35 Burst results for "Forty Year"

"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

05:33 min | 6 hrs ago

"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"Well now dead. Could list a whole lot three. I mean, we're in I'm in full-on. It's Halloween mode. I've watched 23 horror movies already this month my god, when I have time for this, I don't watch twenty-three horror movies. I just watch four seasons of Fargo. I don't I don't have this kind of so I would say Fargo but the current season that's currently going right now not the season before it. Oh, they're good, but I talked about them already. But the ones going out with Chris Rock is really good. It's like the African American Mafia vs. The Italian mafia in the early 1950s, it's good. It's really good. I started I've only two episodes into a four-part miniseries Watership Down. It's a few Brad's talked about four but it's a computer game. It has a mr. Tumnus. I like him. Anyway, it's real it's like kind of serious but me and Archer watching it's about these rabbits that are finding a new home, but it's sad people died dead. And then last you guys probably already know but Tuesday night was the season premiere of The Bachelorette and this is apparently the most dramatic season. Oh boy, they say that every year but they might be right because something happens and she leaves so she does not finish this season. There's a second Bachelorette they bring in money to finish these guys off like yeah, but I think she started and just left them dry and like I'm out. No, seriously. I think that happens man. There's a guy that she really likes from the episode one and I think all the other guys hate him and legitimately so we don't know why but I think all the all of them literally all the guys are going to go to her be like, hey, this is no good. And I think she says I don't care about any of you I want to be with him and she leaves with this guy and what's that like in all the Bachelors are there like we've been voted off or anything like that. So they bring in a new girl. To like fall in love with these guys. Oh and the oldest Bachelor ever 39000. So that's a big deal age is a big deal in this one. They keep saying it and instead of bringing in most leagues her age. They're like 26 and 27 like like why not bringing people closer to age? They're not going to get it but take that sixteen years of bachelor's any limbs cinnamon. I have no I've been I've been re-watching a lot of Supernatural trying to catch a big watching Supernatural season. Yeah, cuz the for the final final seasons on right now deal with terrorists up and then they'll the final season of schitt's Creek just was released. So I've been watching only on episode 6 episode 4 you're talking to me about washing 23 horror movies, but you just you watch a lot of t i watch a lot of T show and I watched a lot of things over again cuz I don't pay attention to t a lot. So I do a lot of things while I went so I like to play like the office. Well, I have two and they're going to be bloodless 7 a.m. And bloodlust your mom close, very close. The first one is on Hulu and it's an anthology movie called books of blood. I've actually that keeps popping up and it's based off of a Clive Barker book and it was really good. It was really good. I like a good Anthology type movie and the stories did really good weaving them together has bought a Robertson in it from Tomorrowland, you know, she has and the other one is on shutter if you have the shutter service and it's called the cleansing hour and it's odd washing yourself. It's actually really liked videos OpenTable just like taking showers summers are just like the women were getting twenty Twenty-One. Yep version. Well, it's about a fake exorcism priest who has like a YouTube video type thing. I told him it's all real one. That's right. Yeah and hit a real wage. Doesn't know what to do man. That's good. I think really good Dean. Well the thing is and it's a friend of his that gets possessed. She's filling in for somebody as far as you say, they said it too. I think that will do it for another episode of the cinema guys. We will be back in a couple of weeks with brand spanking new episode until next time maybe we will see you at the movies.

mr. Tumnus Fargo African American Mafia Chris Rock Clive Barker Anthology type Hulu Robertson Brad YouTube Dean Archer
"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

08:14 min | 6 hrs ago

"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"That you would have never said hip hop I said rap rap hip-hop to me is like Miley Cyrus or something, like what definitely hip-hop's like know pop is not silly hip hop is like Wu-Tang Clan very cool. Cool man, right. I'm just saying I just always called a rat's hip-hop. Yeah, I I mean rap to me rap and hip-hop kind of go along the same lines. I know they don't I don't know man. Cool. The only thing I did think is so I was trying to there's obviously lots lots of themes and I thought maybe there was too many themes. Okay, they were all hit like off were really on the nose. And so there was something with gender definitely something with age certainly something with race with gentrification with being from Harlem. Yeah the movies birth And white for a reason, there's something with sexuality only one or slice the entire movie this color, but it was almost like okay. What are you trying to say everything here? And it might have gotten a little lost some of the message cuz even her play was saying something that the movie wasn't saying it was something that it was a whole different theme. Yeah, and then so what's the theme theme selling out was the theme gentrification was the theme turning old was the theme Reinventing yourself was the theme not listening to naysayers was the theme following your heart was the theme be all was I think it was all of it, but not you can't do all of that great. You can do all of that very like so I so there's I think there was a few themes that were greatly done. The age was the best one. Yeah. Yeah. That's what I actually related to I think yeah, like the change of sort of okay. I gotta do something different. I I dug the race thinks actually the race thing that was going on her play. I thought was actually really interesting but they're dead. Thought about sexuality that I thought just probably was pretty shallow or missed the mark but you hurt her in the student. So all of her students every student okay to talk about genitalia. Yeah. Oh, yeah and all their plays plays about that and like like what is that saying and she had the one student who was just angry she broke through to her and so yeah, there was a lot of stories in messages and throughout the economy so much though. It didn't bother me though. That's some of that's I just thought I wonder if it's dead. Like I said, I know I feel like our lives like we all have multiple like huge story. Oh, yeah. So it's I feel like it's a little simplistic to just be like, oh, well, you need one story lot going on in your life at a time. Right? So she like she has all these different things going on in her life at one time. And that was probably part of the reason that she was feeling overwhelmed and turning forty like there's so much going on and I still feel Just with myself, like what do I do? There's all these things happening. What am I going to have people around me have their own many storylines that I'm involved in and I'm a part of yeah, like her her agent guy who's like Cathy was just sticking with her and then realized, you know, he could have been something more and then her students have their own storylines. So those she's obviously intertwined with those and so they can't just lays her phone now on white without acknowledging and giving credit to the other ones that she's also part of Em are all right. And you said it was kind of a Sorry Brad. It's kind of autobiographical. I don't know. Is it are okay Rana? She I can't say that we wrote and directed it wrote and directed it and start in it and she's in and it did say that it is kind of autobiographical. So what I wonder what piece of art did that sold out like the play I'm interested in that probably the movie this movie if we're going to if we're going to probably figure out like she sold out to Netflix. Hm. Yep. Movie was already made before she likes sold it. It's not like she didn't know so well, you don't know if Sundance said that we're going to sell it out. We're going to sell it to somewhere or something like that. So my one of my question is why I think like like stores they chose black and white all the stories identification and the whole play was about gentrification. That's about black and white, right? Yeah. They they made that they made that stupid storyline in there about black and white house and she was like, I don't want it to be about black and white and want to be about the colors but they're making that about colors and like you're questioning why I didn't you choose color and so she's probably trying to take that out of them try and when you do make a film in black-and-white like you're not focusing on a certain color or a way, so I wouldn't have known the one girl was Hispanic if they didn't mention it several times so we should try and take the race aspect out of it. At first when I found out it was black and white film outside. Oh sometimes black and white films are good, especially like newer ones and then sometimes some like new-age. Roma I forgot about Roma. Here's my other question in the play. Obviously the play was over the top and off but there was a couple lines where I was interested in like what where you so the one line that the white woman kept saying soy milk not this whole milk was. Oh isn't this about loving your neighbor and loving each other which is like well, that's obviously a good thing. But in this play it wasn't a good thing and for everyone there was a good thing but why would you say that would not be a good thing? I think that a lot of white evangelicals come into man bringing up the evangelicals. I'm just saying cuz that's like kind of like a thing is like, oh love your neighbor, right? Cuz like an Evangelical kind of thing to say so you why evangelicals going into lower income area areas to gentrify them essentially and so that's always their Mantra of like Oh, I'm a Christian. It's love yo. Cheaper but the light and stay away from gentrification cuz they're afraid of black people. I don't think so. All right. All right, and also they use that as like the guise of like, well, I'm here to like do better things for your neighborhoods by bringing more income into it and loving your neighbor and I want my soy milk though. Okay, so that's not how I took it but that's interesting. I could also be totally wage. So I took it as you need to love me, but as I'm coming into your community, I'm not loving you but I need you to love me. So I'm asking you to do something that I'm not willing to do myself. So I'm not willing to put up with your shenanigans or you're not having soy milk, but you need to love me because I do love soy milk that song. I was thinking I was wondering where I see that and our world where I'm like, oh we want someone to love and treat us a certain way, but we're not willing to I mean I see right now in politics right wage. Want the other well, they need to be like this but you're not willing to also be like that. I think I think I thought it was I thought was my favorite point in the movie because I see it so much in our poll in world right now. I want you to wear a mask. And I don't want to wear a mask. Like no one's giving everyone's just wanting the other side to do what they want. And so I I like that was actually my I liked that part of the film in I didn't think religion was a part of the film at all. There's there was even a lot of there was even a lot of that in her real life with especially with her and her, you know, her friend slash agent of life you're going to do what I want know you're going to do what I want to kind of thing like where she wanted a certain way or a certain thing cuz they always wanted her to when are you going to write this one movie for this one play for sure. Yeah, and he kept pushing it and pushing it and pushing it and she didn't want to do it. But then in the end she finally said she would she not end up doing that other one in the end no choice, but she he the one guy wanted her to write the play about the one lady. Yeah. No, she didn't I think she kind of blew her done. I I glad that we didn't in this. Play but I thought I thought the Trope of the movie was going back. All right, she's going to Eminem it in the end like oh, yeah, like on stage and drop the mic and it was but she's amazing but we never.

Miley Cyrus Harlem Netflix Eminem Rana Cathy Sundance
"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

The Cinema Guys

08:00 min | 7 hrs ago

"forty year" Discussed on The Cinema Guys

"A long time. They they're still married, right? They've way divorced. Yeah, her daughter looks exactly like her. I'm so freaking why they divorced I know what about Thursday Prince and Sarah Michelle. They're still together, right? Yes. They are. They are man. There are still good things in the world are also good things with her. So Bobby still bill. Would you consider it a full since it's not. But it doesn't go black and white until our full color to the end true that is true. There's just spurts of color throughout whenever they quote unquote like sin. There's they see color when they do something like what would be in that world is wrong, but they're not wrong. Nothing's wrong expression thing is accordingly, right? So nothing's really wrong. It's all expression or exploration of your body. So but in that Pleasantville Road, it's and they start missing baskets. It's like a it's like a town. It's like a town like Footloose Leave it to Beaver. It's just want to dance now. Yeah. Pleasantville is a great movie song. Number one. I'm sure you guys know what my number one be black and white film know. It's classic. Now the Living Dead. Oh is that black and white originally? I had a movie one of my all-time favorite horror movies. I movie. Why do you hate it? I hate it because it freaked me out when I was younger but not living dead is one of my all-time favorites. I watch it every year during Halloween to my cuz that slow zombie, right? Yeah. Oh, yeah George Romero's for how slow zombies win cuz they're like slower than Walking Dead zombies. I mean you get off of them. They're going to eventually overpower your right do they like or their offices or something or they're so slow like you don't know if one's behind you and just get surprised you have any honorable mentions that didn't quite make the list know, I mean definitely now the Pleasantville would have scooted something, you know, obviously thought of Schindler's List. Yeah. That was a big one the man who wasn't there Billy Bob Thornton's like oh wow. Okay, there's one that I thought of I was thinking 200 Cigarettes, but that's not black and white. I think I was thinking the one that you mentioned with George, Clooney. Oh good night and good luck night and good luck. And then there was a lot of smoke and what was the one with the the pant? No, not The Pianist a couple of years ago. John Goodman was nominated for the the artist. Oh, yes. They are the artists. Yes. I had psycho another Hitchcock movie, which is really good. And probably I could have picked any of the classic monster movies like Frankenstein and Dracula the mummy they did the mesh. They did the month still staying at the mass gonna make any smooth any black and white and also put if you haven't watched this version they call Logan Noir and it slows down in in black and white Paris. I do like the whole movie black and white whole movie just black and white purpose of this. It kind of It just fits that style. They also did it with Mad Max Fury Road, and there's a black dog. And which makes sense because matter what video game was in black and white. I know you said parasite. I have not watched that version. So this little guy guess lead into our movie like I'm interested. In fact is a black and white that's like makes me feel vintage e and then there's a black and white like the movie watched where I can't even like I don't really stopped paying attention to the fact black and white. I forget that it's like oh, yeah. Well cuz it's so clear and crisp before we jump into that movie. Yeah. Yeah say become a patron of the show and you could give us a top thoughts. Yeah to do throw it at us. Yeah, you can make a say things and it don't matter if you're black or white. Just go back to patreon.com the cinema guys and you can become Patron. Let's talk the forty year old version. Any more thought on what kind of play we want to rise remember? If you put it nothing it'll be nothing like your career. Remember this face. She was when a spotlight magazines 30 under 30 playwrights to watch we watch but weren't you go Archie tells me you're teaching somebody who had no real hair going to tell me how to write a button Channel Tyler Perry did either of you know anything about this movie going it negative. I had never heard of it until literally you're like, hey watching this and I had to go find it I heard of it and I knew it was getting a lot of buzz, but I hadn't watched a trailer or I didn't know it was a black and white movie at all. What kind of buzz was it getting? I mean it came out of Sundance. Okay. So a lot of people were saying how great it was. It was a lot of people put it on their their top list of sundance's like one of the things they've had all that I mean potential I think yeah. Sure. Yeah. Those were thing this year long wait, they're not doing it this year. I think they push it to February. It probably gets pushed the 2021. They got pushed to April and I mean luckily next year movies coming out they're going to be like people include the movies of this year's. And last year, I mean all the moves twenty-twenty know it'll probably know how far is whether cut off will be down. Let's talk the forty year old version. So before we go off Bruins, he's as we like to do give your rating of the movie and any quick thoughts you have on it. I thought about it for a while. I liked it a lot but I gave a 4 hours e or Starz that's that's big for you big. I mean Huey Halloween got three and half. So are you serious? Hold on but this is the thing. I watched it with a room full of thirteen year olds who were rolling and all the jokes and it made me enjoy it more. Like I think it's not made for us. It's made for thirteen year old. I watched it by myself and wage. There's did you watch Angeline know there's a scene where Adam Sandler's ride a bike and he's at 9. He's trying to find some of these like, I'm gonna say Marco you say Polo and it's like Marco and some of the background skills toll and like dead. Thirteen year olds in the room are like that's the funniest thing they've ever heard and so I'm like sitting here thinking I don't think this is great. But I love that these boys all think thousand that's what made me give it the 3 and 1/2. I fully understand I've watched yeah movies like that like with my kids and they're really into it and I'm like, but I enjoyed it more because yeah exactly if I'd walk by myself. I'd have been like my rain. All right. Send a maiden. What did you give the forty year old version 3 and 1/2 3 and the big got taken down a half because I don't think I'll ever watch it again, but I loved it. Yeah, that was good. All right Bradford. I gave it a one won't I'm just I'm just kidding. I'm just kidding. I used to talk about how you been for years. I gave it a four four four. Wow. That's I feel I really liked this movie. I thought it was you were super apprehensive. I was I I kind of I had heard of the movie. And then when you suggested I was like fine like kind of thing. I'm like, well, what about what we do this one why we do this one when watching it I really got into it. Yeah. I thought it was funny. I thought he connected with her character of turning forty because I've been there so we have like to be a black woman from Harlem. I know what it's like to be a black woman from home turning 40. We really connected, you know, and that that's my forehead a lot to do with I I was into the store like oh and like like I think I texted you guys had to stop it right when she bombed on stage. I had to give or take a kid that soccer or something and I was like, I don't I was afraid to turn it back on cuz like I don't want to watch her bomb on stage. I.

Pleasantville George Romero Sundance Marco Billy Bob Thornton Bobby Sarah Michelle soccer Prince Beaver Tyler Perry John Goodman Logan Noir Bruins Harlem Adam Sandler Schindler Starz Archie
France pays tribute to beheaded teacher.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:00 min | 2 d ago

France pays tribute to beheaded teacher.

"I'm Anthony. Davis. Thousands of people gathered across France on Sunday to support teachers and defend freedom of expression after the killing of Samuel Patty a history teacher beheaded by suspected. On Friday from Paris to Leon, Marseille and Lille large crowds gathered quietly pausing regularly to applaud hold minutes of silence or sing the national anthem. The French Prime Minister attended the gathering on plastic Lara public in Paris along with the education minister and politicians from across the spectrum showing solidarity after a killing the shocked the country forty year old patty was killed outside his school in a Paris suburb by an eighteen year old attacker. Earlier this month the teacher had shown his pupils cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in a class on freedom of expression

Paris Samuel Patty Prime Minister Muhammad Davis Lara France Lille Marseille Leon
Interview with Norman Wolfe

Breakfast Leadership

05:57 min | 2 d ago

Interview with Norman Wolfe

"Welcome back that Norman Wolf on the line. Norman how are you? Doing really good surly more. Time but we have to be on your show that glad to finally have gone here. I know we've been shedding for quite a long time so good to have you on the show. So you wrote a book while back called Living Organization and It's one of those timeless books. So it shows the audience a little bit about you in in the story behind this book. Be. Happy to Michael. Yes. I wrote the book back in Two Thousand and eleven which time I'd say that seems like, wow. So many years ago I wrote the book because of three reasons one is. The success rate of of organizations and people individually. Achieving the goals that the stated objectives, the strategic initiatives, whatever you WANNA call it is is pretty poor. This statistics say that they they succeed to. Fail other rate of seventy percent. So only less than thirty percent of those and I said individuals because. I was reading statistics recently that says New Year's resolutions. Success Rate is less than twenty percent so that feeling about eighty percent. So so I began to realize there's something about the way we go about life in in in businesses especially. That is missing something and the second reason the book is after being in business for well over forty years now. There's almost like a I hate to use the word pandemic these days. There's almost A. Pandemic of sadness people just ending engage they you know the the engagement factor against twenty three percent of people engaged in what they do. Not, a very high success rate. And so you know I. After working with so many companies I began to realize why is that in? Can we do about it and? The solution I realized is that we have. Kind of as a society of all the way of looking at life through a lens of you might call it Newtonian physics. It's a very mechanical approach to life. And at least off some Elise out all the stuff around relationships and and meaning and purpose in belief systems and assumptions that just says focused on what you WanNa do and just do it and boom. That's it and you know that just isn't good enough. So I wrote the book to explain how all that works and. In in how businesses themselves really are living entities. Like people they operate like people You look at the department, any leader who who really steps back and looks at the various departments they. They always can sense that the departments are Personalities like my sales department is going to have a fundamentally different personality than. Been My accounting department. And it's just like people different proclivities, different personalities, different belief systems. And and we think the only way to get them aligned and working together as through set of goals you know give as an they ignored this whole relationship piece in what I call context piece. The belief systems the sense of identity of who we are as an individual also applies to the sense of identity of who we are as a collective of individuals. And we have no all of that stuff. So I wrote a book to explain how all that happens being a scientist and engineer by training I have a very logical. Approach to things. So I created a SORTA engineering formula for how it all plays together. And that's really what I wrote about in the book. Like I said before it's a timeless book and when you said about how the people aren't engaged in. Monster Dot. com just released a study. That right now close to seventy percent of people are. Saying that they're they're really stressed or burned out about work and. So you take that percentage of seven out of ten people burned out. There's a percentage of those people that would be normally engaged in willing to go the extra mile to do whatever they can because they want things to be better enough only for themselves, but for their organization. But if they're too tired and fatigued, they're not even engaged anymore. So it has such a huge effect on the strength of an organization and. During, times like pandemic or any type of economic downturn if your organization isn't acting at its best, you're vulnerable and you might end up seeing a four lease sign in your office space because you won't be there anymore. And that's what we're seeing. You know one of the. The. Interesting I'll say byproducts of the pandemic is as talked to leaders around the world beginning to realize that. He has the way I say it we used to come to work for the purpose of getting work done by we went to the office because that's what you you did things. And a byproduct of that is. We build social connections. Really don't pay attention to that just sort of happened it unconsciously or as a byproduct. Of speaking with the c o the other day in in he said. You know he's he's closed as office space independent Macapa sent everybody home and asked him if he was going to. Go back as things are opening up and he said now we don't need to meet. Together to get the work done anymore.

Norman Wolf Living Organization Strategic Initiatives Macapa Michael Sales Department Elise Scientist Engineer
'Dancing With the Stars': '80s Night

Parenting Roundabout

08:28 min | Last week

'Dancing With the Stars': '80s Night

"Dancing with the stars. So it was eighties night, which meant a great deal of bad hair a great deal. Male and female bad hair bad here all the way around bad here for the host bad here for everybody. And costumes of exceptional cheesiness. And for Justina Machado, having to give herself a shower onstage. Stay true to flashdance you suffer for your art girl you go. And dancing that was. Generally not great but. Colorful. Shiny colorful. and. Harry. Yes Fair so much. So what did you think anything stand out to you. I quite liked Nieves quickstep it got dissed by the judges and I. Agree I thought that was good I liked. Watching Nellie tonight I did too. I pretty much enjoyed them all along. I. Think he's looked like he's throwing himself into it gratifying way but tonight was particularly good. Yeah I. It's not that I haven't liked him in the past I just thought that he he did a good job tonight. Yes. So he was fine. I don't know I did Kaitlyn. Doing the Tango. I didn't that didn't seem like a Tango Song Me Song. I. Think Law now with their like revenge of the nerds costs on. That didn't make any sense to me like no. The three, you know the combination of dance style music and production design was yes. Wacky and then yes, I had the same issue with this as I did with the Disney night. Songs, which is when they're all king played by Rachel live. Stay sound weird. Songs you've been hearing for. Forty years. Yeah that is that is distressing. I did like justinas downs and just because I'm predisposed to earn about what? And I liked AJ? Well it was hard to overlook the preponderance of bad hair. And I don't know how well his dancing necessarily was, but that's such. A Nice be wall song and Shirl was just had that big dress was just swooping all around. So beautifully, I really enjoyed watching that. Yeah. Yeah. Like a particularly good. You know wedding dance maybe look they practiced huge. So I would just you know done without all the hair extensions but okay. by I thought that was a really pretty down. So I give them some parts. For that Nice, and also just because Aj seems to be having a really good time and throwing himself into the. Spirit of the Mirror Ball. So I appreciate that I will give points for that. Yeah. Although I do I feel like most everybody is except for Jesse who said goodbye tonight? I think I may not. That was a merciful elimination though I shall be sorry to not see much Sharon in her pink hair. Yes but Yeah, he seemed like. that he is maybe than thinking better of this. This little plan. Yeah. Someone. Had for him right exactly. So, yeah. I don't think he's GONNA be bad. I hope not but Yeah. It was. It's an interesting group because there's nobody that really stands out as being pretty exceptional I mean. Johnny. Is Probably the best dancer, but he's not this kind of dancer and so yeah if you give them a contemporary teen that's right up his alley. Does well, but he's not going to do well at the ballroom. It doesn't seem right. So and there's some people who have a little bit certainly I'm sure the cheerleading coach has a movement experience need was talking about his experience. But there's nobody there's no ringers I. Don't think. Yeah. They all have a certain degree of uncertainty and counting. With, panicked is there dancing. So you know in various degrees of their pro yelling at them right? Well they're moving. Right. So it's it's kind of refreshing, but also makes it less exciting to watch. But. Holy Cow, the fake audiences excited. And they get mad when Do. Booing of the judges we know it's you know it's not humans stop at. Stop, that's reliant. Stop ferries to knock applause just I keep I keep getting into it and then realizing wait a minute. This is out of the CAN. But somebody's having a good time. There's somebody in the control room who is just having a ball. And I salute that person right? They are burning their paycheck. Hoots this is this is one we need the boost this favorite people clapping along yes. Yikes. They have something that's on the be where they can do that. Same Yeah. Well, I was complaining about this to my husband and he says, Oh yeah, they're doing that with baseball too. So I guess fake cheering yes. I was actually I noticed that the other day we were watching a game. Is, is that fake stand noise that they're doing? So, apparently, we are not to be trusted to. On our own without the sounds of other humans it would just be to ghostly. K.. Twenty twenty so. Heck Yeah. Stream. screamingly weird and you know we can continue to just. BE ANNOYED AT TIRA wasting time spending like half a minute talking to Nellie about arcades like s if anyone's GonNa talk let it be the celebrity themselves or let him read the judges like don't rush them right right through their critique only. So you can reminisce about arcades like yes. Yes. Don't rush into the critique in also A. Used to be on this show that there was time for the eliminated couple to say goodbye there was even a time where I believe they got a little last dance or like a little montage or something. Yeah. Yeah yes. If you could take all of the inane questions, you might have enough time for a proper sendoff or at least smile wave. Yeah, I guess they feel that they're outsourcing the send off to GM, and so it doesn't they don't need to do it here but they need to do it here because I'm GonNa Watch that right and it's just such a bum's rush every week. At least leave probably don't have to get on an airplane and fly to New York to Jimmy this year I'm hoping they letting them do it virtually. No may be so. Yeah everything is. Not, yet somehow I have not yet adjusted my thinking to realize that everything is that way, right? So. Yeah. That's probably right. Well. I don't know a theme nights like this are not my favorite. Especially when they just The. Speaking of the dials they turn up the cheesiness dial two, twelve year I just would rather have pretty costumes and hair and. You know dances that just exists to be a pretty dance

Nellie AJ Justina Machado Harry Nieves Justinas Downs Twenty Twenty Kaitlyn Mirror Ball Baseball Shirl Rachel Live GM Jesse New York Sharon Cheerleading Coach Johnny Jimmy
Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

Bobbycast

06:35 min | Last week

Remembering Eddie Van Halen with Steve Gorman

"Joining me now is Steve. Gorman who was the drummer in the Black Crowes who now plays with trigger hippy and before we talk about some of the Black Crowes stuff in your book I. I saw tweets even it was talking about Eddie Van Halen, which is Kinda. Why you here you say there will be many many words written and spoken about Eddie. Van. Halen, over the next few days, weeks, months and years those millions of words will never come close to expressing what he meant a rock music what he meant to guitarist and what he meant to the guitar itself that's pretty powerful statement Mr Gorman what did Eddie and remind me to rock music I. Think it's it's pretty simple. You can say that he and Jimi Hendrix of the two guys. That truly, and and only the two guys that moved the needle for the guitar itself I mean Hendrix. came out of a blue based. seem. And took the playing and the tone he could get to a new place but even hail and. Really almost came in from another country. Another planet I should say another he's like an alien life form I mean, he was a virtuosic player obviously but he He reinvented what what you could do is to guitar and the fact of the matter is this. Like Hendrix. But even to a greater degree, anybody tries to play like Eddie. Van Halen. Just sounds like a mind a mimic they. It's like rich little doing Johnny Carson okay. Yeah. That kind of sounds like him but. There's nothing nobody's ever been able to do any van. Halen. Did it make it feel a certain way? That each just the and he was that way at twenty two I mean, this is this is not a guy like it's not like David Blaine magic tricks where he gets bigger and better every year he started with card tricks that other people did I even Halen hit the ground running with Van Halen one playing an instrument that have been around for centuries unlike anybody else had ever done I mean he was on the Mount. Rushmore. Of Great Depar- players. At twenty two years old and then, and then he stuck around for another forty years still playing unlike anybody before sin. So I just think that in terms of. You know. Sheer unique. Mindset ambition combined with just. Great talent obviously. But but also phenomenal work ethic I mean he's just a complete unicorn in every sense of the word. How would you describe his guitar sound and I say that I know what I think of it but I wasn't I just messed van Halen like I came around right as you guys were blowing up honestly so that for me the van Halen was slightly classic rock slightly old rock to me as A. Kid. So as someone 'cause, you're just years older than I am but how would you describe his guitar sound someone who was in in it and living it in love and Van Halen? Well I can tell you that that was thirteen years old the first time I heard Van Halen and I remember it. I remember where I was I remember who I was with. It was going home from school in Hopkinsville Kentucky. You really got me there kinks the you know the their cover, the kinks song came on the radio. And and it was playing already and I said, Hey, mom turn that up. It was me and my mom and my friend Brooke. Lofton. The three of us in a car and she turned it up and I my first thought was. That must be like a live version of the king song and I was thinking like we don't they don't rock or do they. But when it hit that Solo and then by the time, the song ended I realized well, that does that's not ray Davey seeing this is clearly a cover version but what on earth is this and it was like making my? Hair on the back of my neck stand up. This is a time when I thought punk rock was the coolest thing in the world. and. The truth is Van Halen was more punk than the punks because they were truly breaking down a bunch of barriers if you will or they were going in their own. You know there hasn't been a band like Van Halen since led Zeppelin in terms of. Rock band hits the ground running at full steam and it obliterates everything in their path in a certain sense and. Jimmy van Halen sound it sounded like California was in my head. You know soon as I realized soon as I heard about them, they're from La, and as soon as I saw David Lee Roth and then as soon as I heard more than you know the next thing I heard was eruption Guitar Solo and you know hearing just two pieces of their first album and seeing what they look like it just. It felt brand new and it already felt like they're going to be around forever. You just knew from the jump and this is me as a thirteen year old kid who is obsessed with music. This band is one of the Alzheimer's like there's nothing like this and they all have the chops and the other thing too as long as I'm just rambling incessantly any van Halen was a great rhythm player. It wasn't just about the Solos he led the band rhythmically and he's also it needs to be noted not that it's not obvious. He's a hell of a songwriter I mean he really was. As I said before he's a true Unicorn I mean, just just nothing like it. What does this sound like do you? It sounds frequent and right in right in the zone near your your key. That's one thing because listen I played a little bit I don't play even as good as my friends who are real life musicians, but it's perfect frequency and frequency is in the tone or the, but as because it's a lot. I mean Brad Paisley plays unnoticed Brad. Paisley. Because I hear the chicken Pickin I hear a very distinct sound and again I didn't catch van Halen as it was happening in my childhood. But when I hear Van Halen Song even if I, it's I, don't know who it is. Just hear the guitar part I hear the Eddie van Halen because I how fast he shreds but the pattern that he does it, you can just tell. By By his fingers and it just kind of again it's hard to explain when you ask about music but that's what I think about and I try to. Always try to. Prepare analogies and most of the people who listen to this podcast here between twenty to forty, and if you were to make an analogy to another band, it's GonNa be tough because Van Halen was massive. But who later on had the kind of? Impact or. Reflected the mass listening that Van Halen had well. What band what yeah. What band can we look at now or in the last ten years and see? Okay. Well, that's how big Van Halen was to the people that were the kids in the eighties.

Van Halen Eddie Van Halen Jimmy Van Halen Halen Jimi Hendrix Black Crowes Mr Gorman Johnny Carson Steve Hendrix. David Blaine Brad Paisley Kentucky Alzheimer David Lee Roth LA Lofton Ray Davey Brooke
"forty year" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pop Culture Happy Hour

05:53 min | Last week

"forty year" Discussed on Pop Culture Happy Hour

"I should Harris Daisy Rosario what is making you happy this week I'm very excited about what is making me happy you guys. Okay. The amber ruffin show on Peacock Amber Ruffin. If you're not familiar with her, she's a very funny comedian who's been doing these wonderful bits on the Seth Meyers show for a few years. Now she's a writer for that show. She does these bits where it's like jokes seth can't tell and her and. Jenny Hegel who is a lesbian woman on the staff and ambers a black woman and they write these jokes that seth is not supposed to tell and so he'll say the setup and they'll say the punch lines and then inevitably they always get him to say a silly one. So amber is this like just joyous strange Pixie of a woman is how I think of her full disclosure, the pleasure of knowing amber and I've performed return on the past but it's not like we're close that show really hit like at the end of last week in particular I was desperate for. Some escape but also I can't ever really escape and one of the things I love about embers show is that she's really taking on current events and being so funny and calling out. All of these things that she's experiencing while bringing this absurdity and this joy to it like it really was something that at the end of the week I felt better I felt both like yes I'm thinking about these things but I'm finding community and I'm laughing and there's just a wonderful absurd streak. So like go check that out I just absolutely love it. It's only like twenty minutes on peacock like I don't care about peacock is the only place you can get it and like it really is genuinely so good. So Amber Ruffin show, where can you find it? I think it's on peacock. Have you guys? We will once again, it's a big week for show notes. We'll make sure and that's in the show notes and you know every week You can also get the show that's in the newsletter. That's it NPR. Dot Org Slash pop culture newsletter. Thank you very much daisy Rosario Kiana Fitzgerald what is making you happy this week. What is making me happy this week is a lovely young woman on Instagram by the name of young barbecue. She is an entertainer is the best way to put it to kind of distill it more. She loves to dance and she's not like your typical like, Oh, I'm GonNa Dance, real fancy for you like she bus out any move that her heart tells her to bust out like she just does exactly what she wants to do, and she's kind of like a caused playing dancer because she'll dress up like a character from sister act two inch dance to like the major scene in that movie where everybody's like up in you know doing our thing..

Amber Ruffin Seth Meyers Daisy Rosario writer Rosario Kiana Fitzgerald Jenny Hegel NPR
New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

The Psych Central Show

08:31 min | Last week

New book tells story of 6 brothers with schizophrenia

"Your host Gabe Howard and calling into our show today we have Robert. Caulker Robert is the author of Hidden Valley Road which was an instant number one New York Times Bestseller and Oprah's Book Club Selection He is a national magazine awards finalist who's journalism has appeared in wired and the new. York Times. Magazine. Bob Welcome to the show. Hi Gabe I'm really glad to talk to you today. Your book is non-fiction. It's a true story. I'm GonNa read from Amazon Right now description the heart rendering story of a mid century American family with twelve children. Six of them diagnosed with schizophrenia became sciences greatest hope in the quest to understand the disease. Let's talk first about how you did the research for this book, you met the Galvin family. That's right. My career really took shape at New York magazine where I've written dozens of cover stories and feature stories about everyday people going through extraordinary situations and I really am drawn to these stories of people who manage crises come through difficulties I find it inspiring and I'm always looking for a deeper issue running at the bottom of her in. So when I met the Galvin family I was amazed, this is a family that's been through so much. Misfortune and also so many challenges and so much scientific mystery medical mystery I I met the two sisters they're the youngest in the family there were twelve children they're the only girls and they now are in their fifties. But when they were children, six of their ten brothers had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The family immediately became interesting to scientists and researchers were trying to get to the the genetic roots of the disease. But before that happened, there was tremendous amount of denial, a lot of stigma that forced the family into the shadows, and so it became clear that by telling their story, maybe we could inspire the general public to sort of remove some of that stigma from mental illness particularly acute mental illness like schizophrenia, which so many people still have difficulty talking about and to anchor this in time they were diagnosed in the seventies. I'm horribly bad at math, but they were diagnosed fifty years ago. So there was even more stigma more discrimination less understanding. It was harder to get diagnosed absolutely and also more of a reason to hide because so many people in the establishment were blaming the families themselves for the mental illness blaming bad parenting in particular, blaming bad mothering, and then of course, the medical treatments, the pharmaceutical treatments were blunter and more extreme back then and they were just coming out of the period of lobotomies in shock therapy insulin coma therapy is all sorts of drastic treatments which are now. So questionable now the parents are dotted Mimi, Galvin their mom and dad did mom and. Dad Have Schizophrenia or any mental illness or was it just their children dated not have schizophrenia neither did anyone in their immediate families and I think part of the mystery of this book is how does schizophrenia get inherited because we now are certain that there is a genetic component to schizophrenia, but we don't know exactly how it is inherited. It's not parent to child it's not recessive. It's not like you need to people with schizophrenia to produce a child schizophrenia it Kinda wanders it meanders through families in a very tricky way and there was a lot of hope pinned on this family that they would help shed a little light on that mystery as well. What were some of the most surprising things that you learned about mental illness and will really schizophrenia from your time interviewing the Galvin's I was surprised by almost everything. But my biggest surprises were that to my understanding of mental illness was that it was about brain chemistry and that great pharmaceutical drugs were coming online that through trial and error and a lot of work. Perhaps, we'll be able to correct your brain chemistry problem and then whatever you had whether it was anxiety or depression. Or bipolar disorder that it would be corrected and that you would become essentially cured although cured is the wrong kind of word for like remission or recovery. Right what I learned was that schizophrenia this isn't really true at all that the drugs that they have the antipsychotic drugs that are very popular that are prescribed so much for schizophrenia, they are basically the same drugs that have been prescribed for fifty years. They may have different names derived from the same classifications of typical neuroleptics or. Narrow left ix and that these drugs are essentially symptoms suppressors. Help a person control their hallucinations or delusions or it might make a patient less erotic and more manageable as a patient in a healthcare setting but it doesn't turn back the clock. It doesn't necessarily add functionality. They really are just sort of good enough in terms of controlling the population but not really the miracles that we look at when we talk about antidepressants for instance, and that was a huge surprise it sounds like that. You didn't know a lot about schizophrenia before you started working on this book. Is that true? That's right. I mean I knew enough to know that it didn't mean split personality multiple. Personality which is. Like the big misnomer that because of the way we use the words get. So there's a Latin root skits which refers to split, but really it was meant to mean a split between reality and one's perception of reality a person with schizophrenia tends to wall themselves off from what is commonly accepted as reality I a little bit and then a lot and sometimes that means delusion. Sometimes that means to lose the nations and sometimes it means being catatonic sometimes, it means being paranoid and in fact, that was the other huge surprise for me for schizophrenia, which was that it isn't really a disease at all it is a classification. Syndrome. It's a collection of symptoms that we have given a name. And I don't mean to sound too nebulous or mystical and talking about There is such a thing as schizophrenia. It's just that it may be several different things in that forty years from now, we might have removed the word schizophrenia from our lexicon and we might have decided that it's really six different brain disorders with sixty screen types of symptoms, and we have found ways to treat those six different conditions differently that was another huge surprise to me. When doing your research for the book? Obviously, you spoke to the family. Did you also speak with medical doctors and schizophrenia researchers and people in the medical field? Yes. Absolutely. My initial conversations were with the family themselves who after many years of difficulty were ready to come forward and talk about everything that happened to their family in a very deep and profound way. But of course, in the back of my mind I was thinking well, how specialists this family for all I know there might be thousand families with lots of kids where half of them have schizophrenia this, this might happen all the time. So I didn't immediate round of checking talking. To major figures in scholarship of schizophrenia in the history of science, but also the treatment of schizophrenia and just to say, have you heard of this family? What would you say if I told you a family late this existed how typical do you think it is? Do you know the doctors who have treated the? Stanley because I knew their names as well are those doctors on the level? Are they quacks and everything really checked out? This is a family that is definitely unusual extraordinarily. So in terms of the numbers, they were important family to study for their time and they did help move the ball forward in a genuinely valid way an. Way So. There's a lot of hope in this story as well. Are there many families that have that many children with half of them being diagnosed with really any severe and persistent mental illness or or even just. This is a a big question that I pursue in the book itself because Linda Lee, one of the researchers who studied this family was actually a collector of genetic material of what she called multi plex families, which is families with more than one perhaps many instances six mental illness, not just among siblings but maybe parents and aunts and uncles and grandparents she made it her job in the nineteen eighties. Nineties was to collect data on as many. Multiplex families as possible. So they're out there but even in that World Galvin families extreme it's it's hard for anyone to think of any other family with twelve children where six of them had this diagnosis

Schizophrenia Galvin Family Galvin Gabe Howard Caulker Robert New York Magazine York Times World Galvin Bob Welcome New York Times Bestseller Robert Oprah Amazon Linda Lee Mimi Stanley
Paola Mendoza on How We Can All be Freedom Fighters

Tamarindo

04:46 min | Last week

Paola Mendoza on How We Can All be Freedom Fighters

"I am so excited to share that today we are joined by Palomino Sir. Thank you so much being on the show with us today for the. Thank you so much for having me. Yes. So first thing I just wanted to say in our last episode, we actually touch a little bit about how important it is that as Latinos and underrepresented communities we continue to own our voice. Get Louder with it, and then we believe in our power to change things I, want to start by just honoring you as an inspiring example of that as the Co Women's March with your book sanctuary the just dropped and just the powerful ways in which you use your platform. So thank you so much for being a model for us of how we how we can do that. Thank you so much for those kind words you know I do the work that I do not for myself. Obviously, but her for my community and for my son in for the young people that are coming up after. I appreciate you know thank you. I want to get into your book before but before that, I wanted to touch on what has felt you know heart shattering and also very poignant in. That's the recent passing of Beta GINSBURG. You've been reflecting on and honoring her life and in many ways, year platforms and one thing that you said that really inspired me was may her memory be a revolution? How has your passing affected you and what do you think this particular moment means for country I think that this moment is a defining moment it is a moment that is defining the future of our country. Obviously Supreme Court, Justice a Lifetime appointment. Is Not about the next year or the next five years or the next decade it's about what this country will will look like for the next forty years. It's what this country will look at for my son's entire life essentially, and that to me is how poor in this moment is for each individual for our future and for our country. So on a personal note, I've been reflecting about the importance of what this moment means. And what it's actually meant for. My past and my pass to get here I immigrated to this country when I was three years old. I came with my mother, my brother we were coming to be reunited with my father and very soon after we got here, my father abandoned us He left my mom with three year old and seven year old new family no English two hundred dollars in her pocket in. La By herself an impossible situation circumstance and just to add to that impossibility three weeks after my father left he my mom found out that she was pregnant. So, she was pregnant on top of justice tragedy and my mother coming from Columbia being ardent Catholic had to make a decision. Thank. God. She was in a country where she could make a decision to choose to have an abortion she chose to have an abortion and that choice that she made literally saved our lives and Now that idea that Possibility Rover says Wade is very much threatened. That millions of women, hundreds of thousands of women might not have that choice in the future in to me. That is a frightening thing to me that. Produces a lot of rage. It makes me be very ready to fight for what we're going to have to do. To save this democracy and save this country. So. What I have been also reflecting on a lot is The. Important. RPG's life and her legacy that she left for us. And clearly. Ruth Bader GINSBURG was meant to live in the time that she was meant to live in. Clearly the work that she was meant to do was meant for those eighty seven years in her life. And I take comfort in the fact that I believe that all of us, each of us were also met for this moment or also meant to be alive. At this moment in time when our democracy is on the brink of collapse when we have authoritarian in office when our feminist icon. Hero. Guardian a democracy has passed and each of us are meant to roll up our sleeves. Get to work and do all the work the dirty work the hard work the good work of saving our democracy because that is what the next. Four days until the election entails and what happens after the election until curation and beyond, and so I want all the listeners to know that they are also met this moment they were born precisely for this time and they have to live up to this moment we all do.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Wade Co Women Columbia Supreme Court
Ritchie Torres: From The Bronx to Congress

LGBTQ&A

05:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Ritchie Torres: From The Bronx to Congress

"Something, I was thinking about wall preparing to talk to you is about how everything and politics and our country right now is just trump obsessed. Does it feel to you like we are paying less attention to congressional races like yours? Yes, and no Donald Trump represents an existential threat to our planet and our democracy in our social contract. So naturally, he's going to be the focus of our politics, but you know the two not mutually exclusive Donald Trump is a racist relic of the past. And the new generation of leadership the rainbow wave that has swept United States represents the future. You can think about both because when represents the past than the other represents the future and the next election is essentially a choice between the two. Do we want to turn the clock back? Would we want to move forward with the terminology describing the Rainbow Wave? I get frustrated with that personally because I think the current congressional group has nine or ten out queer people when it comes like nine or ten to me doesn't make up a wave will by wave referring analytic congress immediate t buddha. Judges the first openly LGBTQ, Bible presidential candidate. You're about to have the highest congress industry of the United States and you have nearly a thousand openly, Algebra, two candidates for public office. At every level of government we've never seen a greater quantity or diverse to the LGBTQ representation among candidates running for public office, and that's a sign of Paris and these city and state legislators like yourself. Well, hopefully feed into these more national roles as well. Look I got my start as as a volunteer community board. And then I became a volunteer in the city council. So you have to start somewhere you growing up could not look at Congress and see someone like you somebody gay so an Afro Latino you also dropped out of college. About your biography do not make the quote, unquote typical politician and so i WanNa know did you know that there was a place for you in politics and if not when did that change I never thought as poor lgbtq kit of color from the Bronx that I will ever become a United States Congress I never had LGBTQ role models growing up by rope in public housing had no conception of a world beyond the immediate boundaries of my neighborhood. The first time I met in openly lgbtq person a teacher. Is the moment that inspired me to acknowledge my sexuality for the first time for the first seventeen years of my life I had no openly lgbtq role models in my life in the Bronx I led a sheltered life and so that was somebody you knew intimately teacher what about looking into like politics and saying L. politicians there. There were no real role models for me I saw no one. No I did not see myself in the people running for public office or holding public office. There was certainly no elegantly lgbtq people of color at the congressional level that I know of and and so I felt largely unrepresented and you know my my story begins with the poverty in the Bronx spent almost my life poverty raised by a single mother way to raise three children on minimum wage. which in the nineteen nineties was four dollars and twenty five cents an hour and I grew up in public housing in conditions of bold and mildew leaks lead without reliable. He didn't have water in the winter in my life something of a metaphor grubbing a public housing development right across the street from trump golf course. So as I saw the conditions in my own home, get worse every day the government had invested more than one hundred million dollars to construct the golf in honor of Donald Trump and I remember wondering to myself at the time. What is it say that our society is willing to invest more in a gated Gilded Golf Course Donald From Then in the homes of black and brown low income Americans, and so that experience has been quality is what inspired me to become housing organizer. And then eventually took the leap of faith and ran for public office was twenty four openly gay at no ties to the political machine no ties to the dynasties of Bronx politics but I wish young and energetic with the fighting spirit. And I knocked on thousands of doors went into people's homes. I heard their stories, it was one voter who said to me in the forty years I've been living in the Bronx. I've never had a candidate for public office knocked on my door. was those kinds of interactions at led me to win my first race in two thousand thirteen I became the first openly Q. elected official from the Bronx at several years before then I was at the lowest point I had dropped out of college. I was abusing substances struggling with depression or struggling with sexual identity crisis. I had lost my best friend to inaugurate overdose. They were moments when I even thought of taking my own life I felt as the world around me had collapsed. And then seven years. Later, I became the youngest elected official in the largest city in America, and now I'm about to become a United States congressman. For. The only home I've ever known the Bronx and so I often tell people, my story is the story of the rocks. It's a story of struggle, but also one of overcoming.

Bronx Donald Trump United States Congress Paris Gilded Golf Official Depression Congressman America
Harvey Weinstein faces new sexual assault charge in Los Angeles

NPR News Now

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

Harvey Weinstein faces new sexual assault charge in Los Angeles

"Convicted rapist and former movie producer Harvey Weinstein who became the face of the METOO movement faces new charges in Los Angeles NPR's Rose Freeman reports Angeles district attorney. Jackie Lacey announced six new charges of forcible rape and forcible oral copulation against Weinstein. He was already facing multiple charges in La. This brings the total to eleven they relate to five victims in crimes alleged to have occurred over a decade ago. Weinstein is already serving a twenty three year sentence in new. York after being convicted of multiple sex crimes prosecutors. In Los Angeles want to have them extradited to La. If convicted in L. A., once team could face an additional hundred and forty years to life sentence an extradition hearing is set for December in

Harvey Weinstein Los Angeles Jackie Lacey Angeles Rose Freeman Rape Producer York L. A.
Who was Sirimavo Bandaranaike

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Who was Sirimavo Bandaranaike

"Today. We're talking about the world's first woman to lead as a prime minister. She defied all expectations to take her position and permanently changed the legacy of her country. Let's talk about CD Malvo Nike. CD Malvo Bundle Nike was born city map rap lot on April Seventeenth nineteen sixteen, and what was then known as the country of Salen. She was the eldest of six siblings. Both her father and mother were prominent in the Sinhalese community. That's an ethnic group that forms the majority of the population of Modern Day Sri Lanka at the time saline was a British colony. Cassation many of the top families in the country took on governmental roles and British names even said, he must father Barnes rat watt was named after prominent British general nonetheless, city must family care deeply about remaining Buddhist and preserving Sinhalese culture wherever they cut when city matern eight her parents sent her to a Convent Boarding School in Colombo the nation's capital under the British colonial rule. This was the best possible option for education. Still, her parents also took care to maintain their cultural traditions native language. When city finish her education she spent years touring the country doing social work including delivering food and medicine. She hiked through jungles and rough terrain to help organize and develop Bilas as a result, she gained a positive reputation throughout the island. In nineteen forty city my married a top government official named Solomon West Ridgeway Dias. Bandaranaike in a grand high profile wedding. The two were considered a perfect match. While city must husband played a more anglicized role in the colonial government city, my herself understood the needs of those living in rural areas. Said Ema, and Solomon had three children. Initially said he must professional role was largely that of an attentive wife. I nineteen forty-eight Salen was headed towards independence from Britain and city Mos home was packed to the brim with her husband's political associates, discussing strategy and the future of the country Solomon viewed his wife's role as a submissive one. Still she became a valuable political consultant. She was the one who convinced him to resigned his political position in nineteen fifty one. After he resigned he created the Sri Lankan Freedom Party or S L F R, which sought Sinhalese control of the country and a democratic socialist government city. Ma. Aggressively campaigned for Solomon in the following years and by nineteen fifty six, he won by a landslide and started instituting left wing and Sinhalese centered policies despite this victory, some of Solomon's political action. So divisions and tensions between salons various ethnic groups including the Tamil people in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, he was murdered in his own private garden. City Mo was devastated even so she took action to fight for her husband's legacy. The very next year sitting you took leadership of the Party and was voted in as the world's first woman prime minister she would serve as the leader of the SFR for the following forty years. City must served as prime minister on and off over the next few decades prioritizing the same democratic socialist policies as her husband, she strived to raise the quality of life of her people and to reduce the overall inequality in her country. Following a win in the nineteen seventy election city. Ma introduced a new constitution that ended salon status as a British Commonwealth realm and renamed the country. Sri Lanka. Her focus on empowering Buddhism and the Sinhalese people alienated the Tummy people during one term in power. An uprising against her party had to be defeated with international military aid from India and Pakistan in the nineteen eighties. Economic troubles in the country accusations of corruption led to a crushing political loss by nineteen eighty-three tensions between the Tamil and the majority Sinhalese people boiled over into a bloody civil war that lasted until two thousand nine. Sumita attempted to repair the damage caused by discrimination against the Tamil but the divide was severe and her political power was waning along with her popularity by nineteen ninety, four city Mas Daughter Chandrika became prime minister, and then later the president of the Country Chandrika appointed her mother as prime minister but by then the constitution had changed. So the prime minister position was only supplementary to the role of the president offering little actual power. Serena remained in some form of office until a few months before her death she passed away on election day shortly after casting her vote at the age of eighty four. Though city Malvo's political legacy is complicated. She paved the way for future female heads of state and lead through political hardships with strength.

Solomon Prime Minister Sri Lankan Freedom Party Sri Lanka Nike Solomon West Ridgeway Dias Bilas MA Salen Country Chandrika Consultant Serena Colombo Malvo Barnes President Trump Convent Boarding School Official
Trump set to miss required deadline for 2021 refugee quota.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:12 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump set to miss required deadline for 2021 refugee quota.

"Trump administration appears to be ignoring a deadline to establish how many refugees will be allowed into the United States next year raising uncertainty about the future of the forty year old resettlement program that has been dwindling under his administration. The Thousand Nine Hundred Eighty Refugee Act requires presidents to issue that determination before October first the start of the fiscal year. With only hours to go on Wednesday, the trump administration had not sheduled consultations with Congress that required before setting the annual figure. There was no immediate comment from the White House, which usually announces the target numbers or the departments of State or Homeland Security which were involved in making the determination. Democratic lawmakers blasted the administration for not meeting its obligation. Trump's violation of the nineteen eighty law will bring our refugee admissions program to a halt leaving thousands stranded abroad with their lives at risk New York representatives Jerry Nadler, who is chairman of the House Judiciary? Committee? Trump froze this year's admissions in March falsely citing a needs to protect American jobs as fall-outs from the corona virus crashed the economy. Advocates fear the government is intentionally delaying its plans for the twenty twenty one fiscal year as a way to eventually eliminate the refugee program. No more refugees can be admitted after Thursday until the president sets the ceiling for the New Year Secretary of State Mike. Pompeo said the administration is committed to the country's history of leading the world in providing a safe place for refugees. But advocates say the government's actions do not show that in addition the State Department announced last week it would no longer provide some statistical information on refugee resettlement sparking more concerns advocates say the trump administration is dismantling a program that has long enjoyed bipartisan support and has been considered a model for protecting the world's most vulnerable people.

Donald Trump President Trump United States State Department White House Jerry Nadler Pompeo Congress House Judiciary New York Chairman
Spirit Week (MM #3475)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Spirit Week (MM #3475)

"The Maison with Kevin Nation back in my much younger day. We used to have Spirit Week in high school. It was usually around football homecoming or maybe when this whole team went to the state tournament, but these days I've noticed something and I see it through my Facebook timeline that grade school kids are celebrating their own versions of spirit week. I just kind of shake my head and I noticed it a lot the last couple of weeks are in Facebook. Now, I realized covid-19 has changed everything. But if we're just this year, I wouldn't think anything about it. But I've seen it over the last few years. I saw a picture of one of my friends kids who were maybe seven eight years old. I think they're in first or second grade. It was spirit week and they were dressed in their favorite decade the eighties, you know, the one that ended thirty years ago and started forty years ago. I'm thinking of myself. What does a seven or eight-year-old child know about the 1980s? Okay, maybe mom was born in the a teenage Mom dressed him up that way but why are kids celebrating Spirit Week in grade school now, maybe if I had kids would understand and I don't have any problem with them doing it. It just doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. It's really strange to me. I got to admit dead.

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Ashleigh's Battle with Alcohol

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:54 min | 3 weeks ago

Ashleigh's Battle with Alcohol

"And welcome to the goodbye to alcohol podcast my name Janet Garand I'm the founder world without wine and I'm your host for this podcast. Thank you so much for tuning in. Today's interview is with Ashley who came along to a workshop back in August two thousand and eighteen on trees and recently celebrated her second soap Uva. Serie well, done actually on say proud of you. Now. This is quite a long conversation because it made so many interesting points and we have such fun chatting couldn't quite bring myself too much. So, let's get straight into the conversation without further ADO. My name is Ashley and I live in Cape Town in city bowl luckily now if case. I'm forty years old I'm currently in a relationship with really amazing person I. Can Yawns Iona an art gallery contemporary gallery. So yeah, we work with artists from Africa. And Southern Africa primarily and and work with the number of international museums. So. Let's go back to but actually went. When did you first thinking that? Maybe we're drinking of it too much in you want to to change what was going on. I started experimenting with alcohol when I was very young. So actually I probably should have been thinking about cutting down on my drinking when I was about fifteen but. following my first expulsion from school with drunken disorderly behaviour. But that was kind of a yeah that was just A. Precursor didn't really carry on stronger now but I think I guess I think quite a long time I probably probably from my kind of early sixties. thinking. About. Kind of starting to moderate my behavior, I mean you come out of? Your twenties and clubbing and partying and. Cocktails and world events in everything and and then I guess that that kind of. The gloss after work and. All of going out it just becomes kind of habitual things I, I think that they were signs you know that I probably should have. Begun to realize that that Okola taking a bit of a too much of Santa Stage in my life. But of course, it's very easy for that to become justified because it's always a you know it's very normal to be drinking at a wedding or birthday or at a funeral Lauretta was function or at a baby shower maybe I shouldn't have tied too much so much to drink party. Will you know maybe it was over the limit when I drove home that night to dammit again, all you know all of those little signs old things that you would have thought. Yeah. So unfortunately took me if he is to actually do something about it. Did you actually tried to did you do dry January's? You know I always used to read those those things about a you're only supposed to have. Whatever it is that you're supposed to have like seven units alcohol in we can like your. Yeah. You could have heard me like snorting in hysterics rolling down the aisles because I mean basically that was me. You know that was like one now, which wasn't tiffany wasn't alone in that I mean you go to a restaurant and they give you A. Three glosses equivalent of what you thinking is one gloss of. Local whatever. But I did I did once or twice I did I think I did it once I don't know what it was I think it was just sober terrible one of these things but I mean, really it was like knuckle it was like white knuckling through the month and everyone you're doing with doing it because obviously gang for mutual support is thinking Oh my God is call wait till we get to the end of this month so we can just God and get splashed there was like, yes. Pondo defeats the purpose, but then you do those things in using Oh. Okay. We'll. I could go you know. I but I, mean you you often you would find yourself. Okay. You know. Offer particularly heavy night will whatever would having gone off dinner with friends and head Two bottles of wine instead of wine all three bottles of to at between the next morning you thinking just God accompaniment we did that city you know we should have we should stopped a little bit earlier and at the time it always seems like a really great idea but then you then comes the kind of I'm GonNa. Need drink on winds on Mondays and Wednesdays. I'm only gonNA drink on the weekends or AMMONIA GONNA drink when I go out with friends socially for dinner. The fact

Ashley Janet Garand Africa Pondo Founder Southern Africa Cape Town Okola
'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:29 min | 3 weeks ago

'Mr. 80 Percent,' An Intimate Portrayal Of Surviving Prostate Cancer

"We're talking about prostate cancer why we don't talk about it because of issues like incontinence, impotence, men's private parts, and so forth I'm joined by Boston Globe Mark Shanahan who is out with a new podcast Mr Eighty percent, which tells the very personal story about his own prostate cancer and a warning again to listeners, we are talking a very frankly about this disease about sexual function and so on and so forth, and so this might not be suitable for younger listeners. We just want to put that warning out there. mark I want to talk a little bit about how this diagnosis it didn't just affect you affected your loved ones too. So your audio, your daughter Julia was in junior high when you were first diagnosed. So I want to hear a little bit of the two of you talking in episode one of Mr Eighty percent. I think I just took it to like. Like he actually died I would basically lose my best friend. This is my daughter Julia she's in college. Now they say like we're not your best friend like where your parents by. Having. Cancer means you get a preview of what your kid might say at your funeral. You're the funniest person I've ever met I. Think one of the most supportive and hardworking people I've ever met and. I also think you one of the most intense people I've ever met and you have a very impressive career, and so I always like looked up to that and by impressive you mean I have talked to Bj. Novak. You took me to Taylor concert. She gave me her bracelet, right? So. So that's a cut from Mr Eighty percent I'm here with Mr, with Shanahan and mark that's really touching moment. But say a little more about that because you make this, you spend a lot of time in this podcast talking about. The effect that this has on your entire family, and by the way the way your wife stepped up in heroic ways and supported you and this is a huge theme about in this story. It's true Anthony that You know you just can't anticipate something like this and and again it's the nature of this disease that you know. This was something that as my surgeon says, at some point in the podcast, you know when you're when you're treating. Prostate cancer patient, you're really treating the couple. And So Michelle had a heavy lift Michelle, your wife correct. I should say right Michelle. My Wife. And she was Extraordinary and But so it's a learning process. For she and then in terms of our children. You well, I Beckett we would like to get back into the podcast but your son as fifty s fifteen year old boy now and You know we wanted him to say, well, we're going to have to talk about our penises and that was. He he just wasn't willing to go there. So again, it's it is. You know we say in the podcast that you get the cancer but everybody's life changes and you know I I don't think that unless you go through something like this, you can really appreciate what that means but I. Certainly do i WanNa talk a little bit about Get get you to talk a little bit about the course of treatment that you opted to follow. So so walk us through first of all the options that you had to consider. When you were first diagnosed well. So we want to also say that because prostate cancer. So slow growing and because many men who are diagnosed are much older I think that people should think very very carefully before embarking on any treatment that there is something called active surveillance, which means we watch it we pay attention to it. And but but. For Myself I was young I had two kids. I had forty years may be to live and. I had a gleason score, which is a score after they give you your biopsy and take a look at what's happening they grade basically of the severity of the intensity of your cancer in mind was seven. Out of ten that's considered to be intermediate I guess you know the options for me were to watch it to have surgery. Or to a radiate my prostate and. In, the end there have been enormous advances in the treatment of prostate cancer over just thirty years. If I had gotten prostate cancer fifty years ago. I. would be rough rough rough. And not just for me every man who had a prostatectomy which is surgical procedure to remove your prostate. before nine, hundred, eighty, two, left the hospital impotent every single Guy which is just incredible to me because nineteen eighty two is not that long ago. Right, it is incredible. So you went for the surgery but I did but that wasn't the end of your ordeal surgery. It turns out we learned didn't get all the cancer. So you had to go back and sign up for pretty radical course of hormone therapy, and this is really the most excruciating part of your journey to read into here about you describe it essentially as a kind of. Chemical. Castration. Well. Indeed and I don't just describe it that way. That's in fact what it is It removes the testosterone from your body and the reason that we do that is because it's the thing that feeds the cancer prostate cancer. Grows Thanks to to Saas thrown. So if you removed from your body to cells cancer cells week in some cases they die and then when they're at their weakest blast them with radiation. The problem is that when you take a testosterone out of a man's body it is a as you say excruciating I became a different person. ahead you know the the euphemism is mood swings. I didn't have mood swings had a I had tantrums and I will say that I was on the phone this morning, the guy who listened to the first three episodes of the podcast and. He. said, he'd never talked to anybody about his course blueprint and he was arrested he actually got arrested. Because a parking garage. because. He could he he got completely out of control. So it's scary. And and you know now as I sit here. There's you know at this surgery if if the prostate cancer should return, there is no surgery there is no radiation. Those are no longer alternatives. and. The prospect of more loop ron or any kind of hormone therapy is really terrifying

Prostate Cancer Cancer Mark Shanahan Mr Eighty Julia Michelle Testosterone Boston BJ Novak Taylor Anthony RON
Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 weeks ago

Feds put first Black inmate to death since execution restart

"The federal government has executed its first black inmates since president Donald Trump resumed executions Christopher B. although was nineteen when he abducted robbed shot and killed Todd and Stacey Bagley a religious couple from Iowa visiting his hometown of clean Texas he was convicted by a federal jury of eleven white and one black and sentenced to death during a campaign event in Jacksonville Florida president trump talked about his denying clemency they came to my office today and the death penalty for clemency I said what was the crime the crime was so horrible in his last statement the forty year old B. although ask god to comfort the families of those he killed seven inmates have been put to death by federal authorities since the summer in the fifty six years before that just three federal executions were carried out I'm Jim acquire

Federal Government Donald Trump Christopher B. Todd Iowa Texas President Trump Stacey Bagley Jacksonville Florida
Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:37 min | Last month

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

"By, the end of this hour we're hoping to inspire you to pick up the phone and reconnect with a friend. You've lost touch with just a phone call, but hopefully a new start for your friendships and hopefully those of you who haven't made the call in six years ten years twelve will get the nerve from this show to pick up the. Phone and reconnect as one woman wrote us a true best friend nurtures the soul and that couldn't be more Trooper Anna and Regina their bond save their lives during World War Two they help each other survived the Nazi death camps and they were only young girls at the time, and now as women they a bond that so strong they consider themselves sisters. I came into the camp was eleven was nineteen, ninety, two I was a long line I don't know why. CAN'T And side. Little go nothing. It was the beginning of a friendship that would last for sixty years in the midst of death and suffering in the concentration camps of Poland and Germany. They were two little girls reaching out for each other that was looking for somebody. To. Be Nice because I didn't have no matter no more I didn't have no fad I. didn't have no family look for each other one could. We're not supposed to go from one back to the other sometimes I, would go in they say hi and then she would be afraid they're going to do something to me. She would succeed give up give out the two girls were separated several times when one girl was shipped to another camp heard it like animals onto cattle, cars, but fate drew them together each time we'll want so many cans wouldn't again too wide. Say Anything of course we should communicate. Was, then to Bruce I had. Half Time. So I was. So Hang I was yanked I needed food. Sites. To Steal from the dog, Regina had smuggled a loaf of bread with her and even though she was hungry, Regina risked her life to share it with her friend. When I saw I rapped the play. Talwar to hey. And votes. killed. I forgive put we went to well. I so what? People just Within weeks they were scheduled to be guest but liberation came I lost in the chaos they never knew if they would see each other again they were separated once more they both married and began families, and after years apart fate Ju- them together again, they discover dot only had they both resettle in the united. States. But actually we're living in the same Boston neighborhood just blocks from each other. Clam to the same street. Trout Chink hours so We're boats that shock. After the war was over a wonderful friends, their friendship grew deeper as the years passed we cannot sit and talk about those things to allow the people's because even even to my kids, this is the bond between us. It's concentration. Can I cherish? Come forget what? What fifty sixty years. If I before she dies before we we're gonNA still love each out. And an-and Regina stories featured in the book. Best Friends. Now, where's Judy night duty I, hear you had a best friend since you were what? By five five years old but you haven't seen each other more than thirty. Thirteen thirty years, thirty years really cracked and the reason for that is. We just don't find the time. I. Guess We make excuses for it and we've just never. Merged our time together to make it work. What you do talk you do communicate we communicate through letters. We've been pound pals for over forty years. and. Where does she live and where you live she lives in like Huntington, New York and I live in Naperville Illinois. Wow. Never a Greyhound bus between you. Never, would you recognize her if you saw her on the street I would hope so through photographs but I don't know. What does she look like? Last. I knew she had long blond hair. Very pretty face does she look like anybody here? Not that I see right now okay. Stand up look around take the audience know. Right there. Say. Anti.

Regina Bruce I Trooper Anna Boston JU Judy Germany Illinois Naperville Huntington Poland New York
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | Last month

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | Last month

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
Episode 12; Listeners stories from the 1980s - burst 01

The Old Man's Podcast

01:31 min | Last month

Episode 12; Listeners stories from the 1980s - burst 01

"This. Say. Sanity. Gross. Welcome to the old man's podcast in this is episode twelve, try something new. On this episode, we're going to have a listeners stories episode. So several listeners, many different listeners of sentence stories or comments directly related to the Golden Pandemic Free Age of the eighty. Nine thousand nine hundred eighty was a different time. Sure. That was thirty to forty years ago everything about it is different than spun interesting to go back reminisce tell stories. Pens where you're at your life now that the eighties might have been. Maybe your favorite time in your lifetime. So. I hope you'll enjoy this I'm going to read a number of stories from listeners. And that's going to be what this entire episode is about though I think you're gonNA enjoy it. Let's get it started.

"forty year" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:03 min | 6 months ago

"forty year" Discussed on Ideas

"Formulations like colonizer colonized or imperialist and victim of imperial power We certainly saw that in the case To take one example and. I think it was the one that I was thinking of at the time. the war in Syria. You know which was an enormously complicated proxy war In addition of course to being a a war against civilians and so I I think that In that in that essay I was critical of some of the uses to which Edward Said's ideas Had been put but in more recent Talk that I gave in in Beirut in May I sounded a more sympathetic note about Said's work Partly because the I I've been reminded Very powerfully and upsettingly of the Persistence of accrued and racist discourse about The Middle East In the last few years under Donald trump particularly the the language that he used to describe A refugees and Muslims so I think that you know the what makes a book like orientalists him so significant and so vital is that you're constantly in conversation with it. You you might. You might run away from it and then you return to it and you realize how fundamental it is and so I guess you could. You could say that I've been that I continue to be in dialogue with it. You're listening to ideas on. Cbc Radio One in Canada in North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on RN and around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas you can also stream us or get our podcast on the CBC. Listen UP I'm nullify it Haley. Hey Fallon and hey listeners. Out We are. The hosts of a podcast called the secret life of Canada. We are a history podcast. Yeah and we've covered topics things like the gold rush or the baby blanket. Yes kind of unconventional stories. Though that you might have missed in your Canadian history class so we're here to uncover the secrets. That's right Czechoslo wherever you get. Your podcasts Edgy. Haji Haji Bhabha along. Haji Baba was the title theme of One Thousand. Nine hundred fifty four film by the same name review in the New York. Times described it. This way there's an episode where a swarm of fiery Dane supposed to be an organized Ben ditty of Fugitive Harem. Girls Sweeps Down upon a caravan of merchants. Also our riot sword fights kidnappings creeping into tents torturing 's chases across the desert and kissing by the light of the moon the film is based on Hajji Baba of his written by James Justinian. Morier a nineteenth century British diplomat and orientalist. Why are you not satisfied to be like? You're father how'd you? You're a good Bob true. I asked myself Mr Hake. The Shaw's two favorite is smelled Handsome that are spoken the nine and he is the favorite well in the famous Lord Treasurer. Who feels the kings covers with gold and does not forget his own but was he. The son of a grocer eats drinks. What he likes he puts on a new coat every day. After the Shaw he has his choice of all the beauties of Persian story of Persian Barbara filled with Harem girls and shakes care events camels and swords. It's a classic piece of Orientalists Literature. Telling the story of a place and people that exist. But the depictions are entirely a westerners projection of what life in the east must be like the unabashed orientalist of the Nineteenth Century Variety certainly continues today in. Tv shows like homeland or movies. Like Elijah come from land from a faraway place with a caravan cameras. Roll where it's flat and then Sunday. He does intense. It's back but hey it's home. Orientalists also exists in subtler forms the kind that winds its way into political analyses and journalism even university courses. Saba carpet and fly to another. I was an early critic of the idea of the humanities courses. They were taught here being called the humanity suggesting that humanity's were only written by Europeans as a result of agitation. They expanded the humanities to include. Well first of all they stopped calling humanity. It's called Western humanities. Now and then they expanded it. Which is exactly what I think is right to include Non Western humanities as well so students are required to take both but I was a critic of Precisely the pretensions of a humanities course that you could educate a student and there was a lot of self satisfaction. This is about twenty years ago. Those ourselves satisfaction about the fact that our students read. Plato and they read Spinoza. We'd Don Quixote and they read good and they're educated and I made the argument that if you don't read them in the original languages if you don't read them complete and if you're taught by people who don't know the language and having read them complete you're not being educated you being educated in education I mean and the pretensions there of what they can calls the idols of the cave. But it's not the real thing And then I also made the point that it was a very eurocentric view which consigned the rest of the world to inhumanity. By implication. Then there was quite an interesting discussion. I'm ever participating in myself on campus. And there was the changing of the nomenclature and the expansion of course to include other literatures and other traditions. And I think it's very salutory ready whenever whenever you're ready to go. I am Amanda Rogers and I am a professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at Colgate University. Where most of my work is focused on critical cultural studies and contemporary Middle East particularly visual culture and media representation. More fundamentally scientists arguing in Oriental. Ism that there is a binary between the so called. East end the so called West. That is fundamentally rooted in Asymmetries of Power In created essentially through conquest imperial expansion and this binary is very much One that is constructed through oncology and epistemology and what I mean by that is that the idea of the so called. Orient is a construct itself that served interests of the so-called West. And this is one of the big critiques sites thesis which I I to share some once. I don't necessarily think that all of the critiques are necessarily fair but he does to an extent draw the same sort of a homogeneous boundaries around an extensively recognizable west that he claims are drawn around a fundamentally constructed artificial concept of the east. But I think what doesn't get understood enough or doesn't get emphasized enough about the difference. Between Occidental ISM SO-CALLED. An Oriental ISM is the fundamental `asymmetry of power relations ideas cultures and histories cannot seriously be understood or studied without their force or more precisely their configurations of power. Also being studied to believe that the Orient was created. Or as I call it orientalist and to believe that such things happen simply as a necessity of the imagination is to be disingenuous. The relationship between Occident and Orient is a relationship of power of domination of varying degrees of complex Gemini. So to to really. You know breakdown what. I'm referring to hear people from the so called Middle East. What we think of today as the Middle East which is incidentally impossible to accurately define. Because it's a fictional construct Did Not refer to themselves as miniature outside which is Arabic for Middle East instead. People identified based on regional configurations where culture and History and linguistics were seen to be not identical but but shared so there were subdivisions like Maga break so that would be Tunisia. Algeria and Morocco at the far west of the Muslim World so-called Arab world as well so called Middle East depending on US defining it And the same thing held true for the Levant countries as well as the Gulf so you had regional divisions.

Middle East Hajji Baba Canada Haji Haji Bhabha Orient Shaw Edward Said Syria Donald trump North America CBC DOT CA Sirius Beirut Orientalists Literature History and linguistics Elijah Don Quixote Plato
"forty year" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

10:59 min | 6 months ago

"forty year" Discussed on Ideas

"Got on the first day and it continued all the school holidays. Dress Code and talk. His colonial education is where Edward Side fell in love with Western literature. It was also where he first saw. How language and images could be weaponized. The first rule of school was English is the language of the school. Anyone caught speaking. Another language will be punished severely so this imposition of their language on US colored. Everything I did in school I mean I learnt English literature geography history. I knew much more about those and I knew anything about my own background. My own language there are always resented. Edward Cy died in two thousand and three but his most famous oriented endures. Even now in its fortieth year side argued that it was this imagined east that became the flawed basis for the West problematic relationship with the Arab and Muslim. Could you introduce yourself with my name is and then just in this episode ideas producer? Now He'd Mustafa examines the legacy and impact of orientalist through conversations with a writer and an academic who were deeply influenced by sides work. You'll also hear excerpts from an interview Adverti- did with ideas in May two thousand. We're calling this episode revisiting Orientalists My name is Adam shots I'm a writer journalist I'm on the staff of the London review of books and I also ride four other publications such as the New York review of Books The New York Times Magazine and the New Yorker Adam. Tell me about your connection to Edward Side My connection with Edward Saieed is both an intellectual and personal one I grew up reading him in the pages of the Nation magazine. I was reading both his articles on Palestine and the politics of the Middle East and his essays As a music critic site was a very gifted pianist and critic of classical music and so One of the reasons that I decided to attend Columbia University was that I knew that I was teaching there and I thought couldn't be a bad place if he was teaching there As as as it happens I never actually studied with with Edward Saieed but his work Continued very much to inform my own thinking about not just about the politics. Middle East and America's role in the region but about the more generally of the politics of representation and questions of power aesthetics and the literary imagination. What attracted me to sites? Work was the would seem to me the elegant powerful and an effortless synthesis of the area date and the polemical everything that Saieed wrote was informed by his deep learning as a literary critic who is also Well versed in philosophy In theory in European intellectual history and in the history of the Middle East and at the same time each of his contributions was an intervention in a in a political conversation. He wasn't writing simply to contribute to knowledge as it were he wanted to change the world and Especially for for a young person. I think This was a tremendously moving example of what of what a committed intellectual could achieve another aspect of. Sade's work that That I found compelling was the moral passion it was imbued with I connected very much with Sides radical humanism his critique of the West but also his fidelity to The very best values of the Liberal. West which were so often betrayed in practice and his utter cosmopolitanism Saieed with someone who to whom nothing really was foreign and that was tremendously Admirable orients doesn't mean several things it means a first of all accepting division between Occident and Orient. You're an orientalist. If you accept that the oriented somehow kind of separate realm homogeneous to itself. The Second Meeting of Oriental is is that it's a it's a particular attitude towards the Orient Right Which suggests that the Orient can be studied as separate Integral thing whether it's oriental despotism. Oriental sensuality oriental motive production etcetera and the third rather specific meaning of it is orientalist. Them has in the practice of orientalists. Who are trained. Experts the emergence of Orientalists as a discipline as opposed to style thought which is the second meaning for example in the nineteenth century. Early Not Century Hugo said in the renaissance people were hellenists in the nineteenth century. People are orientalists that is to say their view of the world includes looking at the Orient as a kind of inspiration kind of source for all our knowledge so or antlers minutes third meaning is the L- learned study of the Orient and I argue that emerges as a result of the conquest of the Orient I by Napoleon when he invaded Egypt in seventeen ninety two and then as orientalists and becomes a Department of study in Western universities I in Britain and France. 'cause they were the colonial pioneers but then later of course in places like Germany and Russia and elsewhere in essence the the the argument that That saieed was making Orientalist was that the the east was an imaginative and political construct. It wasn't An actual thing it was. It was an object of scholarly and political attention that had to be produced in a kind of joint effort of of men of power and they were mostly men and the scholars and writers who were writing about the lands that the western powers had colonized the Orient was almost a European invention and had been since antiquity a place of Romance Exotic Beings Haunting memories landscapes remarkable experiences unlike the Americans the French and the British less so the Germans Russians Spanish Portuguese Italian Swiss have had a long tradition of what I shall be calling orientalists a way of coming to terms with the Orient that is based on the orients special place in European Western experience. The Orient is not only adjacent to Europe. It's also the place of Europe's greatest and richest and oldest colonies the source of its civilizations languages. It's cultural contestant and one of its deepest and most recurring images of the other. That idea that that the images that we arrive at that these are these are not things that arrived hole in their time. These are images that have been constructed. These are ideas that have that have been created in the service of various things historically and and it seems like that is a more prevalent conversation today when we look at you know race or we look gender And and often when we look at things Politically as well but in. Its time this was a new conversation. This was not. This was not part of some just another expression of some well well-founded or well-meaning idea that that everybody was in on this was this was revolutionary in its time. How how different was it from? What else was out there? How how hard was it pushing back? I entirely agree with you. I think that to some extent even those who haven't read orientalist and who may never read it have already internalized Some of side's arguments because in effect saieed helped to create a new common sense among critical minded people. The orientalists is a part of our common inheritance. And you could argue that. He was one of the that he was as much a revolutionary as someone like. Simone de Beauvoir was on In in her book the second sex she famously wrote that one is in born a woman one becomes a woman and in effect site was saying something very similar about the so-called Arab or Muslim one is in born one becomes one. I mean he was looking at these. These these these discursive regimes as it were and even if his his His influences were more Phuc Odeon than SAR Tran-. He was arguing along a similar path. Now sites ideas of course were not invented solely by him and and in Oriental Ism and at some of the essays that he published afterward reflecting on on the book because he published several of them. saieed was very generous In acknowledging that a number of people had preceded him in making these arguments people like Anwar Abdul Malik Frantz. Fanon the Martinique and psychiatrist to join the ALGIERIAN liberation struggle and various others of these these these. These are these arguments about the production. The invention of the East Had been to some extent circulation and saieed. I I don't WanNA suggest that site simply collated them. But he managed to fuse some of these ideas into a powerful synthesis and into a historical narrative that also drew on his remarkable learning in the field of literature because after all orientalists is a work of literary history. I do think that it's a book that is very mindful of the inheritance And the enduring influence of of imperialism on Western societies Is someone who is on the one hand an embodiment of A radical I would say radical liberal humanism and at the same time he's very much a critic of the blind spots hypocrisies and injustices committed in liberalism's.

Orient Edward Saieed Middle East Edward Side Edward Cy West Adam US Oriental Ism Europe Edward writer Simone de Beauvoir Columbia University Nation magazine Adverti Anwar Abdul Malik Frantz Mustafa London review of books producer
"forty year" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"forty year" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Malibu California forty year old heart was a passenger in the nineteen seventy Plymouth barracuda the one off Mulholland highway and rolled down an embankment early Sunday morning also in the news a group of people with disabilities and advocacy groups have sued the city of Philadelphia then it's dilapidated sidewalks violate their right to move around freely a wide W. city hall bureau chief Pat low says that so far the city has no response Tony Brooks flipped his wheel chair on a curb ramp that was too steep Fran Fulton fell into a pot hole in a crosswalk Liam Dougherty has to maneuver his scooter into traffic lanes because there are so many obstacles in the sidewalks on his commute their attorney David Furla grises these conditions violate the federal law that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities mobility people who were able to walk on her own people who can't really a matter of life or death from her since the advocacy groups he represents have been trying for years to get the city to comply with the nineteen ninety three court order to make rights of way compliant and keep them that way to no avail he's asking the judge to order prompt remedial measures including enforcing laws on snow removal and blocking intersections in addition to making repairs and removing obstacles he has no estimate of the cost but says current conditions have a cost to the law economically to the city is the contributions of the people with mobility disabilities Pat Lok kill a W. news radio the violin scene in north Philadelphia authorities are investigating a shooting and collision that left four including two cops hospitalized we say it happened just after seven fifteen tonight when the patrol cruiser in route to the scene of a shooting provided with a great kia at the intersection of north Broad Street and west Glenwood Avenue tops were injured in the collision the driver was also hurt all three were transported to Temple University hospital with non life threatening injuries the initial shooting which happened just minutes before the collision also left a nineteen year old in critical condition Tina Sloan green was the first African American woman on the U. S. national women's lacrosse team the first African American collegiate women's lacrosse coach in the country and she took the job at temple in the mid seventies the YWCA Matt Leon sat down with the Philadelphia native to look back at her remarkable career Sloane greens first college coaching job came in nineteen seventy three at Lincoln she coached basketball and cheerleading and she says working at the historically black university really had an impact on because all my my days at girls high my days at Westchester I had never had seen you know actually a black coach or black teacher girls high so this was an experience to see all these black folks in a very significant role Sloan green also coached field hockey in addition to women's lacrosse while the temple she led that women's lacrosse team to three national championships during her time on north Broad Street in addition Sloan green is also the co founder of the black women in sport foundation the mission of the the blackness where foundation is to increase opportunities for black girls girls of color from the playing field to the board room you can listen to the entire interview with Tina Sloan green by checking out my podcast one on one with Matt Leon subscribe where ever you get your podcasts madly on KYW news radio where.

nineteen year forty year
"forty year" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"forty year" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"That's that's a forty year investment. You never missed a month and forty years but that says you can do it all well. I'm is it too late for me. No these numbers are saying you can do it. You don't have to be twenty seven to do this but I'm saying if you're twenty seven and you're listening to me and you follow this and you have a normal career path not super great but not super horrible but you have a fairly normal career path between between now and sixty seven years old. You should be worth not one million dollars but closer to ten or above that at one if I'm half wrong so day rooms you know better being but investing more that's a stupid but statement I just sat here and walked you through how to become a millionaire and a Decca millionaire in my net worth is well in excessive hundreds of millions of dollars now well. It's because you sold a bunch of books yell. It's also because practice what operate and I'm old. I've been doing this a long time. A long time. You're broke friends with a political opinion are stupid. I don't care what you're broke. Friends think about money. If you're broke friends or making fun of your financial plan that's like a fat person Meghan Funnier Diet come on. That's just straight up stupid you do what they do. You're going to be a loser like they are. Don't do that fifteen percent of your income invested because you got a baby step four at breakneck speed with Gazelle intensity. It's worth the trip boys and girls. It's worth the trip. This is the Dave Ramsey show in a recent study showed that over fifty percent of people. I think the cost of term life insurance is triple what it actually costs. This must be why so many people still don't take care.

Dave Ramsey Decca one million dollars sixty seven years fifteen percent fifty percent forty years forty year
"forty year" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on Amicus with Dahlia Lithwick

"Of the lower courts have so far unfortunately i think that if when this reaches the supreme court there are probably now five oats to copy and paste from trump hawaii and say where deferring to the president on matters of national security and if he says these people are sick and disordered then that's all we need to kick them out of the armed forces so that is my perhaps my most depressing forecast for what's around the corner well that's fairly depressing so i know neither of you are political reporters or journalist or polycyclic professors but what are you telling people at your sunday brunches or your saturday marches about what democrats can do about this open seat i know i've been in a lot of conversations and gotten a lot of listener mail saying what can be done and it seems to me if lobbying susan collins is the best there is that's not a lot but leila let's start with you what are what's your advice to folks who are looking at the prospect of a forty year old trump nominee forever changing the legal landscape at least for the next i think he's saying forty forty five years anything to be done about those september hearing i think the odds that the democrats can do anything or very small they are in the minority they do not have the votes to reject the nominee or to prevent the hearings and so i think the best that they can do maybe isn't persuading susan collins but figure out how to frankly talk substantively about the court enough of this procedural mitch mcconnell did it it's only fair yada yada yada no say how you think they're gonna vote say what you think they're gonna do you might not end up getting a republican senator who you can persuade but build a record and figure out how to talk to your constituents about the court and get them to care march turin are you going to be calling susan collins office this week it as you know senators try to filter out calls from outside their states so i present a threepart plan the first part involves hundreds of thousands of liberals moving to alaska and maine so that susan collins and lisa murkowski's offices will take their calls the second part is them stay saying in alaska and maine so that they can establish residency there and the third part is them voting in alaska and maine so that both states turned permanently blue and republicans cannot continue to push through trump is into the federal judiciary seems like a pretty simple plan to me you only need to move like eight blocks of manhattan i feel like park slope lesbians would find lots to love in maine and there are at least two million of those right now so i just think like we've gotta think big here big picture how are we going to move forward and building a style ville or soros ville in a swing state is a good start for me more seriously though i think democrats need to think about making statehood for puerto rico in dc it is inexcusable that those people are not represented in the senate and designate to figure that one out yeah i obviously strongly agree with that more seriously it's outrageous that statehood has not been number one on the democratic platform for ever it's an ongoing injustice i think it's one of the chiefs of all rights issues of our time how we are at disenfranchising millions of americans for no good reason at all this is again absolutely civil rights issue and i think dem's need to seize on it if they know what's good for them but them's don't know what's good for them so i presume they won't march during coverage the courts for us at slightly littman teaches law at uc irvine and blogs frequently at take care i know you are both as exhausted after this week.

forty forty five years forty year
"forty year" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Forty year old year old you can you invest can invest more more you're working you're working dump dump more money more money in in dollar dollar cost cost average average put put money money in as the in market's as the market's going going down down you're working you're working anyway anyway you're not you're not reliant reliant on your on your investable investable assets assets to pay to pay your your way way because 'cause you're you're still still working working that's what that's your job what your job is for is for but but everybody everybody else out else there out that's there that's in retirement in retirement when the when market's the market's heading heading down down we're were taking taking money money out of our out protect of our protect portfolio portfolio that's been that's growing been growing still still with equities with equities and we're and moving we're moving it back it over back over into stock into stock and we keep and we repeating keep repeating that cycle that cycle over over and over and and over over and again over you again know what's you know coming what's common it's a it's matter a matter of when of when it's not it's a matter not a matter of if of if and the old and the saying old saying goes it's goes hard it's to hard catch to a catch falling a falling knife knife the the time time not not to do to this do is this when is the markets when the markets falling falling you know i you know i can i tell can you tell right you now right now here we here are we in sunday are in sunday night if night if earlier earlier this this week the week market the market had gone had down gone down two or two three or thousand three thousand points points our audience our audience would double would double today today you know you why know why because because everybody everybody go oh my go god oh my what god do i what do do i do there there in the in forty the forty four percent four percent and they're and looking they're looking for advice for advice and they're looking and they're for looking right for now right now don't don't be that be person that person be the be other the side other of side the coin of the b coin the person b the person who knows who knows what's going what's going on on on and has and has a strategy a strategy and a written and a written plan plan and is and in is in a situation a situation like what like chris what is chris talking is talking about right about now right you now have you have an execution an execution plan plan in case in this case happens this happens to have to have that that you really you do really need do to reach need to reach out out and and we're giving we're you giving an opportunity you an opportunity right now right now free free of charge of charge there's no there's obligation no obligation here here if you're if worried you're about worried how about much how this much cost this cost that's okay because we don't charge anything to sit down and talk about it and figure out where you want to be four zero four nine four zero nine nine nine zero zero eight eight eight eight eight as we as always we say always say big city big city we understand we understand we have advisers we have advisers all over all the place over the place if if need need be will be come will to come you to you can come income to one of to our one events of our events check check out the website out the website give us give a call us a today call today let's let's test test your your retirement retirement four four zero four zero four nine nine zero zero eight eight eight eight eight.

forty four percent four percent Forty year
"forty year" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Forty year old year old you can you invest can invest more more you're working you're working dump dump more money more money in in dollar dollar cost cost average average put put money money in as the in market's as the market's going going down down you're working you're working anyway anyway you're not you're not reliant reliant on your on your investable investable assets assets to pay to pay your your way way because 'cause you're you're still still working working that's what that's your job what your job is for is for but but everybody everybody else out else there out that's there that's in retirement in retirement when the when market's the market's heading heading down down we're were taking taking money money out of our out protect of our protect portfolio portfolio that's been that's growing been growing still still with equities with equities and we're and moving we're moving it back it over back over into stock into stock and we keep and we repeating keep repeating that cycle that cycle over over and over and and over over and again over you again know what's you know coming what's common it's a it's matter a matter of when of when it's not it's a matter not a matter of if of if and the old and the saying old saying goes it's goes hard it's to hard catch to a catch falling a falling knife knife the the time time not not to do to this do is this when is the markets when the markets falling falling you know i you know i can i tell can you tell right you now right now here we here are we in sunday are in sunday night if night if earlier earlier this this week the week market the market had gone had down gone down two or two three or thousand three thousand points points our audience our audience would double would double today today you know you why know why because because everybody everybody go oh my go god oh my what god do i what do do i do there there in the in forty the forty four percent four percent and they're and looking they're looking for advice for advice and they're looking and they're for looking right for now right now don't don't be that be person that person be the be other the side other of side the coin of the b coin the person b the person who knows who knows what's going what's going on on on and has and has a strategy a strategy and a written and a written plan plan and is and in is in a situation a situation like what like chris what is chris talking is talking about right about now right you now have you have an execution an execution plan plan in case in this case happens this happens to have to have that that you really you do really need do to reach need to reach out out and and we're giving we're you giving an opportunity you an opportunity right now right now free free of charge of charge there's no there's obligation no obligation here here if you're if worried you're about worried how about much how this much cost this cost that's okay because we don't charge anything to sit down and talk about it and figure out where you want to be four zero four nine four zero nine nine nine zero zero eight eight eight eight eight as we as always we say always say big city big city we understand we understand we have advisers we have advisers all over all the place over the place if if need need be will be come will to come you to you can come income to one of to our one events of our events check check out the website out the website give us give a call us a today call today let's let's test test your your retirement retirement four four zero four zero four nine nine zero zero eight eight eight eight eight.

forty four percent four percent Forty year
"forty year" Discussed on The Money Guy Show

The Money Guy Show

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on The Money Guy Show

"The next financial mistake that forty year olds are making and this one is not financial but it does have a financial impact is neglecting your health yeah this is one bo i'm mid forties now i have recognized and i went into my forties knowing this is because i had fortunately i had somebody i had a pastor who is not that much older he's probably six seven years older than me but he i was in a small men's group with him and he was sharing his journey because he was he was doing like half marathons people asked him well why why did you start running what got you and running goes i turned forty and i realized you know that i needed to do something i'd never been a runner i'd never been an exerciser but my father had approached me because he was fifty sixties and just did not have the same financial exterior that he had when he was younger and he pinpointed it to his forties was that four can the road moment so this person manifested that into they started running right now i don't have a desire i hate running i will tell you if we started running right now though we get to the next block down in downtown franklin raced my brain would already be trying to figure out why we could stop excuses so i had to find other things join classes and you know or or find something that keeps me motivated and that's why i want to share with you guys there's too many resources available right now out there the not get you involved with it whether you might have neighbors i mean one of the biggest saddest things i miss about living in georgia as i had a three neighbors that we'd all go workout together like two to three times a week we'd have flex friday on fridays where we didn't do anything other than like completely h muscles each muscles even though guys here's thing i did this for years with these guys only one guy in this group you could he but he looked before he saw working out with i don't know what was going on so but it's still fun to come rodri and then i think that was health benefits to having that camaraderie but then there's now apps i mean there's there's all kinds of classes there's probably your maybe your community rec department store is offering this stuff so so go find a way to get todd in here's something that's cool that's come about in the last three to five years with this whole dna unwinding of your do the twenty three and me and all this other stuff you can be proactive you see what's going on with your your health and then also i'd say take advantage of the the free physical you know part of the whole affordable healthcare healthcare reform is that your preventative care like an annual physical is now free right i mean it's prepo it's not really free that's not it's prepaid based upon your insurance so go take advantage of that because it's better to know on the front end of stuff even though it's really annoying when you go the doctor and then they find something that you need to altering your lifestyle it's much better to find it is soon as possible than let something manifest and grow into something that really derail your life here's i'm not forty so i can't speak forty year olds however i do like to exercise and i can't speak.

forty year six seven years five years
"forty year" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"So inconsistent and so he he did a nice job in indy and and so just the fact that may have forty years really appreciate what what he he's done throughout his career and we'll see what's next for him he's only sixty three and so he he may be able to to jump jump on a on another staff sometime soon my other big takeaway just about him and his personality and interacting with him in person but then also just watching him over the years is the fact that not every coach not every leader has to be loud voice actress demonstrative in your face intense in a in a way that you can feel or touch or see you can be intense without having to do all of that but jim caldwell was kind gentle peaceful and very similar to tony dungy in that way but but i just acknowledge and recognize that there isn't just one way to be a head coach or to be a leader and it's okay to be softspoken it's okay to not be in your face or to have this huge personality and to take over a room and and so called well was just humble and down to earth and talkative and just very nice to interact with and it's not like he came in as all i'm this big nfl coach or former nfl coach and i know he's he's not joe gibbs or or even tony dungy for that matter but he's had great success he's won two super bowls as an assistant coach and has had a forty year career yet the humility and just the gentleness it was refreshing it really really was and so i'm a i'm a big fan of him and and really loved the conversation we were able to have with him and and so the the the two takeaways the long jetty and the consistency and the gentleness that he lived out in person as i got to meet him so i hope you enjoyed that conversation as well and if you missed.

jim caldwell tony dungy joe gibbs forty years forty year
"forty year" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Running game has been so inconsistent and and so he he did a nice job in indy and and so just the fact that may have forty years really appreciate what what he he's done throughout his career and we'll see what's next for him he's only sixty three and so he he may be able to jump jump on on another staff sometime soon my other big takeaway just about him and his personality interacting with him in person but then also just watching him over the years is the fact that not every coach not every leader has to be loud boisterous demonstrative in your face intense in a in a in a way that you can feel or touch or see you can be intense without having to do all of that but jim caldwell was kind gentle peaceful and very similar to tony dungy in that way but but i just acknowledge and recognize that there isn't just one way to be a head coach or to be a leader and it's okay to be softspoken it's okay to not be in your face or to have this huge personality and to take over a room and so called well was just humble and down to earth and talkative and just very nice to interact with and it's not like he came in as all i'm this big nfl coach or former nfl coach and i know he's he's not joe gibbs or or even tony dungy for that matter but he's had great success he's won two super bowls as an assistant coach and has had a forty year career yet the humility and and just the gentleness it was refreshing it really really was and so i'm a i'm a big fan of him and and really loved the conversation we were able to have with him and so the two takeaways manned along jeopardy and the consistency and the gentleness that he lived out in person as i got to meet him so i hope you enjoyed that conversation as well and if you missed.

jim caldwell tony dungy joe gibbs forty years forty year
"forty year" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"A given and as a result in the market more and more people are betting on higher rates aka lower bond prices so all the sudden sentiment and the bond market is unlike it has ever been an our professional careers and almost in our lifetimes and so the question i have free jason is do you expect that trend in both the the market and in the sentiment that's associated with it to reverse do you think that bonds will will rally after this correction or this long period of of declining bond prices or do you think that this change in sentiment and change in price action is indicative of a reversal of the forty year bull market in pots making a point so i would say on a well what you would consider shorter tim timeframe i think bonds will rally rate will decline we are seeing something we haven't seen before in that's always a red flag you should always say well okay well markets are doing something they haven't done before maybe this is change and that's that's what you should be doing because very often when we see that it does mean a longer term trend change and this is where sentiment will often fail this happened in january of two thousand eight sentiment was failing at that point and that should have been a sign that something was wrong there was an over overwhelming factor that was swamp ing whatever sentiment was saying at the time same thing happened in february of of last year steve i don't know if you remember but i had a few reports on how all of all of the things that we were looking at they kept telling that was failure and you should learn from failures if if the market doing what it's supposed to do that sending a very strong signal in the opposite direction so i think that's very important is to you should.

jason tim forty year
"forty year" Discussed on Small Doses

Small Doses

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on Small Doses

"And then you're sleeping on your cousins couch go and you have no friends you're like dick and down take just your yeah for your taking forty year old woman's they can buy you dinner exactly and that's when you're like you know what maybe this isn't the best this is not the path and if you are a nicest that's when you're like you know what i am gigolo yes so this is the perfect segue but before we actually let me just say this the beautiful part about the people i like segment is that we get to talk about just like the stuff that you're doing and the set that you've done and you know it's not just about like big celebrities or whatever like i like this segment is about like i like the people that come on here because of how they are existing in the world and aside from all these great things that you do i think part of the reason why you're able to also advance is because like your genuine in not only you're creating but in your connections that you make with people and i think that's also part of this boy thing it's like people in hollywood that you have to be phoney and it's like you got to be fake you have to stop people in the back to like get anywhere and the other part of it is like or you can just be resourceful and be genuinely helpful and be reliable and i that takes you so much further and last so much longer than these other like ways and we've.

dick hollywood forty year
"forty year" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"forty year" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Back here in at the barclay centre sec tournament coverage continuing on of the tar heels sports network of course as has been an emotional oven for a lot of different reasons for tar heels everywhere the somber news earlier this week of the passing bargain friend uh forty year voice of the tar heels lordy dharam and were honored and excited to have with us now what he's son and i take it easy on the audit partly play by play voice for the atlanta falcons of course does bus tv worked for the acc as well westerm joining us on west i have to imagine this has been a week of a bunch of different emotions for you obviously difficult in some respects but probably a little bit of a cell of victoria things at times as well jones it's been well that's exactly what experience when the spectre um you know it is a talk to other people about this whole week and coming here and uh the dynamic that you and i share last weekend knowing that you know things were not good with my dad admit you know i was going to get all by monday and the opportunity was as it may not make it back in time to see him again and the reality of it was it is difficult is that was far family it was what he wanted me to do um you know in no surprised anybody that new my dad the you know he wanted west to go to brooklyn and so i came to brooklyn um i think he understood how much i love the event in part because he taught me to love the of that um dummy i just i love coming to the sec tournament and it's been a valuable part of my life in terms of my professional career certainly but also as much althood domain so he knew that and he knew that i was doing the tournament we'd have that conversation back during my travels during january and february.

atlanta falcons brooklyn barclay centre forty year