21 Burst results for "Forty Five Kilometers"

Searching For a Lost Maya City

Science Magazine Podcast

14:33 min | 1 year ago

Searching For a Lost Maya City

"We have contributing correspondent lizzie wade and she went on a hunt for a lost city high lizzy hazara. Can you talk a little bit about your journey of course so we met up in a city called kami thanh in campus and then we drove about seven hours to part of the mexican guatemala border order. That's a little corner that we were staying at this eco lodge. We had guides from that eco lodge who took us into the reserve montessori so we went up i in a motorboat for a few hours when we set up a base camp but basically from there we were kayaking and hiking in the jungle and it was extraordinarily difficult. If there is no trails carved the guides would michetti through through the jungle but everything has fines. Everything is so different from each other. There's so much information and all the plants are so yeah heterogeneous and there's just like so much stuff around you that it's hard to even interpret individual things who is very easy to grab onto a tree that was covered in spines and not really even realize until your hand was also covered in spines they had to cut every out of the way every step i've been in some pretty remote places before but never a place where humans really hadn't been for for decades or potentially centuries and that was very very hard and it felt like the environment was just pushing us pushing pushing us out you know and making it impossible in the rivers were also completely covered in in brush and had to be the machete from the kayaks and late. It was really intense okay. Should i spoil it. Say whether or not you found missing city yeah i mean i think it's hard to talk about it. If we don't say what happened yes so spoilers. You did not find a long last jedi. Wha- what were you looking for. I went to chapas mexico wisdom archaeologist gal just who were looking for a city called sock belong which was the capital of the condone my there's two groups named <unk> condone one one exists today and one is pre columbian maya group when we were looking for this previous maya groups last capital sok-bom means the white jaguar and the lacandon built it basically to hide from spanish invaders which say successfully did for over over two hundred years. Wow what what's the timeline here and i guess i should ask. What century are we him. Yes so the spanish i come to mexico coach central mexico in the early fifteen twenties so to not mind which is now mexico city the aztec capital falls in fifteen twenty one and that's a pretty straightforward holmquest story aztecs were an empire the spanish also empire or wanted to be so they over that all that outland but when you get to the maya world. It's really really different because there's not really a centralized control. Every city is independent of each other and they're all in this elaborate web of allies and enemies. This finished can't come in conquer one city like <unk> or whatever and then everything passes is to them. They have to do it one at a time getting back to this missing city sock belong the lack unknown live there but they didn't always live there. They actually remove their city to this harder define location yeah though i condone lived on this island in lake miramar which is also a a were attacked by the spanish at least once. Maybe a couple of times. I can't quite remember and they had held out but they knew they weren't going to be able to do that forever. So preemptively the late fifteen hundreds they pack up move really deep into the jungle and built this other city called soccer mom but eventually cycle was taken by <hes> the spanish. Can you talk about how that happened by this point. It's the sixteen ninety s the english colonies in the u._s. Are firmly established at this point. I think harvard university has has been founded. This is very much the world we live in now most of the quote unquote conquest that are going on right now are not huge military invasions asians. It's more proselytizing so these two priests are like we have to convert the people of south <unk> devoted to the idea they hire these local maya ed guides who lead them around in circles for five months without them realizing it because the local mayor are so scared of sock belong like the people insect belong have been rating other my <hes> months and months go by of them just like walking around in circles and then finally they realized some things going on and they hired the leader of another local niagara and we don't really know what his motivation was but if you think of the condone being scary and potentially having attacked this town. This guy may have been like whatever ver- enough with this he takes a spanish. They're it's mostly diplomatic. They're not immediately killed. As previous spanish visitors were they convince serve a retinue of the lacombe leaders to come with them to sit in guatemala for more diplomacy basically but on the way they are on the way back almost all <unk> die get sick and die and it sort of clap says and there's not like a big battle this vantage descend on this town of a couple left one hundred thousand of their soldiers and their allied mike holders cycle. I'm gives really easily at that point and then it is is a spanish town for another fifteen twenty years and then everyone is relocated to closer to the pacific coast of water malla which was part of the the spanish colonial policy of it's called reducing might communities so murray by out of where they've always lived in make them live in his new communities where they easier easier control was surprises me then after all of those events is that the location of sack llamas not known yeah. No it surprised me too because it is done some spanish maps. I mean these are like seventeen hundred maps or not satellite abs- you know it was connected to the spanish world for a while but only only for pretty short time so they didn't really have a huge investment in the place when they move people out the jungle stays the jungle like there's not a huge amount of clear cutting so today the location of sucked plum is within this national park in mexico monsoon ways and it's considered an extremely extremely remote part of mexico. There are no trails no roads. Nobody's allowed to live there while you went with a group of archaeologists to try and visit this lost city what what made them think that they could find it and be what would they get out of finding it despite them existing for overlapping with the spanish colonial state for a couple of centuries. There's really no information about what it was like to live in sok-bom or any of the other independent my capitals that existed existed around this time sochua wasn't the only one was but it was the second to last two to be conquered. They wanna know who they were trading with. How connected they were to the outside world. How not connected they were headed they do this. How did they live in such isolation for so long so the reason they thought they could find it is or the method breath <unk>. They used was looking at the spanish documents from the time. After sokolow had been conquered. 'em spanish visitors would go and then they would go other places they would record their roots and how long it took them to travel to different landmarks lakes or rivers or another town's so you can construct a possible zabul arc of locations of the city and basically we were trying to get as close to that as possible so you have your starting point and then they ceo we traveled for seven days you know about how far they went in a circle exactly he's going to be on size herbal and not the other like you can make some inferences and they didn't record it in kilometers or anything that ban measure of distance we would use so you'd have to estimate how far they could walk in a day and it's quite fuzzy but it's a starting point you do have a description of what the spanish a how described cycle on when they arrived yeah it is about a hundred houses which primative adobe so they will not have survived until now there were three community buildings not quite temples but like city halls and those would have had stone foundations and that's what the archaeologists are interested in finding the region today is known for scarlet macaws the sort of iconic red parrots and apparently condone had semi domesticated them in every day at five p._m. They would fly out of the forest land on all the houses and the spanish. I thought that was amazing and so do i do feel like you were able to keep the same pace as the people who had traveled to suck palumbo for you know when you're looking at a previous trips yeah. It's hard to say i mean we weren't hearing oliver stuff. They would have been like did set up base camps. They probably would have been wearing stuff that was really tough to walk around and you know like lots of wool and potentially metal. This is not easy for them either. That was one of the major her things. I was thinking about in the jungle. I don't really care about the spanish confuses blake we i think we pay far too much attention to their experience in history because they're the ones who who got to write it but i was really taken aback by how similar are experience would have been there because of course a lot. Condone knew what they were doing and like we it ends so we we have we were much more similar to the spanish and i felt like if you have a city a few hundred people hiding out in the jungle against a globalizing belies ing empire like it's only a matter of time until they will be found and incorporated into that empire came away thinking that that really wasn't true at all. Oh it was so hard to do this that the conquest of cyclamen basically every other place in the americas was basically the historical accident and a fluke luke. The conquistadors had to rely on locals to help them find the city. Do you think that that's something that the archaeologists are gonna pursue while help was doc vital for the spanish and vital for y'all just now the ones sort of discovery quote unquote that they were able to make on this trip was the classic period read my it ruins which is a thousand years before sock bolom would have been founded but this town in the region knew about some ruins in this little patrick forest that they protect the reserve and they took the archaeologist they are in. It was really amazing. I mean i've seen a lot of unexcavated archeological sites in this was really special one and they never would have known it was there of the local people hadn't been willing to trust them and and tell them about it was tackle on the hard part is that nobody lives in monte. Sicily's there are people who go in there like their firefighters who might know the reserve. There are people who have lived there as refugees like from the guatemalan civil war are a lot of people took refuge there. There are people who know montezuma's ways a little bit better than average person in chapas but because has nobody lives in it. It's just so hard to find those people in it so hard to find the help that you really need to be able to do efficient archaeology. Let's say how far did you travel in all of this. I think we kayaked ninety kilometers in four days. This is a round trip so we went up river forty five kilometers that was already from the base camp. I think a lot of kayaking on in my life the walking was it was really shocking. How slow the walking. It was about a kilometer an hour which you know if i'm walking in a city i go ten minutes. You know the walking. I think it was like eight kilometers things hype it was it was it was not very long but it felt like we climbed mount everest. A lot of archaeology is don don with lighter these days using radar from planes to find hidden structures. Would that be helpful here in this area. It could potentially work. I think it it'd be really great to do it over months away. I know the archaeologist would love to do that to national geographic funded this huge light our survey of a very similar place in guatemala all and it revealed tens of thousands of of structures that archaeologists didn't know about the thing about lighter is that it's pretty expensive <hes> and it takes a lot of coordination and also when you do light. Are you still have to go out to the potential site and see it so it doesn't totally save you from the explorer our jungle adventure that we that we had one of these archaeologists going to do next. Are they going to go back. They are going to go back which i found a little bit mind boggling wing but they're really committed to exploring this area of chapas <unk> swiss and what stood was a give them some information about how how fast the spanish could travel like. Maybe it was a little slower than we thought. Maybe dot com is closer to these landmarks. If you have to go so slow a lot of the information on the satellite maps about the exact routes of the rivers turned out not to be totally right so it made making a more accurate map much easier and i think the most important thing it did probably was bringing these archaeologist in closer contact with the communities down there both the communities who who live in the towns and the guides themselves who know the reserve very well it takes a lot of work to to build a kind of trust you need to have people both agreed to show you what they know especially since archaeology in mexico as in so many places is often connected to the state and official narratives of off the country and potentially land expropriation and things like that people can be very wary of archaeologists for pretty good historical reasons yeah yea so you know you really have to spend a lot of time. They're showing them that you care about these places and you care about the current people's connection to those places in you're going to respect. That's

Mexico Chapas Guatemala Lizzie Wade Kami Thanh Harvard University Soccer Lake Miramar Lacombe Adobe Sicily Water Malla Mount Everest Sok-Bom Sokolow Palumbo
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Crisis got used on Colfax closed all right twenty five seven being pushed on the highway go up to twenty third and then grab that to get back to where you need to go your CVS for whether slight chance of a storm tonight bill the sixty three better chance of showers tomorrow at a high near ninety it's a ninety six right now next update coming up at five forty five kilometers radio Colorado's news traffic and weather station ninety five it seriously is ninety five degrees but you know it ain't gonna be hot for long and soon it's going to be not hot the kids were back to school Aurora today that means pretty soon we're gonna be shoveling instead of sweat John for greed is with the center of Littleton and if your windows were bad last winter we're going to be even worse this year because they just keep getting worse and worse for I know my English teachers on line three but you know what I mean they just keep getting worse you can't really replace them yourself I mean you call it why would you want to one up put forty five years of experience with Venus widow center of little to to work for you forty five years they would join window since the seventies right here in Colorado they know what works and what works others infinity from Marvin windows with the fiber glass break because they don't react to the heat and cold we get here in Colorado the final windows react and they could start leaking air that's a bad thing for a window to do so if your windows are bad last year and you don't want your family to freeze all winter groovy those window center of little didn't right now three oh three seven nine four oh four nine oh or what does your home dot com when your way to our twenty nineteen I heart radio music festival one thousand dollars to spend while your in more than thirty of the biggest music superstars radio arena here in Las Vegas the day times day see Backstreet boys leasing keys Hootie and the blowfish and many many more hosted by Ryan Seacrest listen for your next chance to text and when access to our I heart radio music festival plus one thousand dollars spending cash two days the worst girl it stands between you in the downhill part of the week but now they're a lot less worse because when Tuesday the B. dubs are buy one get one free traditional wings so much you may.

Colorado Aurora John Littleton Las Vegas Ryan Seacrest Backstreet one thousand dollars forty five years five forty five kilometers ninety five degrees two days
Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

08:02 min | 2 years ago

Understanding Australian Indigenous Astronomy

"Right. This week we focus on the ARCO astronomy of another part of the world, this time from the indigenous people of. Another group of people whose lives depended on knowing what was happening in the sky from season to season are Pamela got a big continent. Here of what is the evidence of archaic astronomy from the continent of Australia. Well, what's kind of cool with a stray Elliot's? It's not so much ARCHE of strana me as it's modern anthropology that allows us to look, Pat back on sixty five thousand years of history with, with the aboriginal tribes of gelia were looking at a couple hundred different language groups. We are looking at a continent that has been peopled for sixty five thousand years, that hasn't undergone the same kinds of destruction that civilizations here in north and South America. Underwent? And so as. As we talk with the people who are there today, we can hear into days oral tradition evidence of Frincis, a meteor impact that was thousands of years ago, a supernova that was thousands of years ago, and we still they still pay attention to these stories. This is still part of how they live their lives and why they do and don't go certain places, and it's, it's really amazing culture, and they look at space in such a different way instead of having four seasons. Many of the different nations of Australia, Mark out six different seasons of the year that are marked out with when different of the constellations rise on the horizon, some constellations Mark out, this is when you should go and gather the eggs, this is when. These animals can be expected to be breeding, the dingoes for instance, it's different. And we've both had the opportunity now to be in Australia. I was there almost a year ago, thanks to Dylan O'Donnell and, and his, his got to speak at his conference star stuff. And then we got Carlin, I went on a road trip north from there into the, the jungle part of stralia north of Brisbane, and it was like the skies. There are just there stunning like it's, it's not surprising that anyone who, who lived there. With out light pollution and saw that sky. And it is, it's a Canadian we have dark skies as well here, and I've seen plenty of Milky Way. But the core of the Milky Way is down by the horizon. We see a little bit of it over the summer when the when we get to see Sagittarius and Scorpio and some of those constellations than the rest of the year. It's, it's, it's fine. It's fine. But, but there it is just right. Overhead it blazes, the planets moved through it, right. Overhead. There's like Ayman, if you have seen dark skies, you have not seen Australian dark skies. They are next level. They absolutely have the best view. The people in the southern hemisphere have the best view. Yes. To the core of the Milky Way that we just can't experience from from the north and like the peoples of South, America, and southern Africa. They include in how. How they Mark out the sky's the dark paths through the Milky Way. There is a tradition of seeing an emus spread out across the Milky Way were the coal shack nebula that super dark patch. I saw. Yeah. Societas once pointed out to you see it. And that that's only one of the stories, another one of the stories that are particularly love related to the Milky Way is they see the Milky Way as a dark river, through the sky. And it's the, the souls of men and women who have passed on to the heavens, that have their fires along that, that river and in some of their traditions when they see a shooting star, that is the soul of someone who died far from home returning. The home. It's cool stories. Yeah, I love I love that idea. What was it? There was a animation that came to a couple of years ago, but anyways idea of putting floating lanterns on like on a river and then letting them go and letting them all float downriver. You get this. They do that in, in Japan and China place like that. But it's, it's a very cool effect. So what are now you mentioned a couple of real big hitters. Supernova. Meteorite impact give me some more information. So, so I think the two really awesome things to come out of aboriginal astronomy is how they look at their crater covered lands, and actually maintain a history of. Yeah, these holes of the ground are actually craters, as, as well as their tradition of supernova. So let's start with the craters Australia is, is one of the oldest landmasses it has thirty confirmed craters that are well-structured. You look at them from an airplane, and you're, like, yes, that is a crater and the thing that really gets me is. They knew that these things in the ground were formed from things falling from the sky. In one case, the hen, very crater about four thousand two hundred years ago, a large nickel iron space rock hit central ustralia. And when it came down about one hundred and forty five kilometers south of siding, springs, it carved out a bunch of individual different craters. And when westerners I started visiting that land, and they had an aboriginal guide with them. The guide was like, no, we don't go there. That is the land that was formed when fire fell from the sky and, and right. They have a modern day tradition of fire fell from the sky. And formed this land, and that's oral tradition. That goes back four thousand two hundred years. There are many other craters across a stray Elliot that that they look at. And the various people know this was a crater here. Wolf creek craters is another one of these that is recognizes having fallen in this case when a star fell from the sky. And there are traditions of people going down in Orrell stories and exploring the sink holes and traveling them to through them to water in a great distant area, and it was a Mark of heroism to travel underground under these craters. And so there, there are clearly stories of when people explored and survived. And now people don't do that. Because. Those heroes did stupid things.

Australia Elliot South America Arco Pamela PAT Orrell Dylan O'donnell Wolf Creek Brisbane Ayman Mark Carlin Societas Japan America Africa China
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

THEMOVE

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on THEMOVE

"This is brought to you by friends at patrol, tequila and a very, very quick day. I'm Jay b and Johann is here. Joining us from Spain to talk about stage seven really to look ahead at stage eight but they were incredibly fast today. Yes. I mean, after the change of leader jersey yesterday, they hundred eighty five kilometers and quite acceptable stage, but not an easy stage. So will you be already knew beforehand, that this was going to be difficult for sprinters through to hang on? And so a breakaway when the quite early in the stage a strong breakaway guys initially finally, they ended up with ten, and then finally three or four never had more than two minutes or two. Minutes thirty seconds on the pilot on. So they went super fast in the front super fast in the bunch. And at the end of the day, a guy from the breakaway, you'll be bowel from Astana won the stage. Well deserved, I think while deserve, but definitely these are the kind of stages that take allow for the riders and the tiredness just stacks up. And, you know, a Monday is the first rest day, and it's going to be a welcome, welcome, the for all the writers, especially if you look at, you know, get today they was a hundred and eighty five kilometers, but the amount of kilometers AO, ready, have long super long stages. Everybody's gonna look forward to who Monday for a lot of riders time trial is also a semi rest day because they're not going super super heart, but, but yet today was definitely one of these one of those days that a lot of writers will remember. Yeah, I'd look. It up, even though they had to classified climbs. One hundred and eighty five K average just over forty five kilometers per hour. Yes. Yeah. I saw the first the first one in a half hour was ninety four point five, which means you know, after week of racing that means that the, it was crazy crazy fast than a big war for, you know, a lot of people love deems, who wanted to be represented in the, the breakaway and you know, usually when that happens. It's yeah. It's, it's mayhem. I think with that fast pace. Definitely takes. It's always all a couple of abandoned riders today, one being very yeah. Yeah, I was surprised the obviously because, you know, he's he still has a few chances to sprint or he had a few Jensen's sprint. And then on top of that, you know, with the leader jersey in the team, you don't just abandon because you want to. So then I found out that he's already struggling with the knee pain for number of days. And that, you know, he, he couldn't even try this morning because it was a big inflammation in his knee and of Neal's wants to do the tour de France. So probably his team have said, you know, this doesn't make any sense. It's a big decision. It's a big decision, especially you know with the riders with the only eight riders on the teams now for big tours and they are ready had one guy out of the race. Or.

Jensen Spain tequila Astana Jay b knee pain Johann Neal forty five kilometers per hour hundred eighty five kilometers eighty five kilometers thirty seconds eighty five K two minutes
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

04:58 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on No Agenda

"Two point five meters. Long maximum street. Forty five kilometres will twenty one hundred kilometers obviously, a set, but which is testing to see where it's going to the repeal electric calls here. But also, plenty of hummingbird electric that's to say they have a petrol engine on board like this BMW five thirty, but also on electric motor plug it in then the use case plug in hybrid is actually very suitable to Europe people who want to drive short distances, for example, with zero locally missions. They can do that in full electric mode, for example in cities, and then have the ease of mine to be able to do longer distances without having to recharge supported by petrol engines driving the electrical surge across the car industry, the tough new emission standards coming into force next year, Jeremy Wilkes the Geneva international might to show news. So this is this is indeed the the trend, and I have heard a lot of people talk about hybrids. And they all kind of say the marketing is working, they all say the same thing. Well, when I'm driving around my own city my own town. I wanna be electric. I wanna keep it clean. And then when I get on the highway, then I can you know blow it wide open and use the news the petrol part of the car. So it's a the marketing is keep your keep your hometown clean. This. Approach. It's working. Working. They got him here all kinds. I see Mercedes BMW. Everyone's driving him. You keep charging him. But the flying car is off the radar. Of course, you don't want the flying car. We went electric car that doesn't really go very far that you keep the public. So you can't escape that's the I gave no escape there's no escape and your battery vehicle. None. All right. Well, couples the other things going on that might be worth discussing unless you wanna take a break. No, no. We took a break. I'll take a break if you want, but the show will be over. Listen to what's going on. Does it the anti Israel stuff is really cropping up all over the place. I think it's part of some sort of con-. I think is a trend. I think it's somebody. I think somebody's behind it because too much as do as Omar on the with her. She's like given hers. Biggest some guys whispered inner ear to like keep keep up keeping keeping up. Visit doing this is Omar the freshman, the freshman congresswoman who's hates Israel hates Jews. The just summarize. Let's play this Omar stuff. CBS house speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Tuesday resolution Congess, oh, I'm sorry. My mistake. Yes, here it is. This is the one in the latest comment to land Omar in hot water was this one. She made it a DC bookstore. Slamming congressional support Israel. In this country that says in his case. Push for elitist of foreign country. In response. Her own party drafted a four page resolution rejecting anti-semitism without mentioning Omar by name. It says her comment suggests that Jews cannot be patriotic Americans and trusted neighbors democrat, Josh pot Heimer someone who's Jewish the idea that you'd question. My loyalty to the country has a lawmaker because of my religion has obviously offensive and deeply hurtful the president called it. A dark day for Israel and GOP leaders urged Democrats to go further Nancy Pelosi has to remove from the foreign affairs committee speaker Pelosi shares the cover of this month's Rolling Stone with Omar who is the nation's first Muslim congresswoman, but Lucy also reprimanded Omar last month for a tweet about a Jewish lobbying group and money. Omar says she's being held to a double standard just last week a poster was erected in the West Virginia state capitol Lincoln her with nine eleven. Label. That argument has clearly resonated with some tonight. Democrats say they're going to be reworking this anti-semitism resolution to include anti Muslim bias as well. And they say the vote Jeff will likely get pushed off to Thursday. Let's talk about this for sex different along. But before he talked about you wanna play the one two..

Omar Israel Nancy Pelosi Jeremy Wilkes BMW Europe Jeff West Virginia CBS Josh pot president Congess GOP
What Did the Opportunity Rover Teach Us?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 2 years ago

What Did the Opportunity Rover Teach Us?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren Vogel bomb back on January twenty fourth two thousand four Nasr's opportunity Rover descend into the Martian surface and survived its bouncy landing to the relief of scientists anxiously monitoring the space probe back at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, the four hundred million dollar Rover. One of a pair that NASA landed upon the red planet that year was designed to last for just a few months on the rough dusty terrain of the Martian surface. Instead to the establishment of researchers at lasted for nearly fifteen years in earth time, the longest time that any robot from earth has operated on another planet until it finally stopped communicating with earth after a severe Martian dust storm in June of two thousand eighteen after unsuccessful attempts to restore contact. Nasa. Officials on February thirteenth finally gave up and declared that -tunities mission was over the exact cause of the probes demise is unclear it could be that solar panels went dead under a chokingly thick layer of Martian dust, or that it's tonics failed due to the extremes of Marsh. Other opportunity had outlived its robotic twin these spirit Rover by nearly eight years it's final resting place is the aptly named perseverance valley during its astonishing lifespan this Gulf cart sized planetary probe weighing three hundred eighty four pounds. That's one hundred seventy four kilograms in earth, gravity managed to cover twenty eight miles or forty five kilometers. That's forty four times the distance scientists who designed it to cover it said a single day. Marsh driving record of seven hundred twenty one feet that's two hundred and twenty meters back in two thousand five during its travels. It accomplished plenty of other amazing feats here are a few. It took a whole lot of pictures. The opportunity snapped two hundred seventeen thousand images of the Martian surface, including fifteen three hundred sixty degree. Panoramas? Those images were more than just pretty pictures. Images from its panoramic camera equipped with thirteen different color filters gave scientists the opportunity to enhance the wavelengths and study changes in the features of Martian rock formation. Nhs it discovered. The Martian blueberries just a few months after arriving on Mars, the probe discovered tiny globules rich inhabitants, which scientists dubbed blueberries because of their shape and color. These blueberries provided evidence that ancient Mars had a watery environment and opportunity found more signs of ancient water and possibly ancient life on Mars at the endeavour crater opportunity found clay minerals that were formed in flowing neutral ph water in the distant past this discovery raises. The possibility that the environment around the crater may have been able to support microbial life millions of years ago. It also studied a whole lot of Martian rocks. Samples opportunities tools exposed the surfaces of fifty two. Martian rocks to reveal fresh mineral surfaces for analysis and cleared seventy two more rocks with a brush so that their surfaces could be investigated by its instruments. Also, it was one heck of a climber opportunity proved to be remarkably nimble robot scaling gravel slopes as steep as thirty. Two degrees. An off earth record with disability explored a whole lot of craters in the course of its travels opportunity studied more than one hundred impact craters of various sizes and gathered insights about how craters form and erode over time. And it learned a lot about the Martian environment opportunity studied, Martian, clouds and the Apache the Martian atmosphere, including how it affects solar panels on space probes. That information may help scientists to design even more rugged resilient Rovers in the future the Rover's instruments. Also tracked changes in Martian clouds as they accumulated, providing scientists with the opportunity to study Martian weather in the end NASA. Scientists sent eight hundred and thirty five commands to opportunity in an effort to revive it before finally giving up. The final transmission from earth was the Billie holiday song. I'll be seeing you so hats off to you. You were the best little Rover after. Today's episode was written by Patrick j Kaiga and produced by Tyler clang for I heart media, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other exploratory topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Today's episode is brought to you by the new Capital One saver card. Earn four percent cashback on dining entertainment, two percent, grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you can cash in what's in your wallet.

Nasa Capital One Endeavour Crater Jet Propulsion Laboratory Pasadena Marsh Perseverance Valley Lauren Vogel Rovers NHS California Nasr Patrick J Kaiga Tyler Clang Four Percent One Percent Two Percent
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To care about these people. We're supposed to love these people. Holy how. This is. Flat aperture talapity here is just as ugly as day as long. We'll see how it progresses, but I love that part with with Stephanopoulos right at at the very end. Stephanopoulos at the very end where he's still holding out all sorts of of hope here when Carter Jonathan Karl says there's nothing here collusion with the Russians in the effort to meddle in the elections. Or was there even any knowledge on the part of the president or anybody in his campaign with what the Russians were? Indicted. They haven't laid that out yet in the indictment. They don't have it. You want to argue the Donald Trump junior never should've had the meeting with the Talia veselnitskaya damn straight as he could take some punches directly in the neck for that. Absolutely. You want to argue that Trump didn't hire the best people that never really checked to see what what levels of shady past happening because there's a difference between the business world in the political world, absolutely. Without saying it's one hundred percent fact, Trump doesn't hire the best people film at eleven. Collusion. Sit down you sound like a crazy person you sound like a complete and total crazy person. Not as crazy as the guy who tried to get out of the speeding ticket one of my favorite stories out of Canada. There's a guy driving and Manitoba. He's going ninety miles an hour. Which Canadian is one hundred forty five kilometers an hour. Right. He's moving. He's driving. He's feeling good gets pulled over by a cop and the cops like. How fast do you think you go? What do you think you're doing? And the guy says, listen, I'm sorry, but kickstart my heart by motley Crue is on the radio ads just like really into it. So yeah. So it was motley Crue the officers like, okay, I got that. And then gave him a ticket for six hundred and ninety dollars. Yeah. I mean, it's crazy. Absolutely crazy. I did not know that kick start my heart can make drive at an unlimited speeds. But I love the idea that he tried. So I actually we we discussed this on my on my podcast, the eat drink smoke podcast, we review bourbon and cigars and talk and one of the people on the podcast is April d Gregory. And I asked her has she ever used an excuse to get out of a speeding ticket. And she said I never use an excuse, but I've gotten out of speeding tickets before. And if you ever saw pitcher able d Gregory, you know, why I have never been able to flirt my way out of ticket. And she says, absolutely. She has done it more than once more than once. But then I've never tried a, well, no, I've never tried seduction. I probably could. I mean, I am a piece. No, I I would totally. I would totally get with me. I would I I'm not good. What is wrong with? No. I'm just saying that that I've I've a healthy understanding of of how good I look. And and how this all is. I really do. I really do. But I never dawned on me to like try some level of. Of really any level excuse I've never tried to get out of a ticket that way. And one of the stories that I told was I was I was once in a coming back in Florida. I lived on the west coast fodder for awhile Tampa Bay area. My parents on the east coast, Florida, my wife, and I are are are in in a Honda Accord driving back, and I won't I won't tell you how you wonder how fast growing you gotta subscribe to eat drink smoke. You gotta do that. All right. I'll do it. I'll I'll do it of subscribe anyway, eat drink smoke, and I did go one hundred and ten. Honda accord. I was flying. It was the weather was perfect windows down the music. I just felt so good. We were just so ease just cruising and driving. And I never saw the cop. I didn't see anything all of a sudden he's behind me pulled over the cop walks up. And I said, I did it just give me the ticket. I didn't I didn't waste time. He's like, okay. He knew I knew boom done. I drove about my my business was worth it. It was totally worth it. It was a I I mean, I don't know if I would like did like fifteen minutes like flying and feeling good and feeling free. And then the fascists came in and ruined everything. That's that's the way. I tell the story cats. Ninety three.

Gregory Donald Trump Stephanopoulos Carter Jonathan Karl president Canada Tampa Bay Florida Manitoba one hundred forty five kilomet one hundred percent fifteen minutes ninety dollars
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KPCC

"According to the American wind energy association with over ninety thousand megawatts have combined capacity in the US, but as developers jockey for position in wind rich areas, they may be unexpected consequences Hughley gone Quist is associate professor in the department of atmospheric and oceanic scientists at the university of Colorado in boulder and lead author of a report on wind farm positioning published this week in the journal nature energy. She joins me from Germany, welcome to science Friday. It's great to be here. Ira. Thank you. Thanks for staying up late. So the good news is wind energy is booming in the US. Right, right. And we're going to lot more wind farms, and that's providing more reliably generated electricity, but there's also your team found a possible downside to packing too, many wind farms too close together. Yeah. Just like people. When firms aren't always good neighbors to each other. There are some circumstances where wind farms can cause adverse consequences to their neighboring one party. How did they do that? Well, you have to understand the phenomenon called a winter by week. And I think that we're all probably familiar with wakes if we think about water flowing past Iraq in the stream, for example. How the water downstream is generally slower and a lot more turbulent water up dream, and you know, areas and other geophysical fluid just like water, and so the air downstream or down wind from a wind turbine is also a lot slower and more turbulent and that air makes it more difficult for the down wind turbines to generate as much electricity as they would normally like to and that's just for one winter buying in. If you combine. Ten or twenty or one hundred winter turbines together, then the individual winter by wakes conform a larger wind farm like. That's when the effect happens. Yeah. Yeah. So you so you have a problem if you put too many wind farms together one starts interfering wake wise with the other ones. But we noticed that when farm wigs it actually wind turbine wakes are really only a problem in certain circumstances. So if you think about how the air that you fly in if you're in an airplane that changes the daily basis so during the day at three bumpy very turbulent. And that turbulence just like it would just few that smoke plumes from smoke stack or something like that that would diffuse out during the day and winter by wake and when I wake is mainly not an issue for concern during daytime circumstances. Who were able to talk about how in nightime circumstances that when he went firm lakes can spread for very long distances downstream, and then caused adverse consequences to down woodland. So how big effect is this then well, if you want to stay show extent of the week for the the complex of wind farms that we were sitting waiting in Texas, we found weeks, but extended at least forty five kilometers downstream. And yeah. That's pretty significant amateurs it reduce the output of the wind farms. Well, that depends on the details of the construction orientation of a turbine. But if you wanna think about how often awake happens, that's that's kind of an important consideration as well. So we have you know, these possibilities would be the very large wakes extending downstream. But for the month that we stimulated these when form wakes we noticed that it was only four percent of the time. Did we find a week that occurred? That it would impact the down wind production by twenty percent. So that's a so that's not really a deal breaker, then here just being careful where you put your wind farms. Yeah. It's not a deal breaker at all. And and one of the exciting things that we found was that the week effects can be very well predicted. And so if you can predict a phenomenon then you can manage it. And so it's not going to be a surprise if you know when firm is built quote to another neighbor. If both parties are aware that this could happen at certain circumstances. Then they can make the financial arrangements with the legal arrangements to make sure that what the newly generated electricity can still be produced and. Fact, it can be accounted for all right? That Jillian Lundquist. Thank you for taking time to be with us today. Delinquent associate professor at the university of Colorado in boulder winner, take a break when we come back the future looks bleak for the US under climate change. We're going to talk about how it will impact regions. They don't tip them. Typically think about and talk about that new study just released and what does it do the places that don't get much news about those places? We will give it some news after the break. Stay with us..

US associate professor boulder university of Colorado Quist Hughley Ira Germany Iraq Jillian Lundquist Texas ninety thousand megawatts forty five kilometers twenty percent four percent
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"According to the American wind energy association with over ninety thousand megawatts of combined capacity in the US, but as developers jockey for position in wind rich areas, they may be unexpected consequences surely gone quest is associate professor in the department of atmospheric and oceanic scientists have university of Colorado in boulder and lead author of a report on wind farm positioning published this week in the journal nature energy. She joins me from Germany. Welcome to science Friday. It's great to be here. Ira. Thank you know. Thanks for staying up this. So the good news is wind energy is booming in the US. Right, right. And we're building a lot more wind farms, and that's providing more renewable generated electricity. But. There's also a your team found a possible downside to packing too, many wind farms too close together. Yeah. Just like people wind farms aren't always good neighbors to each other. There some circumstances where wind farms can cause adverse consequences to their neighboring departments. How did they do that? Well, you have to understand this nominee called a winter by week. And I think that we're all probably familiar with wakes if think about water flowing past rock in a stream, for example. How the water downstream is generally slower and a lot more turbulence than the water up stream and areas and other geophysical fluid just like water, and so the air downstream or done win from a wind turbine is also a lot slower and more tribute. And that air makes it more difficult for the down wind turbines to generate as much as they would normally like to and that's just for one winter buying and if you combine groups of ten or twenty or one hundred winter binds together, then there's individual winter by wakes conform a larger wind farm lake. That's when the effect happens. Yeah. Yeah. So you. So you you you have a problem if you put too many wind farms together one starts interfering wake wise with the other ones. Yeah. But we noticed that when firm wakes and actually wind turbine wakes are really only problem in certain circumstances. So if you think about how the air that you fly in, you know, if you're in an airplane that changes on a daily basis so during the day, very bumpy and very turbulent, and that turbulence just like it would just us out a smoke from smoke stack or something like that that would diffuse out during the day and winter by wake and when I wake is normally not an issue for concern during daytime circumstances who are able to talk about how. And they tend circumstances. That's when he's when firm lakes can spread for very long distances downstream, and then cause adverse consequences to down one. So how big effect is this then well, if you wanna think about the spatial extent of the week for the complex of win firms that we were stimulating in Texas. We found wakes but extended at least forty five kilometers downstream. Yeah. And that's pretty significant amateurs it reduce the output of the wind farms. Well, that depends a lot on the details of the construction in the orientation of a turbine. But if you want to think about how often awake happens, that's that's kind of an important consideration as well. So we have these possibilities. It'd be very large wakes extending downstream. But for the most that we simulated these when farm wakes we noticed that it was only four percent of the time. Did we find a wake that occurred? That it would impact the down wind production by twenty percent. So that's that's a so that's not really a deal breaker, then here, it's just being careful where you put your wind farms. Yeah. It's not a deal breaker at all. And one of the exciting things that we found was that the week effects can be very well predicted. And so if you can predict nominee, then you can manage it. And so it's not going to be a surprise if you know when firm is built close to another neighbor. If both parties are aware that this could happen at certain circumstances. Then they can make the financial arrangements with the legal arrangements to make sure that what we generated electricity can still be produced and. Effect can be accounted for all right? That Jillian Lundquist. Thank you for taking time to be with us today. Delinquent associate professor Conversative, Colorado and boulder when it take a break when we come back the future looks bleak the US under climate change. We're going to talk about how it will impact regions. They don't tip them. Typically think about and talk about that new study just released and what does it do the places that don't get much news about those places? We will give it some news after the.

US boulder associate professor Ira university of Colorado Germany Jillian Lundquist professor Conversative Colorado Texas ninety thousand megawatts forty five kilometers twenty percent four percent
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

The WAN Show Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

"In other news apple quietly ads radio on Vega. GP you option of edgy GPO option to their MAC book pro and we've got a linked to ours Technica here. So I guess we're gonna go ahead with that. But I also might have been nice to have linked to apple dot com. And Thunderball three max can make use a new black. Magic e GP pro actually don't know. What would make it an e GP pro. So apple claims AGP us will provide up to sixty percent better graphical performance that makes sense. But that's probably a very strong up to because from our experience with the macbook pro unless they are making some significant changes to the cooling system, which I sincerely doubt that they did it is running at within a hair's breadth of its total limit for how vast it can go before it experiences catastrophic thermal throttling. So like if you're running both the CPU and the GP hard at the same time. I just have a really hard time imagining how they aren't both gonna end up fraud alling. Yeah. But in a best case scenario like for example, if you were gaming and the game you're playing only used a couple of CPU threads. I could see this be. Being a very significant performance grade. Black magic also has their new GP pro which will have a radio on our expert, fifty-six graphics processor. Okay. It's just like a pre done external GP. Okay. I wasn't that familiar with black. Magic's thing because I couldn't really figure out any reason that anyone would buy it because you could just by any GPO because thunderbolt three is a standard, and you could just plug it in that is to say as long as it has a new enough thunderbolt three chipset. So I don't think alpine ridge worked. But then titan ridge should be fine. Don't don't quote me on that though. I can't keep track of the codenames for the different thunderbolt three chipset since alive show look things up. All right. Apparently, people are linking the body the body pillow in discord, but like assuming are bought blocks out links. Make sense. I'm not signed in cross that bridge when we get to it. All right. What else? Do we got here? Oh, boy this again apple slows down last year's iphones with IOS twelve dot one. I mean, there was a whole thing where I less twelve was actually giving people with older phones significantly better performance. Like a lot of people were giving up really positive feedback about IOS fell looks like they've taken all that positive feedback and put it in a fire. So if I was twelve point one apple has brought its controversial performance management feature to the iphone eight eight plus and ten so this functionality throttles the phones processor as its battery degrades over time, and it can stop the handset from randomly shutting down which is good. But it can also cause it's performance to degrade, which is less. Good. The good counterpoint to that. Last point is that it can be turned off if desired now I have an easy solution to this problem. How about apple puts bigger batteries in their phones in the first place if they care about the? User experience. I actually was okay. And again, I haven't done the background research on this. I haven't done my car review yet. So I still have some digging to do, but I was impressed to hear when I walked onto the lot. And I told this out of Chevy dealership, I told him I was already planning to buy their car. And I told them my reasoning the reason that I wanted the Chevy volt was because the electric range was advertised such that even when I factored in five years of lithium cell, aging and cold weather. I would still get the desired range which was about forty five kilometers. And they were like, oh, it's that's not actually how it works. We only discharge the the the battery down to about thirty percent. And we only charge it up to about eighty percent. Like when it rolls off the lot. And so you're actually only using about half of the capacity of the battery from day one. And then over time as the cells, degrade, it will expose. More of it. So that and I forget what the period of time. It was either five or ten years or whatever it was over the period of time that you use the car there should be no noticeable difference in the user experience..

apple Vega Chevy fraud forty five kilometers eighty percent thirty percent sixty percent five years ten years
 Soyuz Mission Aborted Minutes After Launch

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:57 min | 2 years ago

Soyuz Mission Aborted Minutes After Launch

"In what's being the most dangerous man space flight. Since the Columbia space shuttle disaster, the Soyuz spacecraft has suffered a mission aboard, just two minutes after launch from the back in cosmodrome in the central Asian Republic of Kazakhstan the spacecraft was carrying two expedition fifty eight crew members to the international space station. When they saw is if g rockets core stage suffered a sudden engine failure cool to the third stage has been disconnected. And in just a moment, the second umbilical tower will separate. Power onboard, and there's the second tower. Oxygen launch command has been issued seven, six. Four, three, two one. Engine that maximum liftoff Pindar is liftoff of the so use MS tin to the international space station carrying Nick Haig and Lexi of Chinon to the orbital complex. Nick hangs first time to watch to space sealed trindon's. Second hearing good first stage performance for the silliest delivering nine hundred thirty thousand pounds of thrust from its four boosters on single engine. I stage it's still use, measured sixty eight feet in length and twenty four feet in diameter, spurning liquid fuel for the first two minutes and six seconds of flight. Kamler. One thought the ever seen as well on board that you know. Well, thank you poppy everything proceeding as a intended for today's fly. Now just over a minute into it. Flossy of the Soyuz is about eleven hundred miles per hour. News. Well. And in well, copy everything looking good preceding nominally can't we have the escape tower for the us? Now jettisoned everything. Continuing nominally four strap on boosters of dementia, and they've completed their job, dropped away in announced toot of twenty eight statute miles Soyuz traveling about three thousand three hundred fifty miles an hour. He did. Seven. Of the. Separation. Enable power. Thirty seconds into the fight. So he's traveling about forty, seven hundred miles per now. We are in weightlessness accordance Ellison station. Bye. Keys whose have they eleven forty. Two seventeen is the time of the failures. One on a is eliminated copied shroud. Well, well, on worth we have. Always had, and the power is on coffee table. So what does recommendation. Personal. The deceleration. Through? Yes. You knew. Yes, little sour is one. Ballistic this, the man is son from central their puppies. You know, just point seven. We feeling rotation. The Gelo is Billy down for this. Win. Seventy two and building down there that there has been an issue with the booster, and we are standing by for information and we continue to get it from the Russian flight control team. But everything seems to be the crew. We had good come with them and they are okay team here in Michigan. Troll is working with their counterparts in Russian, getting more information on the issue with the booster that has changed as launch plan, getting more information which will provide as as soon as we have a little bit more and we can confirm now that the crew has started to go into the ballistic descent mode, they'll be going in a sharp landing today, and we're continuing to get more information from our counterparts at the rose cosmos space agencies to the peace to have happened as the full liquid fuelled strap on boosters. Nine by Russians is the first stage sip rated from the launch vehicles. Core second-stage is the Russians cool. It one minute and fifty eight seconds after liftoff. This boost the separation which takes place at an altitude of forty five kilometer. It is one hundred and fifty thousand fate involves a spectacular maneuver known as a curl of cross in which full boost boosted single Tena sleep. Flip outwards away from the coast stage only investigation suggested the debate, the foul to separate cleanly, either slamming into the core stage during the coral of cross maneuver and damaging the side of the fuselage or remaining passionately attached and possibly tearing up out of the fuselage

Nick Haig Soyuz Kazakhstan Ellison Station Billy Cosmodrome United States Michigan Lexi Two Minutes Nine Hundred Thirty Thousand P Forty Five Kilometer Fifty Eight Seconds Sixty Eight Feet Twenty Four Feet Thirty Seconds Six Seconds One Minute
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Scientists are increasing the frequency of commands being sent to the still silent MAs opportunity Rover on the surface of the red planet opportunity went silent on June tenth is a global dust on took old covering the Martian surface and blocking out the sunlight needed to recharge the golf-cart-sized RAV is solar panels, mission managers at necessary propulsion laboratory in Pasadena, California have increased the frequency of commands. It's Baiming to the six world Rover by way of Nashes, Dave space, communications network dishes from three times per week, tomato times every day. It's thought the road is experienced. The low pal Fulton perhaps also mission clock fault and possibly an A-plus tomah fold. All of which should be so corrected once the rove is buried of recharged. But all that depends on the global mush dust dome which is continuing to decay with atmospheric Oprah or tau. Now, below one point, three at opportunities, location, passive listening for opportunity. His also continued over. A broader range of times performed by j. Peel's radio science group, which records radio signals emanating from using a very sensitive broadband receiver. And they've also started broadcasting what they call sweep and Bates to address a possible issue which could have developed under some conditions with a mission clock fold opportunity was launched from the Cape Canaveral air force station in Florida, three weeks after its twin Rovers spirit on July the seventh, two thousand and three landing on the mayor. Danny platinum near the Martian equator on January the twenty. Fifth, two thousand four spirit had touchdown three weeks earlier in Gustav crater on the other side of the red planet. Both Rovers were only designed to operate for ninety days in the hash freeze dried mashing desert's but much to everyone's amazement, continued operating for years spirit remained operational for two thousand two hundred sixty nine days until finally getting bogged in sand June with its solar panels, pointing away from the sun. It sent its final message to work on the twenty. Second of March, twenty ten more. Than six years after landing opportunity continued operating even longer having now covered woolen excessive five thousand three hundred days on the Martian surface examining rocks and minerals and traveling more than forty five kilometers from.

rove Rovers Dave space Gustav crater Pasadena California Danny platinum Fulton Cape Canaveral Peel Bates Florida three weeks two thousand two hundred sixty five thousand three hundred da forty five kilometers ninety days six years
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Working down here after pretty exciting to see how we are developing am i in thirteen hundred blow their surface it's huge but but very difficult to understand quite where everything is which often do you get lost if you don't know where you're going so that's why you have to get all of your mentor fourteen months to get to know the mine enough to go yourself you know your way around now not so much so that's i always follow someone who has more experience than me yeah the woods there at one of the planning team with rio tinto down in the bowels of the oil you told mine here on business daily from the bbc that is the chalk face as i suppose we might call it the bbc's joshua thorpe as also been out and about with roger in mongolia hearing from some of the local herdsmen who've been affected by this giant industrial operation not all of them it seems are entirely happy about it as soon as you start driving out from the patriot picnic it's way too poor an improved that track but it's still a pretty bumpy ride landscape is very arid semi desert just a few shrubs grass sprouting out from the sand very flat rams here and dusty it's been a very difficult some very dry summer here and is hardly been any rain forty five kilometers away from the mind the dirt road gets way to a smattering of yet and small houses together in small blocks surrounded by few brand new buildings this humboldt the nearest.

bbc joshua thorpe rio tinto roger mongolia humboldt forty five kilometers fourteen months
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Six hundred people do this journey every day is that right yes sounds like we're arriving now open the gates again wow so rock of metal pillars and the gathering of guys in hats safety vests the lights on them the helmets we're moving now in which whereabouts are we heading an easterly direction and we're just gonna going taxi so we controlling getting a taxi thirteen hundred meters underground i wanna clamor inside now we've reached the point in the tunnels where they're actually digging actually tunneling development the word they used on the plan is that the goes through and at a certain point in the future the support of the tunnel gave way and the rock above it which is what actually once should at that point come through and fall into the tunnel and then they take it out and take it away but at the moment the not reaching that stage money be at least a couple of years or more way before they get to that point like working down here after pretty exciting to see how we are developed me am i in thirteen hundred blow their surface it's huge very difficult to understand quite where everything is which you get lost if you don't know where you're going so that's why you have to get in all of your mentor fourteen months at stick it to know the mind enough to go yourself do you know your way around not so much so that's i always follow someone who has more experience than me the woods are at one of the planning team with rio tinto down in the bowels of the oil you toll goi mine here on business daily from the bbc that is the chalk face as i suppose we might call it the bbc's joshua loop as also been out and about with roger in mongolia hearing from some of the local herdsmen who've been affected by this giant industrial operation known all of them it seems are entirely happy about it as soon as you start driving out from going the pay rate picnic it's way too an improved that track but it's still a pretty bumpy ride landscape is very arid semi desert just a few shrubs grass sprouting out from the sand very flat rounds here and dusty it's been a very difficult summer very dry summer here and his holly any rain forty five kilometers away from the mind the debt road gets way to a smattering of yet and small houses grouped together in small blocks surrounded by few brand new buildings this is humboldt the nearest town will soon be the local.

bbc rio tinto roger mongolia humboldt thirteen hundred meters forty five kilometers fourteen months
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Liftoff

Liftoff

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Liftoff

"Hugh cutting edge power management paramedics big in space it's big in mobile devices like our smartphones it's like power management we as users of this technology we don't think about it as much but it's super important for frame of reference by the way spirit one of the two golf carts on mars again was planned for ninety souls that was the warranty spirit was roaming around the surface of mars four one thousand eight hundred ninety two souls so mars days and then it kind of couldn't move anymore and it was operational for about twenty two hundred and opportunity is currently on its past five thousand mars days since it landed and has gone more than the length of a marathon i think we've talked about that last year that that it is has gone at this point more than twenty miles more than forty five kilometers as of january and keeps on rolling around the edge of endeavour crater right now so there's there's those are those guys are solar power so there is going to be that a different challenge for curiosity but still i love the fact they gotta take immense pride the designers and manufacturers of these rovers that they have lasted so far beyond what was intimidated i would imagine that means that future mars rovers are going to be rated for more time that they're going to use this experience to make them realize that when they say it's ninety days they actually mean five thousand i don't know update the warranty so we have a sponsor this week and went tell you about and that is squarespace inner offer code liftoff checkout to get ten percent off your first purchase make your next move squarespace because they allow you to easily create a website for your next idea you get to may name use a ward wingtip blitz and so much more maybe you wanna create an online store something you want to sell or maybe you have a bunch of artwork in showoff beautiful portfolio or maybe you got a lot of.

Hugh endeavour crater squarespace forty five kilometers ninety days ten percent
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on TechStuff

"About forty five kilometers per hour the cheetah was not built to run free across the landscape it was running on a treadmill it actually had tethered power supply other controls so again this wasn't a all inclusive robot the purpose of the chita was for robotics experts to experiment with ways to build a fast moving robot so again this was for them to kinda build out the technologies that would then be incorporated into future designs rather than something that was its own selfcontained robot the organic cava development platform it was really fascinating to watch though it would run on these treadmills at blistering speed you'd see this treadmill start to ramp up and at twenty miles per hour emit that it was moving faster even then hussein bolt however it couldn't balance itself so unlike hussein bolt you would not be able to like he couldn't take a turn to save his life so if somehow one of these cheetah robots word get after you all you need to do is take a left or right you'd be fine uh also be tethered to a computer and probably could move very far so you're probably fine either way but that's just one they did however use that designed to build out another fourlegged too fast robot called the wildcat this one was a selfcontained robot boston dynamics showed off the wildcat robot in two thousand thirteen with videos of this fourlegged robot bounding and galloping outside it was not tailored so it can run around a had a gasoline engine very similar to big dog pretty loud but also pretty fast he could get a top speed of about sixteen miles per hour so not quite as fast as the chita if you are saying bolt you could outrun this particular robot if you are me you would be robot meet.

chita wildcat hussein forty five kilometers per hour
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And say to hit a poll near the finishing line and it was a traumatic start to the winter games in vancouver just hours before the olympic flame was to be less at the opening ceremony the head of the international olympic committee jack roga appeared shake him and tearful in front of the world's press these are very survey the idea caesar regarding hail you'll have a young athletes who lost his life in pursuing these passion i have no words to say what we feed old now dark humor attached billy was competing for georgia in his first olympics it was his final training run on the new and notoriously difficult sliding track at whistler coming out of the final corner at around one hundred and forty five kilometers an hour he crashed and was flung out of the track as spectators watched in horror he collided with a metal support pillar medics reached him within seconds but there was nothing they could do the impact was fatal legislyos boom on were sold lady who gray allegra phnom but i certainly didn't expect this catastrophe us through dethrone automobile trump villages malaysia debit camera attached really is no does father and a former champion luger himself the 12hour time difference between vancouver and bekou yanni no does hometown meant his family had gone to bed when news of no dolls accident broke nelson.

vancouver jack roga georgia luger nelson billy villages malaysia forty five kilometers 12hour
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And stern waters in conversation with bruno grandi it's time now for i use a look through the day's front pages on into the studio by sebastien boga who is the london correspondent foot berliner zeitung sebastian thanks very much for coming in and i feel like once again as all they're not british but kind of pretending to be that i need to apologize for our forwards secretary you don't need to apologize do gina it's it's interesting so we say it's an interesting phenomenon we have we have the front pages on the of the times and the telegraph posed talk about the latest ideas of mr boris johnson for it is who we are talking about for it is he who we were talking about up if i am am and they'll his latest idea now is the an is building a bridge to france and now he has form of course when a may of london he wanted to build the big airport in the thames estuary then he wanted to build a completely useless the garden bridge across in the middle of the in the middle of london across the tens and now this bridge across the channel which will be or thirty forty four forty five kilometers and across one of the busiest shipping lanes in in the world and the shipping industry things he's spunk cuss he katie things he's wonderful it's quite extraordinary that in at that the the wrist to shipping is surely of keetch can say what i find what i find fascinating is of course that he's distracting by this kind of talk which really is a is a nonstarter as far as i'm concerned.

secretary mr boris johnson france london bruno sebastien boga berliner zeitung gina thames estuary katie thirty forty four forty five k
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Carpet cleaning dot com space the final frontier it again long time ago how does ago i should know that chelsea far far away jimmy mack is so mad at me right now the star wars and heart the men in our lives be very disappointed with us so well uh dr march hammer grin is in the studio near the adler planetarium we were talking about this mysterious celestial celestial object from another galaxies said i completely forgot i got a phone alert about but when we get a phone alert about an asteroid they could do nothing about well it's oh more moolah in it's the first confirmed object that his from another star bad is correct marg direct let's grit all right it's not going to hurt us someone wants no how fast it was going dui yet he had three of the speed on that thing about a half a mile or quarter mile wide yes so roughly maybe a quarter mile wide depending on how bright that's since really was end edits a close pass by the earth the was going neighborhood of uh uh uh forty five kilometers the second we're talking may be twenty twenty five miles per hour second so very quickly how a lot faster driverless cars hopefully don't go there all right that's pretty fair you don't know the intentions of this asteroid at the governor's i if it's gonna be really ciller's the subvert suspicious of it we don't even know is made of right that's exactly right yeah well we we think it's rock because doesn't show any it as opposed to ice because it shows no signs of vapors eishin 101 past the sun and we have a rough idea of its color which use reddish so dark you should reddish wounds consistent with a lot of the things we've seen in our own solar system so it's not terribly unusual in that respect do you think there's life out there do you think there's another galaxy and all your job may be on the line so you can be careful how.

chelsea jimmy mack adler planetarium solar system forty five kilometers
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Second most traditional mission is what's called counterbattery in that is i detect where you shooting from and i shoot back at you with my artillery or my mortars while the problem there is the north korean artillery is of a very very long range the north koreans heavy indigenous artillery system that we call the cox san nineteen seventy m 1979 or the m 1985 party m 1989 and cox in as the name of the north korean town where it was first identified but what the north koreans did was they got a world war two era soviet coastal artillery piece of a huge caliber 100 and seventy millimeter calibre and and a very long barrel and so it can send a big round a long ways now traditional artillery south korean unamerican artillery or one hundred and fifty five millimeters in the the typical ranges about thirty five kilometers the north korean heavy artillery the the range is about forty to forty five kilometers and with uh what's called a rocket assisted project oh it can get up to sixty kilometers so not only do they do the outrage us and south korean systems but they also have another advantage and that is the terrain north of the dmz is very very hilly and the and the north korea sms have literally had since nineteen forty seven to dig deeply into those mountainsides and they've taken taken advantage of that those mountainsides are absolutely honeycombed with firing positions and the the north korean heavy artillery is unattractive vehicle and they do these drills in plain sight the with the.

world war north korean koreans san north korea thirty five kilometers forty five kilometers nineteen seventy m sixty kilometers
"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"forty five kilometers" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"And i mention not there to increase productivity to nicety the japanese have perfected the art of the personal transaction they're very very service oriented and so they have or did have platform workers that just kinda guided people i didn't see that on this trip on many the stops there were automated gates that would open and close allowing the people to get onto the train did something different on this trip we've rented a car and before we just always took the train peyton ninety dollars to go four hundred and forty five kilometers from who tsunami ah up to a bouquet in northern japan twenty cents a kilometer 33 cents a mile but very very wellmaintained roads and just beautiful scenery an example something else that wasn't particularly productive they have hedges on part of this horror this main highway that divides the two sides but the hedges are trimmed into square boxers the somebody's after trimming in and see anybody well at the toll booths in the us and many other countries including japan they have some automated to toll poll booths called atsc can just go through if you have a card we didn't have a card so we're going through toll booths some have changed just it's just you put in your money and you go through with no individual there but some still have attendance and so so nice now hello have your ticket thank you very much explain.

peyton us japan forty five kilometers ninety dollars