalito canyon dot com. Don't forget the t. F v code for twenty percent off. Yeah and if you're up there only an offer the covert and you're you're doing a little traveling. This went down. Because if you're up there you're listening to the program and you want some wine going person and say hey t.f at me and They should give twenty percent off in person. Yeah so now back to the aggressive.

"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

08:11 min | Last month

"forty years" Discussed on The Film Vault

"You want to start a new show called duck talk about mode. Listen i bet. I would love it. That's hurtful or talk with brat. I enjoy sleeping quite a bit in. Spangler which you've seen spain. Yeah spangler. three a three-star movie but she was enjoyable. I enjoyed her in the london. Studio yelling at me to get stanley water and me saying thank you for your concern. But he's not thirsty. I he's my dog and i know ready for my role. I told you he's thirsty. Get him water now. I just happened on her entry into the building a bit. She found no no she wasn't she just love dogs. She thought that i was a bad dog on her because she somehow knew in her heart that he was thirsty. So i went. And got a rummage through some Some drawers which. I never did it. I don't know. I didn't know where he likes this stuff. But i found a tupperware little bowl. And i filled with water brought it back and put stanley down in front of it. Stanley looked at me. Like what the fuck you doing. And he just jumped right back up. And we'll see and i just looked at her and she goes sounds wrong before or after my time. I was not there i was. There was after a long after. I thought you were going to say this. Must have been before she died. I would've been like yeah. This is my follow up. I was doing the math. And i'm almost positive is before she passed stupid. Ups love line. Love line existing. Leibman well existing. I'm doing the math and saying it was. It was probably some time ago. Yes yes yes yes. It was Let's let's just move on. I feel like. I'm not doing any favors to the dead here. Yes i did like her very much as well. I think shaming three films this weekend. Oh did you pull it off a moons. We definitely saw a few of the same films. I will tell you the three films that i saw. I enjoyed all of them. They're all very film. I i have to agree. Let's start off with the listeners. Choice and that listen was matt wreck so we explain how this came to us just for the people who are tuning in. I already kind of mentioned earlier but One of our patron levels is the The signer level which is if you are at the twenty five dollar level for six months straight. You get to assign us any movie within reason that you would like us to watch inflict fast on the program and matt. Rick sner is the most recent person to to come To to rule the roost and he assigned us our k. O two eighty one to thirty one was assigned to us. Nineteen ninety nine film. Direct by benjamin ross enters. What was your knowledge of this. Because i had a vague recollection of it but coincidentally or not. This film is very hard to track down. There are a couple of grainy copies on youtube. Grainy i would just say less than four k. uh whistle but Was not the you would expect for film foolishly this thing an hbo movie. Max and you rented that was the most saying thank you for setting it up. It's hbo pictures. The first thing you see when this movie starts it's a it's a. It's a celebrated. Tv movie it very well with the critics and yet despite being an hbo production this cannot be found on hbo which is oversight. There's a lot of stuff that goes into that. Brian stuff that you and i don't deal with or have to deal with but i mean it could be a dischord is no longer licensed by them or you know there could be a song or two. That's involved who knows maybe one of the actors got points and had a falling out with. Hbo who knows. There's all sorts of different. But i i wish we lived in a world where every single movie was available at least for rent or purchase. And that's almost the case because like in cases like arco to eighty one. It's not readily available to stream or rank but you can watch an illegal version on youtube. And i'm fine with doing that if that's the only option that they give us if that is the only avenue than you know it is what it is. I was very happy to see this movie. Because i enjoyed it quite a bit. And it's it's timely because of mink and make up for all sorts of awards and i imagine. Many of our listeners have seen make and are familiar with david. Fincher bank and this is the same story but told a much more colorful way. Leonard the punt literally. Let me start Like i mentioned nine hundred ninety nine. Hbo tv film. Direct by benjamin ross. It is historical drama about the making of citizen kane. A similar parallel story to make us anderson mentioned the stars. Lee schreiber as orson welles. Who is all throughout the film. He is the star of the film. Unlike manggarai sort the side character. Who pops in a couple times. Knock of it. John malkovich plays herman quits. James cromwell plays william randolph hearst. Melanie griffith is in the Mar marley shelton marion. Davies marley shelton role as marion davies. Roy scheider as george. Schaefer is a large role in the film to ninety three percent at rotten tomatoes Strangely enough like we mentioned can only stream this on youtube. Which is i have to imagine an unsanctioned version. But no one cares because no one is putting this out for rental. I i forgot to write this down in or somebody in my initial research. I can look this up but didn't because one the will the golden globe for best tv movie of the year to call myself from this week's Orange couch episode that I put up I is that where the foreigners You know vote on american movies. I don't i don't watch. Don't watch that. This week. On the episode i released was really the very first episode that you and i sat down to which has been played to death on. We've been released that like at least once if not twice but this time it was you and i listening ten years ago to that show from what was seven years ago now. Seventeen years ago and doing commentary. So we'd say all right logan stop the tape and we would comment on how horrible we both were. And then say alright. Play the tape and it was pretty good. It was pretty good. Did in fact win the golden globe for best media series or tv film. I'm this make no mistake. You watch this on youtube. Which i recommend i highly recommend this movie. You watch it on youtube or any form for that matter and you're gonna think this is they made for cable movie. This is a made for tv. Movie did not belong on the big screen that being said it was delightful. It was fantastic. It went down smooth. It was the same story as mink but without the art. And what. I say if the story is this good which was and i was not aware of most of this. I vaguely aware of mankiewicz. Do you said that. Malkovich plays michael. J. ten ten. Generally i had some ideas just from film school and be this movie being shoved down my fucking throat. I understand citizen kane. Better than i ever have after watching making now are ko to eighty one. They call it archaic one. Because it was arcade picture was two hundred and i and two hundred and eighty first production that they produced as a studio and it was just a much more fun movie and i know that fincher and his dad when making writing make it was fun and it was fun to them and i think that fincher thought that he was making fun. Moving a lot of certain types of people did have fun with that movie. I am not one of those types of people. This version was fun. This one does goes down smooth and it says it tells you the same information minus claire minus some of the politics that i feel like we're really shoehorned into make too so that can mirror what's going on today. Felt some of. It was unnecessary and gratuitous. This one just tells the story mainly of orson wells being pretentious piece of shit the pull for because he's a genius. The courage of his convictions made the guy..

Melanie griffith John malkovich Lee schreiber Rick sner James cromwell william randolph Roy scheider six months Stanley london Malkovich benjamin ross george michael ninety three percent orson welles youtube Schaefer This week Seventeen years ago
Biden oath second only to Reagan and Obama with TV viewers

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

Biden oath second only to Reagan and Obama with TV viewers

"How did Joe Biden's inauguration compared to those of other presidents when it comes to ratings for inaugurations Joe by definition is a solid third over the past forty years the Nielsen company reports thirty three point eight million people watch bidens inauguration over seventeen TV networks last week that trails only two other inaugurations on record in this generation Ronald Reagan swearing in in nineteen eighty one to forty one point eight million viewers and Barack Obama's two thousand nine inauguration drew thirty seven point eight million that's good for second place in all time inauguration ratings in the modern TV era among those who fell short to Biden in the ratings game as someone to whom ratings are very important Nielsen reports that Biden's ratings exceeded the thirty point six million people who watched Donald Trump take office in twenty seventeen on Oscar wells Gabriel

Bidens Joe Biden Nielsen JOE Ronald Reagan Biden Barack Obama Donald Trump Oscar Wells Gabriel
Former Make-A-Wish Iowa CEO charged with embezzling funds

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Former Make-A-Wish Iowa CEO charged with embezzling funds

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting a former charity C. E. O. is charged with embezzling funds a former CEO of make a wish I was facing felony charges alleging she embezzled tens of thousands of dollars from the charity forty year old Jennifer Woodley faces two charges first degree theft and unauthorized use of a credit card according to criminal complaints unsealed Friday Woodley awarded herself a ten thousand dollar bonus in October twenty nineteen two months after becoming the group's president and CEO and over a ten month span Woodley allegedly made eighty for unauthorized purchases for personal use on an organization credit card totaling more than twenty three thousand dollars Woodley and her husband have two daughters who have required brain surgery one received a trip to Walt Disney World through make a wish Iowa before Woodley was hired as CEO hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi C. E. O. Jennifer Woodley Woodley Walt Disney World Iowa Mike Crossey
Philadelphia police officer accused of sexual assault of minor

CBS3 Eyewitness News Philadelphia

00:16 sec | Last month

Philadelphia police officer accused of sexual assault of minor

"Officer could be fired after getting arrested today. A woman told police forty-year-old rahim montgomery sexually assaulted her about five years ago when she was a minor. Montgomery is a twenty year veteran with the police department. He's been suspended for thirty days and could be fired up to bat for the

Rahim Montgomery Montgomery Police Department
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | Last month

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
Joe and the Jews - burst 05

Unholy

00:32 sec | Last month

Joe and the Jews - burst 05

"That israel. Israel's general getting off a sugar rush. Right i mean for four years. They've been running around the candy store. No one is telling them anything to z. Whatever you want ice cream three times a day and other back to the classic. Even bush or clinton or obama administration saying we gotta go back to balanced meals right so they're gonna have a comparison that is different and yao himself is not going to be the first in line getting the biggest portion. He's just going to stand in line with everyone else waiting for his turn. It's a different page

Obama Administration Israel Clinton Bush
'Shameful': US virus deaths top 400K as Trump leaves office

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last month

'Shameful': US virus deaths top 400K as Trump leaves office

"Johns Hopkins University says the U. S. death toll from the corona virus has eclipsed four hundred thousand it absolutely didn't have to be that way Dr mark Roberts of the university of Pittsburgh graduate school of public health we are population and absolutely the worst developed nation in handling the crisis but Robert is optimistic with the new administration coming in especially when it comes to getting vaccines into the arms of Americans Biden's plan to hire a hundred thousand public health workers is you know thirty forty years too late but it's the right direction the right thing to do the nation reach the four hundred thousand milestone in just under a year the first known deaths from the virus in the U. S. were in early February of last year I'm surely employer

Dr Mark Roberts University Of Pittsburgh Gradu Johns Hopkins University Biden Robert U.
Interview With Stanford's Dick Gould

Beyond The Baseline

06:41 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Stanford's Dick Gould

"One john wartime here this week. Sports illustrated tennis podcast. Hope everyone is doing well. No pro tennis events this week but a lot of scrambling behind the scenes trying to get a schedule for twenty twenty one as corona continues its blaze through the draw or the calendar As it were right now it looks like the australian open is going to start on february eighth. That's three weeks later than usual to count for quarantine remains to be seen. It looks like indian wells unfortunately will Cancel for twenty one or at least be postponed. Perhaps until the fall. Miami is a question. Mark will Pass on more news when we have it. Maybe they'll be more clarity by the time you listen to this podcast. Meanwhile today Two great guests very different In terms of the significant age gap. Here but i suspect They would rather like each other I guess dick gould. Who was the men's coach at stanford for almost forty years stanford one seventeen. Ncaa titles under coach gould fifty those players were all americans. He of course coached a Curly haired kid from long island. John mcenroe we talk a bit about that. A bit about the state of college. Tennis tickled sort of the john. Wooden figure who didn't just win a lot but it also is a paragon of virtue and the next person to say something ill of him will be the first. I would submit a glaring omission. He's not in the international tennis hall of fame. But this is a good conversation. We talk a lot talking about mcenroe. Talk about International players in college tennis talk a bit about head injuries as he is the vice chairman of a nonprofit Teach aids which creates health. Ed technology and is paying special attention. Head injuries Good conversation so here's the golden. And after him. We talked to brandon nakashima. Who took intro in between segments. So here's coach. Gould how are you do it. How you feel like everyone. I question we all ask. Is that have you your twenty twenty those. She's been good so far and You guys guys have been affected a little bit kobe. But so far would survive it and It just the families good The main thing for me of course in the so all those good but it's really effective. I working night stops stanford. Three years ago. I've been working on concussion case for nonprofit and and for video so pc and youth football and below the installaion stuff and it just a fulltime job. He can't go in the office. Fortunately everything we do is zoom so if one presumes john we complain about but where we eight million with you Know your it's allowed us economy to To keep functioning and some lab. I want to ask you about that especially well. We could jump too far ahead. But i don't know if you saw the decent. La times yesterday about the the stanford volleyball player. And yeah i did. I did see that actually. My granddaughter was director operations volleyball for eight years. During that time there's two sides to every story you know but it was a concussions are not uncommon vibe. I you know you go up to the spike in the bog. In your hands or you hitting the head and it's our first soapy. See was artistic swimming synchronized swimming. Believe it or not Gushes in that and everyone thinks football. But it's it's it's just amazing and very on another sports we'll talk about I can only think of one. I can only think of one instance off hand in tennis but roller to. I could remember we had a cup. We're we're doing a story law where people talk about the story on the got them. Whatever most of them are athletes about half icicle have college and we have a couple of ten stories in their kids. Get hit with a wall. In ben people are more settled some than others and it just I james wake of course one. But then there's a lot of slipped and fell much display lawyers for the usda all. I didn't think well. I've ever azarenka once. I guess you're right yeah exactly. There was an eight figure settlement mining. Something exactly i wanted to I said blah blah. I wanna talk college. But i also i'm just curious i wanna hear more about you. I mean i. I feel like everyone knows everyone knows dick. Gould stanford coach for more than forty years. It occurs to me. Maybe gula man. That's what you may come on side. You are often described But this is. This is someone who grew up in my hometown. It's near and dear to you. You're the john wooden college tennis. And some of that is about longevity and titles and wins and losses and some of this is about the lessons you imparted ana players. Who i'm sure you know. Speak glowingly of you. But i'm just curious. I don't know anything. i was telling somebody recently. I were you a player. How did you get into this crazy sport. I really don't know much about you. Pre stanford how did you actually come to us. We'll flamboyant and my folks didn't play it all from california. My dad's a form. And and i had a horse to ride all the time and a young kid and and my mom said well you're gonna take tennis wheels. The white freaking shorts downtown instead of my jeans and lee is what are you talking about. So do you wanna ride horses somewhere. Yeah what are you gonna take a less. And you may remember a gal on nancy. Chafee kind of eric mayor of She was maybe top ten in the world and her dad was my was the guy. Give me the lesson. you need everything. I did equate with those four. it was You step into the ball like rocky marciano steps of the bunch. You watched the ball. Come off the record lake road. Kind of what's coming on the pitches everything all of a sudden. It wasn't says he's it was a big thing and he made hitting a ballroom exciting. And i always worked in the summers but impl- sherman's but i i went to stanford and played on a team there and Got pretty good bye last year and Those days olmert sparse. I was but i. I got fairly good but there was no circuit And so you go out and play shamateuritism Do anything and nothing to show for it. And i had a job teaching offer. And i took that job in high school. And and and that was my vocation coaching in the absolutely love. It and it's been you appreciate my guys. I'm doing a book. Not a stanford. Tennis john but on either standing brilliant leadership on coaching in general. And it's i had guys who go to are still alive.

Tennis Stanford Dick Gould Brandon Nakashima John John Mcenroe Volleyball Mcenroe Gould Long Island Football Ncaa Swimming Gould Stanford Miami John Wooden College La Times Aids Mark
"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"It. And we'll be back <Speech_Male> with more piecing it together <Speech_Male> coming <SpeakerChange> up real <Music> soon. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <Music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> guys dave here <Speech_Male> again and you know <Speech_Male> what. I just <Speech_Male> decided <Speech_Male> that you've <Speech_Male> listened. This far <Speech_Male> i might as well play one <Speech_Male> of those comedy rap songs <Speech_Male> i was talking about. <Speech_Male> Because it's just such a perfect <Speech_Male> fit here <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is demise. Indie rock <Speech_Male> song called <Speech_Male> snooze. <Speech_Male> It's one the cleaner <Speech_Male> things <Speech_Male> that we've done. I <Speech_Male> do not encourage <Speech_Male> you to go check out <Speech_Male> any other music <Speech_Male> but this song <Speech_Male> i think would be a really good <Speech_Male> fit so <Speech_Male> enjoy snooze <Speech_Male> and we'll be back

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"It and we'll be back <Speech_Male> with more piecing it together <Speech_Male> coming <SpeakerChange> up real <Music> soon <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> A <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <music> <music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Hey <Speech_Male> guys dave here <Speech_Male> again and you know <Speech_Male> what. I just <Speech_Male> decided <Speech_Male> that you've <Speech_Male> listened. This far <Speech_Male> i might as well play one <Speech_Male> of those comedy rap songs <Speech_Male> i was talking about. <Speech_Male> Because it's just such a perfect <Speech_Male> fit here <Speech_Male> This <Speech_Male> is demise. Indie rock <Speech_Male> song called <Speech_Male> snooze. <Speech_Male> It's one the cleaner <Speech_Male> things <Speech_Male> that we've done. I <Speech_Male> do not encourage <Speech_Male> you to go check out <Speech_Male> any other music <Speech_Male> but this song <Speech_Male> i think would be a really good <Speech_Male> fit so <Speech_Male> enjoy snooze <Speech_Male> and we'll be back

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

04:58 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"I'm jesse i'm ryan and we're the hosts of not my type one couple to personalities and we're taking three million internet quizzes approximately for non serious conversations about serious phantoms. Check us out on my type. Each episode we take buzzfeed style quizzes to explore tv series or a book. As many as we can get our hands up new episodes. Come out each wednesday and if you want to find out more about the show go to not my type dot com. Stay sir. Alright right so. I hope you enjoyed that conversation about the forty year. Old version I don't talk about my comedy rap stuff very often but this is a good opportunity to tell two quick things number. One is that. Even though i've for the most part stopped doing that stuff because it's horribly offensive and completely ridiculous at odds with everything i've been trying to build my career around. I do still plan putting out another demise in rocks album at some point in it's called in our forties and it's supposed to capture the moment of our life where we're still comedy rappers in our forties but on the album cover we're going to be trapped in a forty ounce malt liquor bottle so in our forties. It's a play on words. You got it. And also i talked about how much identify with this movie. Despite you know obviously being a woman of color but from the artistic point of view of this movie Another just quick story if you're still listening at the thirty three minute mark of this episode I'll tell you with that. Comedy rap stuff We used to do. Show here in las vegas all the time where we'd perform those songs onstage and we had quite a bit of a A very ridiculous local following going on But i would always be stone cold sober for for that stuff Because i really just couldn't perform if i was drunk or anything like that And especially not if i had partaken in any weed or anything like the scene where radha has stage fright after getting high backstage That did happen at one particular. Show at the double down saloon here in las vegas and it was the only time i ever smoked weed before a show and it was an absolute disaster. I pretty much. It was almost like what happened in this movie Just completely froze up. Couldn't remember a single word. I think. I said yo lake five thousand times. It was Awful experience and i don't smoke very often anymore possibly partially because of that anyway. That's enough about me. Thank you all for listening to piecing it together if you're enjoying the show at love it if you'd rate and review us over on apple podcast pod chaser of course. Make sure your subscribe to piecing it together. Wherever you listen to podcasts. We've got so many episodes on the way. And i wanna make sure you get. Check them out lots of great guests coming up lots of great movies recovering and if you're subscribed you'll know about it. As soon as the new episodes come up you could also follow us on. Social media at pide joined the facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces and don't forget about that patriot. I told you about the top of the show so You know. I do have this new album. David rosen. that just came out. And i'm going to keep promoting it. I've got the music video. Multiply Recording this october twenty fifth. I'm not sure there might be another music video out by the time. This goes up if it's if it's already out. Check it out on my youtube channel if it's not out i'll tell you about it next week. I'm not sure that's what happens when you recordings in advance. You really can't be sure if things that are supposed to happen. Get done or not. But anyway i do remind you. Though that david rosen is available now on all the major music apps you can of course stream it on spotify or apple music you can also buy it in a limited edition cd form over a bad camp and of course by as download if anybody still does that on itunes and amazon and all those other kinds of sight so Do appreciate your support. And i am really very proud of the album so please do check it out and i think i might as well close this episode out with a track from that bottom. And let's see here. You know what. I'm gonna play the most kind of hip hop ish track on this album. Well actually that's not true. There's a couple tracks on this album. That have a little bit of a hip hop energy to it. But i'm gonna go with this track deep breaths which they didn't definitely i can picture some unwrapping to and I dunno maybe rutta would like distract to to write a new song to so anyway. This is called deep breaths. It's on my new album. David rosen enjoy.

david rosen las vegas apple ryan youtube facebook David rosen. radha spotify amazon
"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

04:58 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"I'm jesse i'm ryan and we're the hosts of not my type one couple to personalities and we're taking three million internet quizzes approximately for non serious conversations about serious phantoms. Check us out on my type. Each episode we take buzzfeed style quizzes to explore series or a book. As many as we can get our hands up new episodes. Come out each wednesday and if you want to find out more about the show go to not my type. Dot com everywhere. Stay sir alright right so hope. You enjoyed that conversation about the forty year old I don't talk about my comedy rap stuff very often but this is a good To to tell two quick things number one is that even. Though i've for the most part stopped doing that stuff because it's horribly offensive and completely ridiculous at odds with everything. I've been trying to build my career around. I do still plan putting out another demise in rocks album at some point in it's called in our forties and it's supposed to capture the moment of our life where we're still comedy rappers in our forties but on the album cover we're going to be trapped in a forty ounce malt liquor bottle so in our forties. It's a play on words. You get it and also. I talked about how much identify with this movie. Despite you know obviously being a woman of color but from the artistic point of view of this movie Another just quick story if you're still listening at the thirty three minute mark of this episode I'll tell you with that. Comedy rap stuff We used to do. Show here in las vegas all the time where we'd perform those songs onstage and we had quite a bit of a A very ridiculous local following going on But i would always be stone cold sober for for that stuff Because i really just couldn't perform if i was drunk or anything like that And especially not if i had partaken in any weed or anything like the scene where radha has stage fright after getting high backstage That did happen at one particular. Show at the double down saloon here in las vegas and it was the only time i ever smoked weed before a show and it was an absolute disaster. I pretty much. It was almost like what happened in this movie Just completely froze up. Couldn't remember a single word. I think. I said yo lake five thousand times. It was Awful experience and i don't smoke very often anymore possibly partially because of that anyway. That's enough about me. Thank you all for listening to piecing it together. If you're enjoying the show love it if you'd rate and review us over on apple podcast pod chaser. of course. make sure your subscribe to piecing it together. Wherever you listen to podcasts. We've got so many episodes on the way. And i wanna make sure you get. Check them out lots of great guests coming up lots of great movies recovering and if you're subscribed you'll know about it. As soon as the new episodes come up you could also follow us on. Social media at pide joined the facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces and don't forget about that patriot. I told you about the top of the show so You know. I do have this new album. David rosen. that just came out. And i'm going to keep promoting it. I've got the music video. Multiply Recording this october twenty fifth. I'm not sure there might be another music video out by the time. This goes up. if it's already out. Check it out on my youtube channel. If it's not out i'll tell you about it next week. I'm not sure. That's what happens when you recordings in advance. You really can't be sure if things that are supposed to happen. Get done or not. But anyway i do remind you. Though that david rosen is available now on all the major music apps you can of course stream it on spotify or apple music you can also buy it in a limited edition cd form over a bad camp and of course by as download if anybody still does that on itunes and amazon and all those other kinds of sight so Do appreciate your support. And i'm really very proud of the album so please do check it out and i think i might as well close this episode out with a track from that album. And let's see here. You know what. I'm gonna play the most kind of hip hop ish track on this album. Well actually that's not true. There's a couple tracks on this album. That have a little bit of a hip hop energy to it. But i'm gonna go with this track deep breaths which they didn't definitely i can picture some unwrapping to and I dunno maybe rutta would like distract to to write a new song to so anyway. This is called deep breaths. It's on my new. david rosen. Enjoy.

david rosen las vegas apple ryan youtube facebook David rosen. radha spotify amazon
"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

Piecing It Together Podcast

02:37 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Piecing It Together Podcast

"Right welcome to another episode of piecing it together the podcast where we take a look at a new movie and try to figure out what movies inspired it. I feel like. I am very energized for this. That's probably good. Maybe it'll get some. You'd hit the subscribe button. Or maybe rate and review us over on apple. Podcasts repod chasers. Why am i so awake. I must have had a lot of extra coffee this morning or something but anyway we got a great episode coming up for you. We are today going to be talking about the forty year old version. A new movie out on net flix written directed and starring rod a blank and it is a great story about a woman discovering her passion and her art and her worth and it is a great little movie kind of came out of nowhere. I was not expecting this one. But i really really enjoyed it and talking to me on. This episode is rosa from latin x lens. It's always great to have rosa back on the show and we have a great conversation about the forty year old versions so that is coming up in a second as always. I want to remind you to make sure you subscribed make sure. Oh my cat just jumped on me. Lily bear say. Hi everybody Make sure you are following us over on social media at piecing pod. Join our facebook group popcorn and puzzle pieces where we continue the conversation about all the movies. We talk about here on the show and last but not least. don't forget. We have a patriot on our patriae on is called. Produced by david rosen and that is because it pulls in a bunch of great content from this podcast from my music career from awesome movie year. The other movie podcast that i produce as well as race no beans and who knows what else is going to end up on there in the coming months but we just posted a new special awesome movie or episode on saturday night fever which is a great bonus episode. You guys should really check that out. And of course. I always post early advanced episodes of piecing together to check out. And i've got a bunch of music stuff hitting. They're very soon some already hit and some coming soon. I'm actually recording this in advance This will go up in early november. It is currently still Towards the end of october. It's not even halloween yet. But you're going to be hearing this whenever you're hearing it and Lots of great content over there the patriot and lots of great content coming to piecing together and my new album. David rosen is out now so go. Check that out as well anyway. Let's get into this conversation about.

david rosen rosa facebook apple Lily
"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

05:33 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"Well now dead. Could list a whole lot three. I mean, we're in I'm in full-on. It's Halloween mode. I've watched 23 horror movies already this month my god, when I have time for this, I don't watch twenty-three horror movies. I just watch four seasons of Fargo. I don't I don't have this kind of so I would say Fargo but the current season that's currently going right now not the season before it. Oh, they're good, but I talked about them already. But the ones going out with Chris Rock is really good. It's like the African American Mafia vs. The Italian mafia in the early 1950s, it's good. It's really good. I started I've only two episodes into a four-part miniseries Watership Down. It's a few Brad's talked about four but it's a computer game. It has a mr. Tumnus. I like him. Anyway, it's real it's like kind of serious but me and Archer watching it's about these rabbits that are finding a new home, but it's sad people died dead. And then last you guys probably already know but Tuesday night was the season premiere of The Bachelorette and this is apparently the most dramatic season. Oh boy, they say that every year but they might be right because something happens and she leaves so she does not finish this season. There's a second Bachelorette they bring in money to finish these guys off like yeah, but I think she started and just left them dry and like I'm out. No, seriously. I think that happens man. There's a guy that she really likes from the episode one and I think all the other guys hate him and legitimately so we don't know why but I think all the all of them literally all the guys are going to go to her be like, hey, this is no good. And I think she says I don't care about any of you I want to be with him and she leaves with this guy and what's that like in all the Bachelors are there like we've been voted off or anything like that. So they bring in a new girl. To like fall in love with these guys. Oh and the oldest Bachelor ever 39000. So that's a big deal age is a big deal in this one. They keep saying it and instead of bringing in most leagues her age. They're like 26 and 27 like like why not bringing people closer to age? They're not going to get it but take that sixteen years of bachelor's any limbs cinnamon. I have no I've been I've been re-watching a lot of Supernatural trying to catch a big watching Supernatural season. Yeah, cuz the for the final final seasons on right now deal with terrorists up and then they'll the final season of schitt's Creek just was released. So I've been watching only on episode 6 episode 4 you're talking to me about washing 23 horror movies, but you just you watch a lot of t i watch a lot of T show and I watched a lot of things over again cuz I don't pay attention to t a lot. So I do a lot of things while I went so I like to play like the office. Well, I have two and they're going to be bloodless 7 a.m. And bloodlust your mom close, very close. The first one is on Hulu and it's an anthology movie called books of blood. I've actually that keeps popping up and it's based off of a Clive Barker book and it was really good. It was really good. I like a good Anthology type movie and the stories did really good weaving them together has bought a Robertson in it from Tomorrowland, you know, she has and the other one is on shutter if you have the shutter service and it's called the cleansing hour and it's odd washing yourself. It's actually really liked videos OpenTable just like taking showers summers are just like the women were getting twenty Twenty-One. Yep version. Well, it's about a fake exorcism priest who has like a YouTube video type thing. I told him it's all real one. That's right. Yeah and hit a real wage. Doesn't know what to do man. That's good. I think really good Dean. Well the thing is and it's a friend of his that gets possessed. She's filling in for somebody as far as you say, they said it too. I think that will do it for another episode of the cinema guys. We will be back in a couple of weeks with brand spanking new episode until next time maybe we will see you at the movies.

mr. Tumnus Fargo African American Mafia Chris Rock Clive Barker Anthology type Hulu Robertson Brad YouTube Dean Archer
"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

08:14 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"That you would have never said hip hop I said rap rap hip-hop to me is like Miley Cyrus or something, like what definitely hip-hop's like know pop is not silly hip hop is like Wu-Tang Clan very cool. Cool man, right. I'm just saying I just always called a rat's hip-hop. Yeah, I I mean rap to me rap and hip-hop kind of go along the same lines. I know they don't I don't know man. Cool. The only thing I did think is so I was trying to there's obviously lots lots of themes and I thought maybe there was too many themes. Okay, they were all hit like off were really on the nose. And so there was something with gender definitely something with age certainly something with race with gentrification with being from Harlem. Yeah the movies birth And white for a reason, there's something with sexuality only one or slice the entire movie this color, but it was almost like okay. What are you trying to say everything here? And it might have gotten a little lost some of the message cuz even her play was saying something that the movie wasn't saying it was something that it was a whole different theme. Yeah, and then so what's the theme theme selling out was the theme gentrification was the theme turning old was the theme Reinventing yourself was the theme not listening to naysayers was the theme following your heart was the theme be all was I think it was all of it, but not you can't do all of that great. You can do all of that very like so I so there's I think there was a few themes that were greatly done. The age was the best one. Yeah. Yeah. That's what I actually related to I think yeah, like the change of sort of okay. I gotta do something different. I I dug the race thinks actually the race thing that was going on her play. I thought was actually really interesting but they're dead. Thought about sexuality that I thought just probably was pretty shallow or missed the mark but you hurt her in the student. So all of her students every student okay to talk about genitalia. Yeah. Oh, yeah and all their plays plays about that and like like what is that saying and she had the one student who was just angry she broke through to her and so yeah, there was a lot of stories in messages and throughout the economy so much though. It didn't bother me though. That's some of that's I just thought I wonder if it's dead. Like I said, I know I feel like our lives like we all have multiple like huge story. Oh, yeah. So it's I feel like it's a little simplistic to just be like, oh, well, you need one story lot going on in your life at a time. Right? So she like she has all these different things going on in her life at one time. And that was probably part of the reason that she was feeling overwhelmed and turning forty like there's so much going on and I still feel Just with myself, like what do I do? There's all these things happening. What am I going to have people around me have their own many storylines that I'm involved in and I'm a part of yeah, like her her agent guy who's like Cathy was just sticking with her and then realized, you know, he could have been something more and then her students have their own storylines. So those she's obviously intertwined with those and so they can't just lays her phone now on white without acknowledging and giving credit to the other ones that she's also part of Em are all right. And you said it was kind of a Sorry Brad. It's kind of autobiographical. I don't know. Is it are okay Rana? She I can't say that we wrote and directed it wrote and directed it and start in it and she's in and it did say that it is kind of autobiographical. So what I wonder what piece of art did that sold out like the play I'm interested in that probably the movie this movie if we're going to if we're going to probably figure out like she sold out to Netflix. Hm. Yep. Movie was already made before she likes sold it. It's not like she didn't know so well, you don't know if Sundance said that we're going to sell it out. We're going to sell it to somewhere or something like that. So my one of my question is why I think like like stores they chose black and white all the stories identification and the whole play was about gentrification. That's about black and white, right? Yeah. They they made that they made that stupid storyline in there about black and white house and she was like, I don't want it to be about black and white and want to be about the colors but they're making that about colors and like you're questioning why I didn't you choose color and so she's probably trying to take that out of them try and when you do make a film in black-and-white like you're not focusing on a certain color or a way, so I wouldn't have known the one girl was Hispanic if they didn't mention it several times so we should try and take the race aspect out of it. At first when I found out it was black and white film outside. Oh sometimes black and white films are good, especially like newer ones and then sometimes some like new-age. Roma I forgot about Roma. Here's my other question in the play. Obviously the play was over the top and off but there was a couple lines where I was interested in like what where you so the one line that the white woman kept saying soy milk not this whole milk was. Oh isn't this about loving your neighbor and loving each other which is like well, that's obviously a good thing. But in this play it wasn't a good thing and for everyone there was a good thing but why would you say that would not be a good thing? I think that a lot of white evangelicals come into man bringing up the evangelicals. I'm just saying cuz that's like kind of like a thing is like, oh love your neighbor, right? Cuz like an Evangelical kind of thing to say so you why evangelicals going into lower income area areas to gentrify them essentially and so that's always their Mantra of like Oh, I'm a Christian. It's love yo. Cheaper but the light and stay away from gentrification cuz they're afraid of black people. I don't think so. All right. All right, and also they use that as like the guise of like, well, I'm here to like do better things for your neighborhoods by bringing more income into it and loving your neighbor and I want my soy milk though. Okay, so that's not how I took it but that's interesting. I could also be totally wage. So I took it as you need to love me, but as I'm coming into your community, I'm not loving you but I need you to love me. So I'm asking you to do something that I'm not willing to do myself. So I'm not willing to put up with your shenanigans or you're not having soy milk, but you need to love me because I do love soy milk that song. I was thinking I was wondering where I see that and our world where I'm like, oh we want someone to love and treat us a certain way, but we're not willing to I mean I see right now in politics right wage. Want the other well, they need to be like this but you're not willing to also be like that. I think I think I thought it was I thought was my favorite point in the movie because I see it so much in our poll in world right now. I want you to wear a mask. And I don't want to wear a mask. Like no one's giving everyone's just wanting the other side to do what they want. And so I I like that was actually my I liked that part of the film in I didn't think religion was a part of the film at all. There's there was even a lot of there was even a lot of that in her real life with especially with her and her, you know, her friend slash agent of life you're going to do what I want know you're going to do what I want to kind of thing like where she wanted a certain way or a certain thing cuz they always wanted her to when are you going to write this one movie for this one play for sure. Yeah, and he kept pushing it and pushing it and pushing it and she didn't want to do it. But then in the end she finally said she would she not end up doing that other one in the end no choice, but she he the one guy wanted her to write the play about the one lady. Yeah. No, she didn't I think she kind of blew her done. I I glad that we didn't in this. Play but I thought I thought the Trope of the movie was going back. All right, she's going to Eminem it in the end like oh, yeah, like on stage and drop the mic and it was but she's amazing but we never.

Miley Cyrus Harlem Netflix Eminem Rana Cathy Sundance
"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

08:00 min | 4 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"A long time. They they're still married, right? They've way divorced. Yeah, her daughter looks exactly like her. I'm so freaking why they divorced I know what about Thursday Prince and Sarah Michelle. They're still together, right? Yes. They are. They are man. There are still good things in the world are also good things with her. So Bobby still bill. Would you consider it a full since it's not. But it doesn't go black and white until our full color to the end true that is true. There's just spurts of color throughout whenever they quote unquote like sin. There's they see color when they do something like what would be in that world is wrong, but they're not wrong. Nothing's wrong expression thing is accordingly, right? So nothing's really wrong. It's all expression or exploration of your body. So but in that Pleasantville Road, it's and they start missing baskets. It's like a it's like a town. It's like a town like Footloose Leave it to Beaver. It's just want to dance now. Yeah. Pleasantville is a great movie song. Number one. I'm sure you guys know what my number one be black and white film know. It's classic. Now the Living Dead. Oh is that black and white originally? I had a movie one of my all-time favorite horror movies. I movie. Why do you hate it? I hate it because it freaked me out when I was younger but not living dead is one of my all-time favorites. I watch it every year during Halloween to my cuz that slow zombie, right? Yeah. Oh, yeah George Romero's for how slow zombies win cuz they're like slower than Walking Dead zombies. I mean you get off of them. They're going to eventually overpower your right do they like or their offices or something or they're so slow like you don't know if one's behind you and just get surprised you have any honorable mentions that didn't quite make the list know, I mean definitely now the Pleasantville would have scooted something, you know, obviously thought of Schindler's List. Yeah. That was a big one the man who wasn't there Billy Bob Thornton's like oh wow. Okay, there's one that I thought of I was thinking 200 Cigarettes, but that's not black and white. I think I was thinking the one that you mentioned with George, Clooney. Oh good night and good luck night and good luck. And then there was a lot of smoke and what was the one with the the pant? No, not The Pianist a couple of years ago. John Goodman was nominated for the the artist. Oh, yes. They are the artists. Yes. I had psycho another Hitchcock movie, which is really good. And probably I could have picked any of the classic monster movies like Frankenstein and Dracula the mummy they did the mesh. They did the month still staying at the mass gonna make any smooth any black and white and also put if you haven't watched this version they call Logan Noir and it slows down in in black and white Paris. I do like the whole movie black and white whole movie just black and white purpose of this. It kind of It just fits that style. They also did it with Mad Max Fury Road, and there's a black dog. And which makes sense because matter what video game was in black and white. I know you said parasite. I have not watched that version. So this little guy guess lead into our movie like I'm interested. In fact is a black and white that's like makes me feel vintage e and then there's a black and white like the movie watched where I can't even like I don't really stopped paying attention to the fact black and white. I forget that it's like oh, yeah. Well cuz it's so clear and crisp before we jump into that movie. Yeah. Yeah say become a patron of the show and you could give us a top thoughts. Yeah to do throw it at us. Yeah, you can make a say things and it don't matter if you're black or white. Just go back to patreon.com the cinema guys and you can become Patron. Let's talk the forty year old version. Any more thought on what kind of play we want to rise remember? If you put it nothing it'll be nothing like your career. Remember this face. She was when a spotlight magazines 30 under 30 playwrights to watch we watch but weren't you go Archie tells me you're teaching somebody who had no real hair going to tell me how to write a button Channel Tyler Perry did either of you know anything about this movie going it negative. I had never heard of it until literally you're like, hey watching this and I had to go find it I heard of it and I knew it was getting a lot of buzz, but I hadn't watched a trailer or I didn't know it was a black and white movie at all. What kind of buzz was it getting? I mean it came out of Sundance. Okay. So a lot of people were saying how great it was. It was a lot of people put it on their their top list of sundance's like one of the things they've had all that I mean potential I think yeah. Sure. Yeah. Those were thing this year long wait, they're not doing it this year. I think they push it to February. It probably gets pushed the 2021. They got pushed to April and I mean luckily next year movies coming out they're going to be like people include the movies of this year's. And last year, I mean all the moves twenty-twenty know it'll probably know how far is whether cut off will be down. Let's talk the forty year old version. So before we go off Bruins, he's as we like to do give your rating of the movie and any quick thoughts you have on it. I thought about it for a while. I liked it a lot but I gave a 4 hours e or Starz that's that's big for you big. I mean Huey Halloween got three and half. So are you serious? Hold on but this is the thing. I watched it with a room full of thirteen year olds who were rolling and all the jokes and it made me enjoy it more. Like I think it's not made for us. It's made for thirteen year old. I watched it by myself and wage. There's did you watch Angeline know there's a scene where Adam Sandler's ride a bike and he's at 9. He's trying to find some of these like, I'm gonna say Marco you say Polo and it's like Marco and some of the background skills toll and like dead. Thirteen year olds in the room are like that's the funniest thing they've ever heard and so I'm like sitting here thinking I don't think this is great. But I love that these boys all think thousand that's what made me give it the 3 and 1/2. I fully understand I've watched yeah movies like that like with my kids and they're really into it and I'm like, but I enjoyed it more because yeah exactly if I'd walk by myself. I'd have been like my rain. All right. Send a maiden. What did you give the forty year old version 3 and 1/2 3 and the big got taken down a half because I don't think I'll ever watch it again, but I loved it. Yeah, that was good. All right Bradford. I gave it a one won't I'm just I'm just kidding. I'm just kidding. I used to talk about how you been for years. I gave it a four four four. Wow. That's I feel I really liked this movie. I thought it was you were super apprehensive. I was I I kind of I had heard of the movie. And then when you suggested I was like fine like kind of thing. I'm like, well, what about what we do this one why we do this one when watching it I really got into it. Yeah. I thought it was funny. I thought he connected with her character of turning forty because I've been there so we have like to be a black woman from Harlem. I know what it's like to be a black woman from home turning 40. We really connected, you know, and that that's my forehead a lot to do with I I was into the store like oh and like like I think I texted you guys had to stop it right when she bombed on stage. I had to give or take a kid that soccer or something and I was like, I don't I was afraid to turn it back on cuz like I don't want to watch her bomb on stage. I.

Pleasantville George Romero Sundance Marco Billy Bob Thornton Bobby Sarah Michelle soccer Prince Beaver Tyler Perry John Goodman Logan Noir Bruins Harlem Adam Sandler Schindler Starz Archie
"forty years" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:53 min | 5 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I should Harris Daisy Rosario what is making you happy this week I'm very excited about what is making me happy you guys. Okay. The amber ruffin show on Peacock Amber Ruffin. If you're not familiar with her, she's a very funny comedian who's been doing these wonderful bits on the Seth Meyers show for a few years. Now she's a writer for that show. She does these bits where it's like jokes seth can't tell and her and. Jenny Hegel who is a lesbian woman on the staff and ambers a black woman and they write these jokes that seth is not supposed to tell and so he'll say the setup and they'll say the punch lines and then inevitably they always get him to say a silly one. So amber is this like just joyous strange Pixie of a woman is how I think of her full disclosure, the pleasure of knowing amber and I've performed return on the past but it's not like we're close that show really hit like at the end of last week in particular I was desperate for. Some escape but also I can't ever really escape and one of the things I love about embers show is that she's really taking on current events and being so funny and calling out. All of these things that she's experiencing while bringing this absurdity and this joy to it like it really was something that at the end of the week I felt better I felt both like yes I'm thinking about these things but I'm finding community and I'm laughing and there's just a wonderful absurd streak. So like go check that out I just absolutely love it. It's only like twenty minutes on peacock like I don't care about peacock is the only place you can get it and like it really is genuinely so good. So Amber Ruffin show, where can you find it? I think it's on peacock. Have you guys? We will once again, it's a big week for show notes. We'll make sure and that's in the show notes and you know every week You can also get the show that's in the newsletter. That's it NPR. Dot Org Slash pop culture newsletter. Thank you very much daisy Rosario Kiana Fitzgerald what is making you happy this week. What is making me happy this week is a lovely young woman on Instagram by the name of young barbecue. She is an entertainer is the best way to put it to kind of distill it more. She loves to dance and she's not like your typical like, Oh, I'm GonNa Dance, real fancy for you like she bus out any move that her heart tells her to bust out like she just does exactly what she wants to do, and she's kind of like a caused playing dancer because she'll dress up like a character from sister act two inch dance to like the major scene in that movie where everybody's like up in you know doing our thing..

Amber Ruffin Seth Meyers Daisy Rosario writer Rosario Kiana Fitzgerald Jenny Hegel NPR
"forty years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:03 min | 11 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Ideas

"Formulations like colonizer colonized or imperialist and victim of imperial power We certainly saw that in the case To take one example and. I think it was the one that I was thinking of at the time. the war in Syria. You know which was an enormously complicated proxy war In addition of course to being a a war against civilians and so I I think that In that in that essay I was critical of some of the uses to which Edward Said's ideas Had been put but in more recent Talk that I gave in in Beirut in May I sounded a more sympathetic note about Said's work Partly because the I I've been reminded Very powerfully and upsettingly of the Persistence of accrued and racist discourse about The Middle East In the last few years under Donald trump particularly the the language that he used to describe A refugees and Muslims so I think that you know the what makes a book like orientalists him so significant and so vital is that you're constantly in conversation with it. You you might. You might run away from it and then you return to it and you realize how fundamental it is and so I guess you could. You could say that I've been that I continue to be in dialogue with it. You're listening to ideas on. Cbc Radio One in Canada in North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on RN and around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas you can also stream us or get our podcast on the CBC. Listen UP I'm nullify it Haley. Hey Fallon and hey listeners. Out We are. The hosts of a podcast called the secret life of Canada. We are a history podcast. Yeah and we've covered topics things like the gold rush or the baby blanket. Yes kind of unconventional stories. Though that you might have missed in your Canadian history class so we're here to uncover the secrets. That's right Czechoslo wherever you get. Your podcasts Edgy. Haji Haji Bhabha along. Haji Baba was the title theme of One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four film by the same name review in the New York. Times described it. This way there's an episode where a swarm of fiery Dane supposed to be an organized Ben ditty of Fugitive Harem. Girls Sweeps Down upon a caravan of merchants. Also our riot sword fights kidnappings creeping into tents torturing 's chases across the desert and kissing by the light of the moon the film is based on Hajji Baba of his written by James Justinian. Morier a nineteenth century British diplomat and orientalist. Why are you not satisfied to be like? You're father how'd you? You're a good Bob true. I asked myself Mr Hake. The Shaw's two favorite is smelled Handsome that are spoken the nine and he is the favorite well in the famous Lord Treasurer. Who feels the kings covers with gold and does not forget his own but was he. The son of a grocer eats drinks. What he likes he puts on a new coat every day. After the Shaw he has his choice of all the beauties of Persian story of Persian Barbara filled with Harem girls and shakes care events camels and swords. It's a classic piece of Orientalists Literature. Telling the story of a place and people that exist. But the depictions are entirely a westerners projection of what life in the east must be like the unabashed orientalist of the Nineteenth Century Variety certainly continues today in. Tv shows like homeland or movies. Like Elijah come from land from a faraway place with a caravan cameras. Roll where it's flat and then Sunday. He does intense. It's back but hey it's home. Orientalists also exists in subtler forms the kind that winds its way into political analyses and journalism even university courses. Saba carpet and fly to another. I was an early critic of the idea of the humanities courses. They were taught here being called the humanity suggesting that humanity's were only written by Europeans as a result of agitation. They expanded the humanities to include. Well first of all they stopped calling humanity. It's called Western humanities. Now and then they expanded it. Which is exactly what I think is right to include Non Western humanities as well so students are required to take both but I was a critic of Precisely the pretensions of a humanities course that you could educate a student and there was a lot of self satisfaction. This is about twenty years ago. Those ourselves satisfaction about the fact that our students read. Plato and they read Spinoza. We'd Don Quixote and they read good and they're educated and I made the argument that if you don't read them in the original languages if you don't read them complete and if you're taught by people who don't know the language and having read them complete you're not being educated you being educated in education I mean and the pretensions there of what they can calls the idols of the cave. But it's not the real thing And then I also made the point that it was a very eurocentric view which consigned the rest of the world to inhumanity. By implication. Then there was quite an interesting discussion. I'm ever participating in myself on campus. And there was the changing of the nomenclature and the expansion of course to include other literatures and other traditions. And I think it's very salutory ready whenever whenever you're ready to go. I am Amanda Rogers and I am a professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at Colgate University. Where most of my work is focused on critical cultural studies and contemporary Middle East particularly visual culture and media representation. More fundamentally scientists arguing in Oriental. Ism that there is a binary between the so called. East end the so called West. That is fundamentally rooted in Asymmetries of Power In created essentially through conquest imperial expansion and this binary is very much One that is constructed through oncology and epistemology and what I mean by that is that the idea of the so called. Orient is a construct itself that served interests of the so-called West. And this is one of the big critiques sites thesis which I I to share some once. I don't necessarily think that all of the critiques are necessarily fair but he does to an extent draw the same sort of a homogeneous boundaries around an extensively recognizable west that he claims are drawn around a fundamentally constructed artificial concept of the east. But I think what doesn't get understood enough or doesn't get emphasized enough about the difference. Between Occidental ISM SO-CALLED. An Oriental ISM is the fundamental `asymmetry of power relations ideas cultures and histories cannot seriously be understood or studied without their force or more precisely their configurations of power. Also being studied to believe that the Orient was created. Or as I call it orientalist and to believe that such things happen simply as a necessity of the imagination is to be disingenuous. The relationship between Occident and Orient is a relationship of power of domination of varying degrees of complex Gemini. So to to really. You know breakdown what. I'm referring to hear people from the so called Middle East. What we think of today as the Middle East which is incidentally impossible to accurately define. Because it's a fictional construct Did Not refer to themselves as miniature outside which is Arabic for Middle East instead. People identified based on regional configurations where culture and History and linguistics were seen to be not identical but but shared so there were subdivisions like Maga break so that would be Tunisia. Algeria and Morocco at the far west of the Muslim World so-called Arab world as well so called Middle East depending on US defining it And the same thing held true for the Levant countries as well as the Gulf so you had regional divisions.

Middle East Hajji Baba Canada Haji Haji Bhabha Orient Shaw Edward Said Syria Donald trump North America CBC DOT CA Sirius Beirut Orientalists Literature History and linguistics Elijah Don Quixote Plato
"forty years" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:59 min | 11 months ago

"forty years" Discussed on Ideas

"Got on the first day and it continued all the school holidays. Dress Code and talk. His colonial education is where Edward Side fell in love with Western literature. It was also where he first saw. How language and images could be weaponized. The first rule of school was English is the language of the school. Anyone caught speaking. Another language will be punished severely so this imposition of their language on US colored. Everything I did in school I mean I learnt English literature geography history. I knew much more about those and I knew anything about my own background. My own language there are always resented. Edward Cy died in two thousand and three but his most famous oriented endures. Even now in its fortieth year side argued that it was this imagined east that became the flawed basis for the West problematic relationship with the Arab and Muslim. Could you introduce yourself with my name is and then just in this episode ideas producer? Now He'd Mustafa examines the legacy and impact of orientalist through conversations with a writer and an academic who were deeply influenced by sides work. You'll also hear excerpts from an interview Adverti- did with ideas in May two thousand. We're calling this episode revisiting Orientalists My name is Adam shots I'm a writer journalist I'm on the staff of the London review of books and I also ride four other publications such as the New York review of Books The New York Times Magazine and the New Yorker Adam. Tell me about your connection to Edward Side My connection with Edward Saieed is both an intellectual and personal one I grew up reading him in the pages of the Nation magazine. I was reading both his articles on Palestine and the politics of the Middle East and his essays As a music critic site was a very gifted pianist and critic of classical music and so One of the reasons that I decided to attend Columbia University was that I knew that I was teaching there and I thought couldn't be a bad place if he was teaching there As as as it happens I never actually studied with with Edward Saieed but his work Continued very much to inform my own thinking about not just about the politics. Middle East and America's role in the region but about the more generally of the politics of representation and questions of power aesthetics and the literary imagination. What attracted me to sites? Work was the would seem to me the elegant powerful and an effortless synthesis of the area date and the polemical everything that Saieed wrote was informed by his deep learning as a literary critic who is also Well versed in philosophy In theory in European intellectual history and in the history of the Middle East and at the same time each of his contributions was an intervention in a in a political conversation. He wasn't writing simply to contribute to knowledge as it were he wanted to change the world and Especially for for a young person. I think This was a tremendously moving example of what of what a committed intellectual could achieve another aspect of. Sade's work that That I found compelling was the moral passion it was imbued with I connected very much with Sides radical humanism his critique of the West but also his fidelity to The very best values of the Liberal. West which were so often betrayed in practice and his utter cosmopolitanism Saieed with someone who to whom nothing really was foreign and that was tremendously Admirable orients doesn't mean several things it means a first of all accepting division between Occident and Orient. You're an orientalist. If you accept that the oriented somehow kind of separate realm homogeneous to itself. The Second Meeting of Oriental is is that it's a it's a particular attitude towards the Orient Right Which suggests that the Orient can be studied as separate Integral thing whether it's oriental despotism. Oriental sensuality oriental motive production etcetera and the third rather specific meaning of it is orientalist. Them has in the practice of orientalists. Who are trained. Experts the emergence of Orientalists as a discipline as opposed to style thought which is the second meaning for example in the nineteenth century. Early Not Century Hugo said in the renaissance people were hellenists in the nineteenth century. People are orientalists that is to say their view of the world includes looking at the Orient as a kind of inspiration kind of source for all our knowledge so or antlers minutes third meaning is the L- learned study of the Orient and I argue that emerges as a result of the conquest of the Orient I by Napoleon when he invaded Egypt in seventeen ninety two and then as orientalists and becomes a Department of study in Western universities I in Britain and France. 'cause they were the colonial pioneers but then later of course in places like Germany and Russia and elsewhere in essence the the the argument that That saieed was making Orientalist was that the the east was an imaginative and political construct. It wasn't An actual thing it was. It was an object of scholarly and political attention that had to be produced in a kind of joint effort of of men of power and they were mostly men and the scholars and writers who were writing about the lands that the western powers had colonized the Orient was almost a European invention and had been since antiquity a place of Romance Exotic Beings Haunting memories landscapes remarkable experiences unlike the Americans the French and the British less so the Germans Russians Spanish Portuguese Italian Swiss have had a long tradition of what I shall be calling orientalists a way of coming to terms with the Orient that is based on the orients special place in European Western experience. The Orient is not only adjacent to Europe. It's also the place of Europe's greatest and richest and oldest colonies the source of its civilizations languages. It's cultural contestant and one of its deepest and most recurring images of the other. That idea that that the images that we arrive at that these are these are not things that arrived hole in their time. These are images that have been constructed. These are ideas that have that have been created in the service of various things historically and and it seems like that is a more prevalent conversation today when we look at you know race or we look gender And and often when we look at things Politically as well but in. Its time this was a new conversation. This was not. This was not part of some just another expression of some well well-founded or well-meaning idea that that everybody was in on this was this was revolutionary in its time. How how different was it from? What else was out there? How how hard was it pushing back? I entirely agree with you. I think that to some extent even those who haven't read orientalist and who may never read it have already internalized Some of side's arguments because in effect saieed helped to create a new common sense among critical minded people. The orientalists is a part of our common inheritance. And you could argue that. He was one of the that he was as much a revolutionary as someone like. Simone de Beauvoir was on In in her book the second sex she famously wrote that one is in born a woman one becomes a woman and in effect site was saying something very similar about the so-called Arab or Muslim one is in born one becomes one. I mean he was looking at these. These these these discursive regimes as it were and even if his his His influences were more Phuc Odeon than SAR Tran-. He was arguing along a similar path. Now sites ideas of course were not invented solely by him and and in Oriental Ism and at some of the essays that he published afterward reflecting on on the book because he published several of them. saieed was very generous In acknowledging that a number of people had preceded him in making these arguments people like Anwar Abdul Malik Frantz. Fanon the Martinique and psychiatrist to join the ALGIERIAN liberation struggle and various others of these these these. These are these arguments about the production. The invention of the East Had been to some extent circulation and saieed. I I don't WanNA suggest that site simply collated them. But he managed to fuse some of these ideas into a powerful synthesis and into a historical narrative that also drew on his remarkable learning in the field of literature because after all orientalists is a work of literary history. I do think that it's a book that is very mindful of the inheritance And the enduring influence of of imperialism on Western societies Is someone who is on the one hand an embodiment of A radical I would say radical liberal humanism and at the same time he's very much a critic of the blind spots hypocrisies and injustices committed in liberalism's.

Orient Edward Saieed Middle East Edward Side Edward Cy West Adam US Oriental Ism Europe Edward writer Simone de Beauvoir Columbia University Nation magazine Adverti Anwar Abdul Malik Frantz Mustafa London review of books producer
"forty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"forty years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Stopping point forty years from that's the fire right well if financial independence retire early retire early well yeah I mean you know we can put the fire in your restaurant that he sort of speak but yeah I think this is this is very very true we see this kind of trend with people right now that they're saying you know what you know retirement I maybe I want to semi retire maybe I want to continue to work but but but that the most important thing is is that I want to join my life I wanted would be able to create more free time I want to be able to have the the funds and the ability them the means to enjoy and do the things that I can do one while I can do them in other words by my health is good well you know my family's together and while I have the opportunity to really you know reach some of the goals and objectives and the dreams that I have and so how do you do that well you have to have the ingredients to a proper investment about school as you pointed out the rat I mean when you talk about an investment Stolar retirements to all we want certainly we want social security we want to have you know about three or four different sources of income coming in perhaps an IRA four oh one K. or four oh three B. or T. S. P. plan that I've had and then maybe the brand strategy might be another source of income or perhaps our investment income from like a you know rental properties and so forth and so on so you won't have multiple legs to that school and but you also want to make sure that you don't sacrifice your retirement school for a thought process that's probably not really within your objectives are your goals like paying off your mortgage does that even make sense at all because a mortgage actually and number five here on the list the right mortgage is all it not only the it doesn't provide that you the unique benefits of a mortgage with taxes and so forth any ability to stretch out payments and everything but it's also a hedge against inflation all right home mortgage with a fixed interest rate can be a hedge against inflation that's because the amount of the mortgage payment is the same every month but the value okay of the money that you're paying that mortgage off with falls over time due to inflation right you know because a problem and and also you may your income will increase and now your house name is the same and so really that does make a difference there you go and you know this is very very important one of the things about the restaurant edgy if that is that it also hedges against inflation internally in the restaurant you there's a thing called arbitrage okay so even as you're taking money out of the ranch strategy that money technically can still be working for you in other words you can be creating interest on money that you removed and are using for other things outside of you know of the counseling maybe taking that money you're using it for a child's education are you taking that money in your you know by doing improvements to your home or or or you know buying a new automobile whatever you're doing you can still continue to great arbitrage with the money this is explained in the book and in all of their the literature that we provide and it's so self evident when you see the illustration we want to get your copy of the book.

forty years one K
"forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The neighborhood for forty years this it's very close to our studio and it grew from being this lido market rosary star to being big bar where people hang out and it's a very bohemian bar where a lot of artists and writers and actors come and we we were drawn to this environment when we started coming here and we liked this interaction and this mood of the place them walking as well right because it's super close so it's it's one of the few chances we have to leave the studio serio people see daylight walking which is a good exercise our profession is very is not good for your health not back so every chance we have stretching out and walking is good whenever you're watching something do you ever think this could be a comic do you ever feel inclined to either no finish that up or start drawing what you're seeing if we don't have a star if we have a story like why are we are working on a story everything can read but if you're not working on a story over our own dan those ideas those feelings they are kept on hold for the next story you were drawing since he was small children right it had a special appeal to us because it was something that we could both do you could both be there on a floor with crayons scribbling that created that facility created a bond between drawing and as being together so we drew on the sand we drew on the walls of our bedroom we drew on the books that we have people were reading to us we could be drawing all the time and we were trying all the time because it was something that had that connection that are this is what we do together was there a point where you thought well this can actually go somewhere we could actually make we want to make a living out of this i've been giving the changing point is when we realized we could tell stories not only draw so when we started creating stories that that were copies of the books we will reading the comics during by the time we we're like eleven or twelve that was the time we got a little more hooked up on making comics you didn't plan or do we didn't know how to make it work we just wanted to do that you're listening to in the studio with me camilla kosta i'm with fabio moon and gabriel bah the brazilian twin brothers who have made a formidable reputation as comic book creators it back from lunch and in the quiet of the studio the work begins again and the focus is on how best to draw car wants to draw fifties american model arriving at a nightclub but he's having trouble finding the right angle this character is saying something like can i take your keys because his his developed it's the basic elements so i can see if the dynamic of the panel works i'm seeing that it doesn't work right now i'm seeing like this because there has to be this illusion of death in the foreground is the car and he's has believing the car going towards the place in the background in the middle of that there's the valley who is offering to take the keys their car and the shape of the cars too small so it doesn't give the foreground this this illusion that's in the front everything and he's too big for the car proportions are wrong so the dynamic is wrong so the placements wrong so if i'm having trouble with the panel i asked him if it working and he can give me tips saved my life is it working perspective is wrong he's a little too big for this car you could move everything more the center in have the door open no the door open because he no valid exists just barking front of the club and getting okay would make the rise online year you can have that below.

forty years
"forty years" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"forty years" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"The title i'm curious whose job it is to figure out when an actual title has value and where the title style you lies that's a great question and something that came through in the focus groups that that that title was an old enough titled that it it was not a significant value at the launch campaign but um you know anna maniacs an amazing stories is our and there's tremendous value to that uh i think i think it's a learning curve and gauging the marquette beloit coupling if westworld had been cold eastwest west land were something that wasn't a movie from forty years ago would it have had the same value that's a good question i think you know obviously because westworld specific it was it was a small following but it me attracted a certain audience but i think that's a really good question i don't know i mean i don't know that it was significant enough i it wasn't just fans the movie who came to watch the series obviously at the big show for us and so and i think people watch it and i'm like oh it's a movie twos who was a let you know there were enough new audience eyeballs on it but i i think it with helped but didn't it's not crucial no curl when you come at this from a different perspective because you work for you one which is an international we face company and so you had sort of the sense of what the international marketplace's are for these how much would you say that international is.

westworld forty years