22 Burst results for "Forty Million Years"

The Geologic Record: The Phanerozoic Eon

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:06 min | 4 months ago

The Geologic Record: The Phanerozoic Eon

"Fenner azoic is divided up into three eras the paleozoic the mesozoic and the senate zoellick the first period in the paleozoic is the one you might have heard of the cambridge in the cambrian is noted for the sudden appearance of complex lifeforms and animals in the fossil record. This is known as the cambrian explosion. Here's where you'll see many of the trial bites which are really common fossils in fact the appearance of trial bites pretty much defines where the cambrian appears in the geologic record all complex life that we know of in the cambrian was in the see. Nothing yet had come onto land of all the periods. I'll be going over. This is one of the most important to have a grasp on it spans. About fifty five million years from five hundred forty million years ago to about four hundred eighty five million years ago after the cambridge incomes the division period it lasted for forty one million years and went from four hundred and eighty five million years ago to about four hundred forty. Four million years ago it's noted for its continued by diversification fish first appeared during this period and probably the first fish with jaws. These were the first vertebrate animals. There still wasn't any animal life on land yet in order vision that we know of there were lots of volcanoes in meteors during this period as well by some estimates over one hundred times the number of meteor strikes that the earth experiences today the next period is the celerion it goes from four hundred and forty million years ago to four hundred nineteen million years ago what separates the division and the celerion is the or division celerion extinction event. This is the first of the major extinction events in earth's history and the second largest in terms of the number of species that disappeared from the fossil record. The celerion sees the appearance of the very first vascular plants on land as well as the first arthur pod type creatures on land. I should also note that as we get closer to the present the information we have become better the divisions in time become more. Precise and there are more subdivisions. Most of which. I'm not going to be going into. After the slurry incomes the devonian which extended from four hundred nineteen million years ago. Two three hundred fifty nine million years

Fenner Azoic Cambridge Zoellick Senate
Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

60-Second Science

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Prehistoric Marine Reptile Died After A Giant Meal

"Of millions of years ago. Reptilian predators called it. Swam the sees their fossils look fearsome but paleobiologist real SUITCA. Motani. Of UC, Davis says, they may have looked more like friendly dolphins maybe in life he feels might have been cute. But at least the smaller ones Martinis team studied one such specimen found in southwest China. It was two hundred and forty million years old fifteen feet long but it seemed to have some extra bones in it, which Montana's team termed to be the remains of a thirteen foot long the ladder sore or see lizard the this or had swallowed and spoiler alert the only reason they were able to see this animal in the belly of the or is that this gigantic meal never got digested the sword died soon after swallowing it. Motamed is careful to say they're not sure exactly why the theus or perished, but the specimen has a broken neck. So he gave a speculative play by play. Perhaps he says the source snapped at the C. Lizard, but the Lizard fought back and the Pike in between the two fierce probably. So the the or fought to subdue its prey damaging its neck in the process then it had dislodged the praised bony head entail from it's juicy midsection. Now, the have to do it through jerking. And twisting like the crocodiles do also bad for the neck and finally the sore had to swallow the animal perhaps using inertia show or gravity to shove the prey down its gullet and the two things are by the kind it was ingested maybe the neck damage was accumulated to certain level and maybe the Knicks could not support the head details of that ancient battle appear in the journal Science. In the reason why this analysis matters is you can only and I so much about who by looking at teeth this fossil offers direct evidence that these ancient beasts sometimes bit off a whole lot more than they could chew.

Davis Knicks China Montana UC Motamed
Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

"Hi. I'm scientific. American Assistant News. Editor Sarah Lou in Frazier and here's a short piece from July twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits In it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From, Turks and Caicos Islands analysis of Ano- lizards collected before and after hurricanes, Irma and Maria in twenty seventeen and eighteen months later revealed that the surviving lizards and their descendants had larger and therefore grippier Topaz. The team examined Lizard photographs from natural history collections and seventy years of hurricane data to confirm the trend. From Italy sediment samples drawn from the tree and see revealed hotspots with up to one point nine million micro plastic particles per square meter, the highest concentration ever recorded on the sea floor. Most of pollution comes from wastewater and sewage systems. Researchers say. From Antarctica, paleontologists found a fossilized forty million year old frog on Seymour. Near the tip of the peninsula, The FROG is related to modern ones living in temperate humid conditions in the Chilean Andes. From Iraq researchers probing the Turkish State Archives found the earliest known record of a meteorite causing a death. The object struck a hilltop in neighboring Iraq in eighteen, eighty, eight, killing one man and paralyzing another. From Japan results gathered from the KAMIOKA. Observatory which includes an underground detector tank filled with fifty five thousand tons of water, suggested intriguing discrepancy in how neutrinos, an anti neutrinos oscillate potentially violating symmetry between matter and antimatter. From Kenya scientists identified a malaria blocking microbe in mosquitoes on the shores of Lake Victoria. Every mosquito catalog with this apparently benign fungus was free of the disease, carrying parasite and experiments showed the fungus prevented its transmission. That was quick hits. I'm Sarah Lou Frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Iraq Sarah Lou Chilean Andes Caicos Islands Editor Antarctica Turkish State Archives Kamioka Malaria Kenya Japan Turks Italy Lake Victoria Irma Maria
"forty million years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And how you can help make it possible liberal and progressive movements need to move beyond a focus on economic entitlements and political rights to embrace a new discourse of love kindness generosity and all these are not some new AG smile and a nice formula or let's get into self transformation before we change society kind of thinking I'm calling for both our American and global societies to embrace a new bottom line so that every economic political societal and cultural institution is considered efficient rational and or productive not according to the old bottom line of how much these institutions maximize money power or ego but rather how much they maximize love and generosity kindness and forgiveness ethical and environmentally sustainable behavior social and economic justice is the bottom line six to enhance our capacity to transcend the narrow utilitarian instrumental way of viewing human beings nature so that we respond to other people as embodiments of the sacred instead of thinking of them primarily in terms of how much they can serve our interests and also so that we can respond in nature not solely as a resource for human needs but rather through awe wonder and radical amazement at the beauty and grandeur of this universe I call this new consciousness revolutionary love and its goal is to create the caring society caring for each other and caring for the earth the vehicle to create this new consciousness we will call the love and justice movement eventually law and justice party the revolutionary possibility of love is the kind of love the breaks through those distortions of consciousness that make it difficult to implement a national environmental policy or to end the many forms of oppression that permeate our world to really amazed embrace revolutionary law requires us to develop a strategy way beyond anything currently being given serious attention in the media the political parties and even many of the social change movements and it requires us to move beyond what seems realistic in terms of the contemporary frame of discourse and there is no alternative if we're to solve the environmental crisis and throughout our society in the coming decades to moving further and further into reactionary nationalism and repression of our own humanity we need a global mobilization of billions of people to solve the problem and this manifesto outlines the first steps to making possible such immobilization to understand the urgency let's consider our current environmental crisis in nineteen ninety two thousands of scientists issued a collective statement warning of the impending dangers to the life support system of planet earth twenty five years later in December twenty seventeen fifteen thousand three hundred sixty four scientists from one hundred eighty four countries signed a new statement that reads in part since nineteen ninety two with the exception of stabilizing the stratospheric ozone layer humanity has failed to make sufficient progress in generally solving these unforeseen environmental changes and alarmingly most of them are getting far worse especially troubling is the current trajectory of potentially catastrophic climate change due to rising green house gases from burning fossil fuels in agricultural production particularly from farming ruminants for meat consumption moreover we have unleashed a mass extinction event the sixth and roughly five hundred forty million years or in many current life forms could be annihilated or at least committed to extinction by the end of the century emeriti is now being given a second notice we are jeopardizing our future by not raining in our intense but geologically and demographically on even material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a planetary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats by failing to adequately adequately limit population growth reassess the role of an economy.

five hundred forty million yea twenty five years
"forty million years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KTRH

"The evolution of the Mediterranean regions complex geology which arises with the moon ranges and dips with sees from Spain to around it went under about a hundred and forty million years ago. Rachel Nevada they prepared for thirty thousand people the storm area fifty one but the number of visitors that descended on the extraterrestrial town a hundred and fifty miles from Las Vegas picked up just three thousand allowing authorities on Saturday to begin scaling back operations nothing serious happened at area fifty one by the way are triangular craft recorded by the international space station's live feed covering over earth as let viewers to ask if it's part of the US space for ship who knows the United States space for ship is a proposed space warfare service branch of the US armed forces which is intended to have control over military space operations what else is going on in the skies let's check in with Stephen Kate's doctor scribe what your report this week Steven and I George happy equinox to you in the listeners of course welcome in autumn twenty nineteen and George this is probably some of the best guy observing coming up in the next few months but we begin with astronomy Venus the second planet from the sun is a most inhospitable places many people do not all with surface temperatures upwards of nine hundred degrees Fahrenheit but George a recent study by astronomers suggests that Venus may have had water on its surface and moderate temperatures which may have even had some primitive life but something dramatic occurred some seven hundred million years ago when massive explosions of CO two from constant volcanic activity transform the plan is to it what it is today a planet that has a day longer than its year rotating backwards and continuing on Venus George because it'll slowly start to appear in the western sky as it moves into that part of the sky in the fall the brightest of the planets that we can see what the Japanese spacecraft acted suki this particular Japanese spacecraft detected super wins in the clouds of Venus and they move around the planet the fastest that we've ever seen. the circle the globe there in for Earth Day is but another Sky News George astronomers confirm water vapor in the exoplanets Kate to eighteen be simple is super earth a hundred and ten light years from us but it's more likely that the object does not support life as no measurable surface is there on that potential planet because it's around the red dwarf star George finally and alive Scott as we mentioned falls in the year the moon tomorrow morning as you look into the sky folks just before sunrise the moon glides past the beehive star cluster in the constellation of cancer the crab marketers are necessary a beautiful sight the moon closest to the earth George on the twenty eighth because urging then spectacularly the dark of the moon or new moon this Saturday is the time to see thanks guy objects this guy always reminds everyone was remember to.

George Sky News George US Stephen Kate Mediterranean Spain Las Vegas Rachel Nevada suki Steven Scott nine hundred degrees Fahrenhei seven hundred million years forty million years ten light years
"forty million years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The evolution of the Mediterranean regions complex geology which arises with the moon ranges and dips would cease from Spain to around it went under about a hundred and forty million years ago. Rachel Nevada they prepared for thirty thousand people the storm area fifty one but the number of visitors that descended on the extraterrestrial town a hundred and fifty miles from Las Vegas picked up just three thousand allowing authorities on Saturday to begin scaling back operations nothing serious happened at area fifty one by the way are triangular craft recorded by the international space station's live feed covering over earth as let viewers to ask if it's part of the US space for ship who knows United States space for ship is a proposed space warfare service branch of the US armed forces which is intended to have control over military space operations what else is going on in the skies let's check in with Stephen Kate's doctor sky what your report this week Steven and I George happy equinox to you in the listeners of the course welcome in autumn twenty nineteen and George this is probably some of the best guy observing coming up in the next few months we begin with astronomy Venus the second planet from the sun is a most inhospitable places many people do not all with surface temperatures upwards of nine hundred degrees Fahrenheit which was a recent study by astronomers suggests that Venus may have had water on its surface and moderate temperatures which may have even had some primitive life but something dramatic occurred some seven hundred million years ago when massive explosions of CO two from constant volcanic activity transform the pundits who it is what it is today a planet that has a day longer than its year rotating backwards and continuing on Venus George because it'll slowly start to appear in the western sky as it moves into that part of the sky in the fall the brightest of the planets that we can see what a Japanese spacecraft acted suki. other Japanese spacecraft is detected super wins in the clouds of Venus and they move around the planet the fastest that we've ever seen the circle the globe player in for Earth Day is but another Sky News George astronomers confirm water vapor in the exoplanets Cape to eighteen be simple is super earth a hundred and ten light years from us but it's more likely that the object does not support life as no measurable surface is there on that potential planet because it's around the red WordStar but George finally in the lives guy as we mentioned falls in the year the moon tomorrow morning as you look into the sky folks just before sunrise the moon glides past the beehive star cluster in the constellation of cancer the crab marketers are necessary a beautiful sight the moon closest to the earth George on the twenty eighth because urging and then spectacularly the dark of the moon or new moon this Saturday is the time to see thanks guy objects doctors guy always reminds everyone always remember to keep your eyes to the skies email me at D. R. skyline doctors got a show at G..

Mediterranean Spain Rachel Nevada nine hundred degrees Fahrenhei seven hundred million years forty million years ten light years
"forty million years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"The Food Network died suddenly Saturday he was only forty four years old the story with that we have in our highlight reel it coast to coast AM dot com researchers have discovered a hidden continent on earth wants not of Lantis they founded while reconstructing the evolution of the Mediterranean regions complex geology which arises with the moon ranges and dips with sees from Spain to around it went under about a hundred and forty million years ago. Rachel Nevada they prepared for thirty thousand people the storm area fifty one but the number of visitors that descended on the extraterrestrial town a hundred and fifty miles from Las Vegas peaked at just three thousand allowing authorities on Saturday to begin scaling back operations nothing serious happened at area fifty one by the way are triangular craft recorded by the international space station's live feed covering over earth as let viewers to ask if it's part of the US space for ship who knows United States space for ship is a proposed space warfare service branch of the US armed forces which is intended to have control over military space operations what else is going on in the skies let's check in with Stephen Kate's doctor scribe what's your report this week Steven and I George happy equinox to you in the listeners of the court welcome in autumn twenty nineteen and George this is probably some of the best guy observing coming up in the next few months but we begin with astronomy Venus the second planet from the sun is a most inhospitable places many people do well with surface temperatures upwards of nine hundred degrees Fahrenheit which was a recent study by astronomers suggests that Venus may have had water on its surface and moderate temperatures which may have even had some primitive life but something dramatic occurred some seven hundred million years ago when massive explosions of CO two from constant volcanic activity transform the pundits who it is what it is today a planet that has a day longer than its year rotating backwards and continuing on Venus George because it'll slowly start to appear in the western sky as it moves into that part of the sky in the fall the brightest of the planets that we can see what the Japanese spacecraft that could suki this particular Japanese spacecraft is detected super wins in the clouds of Venus and they move around the planet the fastest that we've ever seen. the circle the globe there in for Earth Day is but another Sky News George astronomers confirm water vapor in the exoplanets Kate to eighteen be simple is super earth a hundred and ten light years from us but it's more likely that the object does not support life as no measurable surface is there on that potential planet because it's around the red dwarf star George finally in the lives guy as we mentioned follows in the air the moon tomorrow morning as you look into the sky folks just before sunrise the moon glides past the beehive star cluster in the constellation of cancer the crab marketers are necessary a beautiful sight the moon closest to the earth George on the twenty eighth.

George Sky News George US Food Network Stephen Kate Lantis Spain Las Vegas Mediterranean Rachel Nevada Steven nine hundred degrees Fahrenhei seven hundred million years forty million years forty four years ten light years
"forty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"States has filed for bankruptcy the company is accused of aggressively marketing and Pulitzer misleading doctors bankruptcy does not include any admission of wrongdoing. those talking has agreed to pay nearly ninety million dollars to thousands of Australian customers to settle cases relating to the common effects was cheating as a diesel emissions the companies already paid out billions of dollars globally over the scandal the lead singer of the nineteen eighties band the cars Rick a cassock has died at age seventy five they hit simply do the song drive which was used at the live eight concert in nineteen eighty five the backdrop to hiring footage the Ethiopian famine BBC knees. hello only needs to cook I'm calling on the hunt something wrong special. something wrong this. my word is. launched. that is a pick me slow. training in a tree. when it's time. the peculiar pint size paid me sauce a red dwarf species that can only be found on one tiny island off the coast of Panama it broke off from the mainland some nine thousand years ago and ever since then the small office have been shrinking. hi in this discovery on the BBC I want to investigate the advantages of being small and find out what animals all the size they all being small means that you can get to a breeding age much faster it means that you can have more offspring can last time. in a law office point is the mail is very small compared to the female but if he's a bit smaller he might be less likely to be man's brain that might. you're more agile your fast and if you want to fly you have to be small. it's really hard to be a big void animal. sounds pretty convincing to me but to fully understand why it pays to be petite we first need some of the basics the size of the animal is really does all boil down to energy so its trade off between obtaining energy and then transforming it into either metabolism or new babies this is for Lisa Smith paleontologist at the university of New Mexico she has dedicated her life to trying to answer the question of why animals all the size they all evolution is all about maximising your ability to get energy and at different times in evolutionary history depending on the environment depending on the other predators and competitors are present you might expect a different optimal body size right energy it makes sense you are what you eat but it's interesting that its external things like predators temperature that also affect how much food energy you can get and that impacts your body size over generations. looking at the fossil record in going back in evolutionary time we can see how my animals were able to take advantage of a gap in the energy market for example mammals start really small in the Mesozoic four hundred and forty million years they do really not a whole lot but that's because the dominant animals in the landscape or non avian dinosaurs and their usurping mostly energy in those environments after they go extinct at the the KT mammals now have this open field and you suddenly get the evolution of Norman's body size there's a increase in body size of at least six orders of magnitude with him just ten fifteen million years and mammals come to occupy almost all body size ranges we see today that probably reflects this change in energy availability and then the strong selection to make use of that and different mammals did that different ways one word make a fairy him the elephant size giant ground sloth that runs the Americas up to nine thousand years ago if you know anything about me at school you'll know that I am a sloth obsessed zero gists but we're not here to talk about the giants we want the pocket sized mini versions of our favorite tunnels and when I found out that there was an opportunity to see a diminutive version of the product I was happy to travel halfway across the world to the tiny island of escudos just a glimpse of red in danger and very small. slow. no it wasn't a Caribbean holiday island it was an intrepid exploration I had to Wade through sting ray and festive mangrove swamps. one. in the mangrove swamps and the skin this is where we have the greatest chance of finding the pick me sloths. and the conditions all unbelievably tough the sloths all extremely hard to find. still to come across to the best of times and the song pick me self. so the smaller than normal sloths which makes them twice as hard to find having to clamber over routes over time being mindful of the potential caymans and sting rays I'm not sure I do it for any other animal in the pick me sloth. I'm visiting scooter with Debbie Talley's a conservationist with zoological society of London's edge of existence program they are monitoring the progress of population using radio track which should make them easier to find. now where walking through a faerie faery fairy sake mods it's going to sort of me saying the way to it thousands of fan. the roots of the mangrove. is quite a workout. yes we have it yeah. you can see behind this branches of the tree the owner of the phone my word is basically a bowl of gray green for a nestled in some branches and that is a pick me slow. looking straight at me salsa silence and slow and stealthy. an exceedingly well camouflaged. does he tell me how do they compare in size to the broader posts that you find on the mainland well the wait they are like forty percent smaller and in the length there are twenty percent smaller than the ones that you find in.

zoological society of London Pulitzer Debbie Talley nine thousand years ten fifteen million years ninety million dollars forty million years twenty percent forty percent
"forty million years" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John that's this is the John batch so shall we go to the north of Spain the air October twenty six to eight the author William Bryant Logan bill okay is driving and admiring the landscape his books private plans tending the endless gift of trees introduces us to the mysteries that bill is about to discover for himself this is the north of Spain not far from the city of Victoria bill congratulations and good evening you are an arborist but you're also a global traveler watching out for trees the legacy of trees the archaeology of trees the fact that trees are intimately involved in civilization these last ten thousand years except for maybe the last hundred and fifty so your book as a treat introduce all of us to watch you found near Victoria in the twelfth century good evening to you about good evening thank you thank you for that that set up going learning about the history of people's relationship to trees was such a revelation to me although although I take care of trees for a living I wasn't aware of how important they were for about ten thousand years and one of the things it showed me that first was when I was told by a friend you want to see some of those old fashioned trees the trees that were hot like six feet off the ground and allowed to re sprout called Pollard's or those cut right to the ground and allowed to re sprout called compas trees and I know where you go you'll go to the little town of Maroua and just walk down the roadway there and well I thought I would see a couple of trees it'd been treated that way and I started off and you know it was very crowded day and I have to park in some place I should be parking and but I saw a tree I thought my god look as an oak tree that someone had cut back in about six to eight feet in that it re sprouted and they have done that again and again on a period every ten or twenty years will be several hundred years since the eleventh or twelfth century I thought oh my goodness there's one there's another and I started to walk down this road and there was another and another and pretty soon I was entirely lost in a woodland entirely composed of these trees that had been interacting with people four eight hundred or a thousand years there were oak trees there were beech trees there were chestnut trees my wife was with me and we went by one chestnut tree I had her stand by it and you could see that the girl says that chestnut tree was taller than my wife to to the tree was more than six feet in diameter and at least six or seven hundred years old and walking in this area and seeing this all of these different trees treated in this way I realized that the way people lived with trees was not just something they occasionally did as a hobby but the way that they got wood for burning wood for charcoal fruit for eating fruits for medicines all of the different things are building struck things to build structures with all of the things that they needed to make a life out of were made it through their interaction with the woodlands your penetrating summary of your book is trees return that's it Tracy's return so we're about to walk into the world where people knew the trees return and that was useful before there's plastic before there's sharp saws before their buildings that are piled up on glass and aluminum trees return so a couple of definitions here are necessary bill because we use them interchangeably what is Pollard dead as in the Pollard forest you walk through that was from the twelve century and what is Comcast your two different ways of treating the trees to get them to return you Paul argued that is you take your tree and you let its trunk grow up and what it's about six feet feet high you then can cut it back either by cutting the whole truck back or by cutting the branches that are above that back to about six foot height and the reason you do that is if you have animals you have sheep or cow was or go to your pastor you want your re sprouting to come up above where their mouths can reach if you don't do that then of this chalkboard comes back and it won't come back or will come back a couple times and then stop so Pollard was a way to be able to cut up high so you're animals could live in the same pastor with your trees coppicing if you could keep the animals out meant that you could cut all the way to the ground and let the trees re sprout from the ground and that was easier to harvest because it was right from the ground but you had to be able to keep animals away from it and once you were walking in in Spain was a Pollard did for us because they had what six feet in a Bob and the practical nature of this it will strike everybody is commonsensical why didn't I think of that why did they cut the trees to create new branches again and again what they need them for well they could use them for everything from structures they could use some for building fences they could use him for making charcoal and with that charcoal they could make iron they could make glass they could heat their houses they could make you they also used would as an important ingredient in making quicklime which was everything from a medicine to the paint on your houses to something that would improve the quality of your farm fields they used it for fodder for their animals so many sheep and goats and cattle were fed on the the dried branches to through the winter or dry branches that came from a number of these trees so they were extraordinary resource for people but also you know it's interesting that when they did this cutting when I first study that I thought the trees must have been very short lived but it turns out they weren't they lived longer than when they hadn't been cut so that today the oldest trees now living in Europe are trees that were once alerted and the practical nature of this it just I was dumbstruck when it hit me bell the reason you Pollard a tray is rather than take it down to take down a tree you got it once that's what we do cut down a tree cut it up turn it into boards when your power to trade year after year especially if you have a Grove of the man as you take us to in your book you have a Grove of them and every twenty years or so you just wander around the Grove getting new word that is perfectly constructed for everything you need from polls to beams to to canoes so it's it's a farm is net isn't that a way of talking about a polident forest it is a way it's a it's a kind of perennial would like what I like to think of it as it's it's almost like an organism because the trees in the people work together we got things from the trees but when we were cutting them because they would we would kind of take out some of the problems they were having every time we made those cuts every fifteen or twenty years we allowed the trees to re sprout new healthy young baby branches so it made them healthier and help them live longer and help the whole forest be a better forest and a more diverse when both for human needs and for the needs of all the non humans in it so it was an interesting perennial I mean we've long before the word sustainable sustainable relationship to the land around us and the people who did these things say pastor knowledge down several thousand years of war where they specialists there are the is this what I should say as a Forrester would spend without a role in the villages and towns yes and no everyone pretty much knew how to do it but I think increasingly you would find a particular people taking more responsibility for the woodlands probably from the twelve century forward there would have been more specials in this goes back to the neolithic and back even to the Mesolithic at which time probably most everybody knew how to do it but when we're doing modern Paul RD I often wish that I had a neolithic person standing beside me just any neolithic person so I could say to them excuse me if I make that cut what will happen because they would and they would know which they lived intimately with their woodlands let's go to the anxiety that reigns in bills Buck because he is tending London plane trees where are they and what does it mean that you're Pollard exam why is the risk so we're doing it in it is often call arts which probably began around the sixteenth century in Europe or an ornamental form of the polar to people had uses for and they allowed us to bring the to bring large maturing trees into the city and keep them small and keep them on a scale where they wouldn't do harm but also where they would be beautiful to people and not overwhelm are are comparatively narrow streets so we're doing it and we were hired to do it at the metropolitan museum of art with some new trees that we help selected we trained in the nursery and then we brought to the site and began to Paul Arden you know party to if you're an illicit person was something you did all the time but it's not that commonly done now particularly in the United States so when we began at my heart was in my mouth because we cut all the bugs off well not quite all we left a few what the French called kill says that is a few bugs to draw the sap up but we cut off most of the budget these trees so they didn't really even look they look more like children's stick drawings of trees and they did like trees the first time and when this happened I you know after I looked at it I thought so I bust of killed them all they've spent all this money on this brand new clothes and I've given them a bunch of dead trees so I was so relieved when the trees who actually know how to do this and have known how to do this for more than forty million years responded by sprouting beautifully the book is sprout lands tending the analyst gift of trees William Bryant Logan is the author an arborist we're off to Bristol England I'm John batch this is the John Babson John Batchelor show KGO.

Spain William Bryant Logan six feet twenty years ten thousand years thousand years twelve century forty million years seven hundred years hundred years eight feet six foot
"forty million years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

10:13 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I'm John bachelor this is the John batch so shall we go to the north of Spain the air on October twenty sixty the author William Bryant Logan bill okay is driving and admiring the landscape his books private plans tending the endless gift of trees introduces us to the mysteries that bill is about to discover for himself this is the north of Spain not far from the city of Victoria bill congratulations and good evening you are an arborist but you're also a global traveler watching out for trees the legacy of trees the archaeology of trees the fact that trees are intimately involved in civilization these last ten thousand years except for maybe the last hundred and fifty so your book as a treat introduce all of us to watch you found near Victoria in the twelfth century good evening to you now good evening thank you thank you for that that's going learning about the history of people's relationship to trees was such a revelation to me although although I take care of trees for a living I wasn't aware of how important they were for about ten thousand years and one of the things it showed me that first was when I was told by a friend well you want to see some of those old fashioned trees the trees that were hot like six feet off the ground and allowed to re sprout called Pollard's or those cut right to the ground and allowed to re sprout cold compress trees and I know where you go you'll go to the little town of Maroua and just walk down the roadway there and well I thought I would see a couple of trees that have been treated that way and I started off and you know it was very crowded day and I had to park in some places should be parking and but I saw a tree I thought my god look as an oak tree that someone had cut back in about six to eight feet in that it re sprouted and they have done that again and again on a period every ten or twenty years will be several hundred years since the eleventh or twelfth century I thought oh my goodness there's one there's another and I started to walk down this road and there was another and another and pretty soon I was entirely lost in a woodland entirely composed of these trees that had been interacting with people four eight hundred or a thousand years there were oak trees there were beech trees there were chestnut trees my wife was with me and we went by one chestnut tree I had her stand by it and you could see that the girl says that chestnut tree was taller than my wife to to the tree was more than six feet in diameter and at least six or seven hundred years old and walking in this area and seeing this all of these different trees treated in this way I realized that the way people live with trees was not just something they occasionally did as a hobby but the way that they got wood for burning wood for charcoal fruit for eating fruits for medicines all of the different things are building struck things to build structures with all of the things that they needed to make a life out of were made it through their interaction with the woodlands your penetrating summary of your book is trees return that's it trees return so we're about to walk into the world where people knew the trees return and that was useful before there's plastic before there's sharp saws before their buildings that are piled up on glass and aluminum trees return so a couple of definitions here are necessary bill because we use them interchangeably what is Pollard dead as in the Pollard forest you walk through that was from the twelfth century and what is coppiced your two different ways of treating the trees to get them to return would you Paul are to that is you take your tree and you let its trunk grow up and what it's about six feet feet high you then can cut it back either by cutting the whole trunk back or by cutting the branches that are above that back to about six foot height and the reason you do that is if you have animals you have sheep or cow was or go to your pastor you want your re sprouting to come up above where their mouths can reach if you don't do that then they'll just chop what comes back and it won't come back or will come back a couple times and then stop so Pollard was a way to be able to cut up high so you're animals could live in the same pastor with your trees coppicing if you could keep the animals out meant that you could cut all the way to the ground and let the trees re sprout from the ground and that was easier to harvest is it was right from the ground but you had to be able to keep animals away from it one once you were walking in in Spain was a Pollard did for us because they had six feet in a Bob and the practical nature of this it will strike everybody is commonsensical why didn't I think of that why did they cut the trees to create new branches again and again what did they need them for well they could use them for everything from structures they could use some for building fences they could use him for making charcoal and with that charcoal they could make iron they could make glass they could keep their houses they could make it a also used would as an important ingredient in making quicklime which was everything from a medicine to the paint on your houses to something that would improve the quality of your farm fields they used it for fodder for their animals so many sheep and goats and cattle were fed on the the dried branches to through the winter or dry branches that came from a number of these trees so they were in extraordinary resource for people but also you know it's interesting that when they did this cutting when I first studied it I thought to treat must have been very short lived but it turns out they weren't they lived longer than when they hadn't been caught so that today the oldest trees now living in Europe are trees that were once Pollard and the practical nature of this it just I was dumbstruck when it hit me bell the reason you power to tray is rather than take it down to take down a tree you got it once that's what we do cut down a tree cut it up turn it into boards when your politics for a year after year especially if you have a Grove of the man as you I take issue in your book you have a Grove of them and every twenty years or so you just wander around the Grove getting new word that is perfectly constructed for everything you need from polls to beams to to canoes so it's it's a farm is net isn't that a way of talking about a polident forest it is a way it's a it's a kind of perennial woodland what I'd like to think of it as it's it's almost like an organism because the trees in the people work together we got things from the trees but when we were cutting them because they would we would kind of take out some of the problems they were having every time we made those cuts every fifteen or twenty years we allowed the trees to re sprout new healthy young baby branches so it made them healthier and help them live longer and help the whole forest be a better forest and a more diverse when both for human needs and for the needs of all the non humans in it so it was an interesting perennial I mean we've long before the word sustainable sustainable relationship to the land around us and the people who did these things that have passed the knowledge down several thousand years of war where they specialists there are the is this what I should say is the Forrester would spend without a role in the villages and towns yes and no everyone pretty much knew how to do it but I think increasingly you would find a particular people taking more responsibility for the woodlands probably from the twelfth century forward there would have been more specials in this goes back to the neolithic and back even to the Mesolithic and which time probably most everybody knew how to do it but when we're doing modern Paul RD I often wish that I had a neolithic person standing beside me just any neolithic person so I could say to them excuse me if I make that cut what will happen because they would have they would know which they lived intimately with their woodlands let's go to the anxiety that reigns in bills Bach because he is tending London plane trees where are they and what does that mean that your power day why is the risk so we're doing it in it is often Paul arts which probably began around the sixteenth century in Europe are an ornamental form of the polar to people had uses for and they allowed us to bring the to bring large maturing trees into the city and keep some small and keep some of this scale where they wouldn't do harm but also where they would be beautiful to people and not overwhelm are are comparatively narrow streets so we're doing it and we were hired to do it at the metropolitan museum of art with some new trees that we help selected we trained in the nursery and then we brought to the site and began to Paul Arden you know party to if you're an illicit person was something you did all the time but it's not that commonly done now particularly in the United States so when we began at my heart was in my mouth as we cut all the bugs off well not quite all we left a few what the French called kill says that is a few bugs to draw the sap up but we cut off most of the budget these trees so they didn't really even look they look more like children's stick drawings of trees and they did like trees the first time and when this happened I you know after I looked at it I thought so I bust of killed them all they spent all this money on this brand new flaws and I've given them a bunch of dead trees so I was so relieved when the trees who actually know how to do this and have known how to do this for more than forty million years responded by sprouting beautifully the book is sprout lands tending the analysts gift of trees William Bryant Logan is the author an arborist we're off to Bristol England I'm John Batchelor this is the John Babson one of five point nine FM.

Spain William Bryant Logan six feet twenty years ten thousand years thousand years forty million years seven hundred years hundred years eight feet six foot
Simbakubwa Kutokaafrika

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

Simbakubwa Kutokaafrika

"Is it possible that there are big prehistoric animals that paleontologists have never discovered of course it is done. The distant past is poorly known and. Paleontologists find fossil evidence for new large animals all the time in two thousand nineteen to American researchers reported discovering the fossil remains of carnivorous mammal larger than a modern lion and even larger than. The prehistoric Sabertooth Tiger it live twenty two million years ago in what's now Africa really. Were they find it. They found it in a museum drawer at the Nairobi National Museum in Kenya how museum drawer it's not as strange. As you might think decades ago a team of paleontologists dug up fossils of its jaw portions of its skull and some other parts of its skeleton but the team was looking for fossils of prehistoric apes so they. Just catalogued it started and forgot it so the modern researchers most of fun something interesting about the fossils that the earlier team didn't they did. They found that the fossil creature was a mammal but not closely related to any modern. Modern Group of mammals it was a member of an extinct group called the hyena dance for forty million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs. They were the dominant group of Mammalian predators in Africa. They all died out when their environment changed the scientists named the Creature Simba Kuba Kotoka Africa since there were apes in Africa back then it's possible that this giant Predator with Canine teeth as big as bananas may have dined.

Africa Nairobi National Museum Kenya Twenty Two Million Years Forty Million Years
"forty million years" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on 1A

"And this disagreement as to whether it contains evidence of an asteroid that killed off the Niners. How do you do with that kind of ambiguity or an unresolved? Question superior intelligence are really good of ambiguity, because we're looking at things and a long time ago. And sometimes it might say, well, this fossil is forty million years old, plus or minus a million years. That's a lot of ambiguity, plus or minus a million. That's a range, a pretty big range. But what we do this. Okay. Here's the uncertainty is plus or minus a million years. Kim we work in that. Can we get better data and push it down to plus around ten thousand years? And that's what scientists do in general, is they built hypotheses they test them, and they get increasingly better and better constrain view of what happened on planet. So that site of North Dakota that you mentioned we learned in one thousand nine hundred eighty that an asteroid struck the planet, and the idea was. Did this Astros actually caused the extinction of the dinosaurs? Lots of debate about that between one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred eighty eight nine hundred eighty eight most the scientists is, and we're like, yeah, there's actually enough evidence. We find this layer from the debris from the asteroid all around the world. The dinosaurs are right below it, never above it. And not only that, but other kinds of animals, and plants should same pattern of extinction. Exactly at the level where we find the evidence of the asteroids, so that went from being a crazy idea to being settled science in a matter of a decade, as more and more people studied. And that's what science, does it always challenges. It's always testing and repeat your observations of you the same observation multiple times. Start to say. Hey, this might actually be real a bunch of our listeners wanted us to ask about the funding for this hall because it's funded by thirty five million dollars. That was given by David coke call the David h coke hall of fossils. Some of our listeners, kind of questioned of right wing philanthropist. A guy who made his money and petrochemicals funding. This kind of an exhibit. What would you say to them? Well, first of all, the Smithsonian we do get a lot of our funding for exhibits from private individuals. What we don't do we don't allow those individuals to define any aspect of the content of the exhibit there, right? Red line between we put in the exhibit, and what the funders believe think, or feel obviously someone giving money to the exhibit has reasons to do that. And I believe the David coke is a very positive person toward science in the support. He's given to us to Nova to our human origins hall. He supported basic science, and I can tell you that he had no impact on the content of this exhibit, if you go through it, it's very hard hitting exhibit about how climate has changed throughout history and how it impacts us now and possibly into the future, so I can see people would ask the question. But there's a very clear line between what donor does and what the museum does, and we do our contacts entirely within the museum. So he basically gave the money and backed off. That's right. Okay. So. I want to see the big one. Okay. Can we, please I want? I'm trying not to be a twelve year old, and I want to say to people now. Well, we have several big ones. It turns out, you know, which big what I'm talking about. All right. You want to wreck site to, but you wanna see diplotic is on win. Okay. We're going to the stuff later. Thank you are behaving. Exactly like I hope many of our visits behaviors like the door opens a full sprint to the big one. The big one is in view. There is. So you're looking at a complete skeleton of transverse Rex this massive meeting carnivore, that is forty feet long hipster. Twelve feet off the ground. His heads five.

David coke David h coke hall North Dakota Astros Kim Nova million years thirty five million dollars forty million years ten thousand years Twelve feet twelve year forty feet
"forty million years" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"They have failed. But Mike you've spent twenty years in a place. I was covering those heat hawk series back when the hawks were given too much money to John CONCACAF, and the hawks have been that since John con, cock, like, don't celebrate the hawks even though that you want their future, when the hawks haven't done bleep in the last twenty five years, idols I've got titles. And I was at every turn still defending the godfather and last year with the refusal to trade Josh Richardson for Jimmy Butler because you're. Sending mixed messages to me. Right. We're gonna get Wales and we're gonna get killer whales is Jimmy Butler not aaronow. Like, I will tell you that the thing that they are scared of the most okay when it comes to that wailed stuff is thirty and forty million dollars a year for a player over thirty for a player over thirty. And so that's why they hesitated on the Josh Richardson thing. It's because they if you ask the people in that organization, what's the thing that you can't have. It's the Chris Paul contract. It's, it's thirty million forty million years. A for for over thirty I'm just telling you the philosophy. You don't have to agree with it. I'm just telling but it's not at all the philosophy. It was going to be the philosophy. And the tipping point was Shash Richardson. They were fine taking that contract and Josh Richardson passed the cost you nothing. If you're going to take the risk, it has to cost. Nothing giants dot Richardson man. Josh Richardson like seriously like if we're going to go for, like, we're we want to be in the first round of the NBA playoffs. Fine it with the player that gives you a chance, and Jimmy Butler, I will never understand that move. And I'm just sort of confused at the what the plan is now. Okay. We're gonna just ride it out with these bad contracts. And we're gonna fight to make the playoffs with this theme. And we're going to clear space for a bad free agency year with them them, what we're not going to able future assets to try to clear money. That's what the NBA does what this seems quite get pretty disastrous. Those contracts end up being a pretty disastrous mistake and Billy's point is a good one when he says, you expect the organization or no more than we do. But I'm telling you, I it hasn't been that long that I don't remember all you guys to James Johnson back. He had one hell of a year. You were telling me he was baby drained mon-. Like we wanted him back. I don't know if we wanted him back at a price, but came back this founded. No, he didn't. Yes, those four year contracts. All those guys were taking less money that at the time. Mike look Tyler Johnson was getting at the time you could have gotten a line on. We're gonna come back. Discounted, if we signed Gordon Hayward, they had those frameworks in place, and then Pat Riley caved and gave extra years, you wanna say about how their philosophies and not give players over thirty that contract, will they did with James Johnson? They do they did that recently since when since when is up in the philosophy is not it's not the thirty or forty million dollar contract for whatever that's worth has you his four years, sixty million. Right. It's, it's an insane amount of money that it's been a disaster of contract. I'm just I'm just a little frustrated, I, I don't know. Bleep about Tyler hero. I can watch highlights and talk myself into it. I, I just hate not being close, and I hate not really knowing what the plan is. Because if the plan is to just write it out with these guys and get eliminated in the first round. Then. Why are we doing that? Let's see what the rest of the NBA does, which is tank can get the assets and give ourselves a fighting chance of getting the superstar here because Dwayne Wade's gone. Now Dwayne Wade's gone. And it seems like we're really far away from getting a superstar here that can maybe even replace him. We're not even in the conversation. We're not getting in the room..

Shash Richardson hawks Jimmy Butler Josh Richardson James Johnson NBA Billy Dwayne Wade Tyler Johnson Mike Chris Paul John CONCACAF John con Gordon Hayward Pat Riley Wales mon thirty million forty million y forty million dollars forty million dollar
"forty million years" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on 790 KABC

"I mean, they look all so busy, and everything are there, any is there such thing as lazy worker ants. Yeah. Absolutely. This recently discovered that she'd been Sam. I can't remember the percentage but I think it's somewhere around. Fifty percents of grants today at any might even be great. Isn't that a base lazing around doing nothing? So, yes, laziness is something that's what I mean is, we have a tendency to move. We will have a tendency to judge animals by our own moral standards laziness, for example, is something that we feel we deride animals have been lazy say, work around. So it was made big news when it was discovered that, you know, about sexually and not doing anything, but that's you know, that's beneficial to the society. You know, this is another example of an animal, incredibly lazy, and has got a very bad reputation for being lazy, but actually smell saw incredibly successful, animals. They've been around on this planet in one shape, or another forty million years, and they are incredibly prolific doing very well for Mamata best size despite the fact that we chopping down as far as the Lamin, right? The there's a lot of positives to be said, but rather than cooling slow. Lazy really, we should be pulling them, frugal 's, perhaps, in the energy saving icons, basically jiving disarming. We should be sparring to see. That's what I'm doing how, and I'm sitting in the chair out there. I'm just I'm your yes. I'm just leaving end. Doing on this panic right now saving energy..

forty million years
"forty million years" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on ESPN FC

"You know, your stuff all your cousins. Let me test them, if this happens whenever this happens anywhere else, it's not to be it, it is not a debate, of course because some size it's, It's, it's it's not. not. When it's when you okay answer this one and this when we go back to the starting point, and that's Pat, when the passes. Montas if that past. Players in enough side position. She is that all that matters when, when the ball is split now interference one, not just making clear from from rules perspective from an IT perspective. Why not just say if you're in an high fashion? None. Why, why if you're influence, why leave the grey zone because you're allowed to stand in an off side position if you own defecting plate, but that you're affecting play is very nebulous shock. That's up to everybody's individual interpretation. If you're the players clear, what you're seeing is what you're seeing is right by you'll suppose it into position. Oh. Ruled. Regulus. Nebula nebulous. From playing a ball through here and somebody stood out there on this defendant, decides like an idiot, what I'm gonna mop this other guy outside here even though he's twenty yards wide. You're, you're creating strong. You were the one who come up with some ridiculous nebulous when you mean this rule is all all the space potato sack. What about this fear of influence? I. You have got frames to say. Australia. Brazil the other games of the day. Tomorrow's the question on our daily podcast women's World Cup. Maybe we'll have a shock dumb onto yell at me. That show finger wagging. Be anywhere else. It is bad kissing season. Even has today in Madrid in front of you. Can't see them. They're now you see them thousand fans this to see him juggle the ball only a few times him, although. Oh. Oh. Has Madrid one hundred million euros plus some add-ons, that's not the only expenditure this summer for the angle. So there see along with has Luca Yovich will reinforce the attack. Mendi of the own to reinforce the defense. But what about the players that have to move out of Madrid for more on that we bring in sid Lowe said, we know situations like HAMAs and Gareth bale are very tricky. What's the latest out of Real Madrid on how they're planning to offload these players? Well, I think in a way the best way to stop. This is to talk about the fact that we still in June. Now, there are two and a half months to go in the transfer window. They know that they have really significant differ difficulties. We've Gareth bio, the Byerly saying that he's not planning to go. Anyway, he doesn't want to leave that he's going to stay. He's not going to give up any of that salary, which is in the region of seventeen million years year off the tax cults realm, did not follow a forty million years year. No, this is difficult. But they also know that there is time now this spending that they've done very early is partly because of course the damn wanted these plays early. But it's also with the recognition all the idea, or at least that they will recuperate significant amounts of money from CEOs. Now, obviously, you've mentioned HAMAs, and Gareth bale is theoretically the plays that would generate the most money. But you've also got look at people at your didn't. They say bios Kayla Cuevas, I wouldn't be surprised if maybe one or two of a slightly bigger players if an off academy in for someone like nukem Aldrich, I wouldn't be massively surprised if they at least listened to it ruptured. No, they need to recover money, not least, because at least would like this to continue. He would like a couple more plays. Everybody knows it's pretty much an open secret now that they would very much like getting about passing realism suggests that just doesn't happen. Everybody knows that you would very much like that, to get polka realism suggests that probably doesn't happen. But maybe not quite as, as downright impossible. Madrids do that they will need to generate money. And they know this is going to be incredibly difficult to do guys based on the list of players that we know are coming in and unlisted players that we know are coming out. Here's another perspective, eleven Barral Madrid..

Gareth bale Madrid sid Lowe Barral Madrid HAMAs Real Madrid Byerly nukem Aldrich Pat Australia Luca Yovich Kayla Cuevas Brazil Madrids seventeen million years forty million years twenty yards
"forty million years" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Years ago. There were forests on Antarctica, and Greenland, so we can look back in time and see evidence of situations that we might encounter in the future. How do you walk away from an exhibit like this? If say you are not sold on the science behind climate change, or if you're religious views questioned the existence of dinosaurs to defined them as existing thousands of years ago, rather than millions of years ago, how religious views our political views you're gonna have to square them with scientific news as well. And this sort of three levels of Ewing, so people come in here with all sorts of leaves that we welcome everybody to the museum. What we're presenting here is the scientific record of our planet, so it's just data and you don't have to believe science for it to be true, but has to get a little sticky for a federal museum, the kind of deal with so many people with so many different politics in views. I don't really think so. I mean, I think we are a science based nation. So he present scientists, we're not making statements like you must believe this, or you must achieve this policy where saying, here's what science tells us about planet earth. Talk about how the exhibit deals with some of the uncertainty around paleontology, new fossil discoveries. There's this Tanna site in North Dakota, there was a New Yorker article about it in March. And this disagreement as to whether it contains evidence of an asteroid that killed off the dinosaurs. How do you do with that kind of ambiguity or, or an unresolved? Question superior intelligence are really good of ambiguity, because we're looking at things happened a long time ago. And sometimes it might say, well, this fossil is forty million years old, plus a million years. That's a lot of ambiguity, plus or minus a million. That's a range, a pretty big range. But what we do this, like, okay, here's the uncertainty is plus million years. Can we work in that? Can we get better data and push it down to plus or minus ten thousand years? And that's what scientists do in general, is they built hypotheses they test them, and they get it increasingly better and better constrain view of what happened on planet. So that site in North Dakota that you mentioned we learned in one thousand nine hundred eighty that an asteroid struck the planet, and the idea was. Did this asteroid actually caused the extinction of the dinosaurs? Lots of debate about that between one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred eighty eight nine hundred eighty eight most the scientists is the world, like, yeah, there's actually enough evidence. We find this layer from the debris from the asteroid all around the world. The dinosaurs are right below it never above it, and not only that, but other kinds of animals, and plants should same pattern of extinction. Exactly at the level where we find the evidence of the asteroids, so that went from being a crazy idea to being settled science in a matter of a decade, as more and more people studied. And that's what science, does it always challenges. It's always testing in, you repeat your apps. Evasive. You the same observation multiple times status say, hey, this might actually be real a bunch of our listeners wanted.

North Dakota Ewing Antarctica Greenland million years forty million years ten thousand years
"forty million years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KCRW

"What that looks like what that means? Yeah. So these measurements started in the late fifties, and they continue to the present. They show a steady rise is a seasonal cycle on top of that. So we get a sort of a wave with a peak it may and so we hit another peak this year. And that's what we're reporting we happen to hit another round number. I the first daily value over four hundred fifteen parts per million, and it's on top of really remarkable rise over this whole period. So this is the famous keeling curve that we saw Al Gore's documentary, an inconvenient truth where it looks like a hockey hockey stick, really. Well, it's I mean I it looks it's a wave going up in that it's got to on it. That's the seasonal cycle and it shows a level of every year of exceeded the year before and the pace of rise has exceleron, generally over the whole record. So that we're seeing increased now about two and a half parts per million per year. So that's up quite a bit from the of the rate from the beginning of the record. So the level celebs my father started were around three hundred ten three hundred fifteen million. So it's a very, very substantial rise. So now we're at four hundred fifteen parts per million, right? Translate that to us, what is four hundred fifteen parts per million? Mean in terms of what's happening to the planet. So let's see the natural so by father didn't didn't know, for sure. What happened before he started measurements? But we do know now from all. Colder air. That's been recovered from a polar ice cores that the levels before the industrial revolution really for ten thousand years or so early civilization all the way up until the nineteenth century where around two hundred eighty million. So that's kind of the natural background then level started up and then he, he caught the rise from fifty eight and our all all the way up at the four four fifteen said and it with the pace of rise if that continues will be hitting four hundred twenty parts per million in small number years. And then right on up to four fifty and five hundred. So I mean the pace and the levels were asked suggests we're moving into really amazingly uncharted territory the last time as far as we know that levels were this high was back in the Pleistocene about three million years ago. And at that time, the levels were maybe about as high as for unin fifteen. But we are we're soon a push beyond levels that they even saw the Playa seem. So then we'll be talking about. And million years ago or forty million years ago. When levels were last this, this is so they're, they're about to get what did the earth look like then? Well, in the in the Pleistocene, not, not my expertise. But, you know, I read on these things, and I'm impressed with other people's work full swerve, I don't know thirty to sixty feet higher than today. So there's a lot less ice on an article in Greenland. There was quite a bit different in the distribution of vegetate around the planet temperatures were warmer, the Arctic in particular was spectacularly warmer than today. There were forests like we have over central Canada and Russia extending all the way to the Arctic Ocean. We didn't have much tundra there. So really, really very different world, and we're basically setting the stage for changes of that magnitude eventually with these kind of levels, at least that's what the science would probably suggest. So this is obviously before humans roam the earth, three million years ago was obviously, there were early early humanoids walking around at that time, that I'm not sure you would say that they were anything like modern humans. So this is really really long time ago. I guess, you know, I'm wondering is this a an environment that could sustain humans or is it just to uninhabitable at that stage? I think the risk to humans isn't that will go extinct from this. It's, it's we're changing the planet in ways that will be extremely potentially extremely disruptive to all sorts of things. We depend on like growing food and having land that we know how to work and not having heat wave that are too hot to having coastal land that you can farm, the fertile if not below sea level. So I mean, the concern is that we just don't have the right infrastructure for that world. So we'll have to start all over again and civilizations will have to move, which is, of course, the scary thing, because that's often not a very peaceful process. What do you think your dad would have said, if he saw this number today, four hundred fifteen parts per million? That's really hard to say, I, I do know that I heard him give a talk in the hallway back in the seventies about what he thought would happen, and he sought at the point that temperatures were noticeably rising the pack. Action would probably start to be taken in that point was crossed in about nineteen ninety no he lived a bit longer than that. So he was well aware that that opportunity was missed, and he was, he was pretty careful to just stick with his measurements. Not spread too thinly into other areas. But I did sense towards the end of his.

Pleistocene Al Gore hockey keeling curve Arctic Ocean Greenland Arctic Canada Russia three million years forty million years ten thousand years million years sixty feet
"forty million years" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on KCRW

"Of the record. So the level levels. My father started were around three hundred ten three hundred fifteen million. So it's a very very substantial rise. So now, we're at four hundred fifteen parts per million right translate that to us what is four hundred and fifteen parts per million mean in terms of what's happening to the planet. So let's see. So by didn't didn't know for sure what happened before he started measurements? But we do know now from older air that's been recovered from a polar ice cores that. At the levels before the industrial revolution really for ten thousand years or so early civilization all the way up until the nineteenth century where around two hundred eighty parts per million. So that's kind of a natural background then level started up. And then he he caught the rise from fifty eight and our all all the way up at four four fifteen as I said and it with the pace of rise. If that continues will be hitting four hundred twenty million in a in a small number of years and then right on up to four fifty and five hundred. So I mean the pace and the levels were out suggests removing moving into really amazingly uncharted territory. The last time as far as we know that levels were this high was back in the Pleistocene about three million years ago. And at that time, the levels were maybe about as high as fifteen, but we are we're soon in a push beyond levels that they even saw apply seen. So then we'll be talking about. And million years ago or forty million years ago when levels this this, so they're they're about to get what did the earth? Look like then in the place, he not my expertise. But you know, I read on these things and I'm impressed with other people's work. Seal bulls were I don't know thirty to sixty feet higher than today. So there's a lot less ice on an article in Greenland. There was quite a bit different in the distribution of vegetated around the planet. Temperatures were warmer. The Arctic in particular was spectacularly warmer than today. There were forests like we have over central Canada and Russia extending all the way to the Arctic Ocean. We didn't have much tundra up there. So was really really very different world. And we're basically setting the stage for changes of that magnitude eventually with these kind of levels at least, that's that's what the science would probably suggest. So this is obviously before humans roam the earth. Three million years ago was obviously there were early early humanoids walking around at that time that I'm not sure you would say that they were anything like modern humans. So this is really really long time ago. I guess, you know, I'm wondering is this a an environment that could sustain humans or is it just to uninhabitable at that stage. The risk to humans, isn't that? We'll go extinct from this. It's it's we're changing the planet in ways that will be extremely potentially extremely disruptive to all sorts of things we depend on like.

Arctic Ocean Pleistocene Arctic Greenland Canada Russia Three million years forty million years three million years ten thousand years million years sixty feet
"forty million years" Discussed on Sports? with Katie Nolan

Sports? with Katie Nolan

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on Sports? with Katie Nolan

"But then they, but then they die. Yeah. So like, we're seeing the stars overseeing could still be exploding or they exploded like forty million years ago, depending on how close there we're seeing them explode. Yeah. A star is an explosion. Explosion versus a predator. Oh, man. That's a that's a it stars reminds just how small ER give it to the gas. Yeah. We're going to give it to the start. And then the blues versus the jets got damn it. So it's so it's sad. It's sad music verses of plane. Which I think we all know is well, I will say on our trip. They played sad music on our plane. It just kept restarting. It was most annoying thing. I've ever experienced the said music wins it here will say no one asked you think that. A Jet Propulsion engine would drown out the sound of blues. That's true. But you know, jets crash strew music is forever so in but in a fight between the two I think it's pretty clear that the jets would win. All right. These are all really bad. Wave Bruins capitals avalanche blue jackets penguins Golden Knights stars in jet. Yeah. Those are. All right us think I think there I picked everyone who didn't win the first game. But that's fine. Jaded you at what was your take? Oh, no, it's okay. No. What is it? You wrote so much down. No. It's it's not that important. It was basically about the lightning. Give it in two seconds. When the presidents trophy. And like, basically if you win the most games in the season almost never win the Stanley Cup. Yeah. That's a well. Known take. No, we're gonna skip it you were like, oh our audiences smart enough to ardine bit. That's what I was thinking. That's great. That's great. We're really smart audience. Okay. Last one six star. Masters the masters the greatest weekend to sit on your couch and do absolutely nothing. I do that every weekend, but this weekend, at least have a reason. Yeah. We do this last year where we do our picks. Yes, we did. So I normally do a what is it one person who's like a favorite one person who's middle of the pack, and then a long shot this year. I didn't do that. But I just randomly drunkenly picked Brooks KEPCO on Thursday night to be my dude. And he's in first right now, I think he is tied for first. Yeah. As we printed out the leaderboard, he's led for Shambo. So now, so it's Friday. So we're cheating because we already have leaderboard because we didn't do this yesterday. So we're going to pick one person from the top ten one person from the top twenty five and one person from fifty or higher. So you're gonna stick with Brooks. I feel like yeah. I mean, just because I have actual money on them. I just hurts my feelings because I can't pick. Wait, what places? Oh, no. I can pick. Okay. Cool. Yeah. And I'm going to pick him. I'm gonna pick Brooks KEPCO who's your top pick. I'm gonna take Adam Scott, great actor loved him in party down this excellent party down to chamo-. Of course, you tied for first, but he's also super Gulf. Sure, nobody wanted to doesn't Johnson. The only stupid. We only had one pit that's fine for my next pick for my person from the top twenty five minute go with. Rickie fowler. Currently tied for eleventh was about seventeen other people. Lots of people lots of people. All right. I'll take Tiger Woods. Yeah. His not back title. This gives me you're not pick. Tiger. Eight tiger. I want a different colored highlighter to hell I think that'll help. No, just put a big extras name. Okay. You hate him that it's such a dumb J M pick one. I think I'll take Molinari excuse me aren't gonna Nadi. Okay. Is he related to from India their cousins, j just one French guy? L the flags look the same because this is black and white..

Brooks KEPCO jets Rickie fowler Tiger Woods Adam Scott Bruins Molinari Shambo India Johnson forty million years twenty five minute two seconds
"forty million years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"I I will get absolutely no praise from anybody on the left for this. The caricature of is Mark Belling is gonna rip any liberal for anything. They ever do it. He'll defend any conservative anytime that they do anything. Whereas those of you who listen to the program are aware that not only is that not the case. Some of you think I do go to soft in cases like this forty five. I'm just telling you, I got to sit here, and defend what it is that I say on this show and the only position I can take that I can defend it feel comfortable with is the one that I have even if some people think. I am getting adult. Three northbound before capitol drive, a rollover accident Brie with me on this. Do you know, I do agree with you? Yeah. No. I I believe that you have to look at these things as what would you do if it was on your side, and you have to be consistent on that. But yeah. But if it was a Republican that did it she'd she'd be destroyed. No, I'm saying, you know, your think what I do. Yeah. In other words, you're saying I would offer the same commented defending a Republican who had this sort of thing. So that's what I have to do on the other side. The the point is is that it's smooth because the Republican. No, you're right. In the first place because the left does there's no way anyone on the left in the state of Wisconsin would give the take that I gave here with regard to a democrat. And again, I stream Lee mixed views on this in terms of a politician running for office. That's a different thing because those people make policy and make determinations. This woman any decision. She makes is made because Tony Abrahams is the governor whatever lefty way, she runs her agency another left. He's going to be running the agency that's in there. So in terms of power and control of anything that matters. That's not the or for example, a judge is going to rule forever and ever and ever. It is going to be on there iversons if she doesn't get the job Iverson's going to replace it with some other lefty that's out there without regard to this action that occurred, and I think you have to weigh that into the long term consequences of deciding whether or not you're going to allow the class, the constant liberal, double standards to remain in place. And I admit here, I'm holding a liberal to a lower standard than any conservative would ever be held to if something like this. Came up Brett Cavanaugh that he poked a kid in the hand with a pen forty million years ago. I I mean, they'd be they'd be hauling him off. And I'm not comparing the US supreme court with a cabinet position. But we know what the standard would be. And we know how the double standard is applied. And we know that lefties use any type of accusation is a way of destroying people. And I just think that this one isn't sufficient to apply that standard, and I'm not saying she should get a pass. I'm saying that if this is all they have they ought to confirm. That's what I believe high forty three northbound.

Mark Belling Tony Abrahams Brie Brett Cavanaugh Wisconsin US Iverson Lee forty million years
"forty million years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

03:28 min | 3 years ago

"forty million years" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Is the phone number Pat gray on well deserved vacation, Jeff Fisher, Philippine. And of course, Keith is still here. You could follow us on Twitter at at unleashed at Jeffey marae at Agra, Keith, you know, there are plenty of times when we talk about would you want to when you're out and about someone says that, you know, see li- levels are rising at an alarming rate forest. Fires. There's more of them on the planet that ever before we've got to do something. And you just wanna scream, but there's a better way to go about that screaming and Gregory right stone, author of inconvenient facts science that allegory doesn't want. You to know is joining us here. Pet of leash. Good morning, Gregory. How the world are you? Outstanding me on absolute no problem now instead of screaming and hollering and getting into a fight with the lady at Kohl's says, you know, sea levels are rising. I don't know alarming. Right. Should what? What should I what? What what what should I say? They are wising. But the fact of the matter is they started rising if you look at in my book, I listed chart showing the weight of rise for one hundred sixty nine average glaciers around the world. And it shows us that the glacial or the sea level rise and the retreated. Great glaciers, and they go hand in hand because that's the that's fueling sea level rise. It started in the early eighteen hundreds and by the mid eighteen hundreds word about the same level in rate of sea level rise and retreated. Glaciers is what we saw by the mid eighteen hundreds long before we started adding significant levels of CO two to the atmosphere that occurred really about the mid twentieth century and that post World War Two economic boom is when we started adding it so so, yeah, they are rising but their kid to rise at about the same rate as they have for the last hundred and fifty plus years, but what about to what about that? We could die. That right. Yeah. Well, the for outboard the unusual truth is that submarines and then US navy often exceed six thousand eight thousand parts per million bear in mind. We're only little over four hundred parts per million so this so the our submarine submariners and the us navy. Don't see any how health issues with a much much talking in twenty times, the the rates are levels of c of CO two and the dirty little secret is the current period were in geologic period has the lowest CO two levels in the history of the earth, the average CO two level bear mind. We're about four hundred now I don't wanna throw it too many numbers. We're about four hundred now, it's number buddy should know. And the average back until the pre cambering was twenty six hundred parts per million more than eight times Rhett. Life thrived animals and plants thrived at up to twenty times, the levels of CO two and not only that if you look at the last hundred forty million years of CO two day, there's a straight line decline of carbon dioxide down to what I call the line at death, and that line a death is the minimum threshold for life to to exist. Plant life to exist on earth. Now that would be a true climate, apocalypse if we ever got there, and we nearly got there at the end of the last ice age. So no, we're we don't have too much co two we're actually see oh to poverty joining us..

Gregory Keith us Pat gray Jeff Fisher Twitter Jeffey marae Agra Kohl Rhett hundred forty million years two day
Researchers interpret new experimental data aimed at showing dark matter interacts with ordinary matter

This Is Only A Test

01:22 min | 3 years ago

Researchers interpret new experimental data aimed at showing dark matter interacts with ordinary matter

"You remember going to Sern couple years ago now and when they were talking about the the discovery of the Higgs bows on the confirmation when the key elements in that discussion wasn't that they, they didn't observe the Higgs bows on directly. They saw the decay products inference. Yeah, and so they are used MU on decay to sort of track back that the Higgs boson occurred. And this week Sern announced that they doubly confirmed in a different decay pattern because Higgs bows on supposedly has more than one decay pattern that what we saw. So what they tracked was actually a bottom antibody court. Decay pattern. Yeah, but naming pattern in in court. Pretty great. We haven't talked about charm corks very much here on on the podcast, but. The standard model predicts something like fifty to sixty percent of Higgs boson decays I think it's fifty. Seven percent would decay in this bottom antibody quirk. Pattern and they finally saw it. So this does just confirm more aspects of the standard model. And if you remember most of that trip, they were like looking for ways to break the standard model of physics. This adds the confirmation, but they're hoping that it's just another point along the way to breaking it.

Higgs Jeremy Sern Wasser Wass San Francisco Hugh Paris LA ZIA RAY Forty Million Years Seven Percent Sixty Percent