35 Burst results for "Forty Thousand Dollar"

Famed chef says COVID could cause "extinction" of many restaurants

The Takeout

03:34 min | 6 d ago

Famed chef says COVID could cause "extinction" of many restaurants

"World renowned restaurant tour chef and activist. Tom kalicki was special guest. Tom you said extinction event is that irreversible as it sounds it will be a long time before those restaurants come back In most of those most of those restaurants hers of probably won't come back shutting down our restaurants in reopening Tremendous of capital Just one of my restaurants alone craft which is my flagship is not a large restaurant But it's been open for close to twenty years now My carrying costs Fixed cost per month is about forty thousand dollars. That's before opened the doors would we can't. We can't run out of found at funding to do that so I i hope that my landlords and so far they are working with me. But they're gonna have to be my partner here and say we're gonna if i'm close for two months. I can't pay rent for two months. They're going to have to be okay with that You know there are alternatives to evict me And it's gonna be a long time before somebody else comes down opens at restaurant and so this is. This is the issue so many people say well. The workers need to be held up. Absolutely a workers. Need to be helped nashville. Unemployment was four but when we get through this. And i actually believe that sometime you know in the summer probably when maybe sixty percent to seventy percent of the population is inoculated People are gonna come out and you want have jobs that are available. If that's the point where people start thinking about opening restaurants. We're talking you know months and months before that will happen but if you have those restaurants in place and people start coming out. We hire people back immediately. Economy gets going but the economy's not gonna get going if no one can get a job. Goalies businesses closed. So it's a it's a process now going back to the two thousand eight recession. It took us five years to get to to Where we were hitting our projections that we normally would hit pre pre recession. And so it's gonna take at least five years to get there. Do you have any optimism that between now and the end of this calendar year they will be action in washington to address this. Well you know. The the only thing i can think of right now would be You know perhaps mitch mcconnell will will. We'll take a look at what's going on in georgia. Because one thing. I know about mitch mcconnell. He wants to stay in power. And i know we gonna talk politics in this segment. But i can't get back to it. You wants to stay in power. The only way he stays in power to win both season in in in atlanta and if it appears that he just sitting on his hands and doing nothing. Good luck with that. And so i my politics are on the other side but i think from a strategic standpoint. I don't see how republicans think that they're gonna possibly hold onto these two seats if they do nothing for the american people. There's a lot of restaurants in atlanta at a lot of people who work in restaurants in atlanta and. I don't think it's enough to say well. This is all gonna magically go away and the restaurants can stay open. People aren't going. I'm talking to my friends at restaurants in atlanta. that aren't fast food restaurants. And they're desperate as well. So i'm hoping that maybe politics will will play a role here Policy with politics will play a role here to get this done. Maybe that's the only thing. Because otherwise i just seems being a difference to helping so many people that are struggling and and again. I think we're all bullied by very false. Sense of what the stock market is doing. And we all know. The stock market is not the economy.

Tom Kalicki Mitch Mcconnell TOM Atlanta Nashville Georgia Washington
Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems

Sway

09:06 min | Last week

Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems

"Fake data tends to get a bad rap and it often deserves it from facebook's tools being used to abuse privacy to amazon knowing everything you buy two apps tracking all of your movements kids data minefield for consumers these days but in the hands of the right person big data can actually be a force for good or at least one hopes a force for good policy and raj. Chetty is trying to do just that. He's ahead of harvard based opportunity insights research institute. That's working solve america's inequality problem one data set at a time chetty has been tracking millions of people doesn't of years and tens of thousands of american neighborhoods in the process. He's learned that the country could be losing out on millions of inventors and that a move of just two miles might alter the trajectory of a third grader. But jetties research isn't just sitting in long excel. She's on dusty shells. It's helping drive. Bill gates spends his billions of dollars of philanthropy or how president elect joe biden crafts his pandemic economic recovery plant. But one thing he does best was all his piles of facts and figures is to make it easy for even the nandi to rock and there's an explosive term for that you do. Things apparently called chetty bombs. I'm not sure you love that name do like that. you mind. i guess. I guess they're unique insights where you can visually see something to do. Visualization of. What's happening. And i think some of the ones that i thought were much more effective was around covid. Which is where spending is happening or not happening so talk a little bit about what you're doing around cove it so in kobe. We're using data from a bunch of different private companies to track. What's happening to various key outcomes spending employment levels business activity and so forth in in a nutshell. What we basically find happened in the past six months is that high income folks started to spend a lot less like thirty percent less billions of dollars less per day primarily because of health concerns so lots of folks have the capacity to work remotely to self isolate and as a result they started to basically go outside their houses less and spent much less in person services. Local restaurants shops and so forth. Those businesses particularly small businesses then lost an enormous amount of revenue and in particular business located in affluent areas to think about for example the upper east side of manhattan or the highest income places in san francisco. They lost something like seventy or eighty percent of their revenues so just a massive impact in contrast in some of the less affluent places. Like if you think about the bronx or parts of queens you see more like twenty or thirty percent declines in revenue so much less than what you're seeing and appetizers and so then you got all these businesses that have lost a ton of money so what you can do with these data has asked. Okay how do they balance their books. Like what are you gonna do when you have much less money. Well naturally you see these businesses start to lay off lots of their workers and in particular. They lay off their low wage workers. If you look at some of these crops you can see very clearly this pattern where for low income workers people making less than say twenty or thirty thousand dollars a year. Somebody who works in a sandwich shop in downtown area of san francisco for example exactly seventy eighty percent of those workers have lost their jobs whereas that same worker if they weren't even at the same chain so you're working at a report layers something like that and you happen to be working at a branch that was in a less affluent area. You were much less likely to lose your job. Just because spending happened to fall less in those areas perhaps because essential workers are still out in about behalf to be outside their house because of the nature of their jobs were as time can folks can typically self isolate and so what's ended up happening is basically because of this production spending by the rich. It's lower income people who born the incidence of chuck and losing their jobs and finding now is we've had essentially a v shaped recovery for high income. Folks were their employment levels are back to where they were pre covid where it's lower income folks. You're still twenty percent below six million jobs below where you were where they've gone the brunt of the economic distress which i think anecdotally people get which is interesting one of the things that someone was talking about the statistics around the trump voters that wealthier people did vote for trump and mike while they're doing okay more than you think and their income is the same so they're not upset about this issue particularly jibe. That's right karen. I think what's more though as you can see. It's not trust lower income folks in general but in very particular areas right so in the past in previous recessions but you tend to see is that it's lower income folks in less affluent cities who took the hardest head turns out in this recession. It's actually flipped so silicon valley. For example has some of the highest rates for low income. People serfs there exactly because it's the opposite of what you might have thought because of the mechanism you just talked about. So this is one example of i think what you can see in these data but importantly as you touched upon you can basically have folksy this for themselves by just plotting the data in a very simple. I'm just finishing on covid with the cares act. Does the stimulus. Bill have an impact. Then you have this data now that you're showing this. They still haven't passed one. Maybe that's a good thing because they didn't get to see this data yet and they were just sort of shooting in the dark. Essentially isn't going to be a wakeup call or are they going to change their behaviors of where the money is going to be seeing the stated. How does that translate. Well i mean. That's the aspiration so what we're hoping going forward and i've been talking with a bunch of folks and the president elect and folks the biden team. I think there's a lot of interest both among those folks and on the other side of the isles who have been speaking with in trying to understand how we can do better invite of having these sorts of data. Because you know of course. They're always political debates about what we should focus on. But i don't think anyone is in favor of just spending lots of money and ineffective ways so talk a little bit about that concept of understanding effect understanding results in action take in the context of the current crisis the important paycheck protection program about five hundred billion dollars of loans to small businesses to try to keep people on zero again in the context of kobe to try to keep the economy going to stop businesses from laying people off so the way that program was designed. Lots of businesses were eligible in particular businesses with fewer than five hundred employees. And as you said you know there was kind of a hope that maybe giving these firms this money is going to keep lots of workers on the payroll and will make the recession. Not as bad. So what we did is using data from payroll companies which are cutting paychecks for millions of workers. We basically compare trends and employment for firms that had fewer than five hundred employees and hence were eligible for the paycheck protection program versus firms. That more than five hundred employees and ends were not eligible. So you can make an analogy there to sort of a science experiment. You've got a treatment group. The firms that have fewer than five hundred employees that got this extra assistance and the ones that up more than five hundred employees service kind of a control group. They tell you what would have happened if you didn't get this ski enough and so what you end up. Seeing the data is you can follow employment levels week by week and you can see very precisely that after april third that when when this program went into effect employment did start to go up a little bit at the smaller firms relative to the larger firms by about two percentage points. But the problem is it's only a two percentage point impact of fortune for every cost five hundred billion dollars so it it cost about three hundred thousand dollars per job that we saved as a result. Some of these are low wage. Jobs jobs that are paying about forty thousand dollars a year typically. So you know. You're spending an enormous amount of money to save these jobs now. I think people started to figure out over time that lots of firms might be taking up this program who weren't gonna lay off any workers anyway and as a result it wasn't super cost effective but we figured that out only several months afterward and so the kind of vision. We add some of this big data. Work that we're doing. And this is why i think it can be a moral force for social good as in agean. You could see as you're gonna steering the economy to three weeks later while this is kind of working but maybe we need to target it at firms that lost a lot of revenue or redesign it a bit so that it's more effective or in specific geographies like this area doesn't need any money. This area does exactly what specific sectors right. there are certain sectors particularly hard. You can take a really data driven approach and in private companies. This would be second nature right. I try to sell this product. I figure out within a couple of months people are clicking on this. They're not buying us. I'm going to then tweak it. In some way and i think we could do that from a social perspective for for policy with in my view much larger stakes.

Chetty Kobe San Francisco Joe Biden Bill Gates Harvard Amazon Bronx Queens Facebook Manhattan America
How To Scale Your Offer With Ravi Abuvala

Marketing School

04:38 min | 2 months ago

How To Scale Your Offer With Ravi Abuvala

"Everyone today we've got another special episode of Marketing School. At this time, it is with Ravi. Bhalla I think I got that right scaling with systems he's chief scaling officer. We're GonNa let him explain what that means in a second, but she's comes affirm that helps other companies scaled to multiple seven fighters using virtual assistant automation systems and I love nursing out on this type of stuff you know whether it's marketing whether it is you WanNa talk about mergers and acquisitions there always are systems that you have to follow and really great. To Have Ravi on the show. How's it going man? I'm Doin' excellent Eric. Thank you so much for having me on longtime listener actually just in the last guests that you had on us to swift. So that's actually how i. kind of had stumbled across through guys in the first place and everyone that's listening. You got so lending ears, I. Hope I gave you got some value today for sure it's going to be dig out as. Many nuggets as I can for everyone. So let's talk about it. I mean scaling what systems, what is your definition of it and maybe some practical kind of case studies examples yeah it'd be happy. So we essentially take businesses usually higher ticket service space businesses, and usually in the business sector. So online advertising, we've done real estate investing real estate residential search engine optimization. We've gone across the board, but essentially, what we do is we help. Them scale by setting in systems automations and the coolest part about it as we have a training center in the Philippines and we place fully trained virtual assistance inside of our clients companies at about three dollars an hour. So we essentially teaching them what they need to do or grow and scale sales, funnels automations add we can nerd out on that, and then we actually give them a virtual assistant that's going to do that work for them. Got So maybe I mean stories are always a good way to explain kind of what you do. So is a case that you can speak to his for example, I work with this type of company and we did this specifically and these are the results that they saw. A glove too. So there's a few different ones but I just was on a podcast little earlier on a day and gentleman was creating podcast essentially PR company where he gets other people on podcasts and explaining to him about a client of mine. Adam he is an incredible company mogul insider and he came to us he didn't really have know what he was doing. He said how what kind of run up your company but I don't know what I'm GonNa do and I look I've been on these PODCASTS, their incredible I've been monetize. An quite a bit just from the value on giving people reaching out to us as are the biggest issues in the marketplace is in this industry is you give people on podcast, but the other issue is that you're not figuring out teach people how to monetize that podcast like how do you actually make money from you just saying, Hey, I have a great product or service doesn't really do anything and so what we pretty much did is crap in a back end off for him so that he was actually teaching his clients, how to. Generate sales from the PODCASTS that they're getting on how to generate leads and sales from, and so we essentially helped him construct that and he came in literally dollars in the bank. When he started this product with us, we taught him Dave, the virtual system created a sales funnel forum, great video sales letter first thirty days he did about forty thousand dollars in monthly recurring revenue, and then within six weeks, he had about eighty thousand dollars monthly recurring revenue, and that's literally before he had even finished paying us off he was already at. Sixty thousand dollars a month recurring revenue from zero and it was because we were able to number. One system is the back end offer so that it was something that was the product market fit and just pour gasoline on the fire by having instagram outrage linked in outreach email advertising that kind of stuff. So just to clarify, did you take him from zero to eighty k. a month or so to sixty km length or both? So zero to sixty K. and then he actually joined my higher. Here's like look this works like with your. Higher level, and then we took him to eighty K. and we did that literally just by working a little bit closer with them and adding in I think organics are great way to start a you guys obviously deal talk about Seo Inorganic and we do that really really heavy. But at some point, obviously throwing in the paid ads aspect of it can really light a few on the fire and that's essentially where we did after we have a product market fit? We know the Messaging Works and We know that sales funnel converts then we're actually GONNA turn on pay traffic and that's how you Agassi take off. Got Just so I, understand this are you basically helping people craft their offer and then you're helping them scale it and then you had a va just to say, Hey, you go. We're going to take the training wheels off go a great question. So actually most of the time people already coming to us with an offer a product market fit? So he already had the idea that he. Wanted, and usually we don't work with or like I want make my first dollar online because that's a whole different person. That's like, Hey, I already have testimonies I have case studies. I just can't get enough deals. I can't get enough appointments on the phone whatever it is really great. Most of the time that has to do with you just not having enough attention and so day one that client works with us they sign up with us and work with us. We pretty much crafter messaging regret. What channel did you need going on and then we give it to the virtual assistant who does that outreach for them and so it's not unusual for client of ours who averages wanted to appointments a week before they come to us come in and within twenty four hours, they have about eight to ten appointments on the calendar for their service.

Virtual Assistant Ravi Marketing School Officer Instagram Adam Philippines Eric VA Dave Agassi
Should I ask my dad to invest in my business?

The $100 MBA Show

05:00 min | 2 months ago

Should I ask my dad to invest in my business?

"Survey S Should I get my dad to invest in my business or should I ask him to invest my business? I say, I like to point out that it's good that you actually say invest. An investment means he's going to get a percentage of the company in return for the twenty thousand dollars you're looking for. And this is not a loan. This is not like loan me twenty grand and I'll pay you back. Your father will be a part of the company, Meaning Hill own part of it. It may not be a controlling stake, but he will own a good portion of it. especially the fact that you haven't started your company really doesn't have much value because. You don't have anything to show yet because you haven't sold the APP, you have made money from customers been made. Any revenue has showed any kind of traction to say, Hey, this company is worth X. amount of dollars right now is just the hopes that the just purely on the concept and the idea that you actually give him a return on investment. So the first thing I want to say that if you're going to approach her dad for investment, you have to seem as an investor and not your dad, which means you getting to present him the business just like you see presenting on shark tank right and what does the first thing they ask on shark tank all The sharks to ask the same question. Every time somebody does a presentation to go through the whole presentation things like that. The first question they ask is how many units have you sold? How many sales have you made a money Jimmy revenue they want to know do people actually want while you're selling the market value this product because the investor that's all they really care about this. This thing have legs have the potential to grow. Their opinion really doesn't matter. It's the market's opinion that matters. So you're not in that position right now where you can actually give numbers and proved that people want what you have, and that means you need to give up more equity to get the money. So think about the value of your company right now it doesn't really have much value because you're not selling anything you know have nothing in your hands it you don't have anything created, but what will it be in the future If it somewhat successful, it's really hard for you to tell because you don't have any data. But even if you say in two years, the company is going to be worth one, hundred, thousand dollars. In order for an investor to want to make money, they're to want to at least double their money. Okay. That means they won't forty thousand dollars in return for their investment of twenty thousand dollars. That means they're going to at least forty percent of the company. If you're uncomfortable with all of this, then my advice us a try to bootstrap your business much as possible you some of your savings grow as you can think of the minimal viable version of your APPs. You can get idea validation for a skin product market fit get some customers. Make some revenue see this has legs first before you actually try to raise capital because it's a lot easier to raise the money. When you have a working product when you have sales when you have customers, we can say, hey, people like this you know and it's making money and here my projections. But right now you don't have any of that data. So. If you're willing to part with, you know a big percentage of your company. Then go ahead and get an investment from your father and doesn't matter if your father anybody else that is an option if you're willing to part ways with that large chunk of percentage whatever that is if you still feel like you, WanNa bootstrap you WANNA raise some. Money try to see if you really need twenty grand how much is the bare minimum you need to star this thing to have it off the ground maybe it's not twenty maybe it's ten years, five thousand dollars and five thousand dollars can be earned right. You can actually hold off on launching this product and save five grand after a few months. Of living a little frugally. If you absolutely have to take alone five thousand dollars is a whole lot better than twenty in terms of what you're gonNA pay an interest. But if you do want approach your father and you feel like you'd like to have a part of the business. There's nothing wrong with mixing family with business as long as it's clear expectations are what everybody's getting in the deal. You don't want any sour grapes later on, you want people to feel like that. They got what they asked for what they they knew they were getting into. This is why it's important for you to be open and honest with your dad if you're going to approach him and as well as pitched to him as if he was an investor, you have to convince him that your product. Your APP actually has the potential with any data you can gather even if it surveys even if it's a market research, even if it's just simple as. Hey My APP is in this market and the potential in this market is X. amount of dollars of revenue year is how big the pie is, how much money that can be made who are the big players in that market who your competitors and how you going to compete with them. These are some things that you can really explore and display and present to anybody who's interested in investing, including your father and all this time wasted you're actually investing. Some, really good time and learning a whole lot about the market. You're about to enter

Jimmy
HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

Big Book Podcast

04:38 min | 3 months ago

HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

"Who is convinced against his will is of the same opinion still. But not this man. I was the oldest of three children and my father was an alcoholic. One of the earliest memories that I have is of a bottle sitting on his desk with skull and crossbones and marked poison. At that time as I remember he had promised never to take another drink. Of course he did I can also remember that he was a salesman and a very good one. When he was uptown, we were living in the little town of Moscow. I went up to try to get some money from him to buy groceries. He wouldn't give me any money for the groceries, but he did take me across the street and buy me a bag of candy which I later took back traded for a loaf of bread. I was not more than six at that time. My father died in nineteen. Oh One when I was eight years old and I was in the second or third grade school. I immediately quit school and went to work and from that time until I was high school age, there was never a return to school. I always built up in my own mind. The great things that I was going to do, and in fact, I accomplished about fifty percent of them and then lost interest. That continued through my entire life. When I was sixteen years old my mother remarried and I was given the opportunity of going back to school. I went into the high school grades but having missed all the intermediate grades I didn't get along too well. So I developed the habit of going back to school just long enough for the football season and then quitting. There was always a tremendous drive and ambition to become a great guy because I think I recognized inwardly that I didn't have any special talents. At a comparatively early age I can remember being jealous of my brother. He did things much better than I did because he applied himself and learned how to do them and I never applied myself. Whether I could have done as well as he I don't know. I was married at the age of nineteen to a grand girl and had good business prospects. I had bought a piece of ground in Cuyahoga falls and cut it into lots and had a profit of approximately forty thousand dollars and that was a lot of money in those days. With that profit I built a number of houses, but then I neglected them. I wouldn't put sufficient time on them. Consequently, my labor bills ran up I. Lost Money and then just fool the way a large part of that profit. When I was eighteen at the end of high school, the High School team had a banquet at a well known roadhouse outside of Akron. We boys drove out in somebody's car and went to the bar on the way to the dining room and I in an effort to impress the other boys that I was city bread having lived in Scranton and Cleveland asked them. If they didn't want to drink, they looked at one another quarterly and finally one of them allowed he'd have a beer and they all followed him each of them saying he'd have a beer too. I ordered Martini extra dry. I didn't even know what a Martini looked like but I had heard a man down the bar order one. That was my first drink. I kept watching the man down the bar to see what he did with a contraption like that and he just smelled up his drink and set it down again. So I did the same. He took a couple of puffs of the cigarette and I took a couple of puffs on my cigarette. He tossed off half of his Martini I tossed off half a mind and nearly blew the top of my head off it. Irritated. My nostrils I choked I didn't like it. There was nothing about that drink that I liked but I watched him any tossed off the rest of his. So I tossed off the rest of mine he ate his olive and I ate mine I didn't even like the olive it was repulsive to me from every standpoint I drank nine Martinis in less than an hour. Twenty. Two years later Dr Bob told me that what I had done was like switch and setting up a demand for more alcohol in my system. I didn't know that then I had no more reason to drink those. Martinez than a Jack Rabbit. At that particular time the boys put me on a shudder and took me out to the shed and I lay in the car while they enjoyed their banquet. That was the first time. I. Ever Drank hard liquor. Blackout. Drinking. At once.

Salesman High School Martini Cuyahoga Falls Jack Rabbit Football Dr Bob Scranton Akron Moscow Martinez Cleveland
Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

Business Wars Daily

05:29 min | 3 months ago

Tesla Rivals are Moving Into High Gear -- and Going Public

"From wondering I'm Elaine Appleton grant and this is business words daily on this Wednesday August Nineteenth David Brown's on vacation. Tesla has long had an image of being in both good and less good ways without comparison. CEO? Elon Musk stands out for his big vision and sometimes quirky behavior, and until now anyway, Tesla's all electric vehicles have stood head and shoulders above the competition coming from traditional automakers. Competition what competition I can almost imagine musk saying. Oh, but there is plenty coming tesla shares soared two, hundred, fifty percent this year. The company is now the most valuable automaker in the world according to. CNN. That's because Tesla which went public ten years ago is finally profitable. Tesla had a record twenty nineteen in posted its first annual profit last year despite the pandemic it's been profitable this year as well and that kind of performance and the stock market's reward for it is convincing more and more electric vehicle makers to go public and to try to woo customers away from Tesla last week, Ohio Electric Startup, Lordstown Motors Corporation, or L. M. C. said, it plans to go public by the end of the year. It's ticker symbol ride. If the deal goes through, the company will be valued at close to one point five, billion dollars. So who is Lordstown Motors to burst on the scene this way? L. LLC is a spinoff of another electric truckmaker called Workhorse. GROUP LORDS DOWN CEO Steve Burns is the former CEO of workhorse with LLC Burns resurrecting a project that we're course didn't have the money to do the company plans to release an all electric full-size pickup truck the Lordstown endurance in the second half of twenty twenty one that's according to journalist Alan. Adler, writing for trade publication freight waves. The truck will have a range of about two hundred fifty miles on a charge the same as Tesla's sci-fi looking cyber truck it'll toes seventy five hundred pounds alums. He says again, just like the chuck, the endurance will start at fifty two thousand dollars a good deal more than the cyber forty thousand dollar base price. But UNLIKE TESLA LLC plans to sell the endurance to commercial customers buying fleets of trucks since revealing the prototype on June twenty-fifth Ellen Mc says it's received more than twenty seven, thousand pre orders. That's one point four, billion dollars worth of trucks. NCO Burns says its first years worth of trucks are now sold out. That is if it can raise the money, it needs to actually make them l.. AMC. Bought the Lordstown Ohio GM plant that shutdown last year when GM killed the last Chevy Cruz that six million square foot plant needs retooling, which is costly MC plans to raise about six hundred and seventy five million dollars through its IPO. That boatload of cash could help it come through on its boast to be first to market among a group of EV pickup truck competitors in addition to Tesla that group includes Ford GM Nikola and Arabian a company backed by Ford and Amazon. So, here's the obvious L.. He doesn't yet have a product just a prototype if you're wondering how the young startup can go public without a product you should be. L. EMC is one of a handful of electric vehicle makers employing what's called a reverse merger that means the company that plans to make a product like LLC hooks up with the so-called blank check business. It's also called a special purpose acquisition company. SPAC. Is doing the reverse merger with a blank check company called Diamond Peak Holdings. Diamond peak is already publicly traded that means when the merger occurs. LLC. MC becomes public sort of like easing into a coat someone else has been wearing. This back door IPO method is easier for companies to do. They don't have to produce expensive roadshow's. Also, avoid a great deal of financial scrutiny by the SEC. One of the most famous reverse murders was Richard Branson's space company Virgin Galactic, Holdings and Fantasy Sports Company draftkings went public in a three billion dollar reverse merger. Last year according to the A. Times. The number of reverse mergers hit a record high last year. That's because the IPO market was volatile and high profile IPO's like Uber Fared. Poorly. It ain't cheap to build a new car company but Tesla's successes inspiring other entrepreneurs to try and they need oodles of money that helps to explain why another electric truckmaker nickel motors used a reverse merger to go public in June and vehicle-maker. FISKER has a reverse merger in the works. The is green truckmakers may see these back door IPO's as the speediest way to raise the cash needed to fight he'll in musk and rapidly launched their new products. Tesla's promising to deliver the cyber took by late twenty, twenty one which means that the deadline to beat yes. It may be tough to knock Tesla on it's pedestal, but LLC and a raft arrivals are sure going to try.

Tesla Tesla Llc Elon Musk Ellen Mc CEO GM Ohio Adler Diamond Peak Holdings Lordstown Motors Elaine Appleton Nco Burns CNN Llc Burns Lordstown Motors Corporation Steve Burns David Brown L. Llc AMC
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 3 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. 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The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

Ramsey Call of the Day

04:58 min | 3 months ago

I Owe $94,000 to the IRS!

"Joining me today Ramsey personality Chris Hogan. Caesar's in Chicago Hi how are you? Hey how you doing? How can we help? Okay little nervous here. first time caller first time listener. I. Last summer started listening to you. Laugh. Until far about a month ago emotionally on one hundred, thirty thousand dollars in depth, which is on ninety, four, thousand dollars. Irs I'm trying to do what I tend to To figure what's the best way to tackle this Most of most of the other stuff is car Karleena and credit card that I just weren't to Carmax this weekend and sold a vehicle which has some positive equity. Our sixty, five, hundred I. Don't know what to do with this money at this point. What in the world? How do you owe the IRS ninety four thousand? Salamanders Twenty fifteen twenty, sixteen business, you know I, I, started a business with my wife I pretty much try to manage the business myself. You know everything myself and I kinda school things up and didn't help that I had a bad accounting I concert the irs this to be issue I. If we have to file a ten forty x forum I'll try a man does taxes you know put this is in process I mean I still have to making some kind of panic because I'm getting some letters on a male as far as. Stop stuff. So you're saying that the returns were filed improperly and you may not actually Oh this money when you follow amended returns. Exactly. Okay. But if you you have, you have some money you said you had six thousand dollars from sale your car. Yes. Sixty, sixty, five now. And current him baby step two so I might stop just. You're going to spend some money right now on a tax attorney. Or a tax professional, that is a stud of some kind and If it costs you six thousand dollars, it won't. But if it costs you two thousand dollars, this is job one right now. Is You can you can take your hundred and thirty thousand and wipe out ninety four or a big portion of ninety four with some simple proper filing you don't do that yourself. That's how you got here. You go get a tax pro check Daveramsey DOT COM and click on our taxi LP's if there's not one in your area start shopping around talk to some business guys that are that are competent business people in your area ask them for advice on who a good tax attorney or a tax pro Israel and let them dig in. I I don't you don't need to do anything. You don't worry about me staff. No this is job one I R. S. Yes. Job One that's what you're doing and and Caesar make area focused. Don't come up with excuses. Pick up the phone call set up a time to go sit down, gather up, find out all the documentary going to eat 'cause you're going to have to do legwork here but trust me if worth it because it's dealing with irs. Yeah you. Sure you're a good tax professional can tell you if you need to get on an installment plan and. We need to do to get the barking dogs off your heel while you get this stuff filed. But Dude, you don't thirty seconds you get this stuff filed. Now this is an overdue time paper. and. You've. You know this is killing you and these people have unlimited freaking power. It is unbelievable what they can do to your life if they choose to cy I really really really want them To Go away. Yes I want you get the paperwork done and you don't have anything that's more important in your life for the next two of then get all of this filed as soon as possible. Don't don't drag it out three months. Don't drag it out two months file the stuff get with somebody get the work done. Yeah. You State you get you a cup of coffee and work into the work into the we hours of the morning at this done. What. You do because here's the reality some tweaking and the proper filings again has the ability to wipe some of this out. This is a this is a huge opportunity. Sounds like a good portion of it. Impugned it on him because he didn't do proper filing and they guest that's right in the irs never guesses low. It's a rule of theirs. It's written somewhere in a book I'm sure. Oh God. Penalties on this stuff and it all goes away with properly amended filing or large portion of it does. Get that the stuff you should have been working on all these long time ago. Yes. That's out of the way. Down to just forty thousand dollars a dad now go. That's right.

IRS Caesar Attorney Chris Hogan Chicago Carmax Karleena Israel
Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

Motley Fool Answers

05:55 min | 4 months ago

Mastering Money With the Budgetnista

"So. Tiffany. Let's start with your personal story. So we're currently in third recession of the century. But I'm guessing that you're doing just fine partially at least because of the lessons you learned during the last recession to tell us a little bit about your history, what the last recession was like for you and what has happened since then. Now. Certainly The last question caught me off guard i. Was Not prepared. I because quite honestly I was a schoolteacher and you know I was pretty confident. I'm like, I don't know that schoolteachers lose their jobs because you know we are essential workers, and now yet here we are back again. But Yeah I was a schoolteacher and I didn't move my job actually in two, thousand, eight when so many of my friends did but I let I lost it at the tail end of two, thousand nine. So it really took me by surprise but. Up until like I would say, twenty, five, twenty, six, I was what I called financially. Perfect. I grew up in a household. Money was talked about wasn't scared of talking about finances. Might author was a CFO OF A small nonprofit? He also had his NBA in economics, his his a in finance. My mom was a nurse and we literally used to have money meeting so. I. Didn't grow up with the angst that most people did. So by the time, I was twenty five even though. I was teaching preschool wasn't making much. I think I was making like forty thousand dollars a year By the time I was twenty, five ahead. Forty thousand saved bought a Condo I. I had an ADL to I. Think Credit Score at didn't have any credit card debt. I paid off like my parents helped with my undergrad degree plus. I commuted. So what I did haven't stood alone. I was able to pay that off a few years after school. So financially perfect like okay. So I honestly couldn't relate although I was helping my friends with their budgets savings and things like that. I couldn't relate to the mistakes because I had not yet need them but I was going to then. When I was twenty six, I went on to get my masters in education and I was like, okay. So you now you went from no debt to a mortgage, not so bad. I had a a you know student loans because my master's not so bad. But by twenty six, I said, okay. Now, I'm ready to learn to invest and instead of asking my father who has literally two degrees in years of experience I'm GonNa ask a friend of mine. and. So I asked a friend of mine who appeared to be independently wealthy because he had like a really nice car. and. Like a like a fancy apartment he's well I think Spurs. You have to learn to invest with other people's money at. My money. So what he postulated as is that. Do, you have credit card said, yes. But I paid off in full every month because as instructed by my father, he was like well, did you know you could pull money off a credit card? I, did not know that. So he said not only can you pull off one? You could pull it off to I was like double the mistake. Let's do it. So I pulled off twenty thousand dollars off of my credit cards and I went to invest with him what's to say? That didn't happen I. ENDED UP Thirty, five thousand dollars in credit card debt when I didn't have credit card debt prior and I just remember thinking a first year. I said didn't want to take responsibility for the mistake that I made I did not tell my dad or my mom. But I pay just a minimum because I said, you know what? He's going to come back or he's GonNa. Take care of this because it's not my fault of Ansel from age twenty seven I didn't do anything. Well, twenty, seven night out the money twenty eight, just pay the maximum finally twenty nine, I said all right I'm GONNA pay off this debt just going to buckle down I live pretty frequently anyway, and then twenty nine is when I lost my job. So. Now, I've got a mortgage student loan credit card debt and I was like, okay, I don't know what to do. I've never been in the situation. So. Fallon to this light dark hole of like spiral like because I'm twenty nine going on thirty I've lost everything as far as I can tales financially. So I ended up moving back home with my parents without telling them why they knew it was the recession obviously, and they also knew I lost my job, but they didn't know. ABOUT CREDIT CARD DEBT Live with them for year than I. Am I live with my sister on her couch for year, try to figure out my life because back. Then now we're getting the six hundred dollars a week on our stimulus stimulus check. But what was happening then as they just extended unemployment typically, you can get unemployment for up to a year. They extended to two years. So I said, okay, you have two years to. To figure out what are you going to do with your life I was afraid to go back to work for someone because I thought it, you can lose a job as a preschool teacher essential. Then that's not safe. What could be safe? So I tried a bunch of different things I tried on party promoting party planning I volunteered everywhere I can think of, but while doing so I was helping my friends. But save get out of debt all these things in one day. My friend said, you should turn that into a business and I'm like you. Now I had gone to school my bachelor's degrees in business, but I hadn't used it. And so I, tried to charge people one on one. Only to find the people that you're actually helping with your budget. The reason why they hired us because they don't have any money. So that was a bad business. So I, switched my business model to one too few and I worked on getting contracts and I got my first contract with the United, way? And I rose excited 'cause they were going to pay me I think like. Three, or four, hundred dollars a class and I had a six week course that I'd written. For them, and so I did, and that was like my first. Okay. Maybe I can really make a run at this My little sister gave me the nickname, the budget. So that became because she said like, I'm not like the fashion. Easter. Who is really fashionable, but I am very cheap so

Money NBA Tiffany CFO Ansel Preschool Teacher Fallon
Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

Climate Cast

04:00 min | 4 months ago

Climate change is hastening lakeshore erosion

"Climate change is making more waves and eroding the shoreline of Lake Superior more quickly. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter on the shores of Lake Superior this is climate. So I'm back from vacation now, working inside the lab today, but I can still hear those lake superior way of swooshing in my head for the last three summers. We've stayed at some lovely cabins near. Grand Marais each year. The Big Lake has eroded the edge of the bluff closer to our cabin and this year. The edge is only about three feet away, and it's a fifteen foot drop down to the waves below. Charlie. Walters owns the cabins hi Charlie. Doing I'm doing great. How much would you say that? Shoreline has eroded in the past couple of years well this last year has been about a foot the previous year. It was only a couple of inches, but this last season it really picked up pace. We were pretty stunned when we saw the cabin this year that we stayed in its now perch, just a couple of feet from the edge. What are your options to save that cabin and address the shoreline? To Cabin, but you'd still have the Rozhin problem. I'm told you know they'd have to build up with rock and put some type of filter Mesh screen in and back fill with some soil and. Anyway be a long process and in the range of forty thousand dollars, so Charlie if this repair does turn out to be forty thousand dollars. What does that to Your Business? What's the impact there? My wife grandmother came over from Norway and his only things since nineteen thirty two. And right now in the process of fixing up the cabins, and then paying off loans, so it's a pretty big dent. We basically have to stop everything else. We're doing Charlie Walters. Your cabins are lovely I wish you the best of luck and I hope we talk soon all right. So many Lake Superior Property owners like Charlie are now facing costly repairs from erosion damage heavier precipitation in the lake. Superior watershed is boosting water levels to near record, highs and warmer winters mean less protective lake GEIS's forming to buffer the waves that may be speeding up the erosion process. Jay Austin is a professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and works with the Large Lakes Observatory Hi Jay here from you, Paul? So how high are water levels running on lake superior now and in the past few years. We've had a remarkable run since about. About twenty seventeen of extremely high lake levels on the order of ten to twelve inches above what we would normally be seeing at this time of year, and what's the climate change signal for higher water levels in Lake Superior is it as simple as heavier precipitation in the Lake Superior Watershed when it comes right down to it? Yes, last several years have been much wetter than we would normally see here. The other one is the fact that is suppresses surface waves, and hence protects in some sense shoreline from that sort of wave driven erosion. The long term trend is indeed towards less is and how much of a winter temperature difference between total ice and no is does there need to be to make that change unlike superior? A year, where there is significant ice on the lake, and so people are going and visiting the ice, caves and people are ice fishing, the difference between one of those years at a year with basically no ice can be due to winter air temperature differences on the order of two three degrees. Fahrenheit, so the system is extremely sensitive to these relatively small shifts in winter, climate conditions J. Austin. Thanks for making the time in good to talk with you again. Thanks for having me on.

Lake Superior Charlie Walters Lake Superior Watershed Big Lake Lake Geis Jay Austin Paul Hunter Foot Drop Grand Marais NPR Chief Meteorologist Norway Large Lakes Observatory University Of Minnesota Duluth Professor
E-commerce Is Changing. Heres How to Prepare

Marketing School

05:32 min | 5 months ago

E-commerce Is Changing. Heres How to Prepare

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Neil, Patel and two and today we're GONNA discuss e commerce changing. Here's how to prepare. All, right I wasn't prepared to do this intro. To do the episode is so that's what's important. So ecommerce changing as a matter of fact shop advice dog is going through the roof right now. WanNa. Talk about comparing a lot of people right now. We have a guy on the growth accelerator do he's brushing it with his vice store, so if you're just starting out, I would. there's more bands, but there's for beginners to do. I'll just get started. Go shop fibers. Basic starting point I. Yeah and the thing with ECOMMERCE isn't Amazon right now? Like everyday is like black Friday or is that shop if I? was saying like everyday day is like Black Friday shocked by? It's just ridiculous. The big thing with ecommerce right now is you would have a lot a big set. It's an ECOMMERCE Amazons of the world selling everything, but what's doing really well right now is people to selling one product, and that's it may have your up sells down cells, but just like a one product e commerce store. You know I know someone who sells insoles for high heels and she's like yeah, I'll Outta high heel. Shoes are uncomfortable. She created better insoles for high heels and I think she's doing around like two hundred, thirty, two hundred forty thousand dollars a month in profit. Yeah I think so fashions coming back. What is fired luxury fashion? Not so much right? So I think what's important. There's link that I shared. If you Google, covid nineteen within I think you should be defined this. Basically, it's numbers around how ECOMMERCE is performing right also co Van Dyke Jane. Within DOT CO and have been for the retail sales, so you can see where trends are right now and what I would say is. If you're E congress in terms of how to prepare, what would you say? People need to do Neil for people that are a little more established right now. The big thing is make sure that you have your inventory. I think if you don't have a good supply chain and you don't have a ton of inventory going. You could end up. Getting screwed the other big thing with ECOMMERCE. If you're trying to adapt your goal is you're trying to maintain right, or is it to grow grow? The other thing that I would do is if you're ECOMMERCE is spend a lot of money on conversion optimization. There's way too many people that are spending time trying to figure out a new AD channels figuring out new creatives instead just focusing on. Hey, how do I maximize conversion by my downfalls might funnels, so I can scale from one hundred to two hundred three hundred. Because if you don't have that, funnel right over time. It's already proven you. You know other than co bid that adds continually rise, even during a recession I think covered was a rare circumstance because you had a lot of people had a shutdown, because business couldn't have people but I would really focus on commercial optimization, because it's pretty much guarantee just like taxes that Google ads on facebook. ADS ARE GONNA, go up a year from now and getting more expensive three years from now even more expensive five years from now. Yep any related to emerge. Read. Optimization is talking on my your funnel to so in the last episode talk about having a one time offer or or bump on her pages, so the most important thing I think at least to me or one of those things is making sure your supply chain lockdown amateur. It does matter how much you scale your ads, but as you have that lockdown, you're driving people. They by the. Thank you. Page you another offer right there and then. Maybe there was another offer right after again. Cleveland's doesn't really good with this, but I think. Think a lot of people in the e-commerce world. You're not taking as much advantage as they could be. The say to is so I. Remember I bought a bustle records just to cut up. You know, be safe if back, wait, but silver coins They're actually Tori. If you're out of inventory, they actually do. Would you like the texture lower back? We have inventory yet, so I thought that was really Nice I'm pretty sure there's a fly out. I appreciate it must be on platforms must also that was helpful and came back and it was a big burden. Yeah and then the other thing, too is think subscriptions ECOMMERCE. It's been around there for a long time, but a lot of products that you sell. People constantly need when I get him to subscribing to the Senate products so ECOMMERCE business and turn it into subscription. Kind of like a Chewy I think to offer subscriptions and even Amazon does as well versus just selling people something one off especially if they continue need your product like bursts bursts offers really amazing fos I don't know if you use the Eric. It's legit. Do like you just gotta by the birth squash. Ten dollars, but don't buy from their website because they make you subscribe to school by from Amazon. Faster shipping to? are going to try. It aren't Ya. It's like ten bucks by. Way Birth the brush. No, they have lost to be U. R. S. T.. A.. You are at the. They know you're big on glossing lake me, trust me, it's best loss. I've ever tried all right. I will do that the only thing I'll add I have the retail polls thing. But, yeah, looking at Omni Channel e commerce is continuing like when I hit. The numbers were flat now everything's going up into the right so things. Spends cutting back consumer confidence something about so yes, you want to capitalize on it, and it's always good look at. The other thing Neil night light look. Every now and then is looking at railroad traffic meeting. How often are goods being transported least around the United States that would we're kind of confidence is as well

Amazon Neil Ecommerce Amazons Google Wanna United States Cleveland Patel Dot Co Senate Tori Facebook U. R. S. T
041 - Investing In Rental Properties

Live Blissed Out

16:44 min | 5 months ago

041 - Investing In Rental Properties

"This is episode forty one on the list our podcast did you know that historically in the United States? A red door signified that a homeless, a safe place for travelers to stop and rest. He people would paint their doors. Read to communicate that they are welcoming. It is a sign of inclusion and signifies that they value community. Hello action takers welcome to live blissed out a podcast where I have authentic conversations with business owners and subject matter experts to help us get the scoop, the four, one one, and the low down on a variety of topics, tired of hesitating or making decisions without having the big picture WanNa be in the know then. This is the place to go I'm your host Mersa Houston helping achieve bliss through awareness and action. Thanks for joining me the information opinions and recommendations presented in this podcast are for general information. Information only and any reliance on the information provided in this podcast is done at your own risk. This podcast should not be considered professional advice. Sending a coffee Mug shot. Shout out to Peggy L. IN CENTENNIAL COLORADO. Thanks for filling my Coffee Cup Peggy and being such a cool being. If you'd like to help, keep me fueled head over delivery style, dot com, and click on the caffeinate Matab to give me a boost and redeem your bonus as a thank you for supporting the show joining me is. The Mozart of real estate at the Denver one hundred whether you're buying your dream home or selling one. Tim makes it happen. Tim, we'll orchestrate the buying and selling of your real estate with is finally to knowledge of relevant market trends, maximizing Internet and online state of the art, high traffic exposure expertise in negotiating skills attention to every detail with trusting confidence, resulting top dollar for his. His clients. If you're investing in residential real estate, he can make your profits. or Tim serves as the President of the board of directors for the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation and chair of the Grievance Committee for the Aurora Association of Realtors. He is a twenty year member of the Littleton Symphony and is dedicated twenty years of life in the Colorado Army National Guard. Tim gives back. Back tastes community clients and service providers to learn more visit Tim Hoi men Dot Com, searching for a minimal versatile handheld Tripod look no further switch pod works with any camera from a phone to a DSL LAR and simplifies video. Making switch pod is lightweight compact in nearly indestructible. It will save you time between shots, so you can focus more on shooting and less on messing with. With your gear just head over to the partners tab at liberalist out dot com and click on the switchboard link to let them know. I sent you and help support the show. Hey, Tim, it's great to have you on the show today. Well, thanks for having me really appreciate it Marissa well. I'm looking forward to talking to you about rental properties. There are many reasons why. Why people want to purchase a home as we all know, people buy homes because they plan on living in them, or perhaps they're moving to a different location, and they need to get a home, or they're up sizing downsizing. There's many reasons, but in particular we're going to be going through the process of how to consider using property for either investment or current income, so like to. To start by asking you. What are some of the considerations that somebody should have if they were to decide to buy a rental property in terms of the purpose whether they want to use it long term, or as a way to increase their income on a monthly basis, I'm a big proponent of long term planning and long term thinking so really. There are strategies that I. I look at when a person is thinking about going into the landlord business. I is understanding that you are buying future income, so you are sacrificing a little bit now for the future, secondly is appreciation. The way houses appreciate in price is a bonus. I don't really consider that a primary factor but man. It's really good if you look at the history of owning houses third you. You. WanNa buy quality or break, even cash flow properties, so the cash flow at the beginning isn't so important, because the goal is that you own rental properties free and clear me no mortgage. That's where the magic is with owning investment properties speaking of that then how do we get to that point? So? Of course we're going to be talking about money and how the money? Money is going to be invested and there many ways to approach that we can put a minimum down payment and get a mortgage. We can put a larger down payment. We could probably cut the amount of payments that we put in so that we can own the home faster, or we can even pay in cash if we have it. So what are some of the options there? There and the pros and cons because I'm sure there are benefits to certain decisions, and I'd like to get a better understanding as to what we should be thinking about when we're thinking about making the investment while the first call would be to your realtor who is knowledgeable on rental properties and how that works, and typically your realtor really needs to own rental properties themselves so. So they have a better understanding of that. Really it's also up to the lender that you talk to to get that down typically, if you're buying and investment property, which means, you would not be living in it. You do have to put about twenty five percent down. That's a really good number to have. It gets you the better interest rate in it eliminates mortgage insurance which all. All has to do with cash flow another methodology of doing it though is if you're younger and you don't mind moving a few times, you can buy a property with the mindset that I'm going to turn this into a rental property and you can do that a few times over I recommend that people stay for at least two years in the House that they have gone. Gone cash is always king. You'll end up getting a better price on the house and the cash flow is immediate, but you wanna look and see what is the best fit for you based upon the cash flow, and what's called Roi, which is return on investment? Basically what percentage rate you're getting on the money you put in? We come across a lot of realtors in every realtor. Realtor as far as I'm aware, at least they specialize in different things. So how do I know what to ask in? How do I look for realtor? That has a really good knowledge specifically, when it comes to investing in real estate for some sort of rental income, there's questions you can ask real estate agents to Kinda Fair it out if they know about mental properties one. One is tell me what the ROI would be on rental properties if they don't know what that means, that's probably a good sign me, not WanNa. Use Them. I would ask them how many rental properties they own, and how many rental properties have they helped? Clients by those are the types of questions that you can ask also another great way of finding out who the good realtors. Realtors czar is cost some of the property management companies around and ask them. Who would you recommend I'm looking at buying rental properties? What real estate agents would you recommend that I use? That's a really good tip. Actually because they come across realtors that really specialize in this area, and so they'd be able to direct people to the right realtor that has experience in that area. Speaking of property management companies then when we're considering a property for this purpose, they're obviously different property types that we need to be thinking about. For example we want a duplex. Do we want the Condo a patio home single family home? Do we want to be in an area that has an Hoa or not, because there are definite advantages, and maybe disadvantages to those decisions based on our ultimate objective. So how do we decipher what the property type is that we should consider? That's something that our realtor could help us. Think about yes, absolutely and really the way you. You look at it is a term called risk versus reward. If you're willing to take more risk, the rewards are greater so for example when you're dealing with a town home or a condo. You don't have to take care of the outside. That's typically covered in the homeowners association dues not always, but usually. If you're risk averse to having to pay for things like roofs, exterior paint, also landscaping that can be very expensive. You may be better off going to a town home or a condo. The return is going to be a little bit less though the Roi will. will be a smaller percentage. That's really how you look at it. It all up to the individual how they WANNA do it. The same applies with property management. If you want a property manager to help you, there's no real standard rate typically somewhere between seven to ten percent of the monthly income that you received so that's going to take away from your our ally, but that means you manage it yourself, and they're certainly risks and rewards to that as well so it all depends on the individual, and what type of risk. They're willing to take getting into that then. Then in terms of managing yourself. I think that one of the things that people get concerned about is that they don't know enough about how to so. For example we have laws to consider we have to find the right tenants that we know are going to appreciate being in the home and taking care of the home end being their long-term. If that's what we're looking for, and then there's maintenance issues to consider as well as general expenses that sometimes we don't even think about front, so not sense. How do we go about learning about how we should handle? Handle it if we decide that we would like to do it ourselves. Versus hiring a professional are certainly books out there that you can read one that I read was called landlord. It's a really good book. The other way is your real estate agent should be able to help you navigate some of these things as well go online. Go to YouTube. You can do videos. There's plenty of information out there about how to do it yourself. If you're doing landlord, but certainly your real estate agent, they're knowledgeable in the investing side of things should be able to guide you. You and help you get started with that I've done that many times, so in other words do your research right I mean. There's a lot of tools and resources. Now that we have access to that. We never had before and that way. If we can gather as much information, upfront as possible will be more prepared. Absolutely real estate attorneys are real good resources well, they can do lease agreements for you. They can do. LLC's all sorts of things like that to help you. Protect yourself and have a good experience having rental properties. How do we know when it's? It's the right time. The values of properties increase and decrease in things fluctuate, and sometimes you're thinking to yourself. Oh, it might be a good time to invest. Because property values are higher now, and in some cases you're thinking. No, actually it's better to wait until they get lower. And of course we don't know we don't know when things are going to go up and down. They change a lot. So how do we know when we should start thinking about this? If this is an avenue that we want to pursue in the future well first of all I, think. Think, we can all say that it doesn't matter if it's nineteen. Hundred or twenty twenty real estate feels like it's always too expensive. I said that back in the eighties when I bought my first patio home at forty thousand dollars I thought that was ridiculous and boy. I wish I had thirty of those now, so there are things that we can look at and that are localized. The local market is what's important. The Denver Market for example since one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy seven. We've had an annual appreciation on real estate six point one percent even with the. But, there are indicators that I watch for from a localized methodology. The first one is employment, so if the employment numbers are going up now. I'm not talking about unemployment I'm talking about how many new jobs have been added to the market. If it's going up, that's a really good sign once it starts going down. That means it's going to be about twelve to eighteen months and real estate prices are going to start going down. That's typically what happened. Not always supply and demand is second, the greater the supply, the last demand, the lesser appreciation we have in houses, and that also affects rental rates and thirties affordability. How affordable! Affordable is the area that you're looking at. Those are the three things that I focused on when I look at. Is it a good time to buy or not? For the last five years up until last year, I was telling people. It's not a good time to buy. Because pricing was just not there. It's starting to now. We're starting to see home starting to cash flow, and that's the other thing that we look at so hope that answers your question in a nutshell, it definitely does him. This might not be the right fit for certain people, and so what I'd like to get a sense of is what does it. It typically look like to be a land owner to be somebody who's renting out property. What are some expectations that you need to have to determine whether or not? This is the right approach something that you should be thinking about for yourself well. There's a couple of things one of the things that I do sit down with people and talk about is how much extra money at retirement you want, and that helps me and where they're at as far as do. They want to be a landlord or not. Is there risk? Yes, you have to be able to not take personally when somebody would burger up your place and it's. It's probably going to happen. You do have to set money aside for repairs. You also have to look at things long. If you're not looking at it long term and have the discipline to look at it long term, this may not be the right fit for you. Everybody's heard of fixing flips. I typically don't like doing that, but in this case you WANNA, hold pay it off as quickly as possible so that your properties are free and clear and understand that you may have to go in and do some repair work, and if you're not comfortable doing that, it's probably not right for you, but if you have a long-term. long-term mindset and attitude, it's a great way to have additional income when you're retired. Coming in every single month, bats the goal, so in other words you need to understand what is required of you and how that's going to look in terms of how you're going to participate in the process, and if you don't feel it, something that you can do yourself, or at least be a part of an are not even interested in doing it then, perhaps, it's not a right fit, but if you feel like you're excited about it, and it's something you really want to be involved in this. Be something to consider not being involved with. With it, you can't have property management do that and that's perfectly fine. The real question is are you willing to look at this long term? Are you willing to make a little bit of sacrifice now for later? That's a really good tipped him. If people wanted to get a hold of you and ask you about more information regarding this, how do they reach you? There's a couple of different ways you can reach me by phone by number is three, zero, three, six, six, nine, two, six, seven six. You can email me at T -pointment H., Y. M. N. at Diene one hundred dot com. I'm more than happy to answer. Answer any questions that you would have. No obligation won't sign you up for anything and on a monthly basis on the third Thursday of the month. If you do live in Denver, I have a meeting and we talk about how to be a landlord, and what issues there are, and what is the name of this group that you have on a monthly basis, Tim? It's called my wake up money team and the wake up money stands for if you wake up in the morning and you have this income coming in. Would it feel good? And of course the answer is yeah. It's great to know that people have more resources. Resources and information so that they can make the best decisions for themselves. Thank you so much. Tim I really appreciate all his invaluable information. You shared with us today. It was really great having you on the show. Well, it's my pleasure. Thank you so much. Marissa. That's all for this episode of Live blissed out. Thanks for listening and thanks to Tim. Hoi Men for being my guest. If you find value in our show, please visit live blissed out dot com to reach out, subscribe and share on social media. This show is made possible through listeners like you. Thank you so long for now and remember to keep moving forward.

Tim Hoi Wanna United States Peggy L. Denver Colorado Caffeinate Matab Mersa Houston Sensory Processing Disorder Fo Property Manager Colorado Army National Guard Littleton Symphony Marissa Youtube
041 - Investing In Rental Properties

Live Blissed Out

16:44 min | 5 months ago

041 - Investing In Rental Properties

"This is episode forty one on the list our podcast did you know that historically in the United States? A red door signified that a homeless, a safe place for travelers to stop and rest. He people would paint their doors. Read to communicate that they are welcoming. It is a sign of inclusion and signifies that they value community. Hello action takers welcome to live blissed out a podcast where I have authentic conversations with business owners and subject matter experts to help us get the scoop, the four, one one, and the low down on a variety of topics, tired of hesitating or making decisions without having the big picture WanNa be in the know then. This is the place to go I'm your host Mersa Houston helping achieve bliss through awareness and action. Thanks for joining me the information opinions and recommendations presented in this podcast are for general information. Information only and any reliance on the information provided in this podcast is done at your own risk. This podcast should not be considered professional advice. Sending a coffee Mug shot. Shout out to Peggy L. IN CENTENNIAL COLORADO. Thanks for filling my Coffee Cup Peggy and being such a cool being. If you'd like to help, keep me fueled head over delivery style, dot com, and click on the caffeinate Matab to give me a boost and redeem your bonus as a thank you for supporting the show joining me is. The Mozart of real estate at the Denver one hundred whether you're buying your dream home or selling one. Tim makes it happen. Tim, we'll orchestrate the buying and selling of your real estate with is finally to knowledge of relevant market trends, maximizing Internet and online state of the art, high traffic exposure expertise in negotiating skills attention to every detail with trusting confidence, resulting top dollar for his. His clients. If you're investing in residential real estate, he can make your profits. or Tim serves as the President of the board of directors for the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation and chair of the Grievance Committee for the Aurora Association of Realtors. He is a twenty year member of the Littleton Symphony and is dedicated twenty years of life in the Colorado Army National Guard. Tim gives back. Back tastes community clients and service providers to learn more visit Tim Hoi men Dot Com, searching for a minimal versatile handheld Tripod look no further switch pod works with any camera from a phone to a DSL LAR and simplifies video. Making switch pod is lightweight compact in nearly indestructible. It will save you time between shots, so you can focus more on shooting and less on messing with. With your gear just head over to the partners tab at liberalist out dot com and click on the switchboard link to let them know. I sent you and help support the show. Hey, Tim, it's great to have you on the show today. Well, thanks for having me really appreciate it Marissa well. I'm looking forward to talking to you about rental properties. There are many reasons why. Why people want to purchase a home as we all know, people buy homes because they plan on living in them, or perhaps they're moving to a different location, and they need to get a home, or they're up sizing downsizing. There's many reasons, but in particular we're going to be going through the process of how to consider using property for either investment or current income, so like to. To start by asking you. What are some of the considerations that somebody should have if they were to decide to buy a rental property in terms of the purpose whether they want to use it long term, or as a way to increase their income on a monthly basis, I'm a big proponent of long term planning and long term thinking so really. There are strategies that I. I look at when a person is thinking about going into the landlord business. I is understanding that you are buying future income, so you are sacrificing a little bit now for the future, secondly is appreciation. The way houses appreciate in price is a bonus. I don't really consider that a primary factor but man. It's really good if you look at the history of owning houses third you. You. WanNa buy quality or break, even cash flow properties, so the cash flow at the beginning isn't so important, because the goal is that you own rental properties free and clear me no mortgage. That's where the magic is with owning investment properties speaking of that then how do we get to that point? So? Of course we're going to be talking about money and how the money? Money is going to be invested and there many ways to approach that we can put a minimum down payment and get a mortgage. We can put a larger down payment. We could probably cut the amount of payments that we put in so that we can own the home faster, or we can even pay in cash if we have it. So what are some of the options there? There and the pros and cons because I'm sure there are benefits to certain decisions, and I'd like to get a better understanding as to what we should be thinking about when we're thinking about making the investment while the first call would be to your realtor who is knowledgeable on rental properties and how that works, and typically your realtor really needs to own rental properties themselves so. So they have a better understanding of that. Really it's also up to the lender that you talk to to get that down typically, if you're buying and investment property, which means, you would not be living in it. You do have to put about twenty five percent down. That's a really good number to have. It gets you the better interest rate in it eliminates mortgage insurance which all. All has to do with cash flow another methodology of doing it though is if you're younger and you don't mind moving a few times, you can buy a property with the mindset that I'm going to turn this into a rental property and you can do that a few times over I recommend that people stay for at least two years in the House that they have gone. Gone cash is always king. You'll end up getting a better price on the house and the cash flow is immediate, but you wanna look and see what is the best fit for you based upon the cash flow, and what's called Roi, which is return on investment? Basically what percentage rate you're getting on the money you put in? We come across a lot of realtors in every realtor. Realtor as far as I'm aware, at least they specialize in different things. So how do I know what to ask in? How do I look for realtor? That has a really good knowledge specifically, when it comes to investing in real estate for some sort of rental income, there's questions you can ask real estate agents to Kinda Fair it out if they know about mental properties one. One is tell me what the ROI would be on rental properties if they don't know what that means, that's probably a good sign me, not WanNa. Use Them. I would ask them how many rental properties they own, and how many rental properties have they helped? Clients by those are the types of questions that you can ask also another great way of finding out who the good realtors. Realtors czar is cost some of the property management companies around and ask them. Who would you recommend I'm looking at buying rental properties? What real estate agents would you recommend that I use? That's a really good tip. Actually because they come across realtors that really specialize in this area, and so they'd be able to direct people to the right realtor that has experience in that area. Speaking of property management companies then when we're considering a property for this purpose, they're obviously different property types that we need to be thinking about. For example we want a duplex. Do we want the Condo a patio home single family home? Do we want to be in an area that has an Hoa or not, because there are definite advantages, and maybe disadvantages to those decisions based on our ultimate objective. So how do we decipher what the property type is that we should consider? That's something that our realtor could help us. Think about yes, absolutely and really the way you. You look at it is a term called risk versus reward. If you're willing to take more risk, the rewards are greater so for example when you're dealing with a town home or a condo. You don't have to take care of the outside. That's typically covered in the homeowners association dues not always, but usually. If you're risk averse to having to pay for things like roofs, exterior paint, also landscaping that can be very expensive. You may be better off going to a town home or a condo. The return is going to be a little bit less though the Roi will. will be a smaller percentage. That's really how you look at it. It all up to the individual how they WANNA do it. The same applies with property management. If you want a property manager to help you, there's no real standard rate typically somewhere between seven to ten percent of the monthly income that you received so that's going to take away from your our ally, but that means you manage it yourself, and they're certainly risks and rewards to that as well so it all depends on the individual, and what type of risk. They're willing to take getting into that then. Then in terms of managing yourself. I think that one of the things that people get concerned about is that they don't know enough about how to so. For example we have laws to consider we have to find the right tenants that we know are going to appreciate being in the home and taking care of the home end being their long-term. If that's what we're looking for, and then there's maintenance issues to consider as well as general expenses that sometimes we don't even think about front, so not sense. How do we go about learning about how we should handle? Handle it if we decide that we would like to do it ourselves. Versus hiring a professional are certainly books out there that you can read one that I read was called landlord. It's a really good book. The other way is your real estate agent should be able to help you navigate some of these things as well go online. Go to YouTube. You can do videos. There's plenty of information out there about how to do it yourself. If you're doing landlord, but certainly your real estate agent, they're knowledgeable in the investing side of things should be able to guide you. You and help you get started with that I've done that many times, so in other words do your research right I mean. There's a lot of tools and resources. Now that we have access to that. We never had before and that way. If we can gather as much information, upfront as possible will be more prepared. Absolutely real estate attorneys are real good resources well, they can do lease agreements for you. They can do. LLC's all sorts of things like that to help you. Protect yourself and have a good experience having rental properties. How do we know when it's? It's the right time. The values of properties increase and decrease in things fluctuate, and sometimes you're thinking to yourself. Oh, it might be a good time to invest. Because property values are higher now, and in some cases you're thinking. No, actually it's better to wait until they get lower. And of course we don't know we don't know when things are going to go up and down. They change a lot. So how do we know when we should start thinking about this? If this is an avenue that we want to pursue in the future well first of all I, think. Think, we can all say that it doesn't matter if it's nineteen. Hundred or twenty twenty real estate feels like it's always too expensive. I said that back in the eighties when I bought my first patio home at forty thousand dollars I thought that was ridiculous and boy. I wish I had thirty of those now, so there are things that we can look at and that are localized. The local market is what's important. The Denver Market for example since one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy seven. We've had an annual appreciation on real estate six point one percent even with the. But, there are indicators that I watch for from a localized methodology. The first one is employment, so if the employment numbers are going up now. I'm not talking about unemployment I'm talking about how many new jobs have been added to the market. If it's going up, that's a really good sign once it starts going down. That means it's going to be about twelve to eighteen months and real estate prices are going to start going down. That's typically what happened. Not always supply and demand is second, the greater the supply, the last demand, the lesser appreciation we have in houses, and that also affects rental rates and thirties affordability. How affordable! Affordable is the area that you're looking at. Those are the three things that I focused on when I look at. Is it a good time to buy or not? For the last five years up until last year, I was telling people. It's not a good time to buy. Because pricing was just not there. It's starting to now. We're starting to see home starting to cash flow, and that's the other thing that we look at so hope that answers your question in a nutshell, it definitely does him. This might not be the right fit for certain people, and so what I'd like to get a sense of is what does it. It typically look like to be a land owner to be somebody who's renting out property. What are some expectations that you need to have to determine whether or not? This is the right approach something that you should be thinking about for yourself well. There's a couple of things one of the things that I do sit down with people and talk about is how much extra money at retirement you want, and that helps me and where they're at as far as do. They want to be a landlord or not. Is there risk? Yes, you have to be able to not take personally when somebody would burger up your place and it's. It's probably going to happen. You do have to set money aside for repairs. You also have to look at things long. If you're not looking at it long term and have the discipline to look at it long term, this may not be the right fit for you. Everybody's heard of fixing flips. I typically don't like doing that, but in this case you WANNA, hold pay it off as quickly as possible so that your properties are free and clear and understand that you may have to go in and do some repair work, and if you're not comfortable doing that, it's probably not right for you, but if you have a long-term. long-term mindset and attitude, it's a great way to have additional income when you're retired. Coming in every single month, bats the goal, so in other words you need to understand what is required of you and how that's going to look in terms of how you're going to participate in the process, and if you don't feel it, something that you can do yourself, or at least be a part of an are not even interested in doing it then, perhaps, it's not a right fit, but if you feel like you're excited about it, and it's something you really want to be involved in this. Be something to consider not being involved with. With it, you can't have property management do that and that's perfectly fine. The real question is are you willing to look at this long term? Are you willing to make a little bit of sacrifice now for later? That's a really good tipped him. If people wanted to get a hold of you and ask you about more information regarding this, how do they reach you? There's a couple of different ways you can reach me by phone by number is three, zero, three, six, six, nine, two, six, seven six. You can email me at T -pointment H., Y. M. N. at Diene one hundred dot com. I'm more than happy to answer. Answer any questions that you would have. No obligation won't sign you up for anything and on a monthly basis on the third Thursday of the month. If you do live in Denver, I have a meeting and we talk about how to be a landlord, and what issues there are, and what is the name of this group that you have on a monthly basis, Tim? It's called my wake up money team and the wake up money stands for if you wake up in the morning and you have this income coming in. Would it feel good? And of course the answer is yeah. It's great to know that people have more resources. Resources and information so that they can make the best decisions for themselves. Thank you so much. Tim I really appreciate all his invaluable information. You shared with us today. It was really great having you on the show. Well, it's my pleasure. Thank you so much. Marissa. That's all for this episode of Live blissed out. Thanks for listening and thanks to Tim. Hoi Men for being my guest. If you find value in our show, please visit live blissed out dot com to reach out, subscribe and share on social media. This show is made possible through listeners like you. Thank you so long for now and remember to keep moving forward.

Tim Hoi Wanna United States Peggy L. Denver Colorado Caffeinate Matab Mersa Houston Sensory Processing Disorder Fo Property Manager Colorado Army National Guard Littleton Symphony Marissa Youtube
Don't you step on my rhinestone studded jockstrap - Elvis memorabilia for sale

Radio From Hell

01:19 min | 6 months ago

Don't you step on my rhinestone studded jockstrap - Elvis memorabilia for sale

"Unique piece of Elvis Presley memorabilia is up for sale it's a custom made jockstrap minutes imbedded with rhinestones currently for sale for the price of forty thousand dollars wait a minute wait a minute courtesy of limestone yeah it's really good with mantis great look and it's and it's kinda looks man's kind of small but I don't think that would be uncomfortable the undergarment was made by a fan and was warned by the king of rock and roll until his death in nineteen seventy seven he never took it every day it was when he died on the toilet he had that job drunks rap down around his knees well no I guess you didn't even have to pull it down probably yeah I saw it along with several silver rhinestones across the front blue Ryan Strome stones across the waist band spell out EP Elvis Presley's initials this is a rhinestone studded jock strap and it is pure Elvis Presley the US the to the ticket that goes with it says they also described the garment as everything from extravagant too absurd and even sexually potent Elvis Presley's rhinestone studded jockstrap for sale

Elvis Presley United States Ryan Strome
Robert Rapella, pleads guilty in Boston court to paying bribe for daughter's admission to Georgetown, Washington DC

Jay Talking

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Robert Rapella, pleads guilty in Boston court to paying bribe for daughter's admission to Georgetown, Washington DC

"A Pennsylvania man pleads guilty in Boston federal court in the college admissions scandal Robert propellant accused of bribing Georgetown university's former tennis coach to get his daughter admitted as a fake athletic recruit prosecutors are recommending a sentence of ten months in prison and a forty thousand dollar fine repellent is the fifty fifth person to be charged in the scandal

Robert Propellant Georgetown University Pennsylvania Boston Tennis
With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:41 min | 6 months ago

With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

"Tenants behind on their ranch can be kicked out of their homes in Texas the state has lifted its moratorium on evictions some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters many of whom of lost jobs because of the pandemic Houston is not one of them it's now the largest city in the United States were evictions can resume Elizabeth drove all of Houston public media reports before cove in nineteen life was good for Houston resident ridiculous all of the heck grandma taking care of her great job just going about my everyday living doing what I do wake up in the morning and say my prayers for my coffee then coronavirus hit everything out wow yeah it is like my life do you know that he would talk to me over the phone from her apartment where she lives alone she used to make money babysitting her granddaughter and niece that ended with covert nineteen and her eight hundred dollar disability check doesn't cover her monthly rent of nine hundred dollars she said her apartment manager warned her eviction notices are on their way nobody needs to be stressed out whether they're going to have a place to live today in the homeless to March I can't think like that right now you know I can't I can't think like that I'm not only I don't want to think like that people like you it are vulnerable now that the Texas Supreme Court lifted a ban on objections this week attorneys who work with low income clients are preparing for the worst Donna Carney works for Lone Star legal aid which provides free legal representation to low income Texans Carney expects more families on the streets in the months ahead and we anticipate that there will be a tsunami of affections files I have no doubt about it we are going to see homelessness nationally there's been a patchwork of protections in place for renters other statewide moratorium's are expected to expire in the coming weeks and unemployment is through the roof James roller is with the national housing law project forty percent of households under forty thousand dollars your income loss of job in March and since it's staggering to sort of like to try to get your head around what that means in practice ruler says there's still a federal moratorium on evictions through late July but that only applies to rental properties with federally backed mortgages and that that's only a third of all properties for now moratoriums and government assistance like expanded unemployment benefits have kept invitations at bay in cities like Houston but as these protections expire experts say a wave of evictions is on its way and with corona virus spreading roller says these evictions create a public health risk displacing people from their housing and sending them out looking for additional housing or sending them into homelessness a danger for all of us in Houston so many people applied online for the city's rental assistance program that it ran out of funding in just ninety minutes rejects you it was one of the lucky few who were able to submit an application but she's still waiting for final approval if the rent money doesn't come through she expects to be forced out of her home waiting in hope that if I do that I'll be able to get into a shelter among doctors who opened the door to the thing will open to the mall she would like many Americans will be at the mercy of friends and family when looking for a place to live for NPR news I'm Elizabeth Troy fall in

Texas
Texas Lifts Moratorium On Evictions, Leaving Renters Vulnerable

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:36 min | 6 months ago

Texas Lifts Moratorium On Evictions, Leaving Renters Vulnerable

"Tenants behind on their ranch can be kicked out of their homes in Texas the state has lifted its moratorium on evictions some Texas cities are taking additional steps to protect renters many of whom have lost jobs because of the pandemic Houston is not one of them it's now the largest city in the United States were evictions can resume Elizabeth drove all of Houston public media reports before cove in nineteen life was good for Houston resident ridiculous all of the hefty grandma taking care of her great job just gone about my everyday living doing what I do wake up in the morning and say my prayers for my coffee then coronavirus hit everything got why yet it's like my life do you know that he would talk to me over the phone from her apartment where she lives alone she used to make money babysitting her granddaughter and niece that ended with covered nineteen and her eight hundred dollar disability check doesn't cover her monthly rent of nine hundred dollars she says her apartment manager warned her eviction notices are on their way nobody needs to be stressed out whether they're going to have a place to live today in the homeless tomorrow I can't think like that right now you know I can't I can't think like that I'm not only I don't want to think like that people like you it are vulnerable now that the Texas Supreme Court lifted a ban on objections this week attorneys who work with low income clients are preparing for the worst Donna Carney works for Lone Star legal aid which provides free legal representation to low income Texans Carney expects more families on the streets in the months ahead and we anticipate that there will be a tsunami of affections files I have no doubt about it we are going to see homelessness nationally there's been a patchwork of protections in place for renters other statewide moratorium's are expected to expire in the coming weeks and unemployment is through the roof Janus roller is with the national housing law project forty percent of households under forty thousand dollars your income loss of job in March and since it's staggering to sort of like to try to get your head around what that means in practice ruler says there's still a federal moratorium on evictions through late July but that only applies to rental properties with federally backed mortgages and that that's only a third of all properties for now moratoriums and government assistance like expanded unemployment benefits have kept evictions at bay in cities like Houston but as these protections expire experts say a wave of evictions is on its way and with corona virus spreading roller says these evictions create a public health risk displacing people from their housing and sending them out looking for additional housing or sending them into homelessness is a danger for all of us in Houston so many people applied online for the city's rental assistance program that it ran out of funding in just ninety minutes rejects you it was one of the lucky few who were able to submit an application but she's still waiting for final approval if the rent money doesn't come through she expects to be forced out of her home I hope that if I do that I'll be able to get into a shelter among dogs who opened the door to the thing will open to the mall she would like many Americans will be at the mercy of friends and family when looking for a place to

Texas
MLB owners, players feud over plan to start 2020 season

Total Information AM Sunday

01:48 min | 6 months ago

MLB owners, players feud over plan to start 2020 season

"Office to the MLBPA the Major League Baseball Players Association a twelve page document dated may twelfth an initial step in negotiations aimed at starting a delayed season around the fourth of July Major League Baseball owners made their pitch to the players trying to convince them to accept less pay due to the pandemic MLB telling players that pro rated salaries would contribute to an average loss of six hundred and forty thousand dollars for each game over an eighty two game season it empty ballparks Major League Baseball also created a sixty seven page draft of a proposed twenty twenty operations manual and I told you at six forty five I'd go into that a little bit more and here's some of the stuff that's in there this was obtained by the AP it was first reported by the athletic among the routine changes include players possibly arriving in uniform and being discouraged to take showers a ball parks team personnel would be bad for me to get restaurants on road trips mascots like Fred bird would be prohibited from ballparks the traditional to exchange of lineup cards would be eliminated no high fives no fist bumps no bad boys and Bad Girls spitting prohibited along with water jugs not you can't use those the use of saunas steam rooms pulls cryotherapy chambers hitting an indoor cages would be discouraged they would encourage everyone to wear batting gloves batting practice pitchers would wear masks dug out telephones disinfected after each use they have to wipe them down players can't touch their face to give signs they're not allowed to lick their fingers teams are encouraged to hold meetings outdoors with players spread apart and teams will be allowed to have fifty players each under the plan with the number active for each game still to be

Major League Baseball Players MLB AP Fred Bird Twenty Twenty
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:52 min | 8 months ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Forty thousand dollars ransom the entire deal gave Frank senior how lifelong habits what was it exist yet Sinatra to communicate with the kidnappers via pay phone he carried a roll of times throughout the whole ordeal when it became a lifelong habit it said he was even buried with a roll of dice wins news time eleven fifteen although the corona virus outbreak hasn't peaked yet the trump administration is predicting that the economy will be as strong as it was before the pandemic within a matter of months treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin says he sees the economy making a complete recovery by the third quarter of this year while White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow told ABC's this week that the recently passed economic rescue package will help it's the largest mainstream financial assistance package in the history of the United States so it's hard to know if we can get everything help everybody but I think I'm optimistic I think the sheer resources here we are putting in what ever it takes reusing every federal power lever possible to help folks it's going right into the middle lower middle class people last week more than three million Americans filed for unemployment social distancing has made brisk business these days for Amazon but some of the forty five hundred workers at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island are planning to walk off the job tomorrow they say a co worker has been diagnosed with COPD at nineteen but Amazon isn't doing anything to protect its other employees some of whom have since caught the virus as well correspondent Richard quest has more they won't is that the plans all the well house to be shut down JFK ages it's known to be shut down and then deep plans on down the road to be made safe and sanitized and then in some cases they also want to receive hazard pay for continuing to what that in a statement that they have taken steps to protect the health and safety of its.

Frank Sinatra Larry Kudlow ABC United States Amazon Staten Island COPD Richard quest JFK Steve Mnuchin White House economic adviser
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:45 min | 10 months ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Forty thousand dollars ransom the entire deal gave Frank senior a lifelong habit what was it exist yet Sinatra to communicate with the kidnappers me a pay phone he carried a roll of times throughout the whole ordeal when it became a lifelong habit it said he was even buried with a roll of dice eight here K. are all the what happens next now that the impeachment trial is over we check your traffic and weather together on the H. Julie Rogers all right we're gonna scope out the situation on one seventy five did we find anything in there regularly still looking he's been sighted dead man's curve now normally it's about one seventy five the parking lot from forty five a two dead man's curve but today's kind of A. S. special deal we are getting word of an accident they're trying to nail down what lane it's and if you do see that please give us a call two one four two one nine ten eighty self under twelve looking very good in fact it's only about a fifteen minute drive from thirty five each of the four oh eight split okay we're gonna go over to tear account a couple things going already full yeah north fort worth westbound Lupe twenty one fifty seven blue mound there's an accident that's blocking the left shoulder a little bit of a slowdown back mark for parkway is a result of that Arlington westbound twenty eight New York Avenue the accident is on the left shoulder huge backup from carrier and westbound thirty the usual delays from fielder in Arlington the sandy lane in fort worth or in full force right now all right thanks Randy I'm Julie Rogers next report at four thirty eight and breaking traffic alerts when they happen from the K. around the weather's center we check in with NBC five's Rick Mitchell for actor Jim well our storm system is moving away we will see some improvement but Hey it's gonna still stick pretty cold I'm in B. C. five chief meteorologist Rick.

Frank Sinatra H. Julie Rogers north fort Arlington Randy NBC Jim Rick Mitchell chief meteorologist
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Huge savings on the things you needed one it's a this is on the side once a withdrawal from nuclear agreement he said several times did not constitute a violation something that the I AEA which is still cancer decide he yeah the horse to keep talking to the Europeans I think that was the real issue here because in the end we want to keep working with you but you have to start off a good call something else that we can actually we benefit you will leave complying with related position on the line what's the mood on the streets of Tehran lie because the rhetoric is getting sharper but how's that perhaps getting spilled into the public narrative well I think the school colors I don't think he needed a change significantly involved in what was a few weeks ago I think that's just the the only formal sense of he the situation he called me one hundred forty thousand dollar car this all we hear is that the central bank's policies trying control this is for the exchange all we can to an extent because the things that some of our lives students informed on the I don't think there's a sense the house what I do have two more clips condition sophistication at the same time I think many people they don't feel that thank you for that they may have felt accomplished because we applaud the around situation and the wider Middle East markets with Ali al I do head of asset management on demand investments the new political issues.

cancer Ali Tehran Middle East one hundred forty thousand dol
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Forty thousand dollars another real estate news it's a billionaire's delight brokers are working harder to close mega deals and the top end of the LA market for example which relies heavily on foreign buyers from katar Bulgaria in China now I only owe me through a one hundred thousand dollar events with exotic pole dancers and a camel to entice buyers the asking price for the six bedroom mansion up the hill from Sunset Strip was still lowered by thirty six percent to thirty five million dollars even the fourteen bedroom twenty seven bath spelling it manner Salem only hills which at one hundred twenty million was the highest price ever paid in Los Angeles had dropped from two hundred million dollars Amanda Roday Bloomberg radio thank thank you for this great honor as CEO of this company I couldn't be happier with our accomplishments this year we achieve double digit growth we lost key personnel but we didn't miss a step I want to take a moment to thank one of our key partners serious executives when I first heard of serious I was a little skeptical what is an interim expected if when they told me one executive at one day a week can help us get double digit growth I was shocked I didn't even know that was possible and here we are twelve months later and serious will continue to be one of our key partners for years to come because regardless of the problems that show up in our business they always have an executive solution ready for us so serious thank you for a wonderful year higher executives as you need them on an hourly daily weekly part time intern for temporary basis series executive your internet.

China Sunset Strip Salem Los Angeles CEO executive Bulgaria Amanda Roday intern one hundred thousand dollar thirty five million dollars two hundred million dollars Forty thousand dollars thirty six percent twelve months one day
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Better to. Side to save go through the hassle having to pay off these credits and possibly getting into more and more debt. So I was wondering how you think I should go about getting student loan paying off school thirty three thousand a year approximately. Gotcha. Okay. And do you have any money at all? I do have some, but it won't be much after the first couple semesters how much money do you have? It's about forty. Okay. All right. Good good. So I get you through a year. Okay. That's good. Where'd you get fined going there for about four years? Yeah. I was planning on new that I know UCLA was a four year school. And so what are you planning on studying? I plan on studying aeronautics and Jet Propulsion. Okay. Very good space program there. Gotcha. Okay. And if you looked at what your curriculum looks like the first year. No. 'aeronautics are Jet Propulsion in your curriculum for the first year. The first year just going to be a lot of general. I know. High school and then. Some aerospace dynamics and. Yeah. You'll pick up most of your. Things specific to your field of study in your junior and senior year, maybe a tiny bit in your sophomore year, your first two years or primarily general studies and most good degree fields. Okay. And that's pretty standard with most four year universities. Okay. There's two or three things to think about number one. I'm never going to tell you to borrow money. You're the thirty year old version of you is going to be pissed at the eighteen year old version of you. If you go deeply in debt to go to UCLA to get a degree in Jet Propulsion. This is not gonna turn out. Well, okay. So let's just start with the premise. We're not going to borrow money. Now, how in the world can we get through four years of school with forty thousand dollars? If we're not going to borrow money. The number one thing that causes people to go in debt is their choice of school you wisely chosen an in state school. However, you can do one or maybe two years of community college get your basics out of the way in California. That's free. Free. Okay. Not what you wanted to do. You wanted to go to UCLA move in the dorm play some beer, Paul on the weekends. But I'm wanting you to go to community college since you're broke guy. I've been Abro guy. I don't want you to be a broker guy. The second thing I want you to consider is how much work you can do between now and the next five years, and I'm not talking about flop and walkers at minimum wage, I'm talking about starting a real legitimate small business idea or doing something in the Jet Propulsion field or getting into an apprentice program of some kind or considering the military as an option or something along these lines to where someone gives you so much money for working, you just work your way through college. And you can do that. Especially with a forty thousand dollar head start. Okay. Because you've got two years before of work to build up the next forty thousand dollars and you can make that delivering pizzas. Now, you're not gonna have party life. You're going to be working, dude. I worked forty to sixty hours a week when I was in college, and I did not die from it. And I graduated in four years. Most people work while they're in college at least the last three generations up until now. Now. Now, people go one hundred fifty thousand dollars in debt and call it. Necessity. And it's not a necessity. Okay. So where are you go to school? How you go to school? How much you work? The next one is your new part time job. In addition to your other job is applying for scholarships. I want you to apply for one thousand scholarships in the coming twelve months. I want you to scour the internet for anything having to do with your race, creed color, national origin, your heritage your. Jet Propulsion scholarships aeronautics scholarships scholarships from American Airlines are Boeing for people that want to because they want people sharp like you to be ready to come into their field and have having studied it. And if you will get a turn down for nine hundred and fifty scholarships and.

Jet Propulsion High school UCLA Boeing Paul California American Airlines four years two years forty thousand dollars four year one hundred fifty thousand dol forty thousand dollar eighteen year twelve months sixty hours thirty year five years
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

"Right. More of your calls. More of your text comments coming up and also the song coming up out of this break was released on this day in nineteen sixty six. And up to that point. It was the most expensive single ever recorded a cost forty thousand dollars that songs coming up out of this break. I have talked to you about the notary shop, and I've talked to you about you, get these papers. And you think you have to go to an attorney. I've talked about how you can you can go to the notary shop instead of going to a government office to get something done. Like, you know, if you needed a copy of your your registration for your car because you misplaced it or title for your car you need to break. Tagger you're selling your car, you need a copy where do you go? You can go to the Notre shop, and there's not just one location. No, they're six locations around the New Orleans area. And so there's one not far from you there in New Orleans there in Metairie, they're on the West Bank down at home and in Kenner, and many of them are in or close to it to WalMart, which are very very popular areas. Where people go all the time. So there's a lot of papers that can be done at the notary shop, you can get your driver's license renewed their instead of waiting so. And a lot of stress in your life by taking the papers that need some action take him to the notary shop. Here's the number five zero four four one zero thirty one ten call him up. You get some something comes in the mail. I am I have to go to attorney with this. We'll maybe not maybe you can go to the Nova shop call them because if they can take care of it. You'll have a lot less stress in your life. The number for the notary. Shop is five zero four four one zero thirty one ten the website is not shop S H O P P E dot com. Ever since buying the twenty eighteen RAV four Lauren's become more adventurous, she put the mountain back in mountain biking. I'm gonna jump that cliff. I don't know looks pretty steep. Then there she goes, no matter the obstacles, she found courage Munson various from that Bush, poisonous. And.

attorney Lauren New Orleans WalMart Kenner Nova Metairie Munson Bush forty thousand dollars
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Hundred forty thousand dollars for Special Olympics show annoy organizers, expect today's event which marked Special Olympics fiftieth anniversary year too easily surpassed previous years. Authorities in New York City are facing an epic security and logistical challenge. With the upcoming arrival of President Trump and other world leaders for the United Nations General assembly NYPD says it will deploy thousands of extra police officers to protect both the U N N Trump Tower, this security arsenal includes police boats and divers patrolling the East River near the UN and teams of officers trained to respond to chemical biological and other potential terror threats including killer drones or assassins armed with poison following attacks like this abroad officials say so far there have been no credible threats. Julie Walker New York criminal charges have been filed against. An employee of a New York daycare center with authorities say stabbed five people including three infants when you fend one gets out of the hospital. She'll be arraigned on five counts of attempted murder that coming from the queen's district attorney's office, she still recovering from a suicide attempt after police say she stabbed three infants in two adults here inside this apartment building on a quiet block in flushing. Trying to get to the bottom of weather all the babies happen reunited with their parents. The next concern says state assemblyman, Ron Kim is figuring out. What exactly was going on inside this building? He says it might have been part of what's known as birth tourism allowing foreign mothers here on a tourist visa to give birth in the US, thus giving their kids American citizenship. That's WCBS reporter Steve burns..

President Trump New York City Olympics Ron Kim Trump Tower New York daycare center United Nations General assembl Steve burns Julie Walker UN East River US reporter Hundred forty thousand dollars
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"See if we can get to a couple of emails. You can probably help me with this. What was the last time? He had a Freda as a client. I've ever had about four years ago. I knew if I lived in Philadelphia, and I was a kid because every third person was named Freda. Okay. My annuity free to asks has seventy two thousand in cash value with forty thousand dollars of gain. My broker wants me to cash it out and pay the tax. And then put what's left over in his managed portfolio. What would you do? I'll tell you what I would do. But let's pose this question to MS row. I get a new broker. You don't like moving from an annuity with a big gain and paying the taxes and going into account who's going to benefit from that move. Let me think the broker. So she's gonna pay ordinary income tax rate. She's gonna turn around put it in the manage portfolio and could go out could go down could do whatever it's going gonna do. And you're gonna pay taxes on that throughout the history of that capital-gains, short-term, capital-gains, whatever. So I'm not so sure that that's gonna benefit her. All right. Well, here's my answer. A you're you're on the right track. Misery. Oh, no doubt about that. You've got forty thousand dollars of gain. Remember any money? You take out of that annuity is taxed I as interest income that's called life. Oh last in first out. So anyway, you slice it. You're paying taxes on forty thousand bucks. I don't know what other income you have. But more than likely that's going to cause you to creep into a higher income tax bracket. It may have an impact on Medicare. It may have an impact on taxation on social security. It could have a lot of negative effects. I don't have enough information. But that's enough to go on at least for me to say. Let's take.

Freda Philadelphia Medicare forty thousand dollars four years
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KTRH

"Annuity not only provided the forty thousand dollars of guaranteed lifetime income for her. If she passed away there was a death benefit the remaining balance went to her family. But if she did live to be ninety or a hundred she was guaranteed to see that forty thousand dollar lifetime income does she was receiving or would receive when she retired double to eighty thousand dollars to help pay for long term care. So she says, wow, I had no idea that something like this existed. I could have a good guaranteed income deposited every single month in my account. But then also if I need long term care, they're going to deposit twice the amount of money into my account said, yes, she said for how long again, I said five years so to just as a blanket statement to say, I don't like annuities. It really is disingenuous at best and uninformed because there are some really good products in the marketplace that can add peace of mind to the retiree who doesn't want one hundred percent of their money at risk in the securities markets. Now, do you go and put all of your money into an annuity? Now. That's probably not the best idea. But you should have a bucket system set up you want to have one bucket, you know, where you do have stocks for long term growth, and you're receiving maybe dividend income. Are you won't have another bucket for safety and reasonable growth in you diversify that way and set up this these different buckets, and ideally, they're all providing some type of income either today or tomorrow, but an annuity is nothing more than a tool, and if you use that tool appropriately in the right bucket, then it can be a very valuable asset for retirement. So I wrote I guess it's been a few months ago, but I wrote the definitive guide to annuities directly in response to the questions that we've been receiving? But also some of the misinformation that I've been seeing on TV and the internet, and it's a very objective guide that lays out from soup to nuts. Everything that somebody entering retirement and considering purchasing annuity needs to know, the beginning of the report is pretty simple and straightforward. But it gets more advanced as it goes through. It's a very nice a report I'd say it's probably about twelve thirteen pages long..

eighty thousand dollars forty thousand dollars forty thousand dollar one hundred percent five years
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Census said in a press release at the citizenship data would help the justice department enforce the voting rights act which protects minority voting groups pruitt says the us government already has good data on citizenship from the american community surveys which should bring it into the the census and public housing tenants and their attorneys want to judge to force new york city to reexamine all apartments that might have lead paint the demand comes as part of an ongoing lawsuit against the beleaguered housing authority jim walden is the attorney representing the tenants it is a real shame that there's so much public attention on this and there's so much at stake and night still is incapable of doing the right thing in court documents filed yesterday a brooklyn tenant says she complained repeatedly tonight about peeling paint in her apartment a nitro official told her recently that her apartment would not be inspected because test decades ago determined the whole complex was free of lead but just last week the state's health department inspected her apartment and found lead everywhere niger says it conducted a subsequent inspection and is now reviewing the results and the new york city conflicts board of interest is hitting former brooklyn district attorney charlie hines with a record forty thousand dollar fine highs admitted he used city resources for his two thousand thirteen reelection campaign the board also settled with four of heinz former employees at the da's office tonight rain likely low around thirty eight degrees currently it's forty one degrees at six oh six support for npr comes.

pruitt jim walden attorney official niger charlie hines npr justice department new york brooklyn forty thousand dollar thirty eight degrees forty one degrees
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

"Hundred and forty thousand dollars where are you guys rome we're from boise idaho followed her and forty thousand my by a little bit in boise idaho man thought alatas a welcomed the national it's good to have you how long did it take you to do this it took three years and eleven months while almost four years and you're range of income during that time we started off right about one hundred gay and now we are just recently over four hundred well there's a nice job you guys i have a story here somewhere what are you all do for a living well i i'm a physician and i worked as a jse analyst for an engineering group okay very cool so the physician income kicked in during this time i guess what fiber physician are you i'm emergency medicine oh okay lots of ours yes yeah and thus lots of money he has their legal and works that way so what kind of that was the five hundred and forty thousand med school yes we had a little bit of everything but a lot of school so we had about forty two thousand dollars whereas were cars eighteen thousand and was credit card i got a ten thousand school relocation loan to move like three miles away from where it was living the whole ten thousand dollars and then we had a little over three hundred thousand in school loan debt and then we sold a house that we became landlords by default which was about to hundred and seventy thousand while oca show was the whole deal aimed at yours or choice for some of yours there was we share that pride about eighty was mind that most of it was tulsen's foca cool so uh i'm guessing maybe you got married four years ago the s redid that's kind of where it started meyers my job i was able to listen to the podcast and one day i just saw some financial podcast than that's kind of where i started listening and i mean it was just amazing some of the messages.

boise idaho analyst meyers boise idaho jse oca tulsen four years forty two thousand dollars forty thousand dollars ten thousand dollars eleven months three years one day
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Forty thousand dollar grant from the federal environmental protection agency to by zero emissions groundsupport equipment city officials say that the grant will let the chicago department of aviation and united airlines invest one point four million dollars to buy 26 new pieces of equipment to replace older diesel fueled equipment chicago's aviation department has been awarded nearly eighteen million dollars in grant money since 2011 to reduce emissions from cars trucks support quit met and the power units unveiled earlier today portraits of former president obama and first lady michelle they will now hang in the national portrait gallery which is part of these myth sonian group of museums former president obama says he can't recall a relative who had has had a portrait dieter do it for your book picture which there's no gray checks the national gallery has a complete collection of presidential portrait and a different set of portraits of the former first couple will eventually hang in the white house wls news time 404 the edens out fully cook sixteen inbound from lake cook to the junction twenty one kennedy out to the junction just eighteen out to o'hare thirty five inbound o'hare to downtown 45 junction in 2006 eisenhower out to wolf had 40 to thorndale fifty inbound from thorndale to downtown an hour to wolf in thirty six stevenson out to the tristate 46 out to the veterans toll one hour inbound from the veterans toll forty tristate in thirty and the dan ryan out to ninetyfifth the 26 inbound from 95th 20minute trip extract update and fifteen minutes news on the hour the.

chicago obama lake cook kennedy thorndale dan ryan chicago department of aviation president michelle white house eighteen million dollars Forty thousand dollar four million dollars fifteen minutes ninetyfifth 20minute one hour
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KKAT

"You were able to take a forty thousand dollar you're talking about the prophet being 40000 right uh not the proceeds profit the prophet ya ya if you take if you take if you take a forty thousand dollar longterm capital gain where were the in the fifteen percent bracket that you say you're in that would apply to you then the most that would cost you would be six thousand dollars before you do the transaction you might wanna go over this with your tax preparation expert with your cpa whatever service you use your enrolled agent to see exactly what the tax liability on something like that would be but you should be able to do that without too much shh difficulty it's been a great stock market has net the sp 500 has been in an up rory is rally since the spring of two thousand nine we have seen the s p 500 which was sitting in at six seventy six in the spring of two thousand nine rally to the twenty five eighty one a level that is more than three times the level it traded at in the spring back in march of two thousand nine and up rory is rally imagine the sp going from six seventy six to twenty five eighty one and during this period there have been some corrections but there have been no bear markets no bear market declines on a closing basis as measured by the sp 500 in excess of twenty percent and that's during a period of time from spring of oh nine to october of two thousand seventeen certainly has to go down as one of the greatest extended bull market runs of.

stock market rory forty thousand dollar six thousand dollars fifteen percent twenty percent
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on KOIL

"To take a forty thousand dollar he's talking about the profit being 40000 right uh not the proceeds to be off at the prophet ya ya if you take atlantic if you take a forty thousand dollar longterm capital gain and whether in the fifteen percent bracket that you say you're in that would apply to you then the most that would cost you would be six thousand dollars before you do the transaction you might wanna go over this with your tax preparation expert with your cpa wh whatever service you use your enrolled agent to see exactly what the tax liability on something like that would be but you should be able to do that without too much shh difficulty i'll it's been a great stock market has net the sb 500 has been in an up rory is rallies since the spring of two thousand nine we have seen the sp 500 which we should it again at six seventy six in the spring of two thousand nine rally to the twenty five eighty one level that is more than three times the level it traded at in the spring back in march of two thousand nine and up rory is rally imagine the sp going from six seventy six to twenty five eighty one and during this period there have been some corrections but there have been no bear markets no bear market declines on a closing basis as measured by the s p 500 in excess of twenty percent and that's during a period of time from spring of oh nine to october two thousand seventeen certainly has to go down one of the greatest extended.

stock market rory forty thousand dollar six thousand dollars fifteen percent twenty percent
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WVON 1690 AM

WVON 1690 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WVON 1690 AM

"And public safety i agree with chairman daily a dan with him and i want to make sure that we find that money and we will find it and there ought to be a robust debate on on on those 1500 vacant open and bug that have four positions and the county government why do we need them how long have they been open and and and who's gone in those jobs there ought to be a robust debate about that but we also have to have a debate about work all of these us spending increases that we see salary increases a rv now theory of person at the hospital forty thousand dollar salary increase another person are fifty thousand dollars salary increase of the hospital i mean we have to have a debate about every agency of county government or clothing unit that the jail we're holding unit that the g rao temporary detention center while we need to make sure it is the workhorse the right size workhorse i mean you know how do we figure out how do we right so that workforce uh how do we motivate our employees in county government to give the most that they have the best that they have a county taxpayer the time is now for us to reinvent orient reform county government and by golly i'm excited about it we're gonna go about this work and a very diligent and thorough way i encourage people to attend the public hearing that are common ouk we have four public caring or around the county that people will be able to come to and provide their ideas on how we the county government without go on to the taxpayer and yet once again and asking them i worry tax increase and taxing them for more revenue but now of the 1500 vacant and fullyfunded position seven 100 i'm told are for the hospital lone house.

chairman g rao fifty thousand dollars forty thousand dollar
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on WWL

"Thanks for joining us from her were glad you are here walter with us in canada i walberg how are you good how are you doing here better than i deserve whatever by you having about forty thousand dollars in back and i do happy are america and carroll area like that i had been i owed much higher and there about paying it off and cracker credit come in option quick paper pair europe but i have a market and i wonder if i be repaired option time query numer mortgage that would hurt me there yes yeah i typically will it if you if you use the debt consolidation companies that pay the bill for you and give you a lower interest rate unless you're unless you're resetting the loan and getting a new loan that is treated like a chapter thirteen bankruptcy in the state's now i don't know how to be treated exactly in canada but it does damage your career at it and and so that's not the route to go in order to save on interest now if you can restructure the loan borrow money someplace else at a cheaper interest that's okay the do but that's really not your problem because let's just can't do the math for second let's say that you dropped her interest rate on forty thousand dollars by 10 percent interest europe from eighteen to hit on all of it is probably not all at eighteen okay but if you've got all the way from 18 down day that'd be four thousand dollars a year the guy four thousand dollars a year does not solve a forty thousand dollar problem four thousand dollars a month does above four thousand dollars a year dozen so my point is is the interest rate is not as it it's about five percent of the issue 95 percent of the issue is getting yourself on a plan and being so pissed off your sacrifice everything so you can attack this with a vengeance and make it go away quickly that's 95 percent of the plan that get you out that five percent as the actual math and the numbers and you know if you've got a bunch of high interest rate stuff you get some lower interest rates stuff that's fine but it doesn't really fix the problem and in some people's case it's worse than that because what happens with a.

walter canada europe interest rates america four thousand dollars forty thousand dollars five percent 95 percent forty thousand dollar 10 percent
"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"forty thousand dollar" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"In this fucking forty thousand dollar a utility vehicle at some point that the the difference between that fantasy and their shitty reality basically drives them insane and they decide that it's up were people's fall but like you know inaction oualadi using like a bus or train or whatever i i actually feel more free because i'm not because of the money involving i actually physically tied to the vehicle itself i can just leave whenever i want look i can get out at any point and just like walk away unless it sucking the tunnel or whatever which is its own issue with the subways and new york city at the moment but like this idea that like being on a trader bosses like constraining you're you're mobility or autonomy in some way whereas being in a fucking car is in is just is just stoop well that's i think probably why he's writing this is because he sees a moment to to get this long dormant a screed out in the open because everyone's mad at the mta because of a governor that basically believes all the same things that jeff does a fucking it up and he thinks that everyone will now agree that actually a public transportation sucks and we should all be listening to bad to the bone as we asked out already of you'd jeff be the jeff is pulling up the fucking baskinrobbins going like flavor on my going to get dressed up like cyrus from trailer park a little more freedom but he goes nothing is more wearying than a lecture from disdainful environmentalist selfrighteous collectivist about this show the shameful waste of cars and so low driving.

jeff forty thousand dollar