34 Burst results for "Forty Fifty Years"

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Toure Show

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

"The game, the structure, the style of the game that you played back to the basket center right trying to get high percentage shots closer to the basket that game has been completely forgotten, and there's very few. There's nobody who plays the center position the way you did with the back to the basket and it's like try to get the highest value shots the furthest away. But three pointers as much as you can does this style interest you disinterested you look down on it. You say you don't know how to play the game properly. Well, you know there, there are different theories about how to play the game but I think getting high percentage shots really makes a lot of sense, but it also has to dovetail with your defensive strategy also. So a great team like the Bill Russell. F- Celtics. Bill was able to to stymie any shots around the hoop and. His team. Would run and get high percentage shots down down court, and that was a winning strategy era. I mean, nobody's playing center. The way you did that is totally gone now. I think. So but that doesn't mean that someone cat had that type of skill and still come in effect the game. In a meaningful way, we talked earlier today. One of the things you said, the eighty five finals against the Celtics was one of your most important moments as a player. One of your crowning moments as a player you were the. MVP that year you guys won the Lakers one but you had to go through the Memorial Day massacre where you guys got crushed by like forty points a game over in the middle of third order and a down moment and I lived in Boston at that moment, it looked like are going to go on to destroy them. How did you come back to win and why do you think of that as one of your crowning moments as a player that series? Well I think that? What happened to me personally in that series was. Once, we made it into the finals I kind of relaxed. and. So I went into that first game thinking that. The worst is over and you know the the worst was yet to happen. So. It kind of woke me up and made me realize that I had to kick my game up a couple of levels in order to. Finish off what we started out to do because we lost. In eighty four to the Celtics and Gabe a game away. And that ended up being the the crucial game. How could you go into? A series against the Celtics who had Larry Bird who series plate you know clearly one of the great players of that time how you Gonna Like Oh, we got this. No. I didn't think that we got this but for me personally, I figured I've done my job where we're in the finals. Things. Think things will be alright and they work. One. Of the one of the chapters, one of the parts of the book that I really thought was really interesting. You talk about athletes and what they must do with how they have role models at the happy aware that they are role models and you say we can't pretend athletes are influencing our children's thinking and behavior. So we must demand higher standards from them like it or not college and Professional Sports. Machines are turning them into role models, and if they aren't willing to accept that responsibility as part of the contract, then they should seek another profession. Strong position. A little bit about why you feel that way when you went through that life right superstar High School Athlete College, Athlete, and you know the way that superstar athletes from a teen age are coddled. They are given you know love for their athletics points for their character. Society is not training them to be role models, but then they become big college players big prosed and we expect them to be role models. Are they even ready for that? I don't know you know for me. Being a black American and in the era that I grew up in all black. realized. That They would be judged by the actions of. Any problem. Black Person. And so. That burden. Was something that that you assumed. Soon, as you've got to do anything in a in a prominent fashion, you assume that burden because you knew that. All black people would be. Judged on whatever it was that you did and he's screwed up A. Set, the race. I mean that's absolutely right and you talk about that I came to realize that the lew alcindor that for the younger folk that was his name forty, fifty years ago the lew alcindor everyone was cheering. Was it really the person they wanted to be they wanted me to be the clean cut example of racial equality the poster boy for anybody from any background regardless of race religion or economic standing could become an American success story to them. I was living proof that racism was a mythological beast like Jack. Elope when when the audience is feeling like that right I assume the media is part of it. How do you? How do you rebel against that? Well. You just have to show them that they're wrong and. That that is not the case, there's a whole lot that has to be done. I into earlier. Right after Dr King was assassinated, I was involved in a demonstration on UCLA's campus and people. Would just standing there. and. It was a silent. stood. There for an hour in silence and some of US had signs and a number of times people came up to me and said, you're getting the opportunity to play in the NBA. What do you demonstrating for and they did not understand how these two things did not relate to each other at all the fact that I, I was getting opportunity to play in the NBA did not mean that what happened to Dr King was a tragedy and a crime and the. Thing to get across to people and the you know I, it's taken awhile you

Celtics Bill Russell Dr King NBA High School Athlete College United States Black Person Boston Larry Bird MVP Lakers Ucla Gabe A. Set Jack
Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

My Seven Chakras

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Unlock Your Untapped Human Potential By Changing How You Breathe With Dan Brule

"Our guest today is the one and only Dan Brulee Denver is a modern day teacher healer and world renowned pioneer in the art and science of breath work. He is one of the creators of breath therapy and he was among the original group of internationally certified rebours. He's a master of Yoga and she gone Janis, medical breathing exercises, and he leaves the worldwide spiritual breathing movement, the coaches trains, and certifies professional Brett workers, and since nineteen seventy, he has traveled to sixty seven countries and a strained more than two hundred and fifty thousand people to use the a bread and breathing for personal growth, professional development, peak performance, self healing, and spiritual awakening, and by the way. Tony Robbins wrote a forward for Danville is books. So you can imagine the die of content, the type of information and wisdom that we're going to get in today's episode, and by the way in case you didn't know this is the third appearance of Dan. Daniela on our forecast and the last time we connected was some wouldn't thousand and eighteen sedan super excited to have you on our show. How's it going? Wow. Wonderful. As I said, if things are going any better I'd have to be twins. Almost feel a little bit guilty during the shut down during this corona craziness Farrah's it's been just it's amazing unplanned unexpected opportunity to to really pause to really stop to dig in and it's resulted in a lot of creative juices flowing and guy been busier than ever. And meanwhile, so many people in the world are really suffering and really struggling and so my heart goes out to people So you know what we we do, what we can we make the best of every situation and sometimes something that we think is something really negative turns out to be a blessing, the gift, and this that that's what's happening for us loosen our corner of the world's around this whole crazy shutdown thing. Absolutely I think it's been hard time for a lot of people around the world especially in terms of divisiveness, your people, both sides, and there's a lot of. Anxiety stress as well. But I think your services and your support are even more needed right now as you very. Profoundly, teach people how to breathe correctly and properly and well. So I think it's a very opportune moment validity to. For this interview I was hoping to start from very beginning. Maybe tell us where did you grow up and what was life as a kid for? Well, you know I was the kid who in the school yard was organizing all the breath holding competitions. You know I can remember we we play with hyperventilating and then like squeezy. Almost pass out and you know just. Playing with the plane with the graph I since I was raised in new Bedford Massachusetts Which is where Moby Dick you know there's a whaling capital of the world. Catholic school who? factory Industry Town Garment Factory Textile Mills the cushion it river was right next to. US some very old American Indian tradition in that part of the world. And So the energy is really beautiful in the forest and long the ocean there. but yeah I. turned onto the breath as a little Catholic boy in kindergarten hearing about how God breathed into the nostrils of man the breath of life and man became a living soul and I don't know it just hearing that as a little Feiger kid. I Dunno lit something in me and And just been a missionary for the breath ever since and every job I've ever had and. has kept taking me back to the breath in one way or another until it's the only thing I've really done now for the last forty years is is been a missionary for the breath. So and it's you know forty fifty years ago I felt like a voice crying out in the desert. Breathing what's that breathing a? and. So now it's great that the science is caught up and can now we have understanding on my some of the ancient yoga practices and guys practices and why they work and and what's what's involved in them and So I love that science and spirit meet and the breath is is exactly a perfect place or science and spirituality could meet.

Dan Brulee Denver Janis Tony Robbins Industry Town Garment Factory Daniela Catholic School Danville Bedford Massachusetts Moby Dick
Secular Strategies for Politics

Dogma Debate

06:10 min | 1 year ago

Secular Strategies for Politics

"Welcome to the show. So good to be back with you. I'm doing a couple of shows this week. and. They're kind of across the spectrum. The last show I did. I ever with the Mormon So exciting Mormons tinted stay far away from me. But it was fun actually having a Mormon willing to engage in an actual live debate and we went for like almost three hours and so if you haven't heard the full unedited. Commercialized version of that. The full extended version it's at Patriotair Dot com slash David C smalley. But right now. I'm joined in studio, the One and only Sarah Eleven. God I haven't heard that name in a long time. It's so great to be back. Gosh and it's weird. It's our first time in studio. Yes. You've done a actually come a little closer. You've done a lot of stuff with me, but it's always been over the phone would call in like every week back in the day and the old the old dogma debate days don't even call the show that anymore. but it's like. You've been so active in the political scene and it's funny that there's there are a lot of new people listen to the show now, who have no idea who you are, and then are some of the old school people who were like Sarah. Seeing a long lost cousin. Great. So have you been first and foremost good really well, I just moved to Los. Angeles. So. Thank you. Welcome to the fires and small quakes. It's so disappointing. The first week it was clear skies as beautiful and we were like Oh man we're going to go get our beach tent and and all this stuff, and then it's like now now it's. Hazy skies and it's really depressing and you know I sound like a very privilege right now. Go to the beach. The opposite effect for me the first six weeks I lived here it was rainy and cold, and it was like. I know it was six weeks straight in everybody everywhere I would go they would always go. It's never been like this. We don't know what's happening like it's never been like this I'm going. Yeah. Right and then sure enough it went seven months without raining or something it was gorgeous seventy five degrees every day for nine months out of the year or something, and then it rains again and I'm like, what's this falling on my car? This is bizarre. It is really is really rare that something like this happens, but it's that's what they said about. The last weekend were like this is the hottest weekend and all of all of the year and my place doesn't have air conditioning because it usually doesn't need it most people here that and they're like, why do you not have air conditioning? There are a lot of people go out here a little bit north of Hollywood. So where I am it's common to have AC but down actually on the beach, most people don't because it's like. Seventy S. Literally. Just crack window open your door in. It's fine. but last weekend. Right here where I am I say you a screen shot at one hundred seventeen degrees right here at this spot for you. It was one twenty-one. Few miles away. I can't even imagine one, hundred seventeen. I actually walked outside just to see what it was like literally like an oven it is. You just don't want to do anything used. and. I'll say it's still not as bad as like ninety six degrees in Texas. Because of the humidity humidity, you could take a shower and get out of the TUB and you're sweating and you feel disgusting. It is actually a swamp people forget. Reason more than one reason why it's So let's get into that. They remember you from a different organization. We don't have to dive into all of that, but you are now Founder and principal founder. If you wanted to say with or what, but you're now the founder of secular strategies. So let's get into a little bit of what that means because. I think more than ever. We need that right now just the name it says so much talk about what you do, what you were going to Asians. Sure. So you know I'm I'm really kind of like a meat and potatoes doer and always have been I'm I'm really most interested in just getting things done and getting them done as effectively in strategically as possible and I one of the inspirations for me to start my own company to work with. Clients focused on religious freedom separation of church and state was and you were part of this right in Texas in two thousand sixteen. When we got the secular caucus running that is now totally a pre- pretty much self reliant fundraising for themselves. I would say we spent maybe. A total of like five thousand dollars investing in that in that whole event and that that startup period and. Now, four years later that organization has you know a chair Vice Chair secretary treasurer is raising money got a resolution pass in two local counties van in conversion therapy in Texas. That is and more endorsing candidates. Remember correctly was was that the first ever secular caucus for advancement convention I gave a talk at that. I spoke. I Yeah I remember I remember being able to like I was just I got to say that I got to give a talk at the first ever everyone that's huge. Yeah and now they're like fully functioning. Yeah and now there's one in Nebraska just got one stood up in Florida. So they're they're secular Democrats of Florida and I'm working on. Virginia Colorado And Kentucky now, and we'll get into that in a second but I go back to twenty sixteen when I talk about what I'm doing today because from my perspective. That is one of the highest return on investment projects I have ever done. In terms of how much investment of time and money and the long term offensive because you know, you can do a lot of work but you want your. For me I want to institutionalize things that are going to be self sustaining so that we can I mean from my perspective, we are basically forty fifty years behind the Evangelical, right?

Texas Sarah Eleven Founder Florida Chair Vice Chair Secretary Tre Founder And Principal Patriotair Dot David C Smalley TUB LOS Virginia Hollywood Nebraska Kentucky Colorado
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 1 year ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
What was Before the Beginning?

Knowing Faith

05:18 min | 1 year ago

What was Before the Beginning?

"Most people start reading genesis they, they don't stop to go what was happening before the beginning right in saying and she's ready. The. Question to the book, start the Genesis starts realtime action with the beginning I mean. So you're already in the flow of it. So this is kind of stepping back and saying, okay well, what was happening before that actually started? So who was there? I mean They're a bunch of stuff going on. There are a bunch of people there. was there a big you know meeting talk about it with turtles way down who was there? Yes. So The way I understand it I think the way the Bible describes it is there was nothing everything is dark for was void try to. If you can nothingness like nothing nothing nothing nothing other than got. Got The. Only thing that there is got is the only thing that is a being that is in existence in he is entirely created actually had somebody asking me question the other day here at the church. I pastor now and they said jt glad you're here I've wrestled. This is a this is a kind of an older saints who've been walking the Lord for forty fifty years. And he said to me, he said agent at this intellectual question for the entirety of my walk with the Lord. Laird, God come from. In ease asking the question like who made godwit gut come into being, and that's a very common question in the Christian response to this is God didn't come from anything didn't start anywhere. He is the thing that is probably most distinct about God in this is what we learned last year in the apostles creed is that he is the maker he is the he is the one who has unmade. His created exists entirely distinctly enough himself in Trinidadian relationship father son and Holy Spirit. So the first thing we want to say before we even get into Tyrian ISM if you want to go down that path is before anything. got. Yup. Yeah. That's and it's pivotal because specifically when we're talking about who got is reference to these first chapters of Genesis, we often use the language of creator creature distinction right exactly, and that might be one of the most important distinctions. Bible makes in that we have in theology is that God is entirely. In of himself yeah. Absolutely. that. He is qualitatively different. Than anything else he is utterly unique. As. One of the ways when I teach this that I get people to sort of have this hit home as I say, right you gonNa make a chart and on one side you're gonNA. Label call them things that are created and then on the other side you're GonNa label it things that are created and then on the left hand side things that are created for you right? Right God. And then on the right hand side where you're going to write. Everything else like there's there's nothing that was not the did not That does not have got us its origin. Yeah. Yeah. So We. Start there with talking about God is Creator in Genesis clearly displaying this, that God is creator everything else is created but who is this guy jt? You mentioned it kind of when you were talking about that. This is trinity right God his father son and Holy Spirit, and so are we talking about three different gods up they're all discussing with one another are we in collaborating with one another are we talking about one God who has three different roles? Who are we talking about when we're talking about this God who is Father Son and Holy Spirit? Yes. I think there's just clues that are given to us in genesis some people like to go to genesis worn twenty six or the texts says, let us which shows some kind of divine plurality. There's lots of ways to to interpret probably better for us on suggest to go to the New Testament Charles spurgeon has analogy where he talks about God has always been trinity, but it's kind of like walking into a room where there's furniture everywhere in the old. Testament, the lights are off in a new testament. You're turning the lights on none of the furniture was placed there during the New Testament it was there the whole time, but you can now see it better. So canonical, it's actually probably better for us to to move our way backwards if God is if there's only one God. In he is trinity and that's what we see clearly in the New Testament in the churches confessions than that must be the same God who existed before creation, and so the way that we understand Trinitaria relations in the New Testament is that there are three persons in one God. Our definition for Trinidadian is is that God eternally exists as one essence in three distinct persons, each of whom are fully God yet, there's only one God so. Policy for a second. Could you could you go back and say our definition of the trinity is just kind of repeat that real slowly? Yes. So our definition of the Trinity is God. Eternally exists supposing there that he that's what we've just been talking about. He is eternal. He has not come into being he is the Creator and maker of all things. So so always been always will be it's right. Okay and and never will never came into existence never has ceased existing never will cease to exist

Holy Spirit Charles Spurgeon Tyrian Ism Laird Trinitaria
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Right so so he jumped from four hundred years ago or even a hundred forty fifty years ago today nothing in between not a civil war that is civil white rights battle not the eighty second airborne that's right the insurrection act was used by Eisenhower and Kennedy and even by Johnson and Truman none of it matters because America was born and will always be and I'm just racist society he heard from him and he's embarrassed as a white person has this man ever been to a battlefield a civil war battlefield does he know anything about what took place during the civil war has he ever been to any of these battlefields under the union soldiers Tanaka under the union soldiers hundreds of thousands of whom were white and died this is why this identity politics is so poisonous reconstruction was a disaster and because Ulysses S. grant strongly believed in reconstruction in the first term he was moving strongly towards that but the second term Democrats win the house of representatives and blocked everything.

Eisenhower Johnson Truman America Kennedy Tanaka Ulysses S.
"forty fifty years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And say the key word money okay Jim today we're talking about really what people can do to put themselves in a really good financial and the markets are crazy up ten percent down ten percent in a day just crazy and we started talking about the three bucket approach that we use to allocate assets and it's going to be a conservative approach but our clients are retirees and pre retirees and it fits for what they want if someone wants to build her aggressive it just doesn't work with us we won't put those types of portfolios together it doesn't fit for us so we'll tell the client know that just won't work and you have to find someone who's willing to be overly aggressive with our money we aren't we're gonna be all too concerned with the money we don't want clients to be in a position to lose an estimated more than five to ten percent of their total asset base if the market craters like it has so someone has three million dollars in the portfolio we don't want them to have more than let's say a five percent risk a hundred fifty thousand dollar overall portfolio risk so we what what that three million dollars to go down any more than two point eight tent down to two point five million and some of people say they don't want any risk we designed those type support for those also let's talk specifically about you know something that people here so many things about going to bed that's in utilities and annuities depending on the type of plan you have could be good or bad we think variable annuities usually get most of the bad press because you're typically going to have the same volatility in the stock market because you pretty much are buying what are called sub accounts that kind of work like mutual funds inside the agnolotti and typically gonna have very high fees so when you look at that we can understand why that might get a lot of bad press when you look at a fixed indexed annuity attention with an income rider fixed indexed annuity is going to protect one had a percent the assets against any and all stock market losses if the market crashes goes down ten twenty thirty forty fifty percent the account will go down zero they won't get a rate of return they'll get a zero percent return but they won't lose any money which is great that was the purpose for that principle protection then when the index that that account is based on increases they will typically get a percent of the index they will get all the index in a lot of people say well those caps and all these things alright well some plans have caps some plans don't have caps meaning they have end cap strategies now just depends on what you find and what you actually buy you have to make sure you understand what you're getting into then one of the most important things we think is the availability of what's called the income rider lifetime income rider that will guarantee for as long as you live your income will be paid to you regardless of what happens in the market regardless of how much your account earns regardless of how much money you have in your account you could live so long and use up every single penny in your account and have to continue to pay you your income for long as you live even if you lived a hundred twenty you're married you can choose a joint pay out as well the difference with and UT's today than thirty years ago as if there's any assets remaining in your account in a fixed indexed annuity with an income rider when you pass away all those assets that are passed on to your beneficiaries if there's anything remaining if there's nothing left in your account then your benefits you get nothing because you've taken out so many payments of of income over time so when you look at just that as a philosophical investment and you say Jim that you could have something that wouldn't have any possible loss which is what pretty much most retirees want that will give them some opportunity for gain when the market increases indexes they're investing in increases not all game but some we'll have typically extremely low fees as compared to variable annuities and even managed accounts and that will have the opportunity to provide an income that will last for as long as you live what does that do for someone was that due to their psyche in their motion well being what what's a prospect understands how these instruments work and often this they haven't heard about this before they haven't really understood it today financial instruments in general or can be complicated and that's why it's so important to go through a whole process with the firm that understands how to do comprehensive planning because in order for us to go through a plan process with the client it's gonna take three four or five meetings to make sure they comprehend how all these products work but again Dan the key is not putting your money all your money into one bucket the key is diversifying your assets across a wide base of financial instruments to make sure that you're leveraging your sole property inside the portfolio give you an opportunity for some level of growth also make sure that you don't right the stock market down with the forty fifty sixty percent loss factor potentially in making sure that you have enough income that's gonna last you for your entire lifetime and we're dealing with retired people Dan and should be retired people and because of that they've saved their money for thirty forty fifty years and all of a sudden they have this lark nest egg and they want to protect it so how do you protect it will we believe by Eugene R. three bucket strategy allows us to provide a level of production that is well much better than just putting your money in the market right because if you put the money just in the market Hey you have to be able to take a hundred percent risk with that as an adviser we have to tell you when you put money market that you have a hundred percent risk factor you could make money or you can lose money but you'll do both and if you're trying to rely on income for the rest of your life and you're trying to lessen your anxiety that you go through in the markets do what they've done of late having a diversified portfolio using very specific instruments that meet your very very specific objectives we think it's super important Dan well think about if you could sit here right now and design your own portfolio and we wanted to do it for risk mitigation but you also wanted to have some growth what if we put some money in the bank what if we put some money into the fixed indexed annuity that has the protection of principle what are some of the money went into the stop loss type of program and now what if you could keep a chunk of money in individual stocks that you like a lot that you think would grow that would make you worry a lot less about those funds that are aggressive because the other monies would be protected a little better and you would overall have less risk the portfolio if we're able to design that.

Jim
Eric Siu of Single Grain discusses effective content marketing strategies

Business Rockstars

07:49 min | 2 years ago

Eric Siu of Single Grain discusses effective content marketing strategies

"I'm Marc lack on business rockstars joining us is Eric students you know a single grand there wasn't happy about it thanks for having me it was good we got what is your into yeah so we're a digital marketing seem to work with fortune five hundred companies to venture backed startup helping them grow their businesses online using paid advertising so we were just talking about how most businesses struggle in the areas of one or both generating leads and or converting leads going businesses and that's kind of where by the boss or businesses thrive as we go into other businesses and help them with the life blood and oxygen in every organization that is their ability to generate income and sales and as marketers we go in we help businesses with this what do you feel like are the bottlenecks that are holding people back from generating leads I think it's you know I think is a lack of patience you know people want to see things happen quickly a look at the the tech world when you get when you get a round of financing you're looking to put that money into paid advertising grows quickly as possible are you looking to buy your way into into customers and I think that the thing is you know people talk about content marketing to that's that's you plan a long game and that's anywhere from twelve to eighteen months journey before you even start to see anything I'll give an example I was looking at my number is far from my one of my podcast I have my got for the first year it was just flat and then it starts to slowly take off at the twelve to eighteen months market interests are still like you know go up into the right so I I think that's the thing is it's a lack of patience and a lack of you know willing to you know grind it out these big companies that have been established maybe they've been in the game the coming around for ten twenty thirty forty fifty years you said you work with a lot of fortune five hundred are you what you've been around for decades so I feel like tions part makes sense for a lot of the beginning entrepreneurs and business owners but what about the big ones because you work with bodies they want to feel like you know you can be around a long time to be paid in patient the whole way but why do you feel like these big companies were so established hire company like you to comment big companies are slow and there's a lot of red tape around the week there's a really big one in the top ten right now that we that we work with and it's just really hard to push anything through new ideas everything requires a lot of approval requires you know thirty forty days and when you're doing marketing stuff you have to move quickly I'm sure you know you have to be willing to make changes on a flying test very quickly but some people call high temple testing I think that's the thing it's the it's the level of the bureaucracy out there in the level of red tape that slows things down when you're slow you can't really get anything done so how can you make sure that you're moving fast but doing it right because a lot of times we see entrepreneurs to come out of the gate and they're trying to hit a home run right they think that all my coming into a million dollars in the first year because this guy this guy this guy and this guy this guy and that guy and a girl not girl online crushing it making millions of dollars yeah and so why do you think you know how do you think I guess is a better way to phrase it how you think people can make sure that they succeed early on while moving fast yeah so I think definitely I mean he doesn't want to have a ninety day ninety goals you know a more you want to be okay here's here's what years were at today here is we want to be so there's a two out there that just was released I think it's like a three forty five day trial whatever it's called growth factors projects and then you can literally put it you know here's what we want to be and here was gonna happen to have a whole team involved and integrates a lot of different tools out there but I think it's important to set numbers and then go for them I sometimes you know if you wanna get crazy you can have daily check ins where your check it when you're recording numbers every single day some people get that crazy I like to do it perhaps weekly but you just want to have you know whatever gets measured gets manager at the end of the day so you want to have that but at the same time I think you also have to temper expectations just because somebody else you know we got to a million or or you know ten million for you know we're seeing all the stories out there but it took a very long time to get there so I think there has to be that level of understanding yeah I mean if you did if you want to get results fast I think the fastest way to do it is to follow the right recipe you know if you're trying to build a million dollar business in your first year or maybe been business for three years and you're stuck in a quarter million or whatever the number is you want me to at seven figure market figure mark I think the best way to get there is to simply invest and learning the recipe called a blueprint formula science any question when everyone caught the rest because he's an allergy but if you and I are average yes we want to be world class chefs at least a fast way to make a world class meal would be to invest in the recipe and ingredients exactly so if you and I are terrible chefs but we had the ingredients and the recipe to create a Michelin star meal or to do it you can't not do it but I feel like most people are calling the wrong recipe in their business and that's why they're stealing and it's a direct result of you know this is why the the the end result the product is the way it is because if we reverse engineer the result it's because of the things you did the rest and I think the fast way to get results is to just invest in learning proven breast can heal the results you want what company culture at something that I feel like a lot of people don't talk about because there is just a topic that I feel like it's not that I'm kind of a boring topic in some cases a lot of people aren't doing a good job of creating company culture but I know you guys are so what are some things that you're doing to create awesome environments for your team to thrive yeah culture is not like a fun thing to talk about talk about marketing and sales at the end of the right but the thing is if you're competing and companies out there like the go go's on the face of the world you have to create a fun environment to work at so for us you know we we talked about this earlier you know some of this is becoming more standardized but for us we only work you know three days a week out of the office most of our team is remote that's happening yeah remote working I mean a lot of people are gonna become independent contractors working from home it's gonna be a more common same people there's actually billion dollar businesses that are now shifting over to having a majority their workforce beat you know remote I think that that's interesting that you guys have come up with a way to do that no single grain Eric sees joining us where to inspire and forming connect the community of entrepreneurs I'm Marc lack on business rockstars so Eric what time the company culture I want to know how did you come up with this whole remote working thing I know it's not something that you created or invented how did you decide that was the right move for your business that's interesting so I used to work for this online education company and sixty percent of our team was remote and I was like wow this is completely I never done this before and it actually worked really well for us we know we had with as long as you have the right meeting cadence scheduled what's your managers or with other people on the team and then you for us we always did at least you know to onsite meeting for everyone got to meet each other in a week we kept the glue together and and you know we had the the right elements the right mix of kind of meeting in person also you know collaborating online so that work well for us how do people accountable because I feel like that's the tough part right students people are no longer in the office and not being in the office means that you should be or could be micromanaging them and things like that because nobody likes that yeah and if you have to my command ship with the wrong people but at the end of day distinction to make here is how do you hold people accountable when they're working remote and they're not in the office you can't see them here than it is meeting great question so we do with with the rep reports there is a one on one every day with their managers and then the other thing is week there's a variety of tools that we use that we use slack for example but then there's a plugin called geek bought that one do a daily stand up checking on okay would you do yesterday were you working on today so everyone can see what's going on at the end of the week on Fridays how we use a tool called fifteen five that will send a report based Wilson questions saying okay how do you feel about this week what did you learn this week and will you be the college was this week what your struggles this is the a bunch of questions there and like some random questions thrown in and then everyone can kind of see how things are going on from my levels from admin level I can see how are people going over time how is the training and then we have a question in there how much have you grown this week how much did you learn right and that's also we're seeing what's trending so for us were able to measure kind of what's going on and we're also very focused on helping people grow as well so we're investing in their their education to unravel to

Eric
Proposed federal law seeks to limit skyrocketing salaries of college coaches

The Paul Finebaum Show

10:06 min | 2 years ago

Proposed federal law seeks to limit skyrocketing salaries of college coaches

"Well anyway. I I call one of your stories. He's just week. We're talking about salaries and congress trying to put a cap on things and you. Did I think a an amazing. I don't know how you doug all this up. A deep dive live into the evolution of coaching salaries. Take us through that process. Yeah I one of the one of the most interesting thing about college. Football is how in twenty twenty I guess in our in our myopic nature point twenty we think that we all have these like little arguments novel discussion Russia. We've been doing this thing for one hundred fifty years at this point in time there are quite a bit of things that just are not new and some of that is complaining about too many bowl games but another one of those things is talking about how coaching salaries are way too high. I mean it's it's it has quite literally almost almost always been like this. I mean Amos Alonzo Stagg at Chicago making six thousand dollars in eighteen eighteen ninety two now I went back and use the consumer price report and price some of these salaries out in you know twenty eighteen at the time buying power. And you know. That's six thousand dollars. Amazon does stag was making then was worth like a hundred and sixty thousand dollars back in eighteen. Ninety two there has always been this separation between what highly paid college. Football coaches made Versus what the Common Man Colombian mix. You know I'll I'll bring it to your audience and hit them home like bear Bryant when he's doing. Brian show that that famous Sunday highlight show That that became formative so formative for a lot of Alabama fans. He wasn't doing that just out of the good report he was because he was getting paid there Bryan getting in pay. That's why I thought he. I thought you said he was a benevolent. So I believe you remember this because you weren't born but he also had to Eat the potato chips and drink cocoa which by the way had bourbon in it. Yes absolutely I mean like bear. Bryant was Bear Bryant was cheering the back right now. Yeah so I find it amazing we we. We had a professor on earlier who who was very much a part of the Donna? Shalala Team Wanting to limit coaching Ching salaries so When did they make the big turn? When did they start going? I mean as as some of the critics say out of control to me. It really doesn't matter what any of these guys make but TAKE A. When was the big turn? I think they really and truly exploded in the nineteen eighties because in the nineteen eighties. That's when that Supreme Court hate happened with like Georgia Oklahoma and you know they got. TV rights You know they divorced the TV rights from the NCAA and schools colleges then became able to go. She ate television rights As entertaining defended themselves. Obviously than we get into the CFO era and BCS. And what we have now where the SEC. Disperse what was it. Six hundred and fifty some odd the million dollars yesterday give or take a few million yeah To all fourteen member schools. I mean look. The bedrock of this cannot be overstated. The bedrock bedrock of this is this when you as an Athletic Department at Florida Alabama at Lsu is Florida state when you do not have to pay your labor force when you do not have to compensate you or athletes. That money has to go somewhere now. That money goes to beyond coaching salaries. I mean that's the facilities race that is everything. Everything that makes these college will programs at opulent as they can be obviously a really really big part of the PIE now. Is Coaching salaries. Now Coaching coaching salaries the early eighties. That's stuff starts to get reported. That's my really really starts coming into Coming into the sport in a way that it had really really before that By the time you get through the mid nineties Florida's paying Steve Spurrier the one of the first billion dollar contracts so that he doesn't jump to the NFL at that time honestly the NFL itself explodes. You've got that competition. So it's it's the competition that that spurs in any industry the street Salaries and money and will lose those things but the early eighties. I think is where we can really pinpoint when college athletics kind of started growing up from a from a fiscal standpoint talking to Richard Johnson from a better society in now we all know what is going on. I'm interested where were you. Were you sit on this. Because the the so called Donna. Shalala proposal We heard Professor Ridpath on this would would curtail a lot of things I find find. It somewhat amusing chancellors and presidents at Private Schools More so than public schools making. I'm five six million dollars a year We have an offensive and defensive coordinator is making major seven figure salaries I know is a highly paid journalists. Where we're we're are you on what Shola is is attempting to to do at least down one lane in Congress right. I think you have a good point. the the facilities boom and the salary boom of coaches collect directors and the things that we coach Sports Mirror. That of what we see on the institutional side at a lot of these verses and I think that is one thing thing that really gets lost you know like you said like g Foreign President of like West Virginia. Like these guys make guys and girls make six figures seven figures. There is a lot of money in higher education in the United States at the highest levels. college athletics is it is not an outlander But like studies have shown time and time again going back thirty forty fifty years that when your football all team is good when your basketball team is good It becomes you know they always say that is the front porch of the university. Admissions skyrocket when athletics. Do well and that is. Why a lot of these University of course than anything else I think? Put Up with and we'll pay out the nose for Nick Sabin or Jim Harbaugh or a Davos. We or whatever I think the dirty secret is is the weight from Ro a lot of these endowments in some of these very popular. Schools would shrink a lot more than people wanNA realize. No I mean just look around. I mean boone pickens. She died recently. I mean the the amount of money that he put into Oklahoma state and I don't I don't mean to disparage Oklahoma state in stillwater Oklahoma. Oh my been there. And if you haven't Richard Make sure that you put that on your bucket list. Wouldn't it wouldn't have had that type of money And and a lot of these Jerry Jones. He's given to the University of Arkansas. You can go down the list And I mean and it's because of one thing we're trying to win in in in college football or basketball depending on on on where you live and what part of the country you're in. Yeah absolutely I saw a stew. MANDL's works in the for pretty athletic. He He has a college pat column and somebody asked him Ten million dollars. What would you do with it to build a staff? And I look the question and I was like look man if you WANNA compete with Alabama Lsu Clemson Oklahoma Ohio state. You need more your salary. You Pool has to be bigger than ten million dollars. I mean on on its face. You'RE GONNA have to pay a coach at that level. Five five and a half six six billion dollars. You'RE GONNA have to pay your coordinators eight hundred nine hundred thousand dollars because Dave Aranda was was pulling such a salaried Lsu a few atmosphere necessarily because he was such town defensive coordinator which he is but it was because one opinions coordinator so that the only job job they'll leave for is a G. Five or or power five kids coaching job. It's got bulletproof coordinators. I WANNA lose them. I don't want to take collateral. If they leave me they gotta take step up so okay. You're paying both your coordinators Like one point eight billion dollars between the two. That's like eight million dollars. Just gone to the head coach in coordinators. Now you're in another like five million dollars higher director staff your eight assistant coaches which is all right. That's your ten assistant coaches You want to compete with Georgia Alabama. All right we'll have a party because you have to fill out the rest of those staffs with analysts. We assist tense You know you gotTa have a staff of three saw guys kind of the shadow. Coaching staff that that Alabama kind of those famous or infamous. No matter how how are depending on which by the fence you went on but You know it takes money to keep up with the Joneses and it takes a lot of line really want we national championship. Always great to have you on Richard other than chicken. What's the what's the second most favorite food that you'll be serving the super bowl party Sunday lady a friend is bringing some guacamole? She'll be homemade guacamole. I'm not a big block fan but you know you know how this you gotta try say like it. So that'll that'll it'll be my My side dish. I cannot wait I if I'm in the neighborhood I'll just drop Bil- bring some bring bring a some some fruit cake leftover from Christmas. I couldn't give away Gringa fruitcake. Brings some cold ones man. I'll have seat for you right on the couch next to meatball. Thank you great. Great to talk to you again come back soon. Have you

Oklahoma Bear Bryant Alabama Football Florida Street Salaries LSU Defensive Coordinator Richard Johnson Donna Congress Doug Private Schools SEC Ncaa PIE Alonzo Stagg Boone Pickens
Why are leaves still on my Japanese Red Maple in January?

Your Gardening Questions

04:27 min | 2 years ago

Why are leaves still on my Japanese Red Maple in January?

"Of the neighborhood get growing with stokes. Now how today's question Johnson email and he says Japanese maple is still holding onto its leaves and it's never kept them this long any ideas. Why and then he says someone in another part of the country had the same situation? Well in and I'm I'm seeing this I. I haven't traveled all over the country by any means. But I'm seeing this and and I've been thinking back to well forty fifty years ago when it seems to me they cleared themselves of leaves Pretty reliably and this year. I think it's a weather change thing. It's environmental and this year. I think it's a specific environmental thing I was just teasing with mark. I- Penn State is my enemy during football season but there my my backup when it comes to horticulture and and we mark checked and I came to complete disarray. Complete agreement with this discussion in terms of they didn't form they obsession layer which is a a chemical thing in plants that causes the leaves to drop off. It's one of my signals on plant health in the fall if a May well in many cases when a plant holds it's leaves and Goes into winter. Or let's just say the middle of summer and the leaves stay there and die. It's not a good sign. It means the systems in the plant. Shutdown Penn state went one step further in terms of going back in temperature time in terms of November freeze WIT IT IT slowed the plants down. It started to throw them into and this this is all plants but into the red maple category. It's slowed them down so that the internal systems system's got shall I say interrupted the chemistry in the plant that forms they obsessionally or no. That's that's the the cells that are in between the twig and the bottom of the leaf. The PETIOT In this all gets pretty technical but it boils down to the fact attracted didn't form completely so the leaves hung on and then went ahead died in a normal way. I find this worrisome because in general when I'm looking get a plant if it has Well many signs and symptoms but if it isn't dropping it's leaves in a proper way or proper time time I know that systems inside of shutdown and that's not good However I think in the Japanese maples maybe our overall environmental change Enj- going to warmer circumstances has some bearing on it? But then as Penn state and and mark checked on this They feel that this freeze we had a real quickie in November is part of it however a justin freeze in November every year and I find Japanese maples holding longer now. Well then I'm going to say that I find it. A bit worrisome. Because of well observations that are of the other nature were planned. Glenda's either going to die or has the we'll see what spring brings right now. I don't think we're going to find anything more more than some leaves. Leftover as the new leaves come out in the spring I looked at the birds on my trees. They're fat and supple as they should be for this time of year but something something got interrupted internally to where they're they're holding 'cause I well in best guess with on a leaf count. My my trees are still seventy ninety percent fully aided Hanging

Penn Mark Johnson ENJ Glenda
"forty fifty years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:18 min | 2 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"At six PM we put each hour up on Instagram TV as well but just look for America first Sebastian woke up on the website is said Google dot com do you ever allow people who disagree with you to call in and you ever invite people you disagree with honest gas I have I had the shank we got her on the show from the young Turks I I'm open to debate every week we got a couple of liberalism I could use you know who you are he loves it when I get into the rhetorical battle with those so yeah we we we don't have any Phil to us and my it's a demand of my children as well they say don't just preach to the bridge the choir open it up and we do every day in your second book why we fight you referred a political correctness as a permafrost on America yeah this imagery came to me during the election of sixteen and it it it actually came out of my first meeting with with candidate trump I was struck a nation that meeting that this is and I grew up in the U. K. I went to private school if I fully if debating club all that stuff so the style of this man from queens is very different from what I was used to but within seconds maybe minutes of posting meeting with him face to face I realized one thing this individual to his cool the tests political correctness with a passion he he is the kryptonite to political correctness and that's why it was very easy for me to make the decision to become his advise and that to work for him in the White House and then as as I started thinking about it it came to me that what we've seen in the last forty fifty years in America is this increasing the height of both political correctness in the colleges in media in Hollywood and eventually under the Obama administration this level of political correctness became a permafrost across American culture that the lock in one way of thinking I'm the reason that sixty three million Americans elected non politician as their president is because the soaring him the icebreaker ship it's not one individual who says I will not surrender to political correctness I will not allow those who politically disagree with me to dictate my speech and and like a true icebreaking ship he rose up on to that she device and smash their way through it which opened up so many people in America the possibility that week Hon once again return to the founding principles upon which the Republicans built where freedom of speech is respected where you will not curtailed in what you are allowed to say for political purposes so for me Donald Trump became the ice breaker on the political correctness the permafrost was finally broken but as with old ice breaking ships I was the I finished analogy with this what happened in icebreaking ship break through the ice if there isn't a flotilla behind it the physics of of you know the the the and talk to go to the arctic is the ice will immediately reform and renew it behind the bow of the ship so it's up to us Americans to keep that that passage way clear and that's why people have to believe that they matter in today's America every single one of us to keep the the the navigable lanes of freedom open and in the war for America's soul you quote Andrew Breitbart today's politics is downstream right from culture this is perhaps the the outside of been Shapiro's thanks okay about your feelings slogan I think Andrew Breitbart phrase the politics downstream from culture is the most universally popular one on the right in recent years but most people throw it out there without understanding what it truly me and on my radio show again and again and again I tried to make people understand what it does you actually mean by saying that he met the following when an issue you care about it doesn't matter what it is whether it's pro life second amendment freedom of speech deregulation whatever it is by the time that issue arrives in this city and this one by the time it gets to Capitol Hill already settled it was settled decades ago years ago in the media and Hollywood so the idea that you could have a debate on the merits of the individual issue in Washington misses the point the issues of our age the issues in our culture all shake off won't create conventional wisdom in the culture first so you cannot wait this is the last great success is the success of all in ski in the Frankfurt school that they understood it's not BC that matters DC's eventually as the right to stop it's what you do in the culture the you know the community organizer the screen right to follow more important that's why talk radio with without Rush Limbaugh are in his twenty four million listens there is no Donald Trump culture is where you must if you care about an issue it's not about every four years on the ballot box you've got to be active in the culture first that's what Andrew meant and Andrew was so very very right to to Celia code seven four eight eighty two hundred if you live in the east and central time zones two oh two seven four eight eight two zero one for those of you in the mountain and Pacific time zones we have about a half hour left with our guests the bastion Gorka and don is in Danvers Massachusetts and you're on the line in order very well better than I deserve gone well version nine yeah I was listening to the program then you mentioned in your books you have a some discussion on what we can do and I thought I would relate any terrifying story with that has a little spark of hope to it please my hobby is is a lonely hobby I go to these talk to people about global warming to scare everybody and convince everyone or destroying the planet and then usually the only person who asks about the science in the and can questions the line that they're giving all of the past six years I've noticed that at the his presentations have involved in the latest now is presentations at revolve around the urgency to act to do something in the latest one I went to locally they had was organized by democratic party folks and they had the high school Democrats students there all giving their presentations about global warming and then a couple local conservation people on a quick one scientist and the whole audience and everybody else is being really ginned up to say we have to act we have to do something coincidently about a week before that there was a conference in Europe the collision during a given a positive for some skeptical climate scientist with getting together and one of these environmental activists organizations somebody somebody said they were kind of like anti for want of a hotel with everything you need and her dress that will tell so much that hotel cancel the contract for the conference the conference said to pull through at the last minute trying to find a new hotel Donna is I apologize but we're going to have to cut it there I think you got the gist of where he was going yeah let me well I don't want to go off on a tangent but but on climate since when is signs the function of consensus we we've been told to get this consensus in the community science isn't about voting it's about fear is being proven correct or not it's about five there was consensus the world was flat but it wasn't so let's let's get back to facts and if you look at climbing gate in the UK and the falsification of beta there's enough skulduggery going on so we we understand what it's really about it's about one thing done it's about controlling your future we have had sixty years of being told it's an ice age it's it's the ozone layer it's the bees it's it's swine flu it's bovine spongiform encephalopathy can we have some consistency on all which is the apocalypse is going to come around the corner that's based on facts and not on the idea that a sees green you still have to make cheese burgers illegal gasoline engines illegal flying by planes unless you're a member of the political elite this is a level of control that Stalin would have celebrated over it's about the state have the will power over you that's inject science back into the debate it means that one little story with you if I may if done that one of the reasons that I I wrote my last two books was what happened to me the Tuesday after the election twenty sixteen I was my wife and also to get some groceries on the way home I stopped at the the the local grows and I was paying for the few items in the two middle aged ladies behind me the one next to me I could tell she maybe was a Latino Ole Ole from the Philippines and she kept talking ahead of me and really knew that she sings only before finding the penny dropped and as I was paying she went over to me with with hello to her not a whisper and I said no it's not we won it's America one at which point the one behind who school cation clearly born here not an immigrant like me all the other lady sun screaming and set no it's your thing bey get all the candidate is going to ruin America now I'm forty nine years old I've never had somebody do that to me in public with witnesses let alone a woman which I responded no my dear it's that attitude that got your candidate to lose this is why I write my books America is in a situation now that is not justified by who we are what we've done for the world trump derangement syndrome is real we need to get back to the realities it's kind of a big deal to change your nationality is not I just I have no contest for that being born and bred yes it is but not if you grow up in the U. K. watching re runs of Starsky and Hutch and Hill Street Blues and loving American culture in seeing Ronald Reagan is the the male version of of your own hero at the time of the faction I I was in love with with America from a very early age I went when you actually buy into the reality that we are the greatest nation on goals are the only ones founded on the principle of individual liberty it wasn't a hard decision text for you the millennium's that are so enthralled with communism ironically would never survive under it they are so pampered narcissistic and that doesn't bode well to live under communism as much as I'd love to box their ears this is the slow and steady indoctrination that is targeted our youth for some time yeah it's it's how it is in on down individuals tone skin others who who have no love for this country believes we all the new empire when this is a nation that liberates others and never stays that to control the country's they've liberated yeah the idea that people who who complain that they need safe spaces would that would do well under a socialist regime where the only say space I guess is if you're a member of the elite and the polit bureau man many have said it not for me these individuals need to spend a few weeks or months in North Korea or Venezuela and then get back to us Venezuela the richest country in the hemisphere in which people are not beating that domestic animals because the economy has so collapsed under socialism so if it is indeed indoctrination next call for Sebastian Gorka comes from Mike in Detroit Mike good afternoon in depth with Sebastian Gorka not live no calls please you know what you're talking about it and I think a lot of people are missing the point you know when it comes to the mess hall and right now and that is who and what this Democratic Party has become are you know the the trunk derangement syndrome deplorable Russians are all that for me it is just really trying to rationalize and justify you know there should issue a certain horrendous behavior you know and I think that the sooner people current president trump deals with them such as who they are there are a lot of people in this country are still waiting for them to kind of come to their senses reach across the aisle and this is not gonna happen new they've missed years been damaged everything they've touched you know in our government and I think it's just we cannot govern lets them we'll just have to keep their hands off of the the levers of power that's Mike in Detroit Mike I couldn't agree more with you I I I still don't know how my old boss does it the idea that you'd invite Nancy Pelosi to negotiate with you in the White House the the day that she calls you a criminal he's a better man than I am I could never do that these people are truly seditious when we know what Adam Schiff death when we know that he coordinated with the added charm out of the whistle blow and then denied at the lied about it when he fabricated a version of the telephone call but never ever happened that when we know that the DNC sent a Ukrainian American culture lupa to the embassy of the Ukraine but only to collect smear material against the president but to coordinate a smear campaign against candidate trump with the Ukrainian government that is the definition of sedition this is a group that you really can't do business business with remember the the whole doc of debate the the Democrats wanted to have eight hundred thousand of six hundred thousand daca recipients it's a naturalized to provide them with immunity what Donald Trump do.

Sebastian America Google
Questions deepen around nature of Jeffrey Epstein's death

Mark Levin

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Questions deepen around nature of Jeffrey Epstein's death

"Is six sixty minutes was a big thing on you basically did Jeffrey obscene kill himself and one of the guest they have on is a guy who was be was a a a doctor who was paid by F. Steve's brother to figure out the truth so we realize that there's a motivation here into telling you that Jeffrey dean didn't but is also a credible witness yeah he's done many many of these he's very credible so Sir I think we have one click for Mike here on on from that doctor Michael Baden his name he is our beta Nick I believe it is he was a this is a guy who's paid by the esteem family to kind of figure out look into what really happened here let's listen do you think there was foul play here the forensic evidence released so far Klay atop the point much more to murder and strangulation than the suicide and suicidal hanging I hesitate to make a final opinion until all the evidence is in people will say well you are being paid by mark absence of course you're gonna say that something suspicious is going on that's a reasonable thing for some people to think but our job is to find with the truth is just to find out whether the homicide or suicide we're still haven't gotten all the information and this is not a guy who it had dealt with situations like this hidden thousands of them is talking about how rare it is to see the types of fractures from jeopardy Jeffrey Epstein was I have never seen three fractures like this in a suicidal hanging sometimes there's a fracture of the high bone or a fracture of the thyroid cartilage and not very very unusual to have two and not three and going over over thousand jail hangings suicides in the New York City state prisons over the past forty fifty years no one had three fractures I don't know what I just know what out of thousands out of forty years it's pretty amazing they should in the one of the other points he makes is there they have now these pictures of come out of pretty graphic of of that scene you can see close ups of his neck and a couple things you see like a line of blood essentially on his neck you do not see blood on the news that was supposedly used at least in the pictures you do not see a point where when you have it typically hanging you put the thing around your neck it sort of slips a little bit so you'd see almost markings of a slippage which they did not see also they going to some death on I'm the fractures which just seem to be completely odd and the fact that this the pictures are more consistent with all why you're essentially a wire strangulation than a typical jailhouse hanging of themselves however the other evidence presented was pretty compelling as well and you know what do you want to do what what the motivation for something like this if it's going to happen and the motivation was clear in a suicide note all this was a side note was incredible okay our full I mean you kill yourself to in the sure sure sure he makes several points here number one have seen rights kept me a lock shower for an hour so I mean look you eat your molest a few hundred teenagers in here I can be me me twenty minutes in a shower maybe but an hour in a shower now I know free personal showers are awesome and and as my wife would tell you I've taken too many one hour showers third just awesome however when you're locked in there against your will for one full hour that's sixty minutes also the name the show when this happened on that's powerful that's number one incidents how about this it looks like Nole who maybe one of the guards sent in burnt food holy cow out the shower you didn't have me but now I think the food burnt food lives I'm starting to get sad myself yes I'm thinking of this is happening to me right now you're really sad yeah the next part giant bugs crawling on my hands now I I I wouldn't that's that's pretty bad I don't know exactly what happens my guess is he wakes up in the middle of the night is a cockroach on his hand he's not used to this activity likely he I don't know a lot of people that are are I I had activity really did live in the couple residences early in my life yeah great however any of those three kind of build up you know the net the shower for an hour the burnt food the bugs on the hands that's all really bad but it builds really to the final conclusion which is typically the thing you would right before you commit an actual suicide which is no fun exclamation point exclamation point true exclamation point zero fine no fun now of course you go to prison for molesting a bunch of children you assume it's gonna be fun but not here no fun zero four not even a little fun he says he kilo fun that's the most ridiculous suicide note I've ever heard it doesn't see I mean it looks like a couple things you want to bring up to his lawyer it as not it doesn't look like a suicide note at all like maybe he's whiting to his lawyer for better treatment or whatever but that's not a suicide note unbelievable no no and the it almost points to the fact that it wasn't a suicide why are you complaining about your conditions if you're about to hang yourself I see the reasons but those are not now not even the giant bugs I might kill myself to fight giant bugs all over my hands but you know it's no fun it's not gonna be

F. Steve Jeffrey
France sells off national lottery as economic reforms continue

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:25 min | 2 years ago

France sells off national lottery as economic reforms continue

"Let's get the nicest business and financial news from Lewis Kupa. Welcome back Louise at. We begin with the French state lottery a bastion of French culture about to be sold off. Yes has been sold off. This is president macron recreating Margaret Thatcher the UK UK Prime Minister in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s by by giving voters a Lotta prophets privatizations. That's what she did. She stayed sold off all the many state institutions solutions British Gas British Telecom and. It seems that the French have caught on about forty fifty years forty years later. So he's done is he. So the French law trees you say. Full says does your yet and he gave so the French state used to throughout virtually all of it and he sold fifty two percent of the company which is a huge public offering biggest. IPO initial public offering. Since two two thousand in France in two thousand five in France raising one point nine billion euro. He gave French voters much. Better deal the institutional shareholders so they bought the shares at a much lower price. They've also got another discount as well. And if the French Voters keep the shares for more than eighteen months. Get another free share for every ten bought share price. What twenty percent in day one so effectively? He's given the French voters a nice big paycheck pricing. It too low and sort of convincing them of of privatizations in the capitalist model exactly like factor she did however Monsieur McCall has got a lot further to go in economic reform in France Thatcher. Did it he so far had failed to and whenever we choice he gets the the the yellow vest protests also despite the fact it was a massive. RPO It sort of pails. The amount of money raised east one point. Nine Billion Euro Pales into insignificance given the size of the French state debt. Two point four trillion million euro of debt. The French government has racked up and it hasn't won a budget surplus since nineteen seventy four. So he's got a very long way This is boosted his capitalist credentials. But he's a very long way to making much needed structural economic reform in his country.

French Voters Margaret Thatcher Lewis Kupa French Government France British Gas British Telecom Louise UK Prime Minister President Trump Monsieur Mccall Fifty Two Percent Forty Fifty Years Eighteen Months Twenty Percent Forty Years
"forty fifty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

12:36 min | 2 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"American with the heritage foundation also is up for federal position that he was taken down by democratic slime things that character but he's a great economist who works for heritage Stephen Moore has a book out called trump trump anon makes along with art Laffer talking about the American economy the mainstream media will not do because it's a positive message about what's occurred under trump on omics joining me now is that same Stephen Moore Stephen Moore welcome again to the bill Cunningham show in Steven how are you bill thanks so much for having me let's talk about the American economy when the economy goes down or there's a maybe an indication a few days ago about the manufacturing jobs of lesson probably because the General Motors strike but does not pointed out by the media when the economy goes down in the stock market goes down as trump's fault when the stock market is flying or there's more jobs credit than ever before it's never trumps credit is something else is going on so talk about in your book the three outlines of the three prongs of the trump growth economy and why that's working by your soul right I've noticed that too when something goes wrong with the economy is strong fault with something goes right up with the economy is Obama yes No bomber gets the credit for you know a truck out when with these people and by the way these the same people who said that if Donald Trump was elected president he was gonna cause second Great Depression now we got this booming economy with the lowest unemployment rate lowest interest rates lowest inflation eyes wage gains and you know thirty forty fifty year so it's a it's a strong economy and you know what I talk about my book from phenomics is that you know the three major factors behind us or not number one the lessening of regulations on our businesses so they can you know do their own thing and and expand their businesses number two of course was the historic tax cut the trump house which has been an enormous stimulus to the economy and then third of course is the promotion of American energy our our oil or gas or coal or nuclear power and we we have become a you know the energy superpower in no small part because of trump's policies so I reported this week in the Wall Street journal just to give an indication of how strong the economy is today that sense Donald Trump came into office that's in January two thousand seventeen in the latest census bureau data middle income families are you sitting down bill I'm sitting down here's how much they're up in the two and a half a little over two and a half years that she dropped is unpleasant average middle class families adjusted for inflation the scene a four thousand one hundred dollar increase in their wages and salaries four thousand so the most there and may not mean a lot to rich people like you man Toni Bender but did every schlep working that would be a major major accomplishment if Obama was in the White House that would be unbelievable yeah right here's the amazing thanks other up four thousand one hundred dollars in two and a half years of the trump presidency in the seven years that drop a bomb was present not counting the first year of the recession the bush recession will come out of the bush you're over that period open at seven years of the so called Obama recovery incomes went all the way up to a thousand dollars for median family income so they're gonna board alters under trump and one third the time that they went up for one thousand dollars under Obama something big is going on by the way this football live what we hear every day from Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden that only the rich benefit is not trump policies that simply is not true when you're seeing historic gains in wages and salaries and take home pay for middle class workers the American fiscal year end in a few days ago September the thirtieth and at that point the argument of the progressives Bernie Sanders who's recovering from his stand situation and then Elizabeth Warren of all said what you just said which is middle class Americans have to work five and six jobs to make any money which is a lie but the dollar amount given to the American economy because of the of the tax cuts of Donald J. trump dollar amounts are greater than any time in American history so the cut the tax cuts working grading more revenue to the federal government the problem is the spending cannot be addressed because to cut spending you have to have sixty votes in the Senate that'll never happen under Democrats they will not give trouble Victor on anything so for those who say that the tax cuts did not work what what Stephen Moore say well two things first of all I just want to be clear on something you reminded me of this that I should have said earlier remember when I talk about the big gains and the income does income gains were pre tax so they don't include the effect of the trump tax cuts at the heritage foundation we found that the average family got about fourteen hundred dollar you know reduction in their in their taxes as well so you add that to the four thousand dollars an increase in income you're talking about real increases and real take home pay the people out now you are also right bill that the federal tax revenues into the United States treasury and fiscal year two thousand nineteen which just added a couple days ago adjusted for inflation were higher than any other single year in American history and what that tells me is that we don't have a revenue problem we have a spending problem but here's where I disagree with you about yeah I I believe with all the in all due respect and I'm a Republican but you cannot blame those overspending on the Democrats only it's a bipartisan spending spree of the Republicans and the Democrats and I you know I'm embarrassed by it frankly but I hate to say this Republicans don't want to cut spending anymore than Democrats because those relying upon government spending whether it's defense contractors or oil or food stamps or whatever they're dependent upon a certain revenue stream in your eye maybe I need to revise and extend my remarks the Republicans and the Democrats both because they are doing this way I put ability guess what politicians I don't it doesn't matter where they run our or do you next to their name they like to play Santa Claus they like to chat about the goodies and that's what they're doing so what we had with Republicans wanted to spend more money on the defense contractors in the military Democrats want to spend more money on social programs so that they made a deal that they spend more on ball right now the the let the the with the three things are cut taxes slash regulations produce American energy if somebody would have told you I anyone a few years ago that Iran just launched a massive military assault on Saudi Arabia I DO putting off line up to half of their energy production and with the threat to doing much more in the future I would have to assume that the oil per barrel as well north of a hundred dollars might be two hundred dollars because the world is in total chaos a couple weeks ago we had the Iranians viciously attacked the Saudi Arabians and calls billions of dollars for the damage the Saudi Arabian American economy and it wasn't even a heck up why are you know great minds think alike I wrote a column on this a few days ago making exactly the point that you just made girl which is that yeah I imagine that we had enough a president Elizabeth Warren or press five new say they want to get rid of our shale oil gas production which is made America the energy you know the energy production leader of the world you are exactly right without shale oil gas here in the USA the price of oil would have gone up to a hundred dollars a barrel and to put that in terms people can you know feel at the gas pump it would have met you be paying five or six dollars a gallon today for gasoline yeah thanks to the fact that we produce so much oil and gas the price only went up about twelve or thirteen percent not not a hundred percent so thank you Donald Trump for keeping our shale oil gas revolution going which is active in Texas and North Dakota and Oklahoma and West Virginia and Ohio and Pennsylvania is so many states have benefited from that's with hundreds and hundreds of thousands of jobs it's just I I I I cringe when I hear Democrats say we should shut down fracking we should shut down shale oil gas that the only people would benefit from that of the Saudis the Russians that you know the Chinese and all our competitors now the other the other issue CO two emissions the last ten years have gone down in America and it's accelerating only because of fracking and one of the Democrats want to get rid of tracking and so that means energy imagine a person pulling up I filled up my Chevy traverse yesterday and it was like fifty one dollars to fill it up imaginable is a hundred dollars for tank of gas for the every schlup driving around but the media gives him give trump no credit for that because it's a benefit before I want to get in some other area quickly which is the big question for you Steven Moore imagine the road not taken let's say a year from now it's October and right now Elizabeth Warren appears to be the democratic nominee dot the health problems of Bernie Sanders plus Joe Biden hunter Biden on stuff and Elizabeth Warren appears then thirty days from a year from now it's going to be the next president and she's telling the American people that she wants to nationalize and seize the assets of large insurance companies and medical businesses they want to she wants to seize the hospitals the doctor's offices she wants to seize a pharmaceutical companies she wants to seize the assets of energy companies and stopped fracking what happens to the American economy if Elizabeth Warren in November of next year is elected to the presidency what happens to the American economy well god forbid one thing happens I moved to Canada you know this would be terrible and by the way you don't have to listen to me or you how about March doctor Burke who's a big liberal who on Facebook who said the other day that in a private meeting that was tape recorded Elizabeth Warren would be a disaster for the calories you would be a disaster for Facebook to a disaster for the millions of Americans own shares on Facebook I mean when you have liberal offered a liberal we always like my Drucker birch saying there was but one would be a disaster you know you're pretty bad situation the United States so I imagine if that's obvious what happens is stark markets even more of what it's now it's now a little bit of a difficulty which in things go up and down what happens to the value of stocks and pension funds and pensions of public employees to the cops the firefighters the butchers the bankers the candlestick makers the teachers with pension funds what happens in the stock market is it fifty percent reduction I don't know I mean I I got only one like gas I mean it goes down obviously because she she hates American companies and you mentioned she hates that health insurance company she hates the the she hates the technology companies she hates the pharmaceutical industry you know one after one another all the energy company she wants but those out of business I mean you're talking about you know massive reductions in the GDP of the economy reductions in wages and salaries for middle class workers and you know it's it's just what I can't think of a single thing that Liz would warrant has sat jun she now she is running for president that is pro growth that would actually expand economy's all basically redistribute give give things away to people for free go after people were successful who by the way a seventy percent of people are millionaires and billionaires are small business owners did you know that sure the people killed companies why why do we want to get you know active at that but there's some of those of Dylan they're not bill and they're the heroes of the American economy they don't see it that way at all and you have a great day charge on one of your website to talk about the last six quarters of Obama compared to the first six quarters of trump and this was not and when the in nine ten eleven twelve this was implementation of Obama's policies which would be a misdemeanor compared to what Elizabeth Warren would do so tell the American people the last six quarters of a bomb a compared to the first six quarters of drop I was like a you turn attacked I like to look at for example what happened with a blue collar middle class jobs construction manufacturing and mining remember Obama said you know dismissively right before the election how how's trump going to bring back those jobs with a magic wand well does those jobs were out of the quieting under Obama and under trump we created one point five million manufacturing construction and mining jobs and those of those blue collar jobs there were disappearing from the heartland of America and they are back in the the other chart I'd point out the last six quarters of Obama Biden and hunter Biden the GDP average was one point six percent of the American economy the first six quarters of.

Stephen Moore Laffer six quarters hundred dollars seven years four thousand one hundred doll four thousand one hundred doll fourteen hundred dollar thirty forty fifty year four thousand dollars one thousand dollars two hundred dollars fifty one dollars thirteen percent thousand dollars hundred percent seventy percent fifty percent six dollars
"forty fifty years" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on The Young Turks

"I mean he's just running a company and the company winds up. Getting tens of thousands of people killed but he's running running a company. I go to cocktail parties. I see him in the hamptons that black guy who smoked a joint in baltimore. I never see him. He says he looks like a criminal to me. Lock the ball up on god. I'm so sick of that injustice the whole country sick of that injustice because it's not just black guys in baltimore you think they care about you in the holler and west virginia in kentucky. They crush you daily for their beloved executives. Can you imagine and i know it's hard to imagine in this day and age at america a politician that actually represents <unk> presents the voters that actually represents everybody and not just the rich we haven't had it in forty fifty years so seems like really is that even possible politicians who put executives in jail and release innocent people from jail. That doesn't seem possible does it. It actually is possible because because we're supposed to live in a democracy now i know that in the past the donor money is controlled everything but in a presidential election there's so much free media. You actually actually can get past the donor money guys. It's up to you you vote for a progressive who's going to seek justice and you'll get justice if he gets scared and and you vote for biden or you vote for corporate democrat first of all they're more likely to lose a second of all you never ever going to get justice. It'll be the same guys still crushing daily. No matter where you live in america let's actually go after the real villains and actually free americans. Aren't we supposed to be for liberty. Let's vote for warner. Sanders actually get liberty for america so i highly recommend that you check out <hes> both proposals elizabeth warren has been releasing her proposals on medium and bernie sanders were proposed <hes> his legislation and his reforms on his website. That's bernie sanders dot com and we'll put the links down below. If you're watching this later on youtube and facebook get the information for yourselves. Whatever you do don't listen to television pundits telling you who's more electable actually find the real truth. We got a quick break. We'll be right back..

bernie sanders america baltimore youtube biden elizabeth warren facebook west virginia warner kentucky forty fifty years
"forty fifty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Four years or so or less than that and in divorce families where there is a minimal amount of father involvement afterwards that's where the boy crisis reside and that is what that is to the things that is very different from when you and I grew up the other major thing that is different is when you and I grew up the the message from parents in two boys especially is that you exist therefore you serve it's much more you exist therefore you deserve sweetie do you like those those Cheerios with the the the right type with the right amount of sugar on them do you like them better than the Cheerios that are that you want to Cheerios and all of you you know and and it's that type of catering to the child that teaches the child that the most important thing is the child as opposed to brothers sisters father mother and other people's needs besides the child and so the child has to become much more entitled than children growing up knows about forty fifty years ago when I was a kid you don't know my personal history bone I was twelve years old and my father left on every song and the rest of my life I was an intact family my mother took control one on one side of me was a father on the other side of me on Huddleston and your park was at my father I I played baseball and I had strong coaches I and how Pennington Gordon veteran no F. banker I had a male dominated society around me even though from the age of twelve on I was like without a father they were fathers all around me so even but today that is not the circumstance in fact government often encourages mothers to have kids without a father being around it's like men and women are equal but Rick but we're different and society says her mother you can do a great job what role does a father play and raising a son that a mother has difficulty doing the role of the roles tend to be boundary enforcement in Kerr out get more into that in a minute mothers and fathers and children tend to bond by playing together like rough housing and the rough housing tends to be volatile and that allows the child to hear the boundaries of the father clean without rebelling against that that the father so for example that's a far more likely to rust helping them the moms are and well the three of the children of the father may take the three kids and throw them on the couch and say okay the game here now is that the three of you to jump on my back into me down before I've been the three of you together down okay okay to that's great and so the the you know the kids jumped on the fathers back then that is looking on going all my god I feel like I had just one more child the mother and the mother is thinking like a lot well I don't want to fear that kids do seem like they're having a lot of fun but I just sensed that sooner or later this is going to end up in somebody being hurt somebody crying and she's about ninety nine point nine percent likely to be right and and so the the kids kids jump on the kids out of the fathers back in the and they begin to pin the father down but then Jimmy just put his elbow and and his sisters are hi and.

forty fifty years nine percent twelve years Four years
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:32 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Four years or so or less than that and in divorce families where there is a minimal amount of father involvement afterwards that's where the boy crisis reside and that is what that is to the things that is very different from when you and I grew up the other major thing that is different is when you and I grew up the the message from parents in two boys especially is that you exist here for you Sir Hey it's much more you exist therefore you deserve sweetie do you like this in this Cheerios with the the the right type with the right amount of sugar do you like him better than the Cheerios that are that you want to lose it all how do you you know and and it's that type of catering to the child it teaches the child that the most important thing is the child as opposed to brothers sisters father mother and other people's needs besides the child and so the child has to become much more entitled than children growing up knows about forty fifty years ago when I was a kid you don't know my personal history bone I was twelve years old my father left the never song and the rest of my life I was an intact family my mother took control one on one side of me was a father on the other side of me on Huddleston and your park was at my father I I played baseball and I had strong coaches I and how Pennington Gordon veteran at banker I had a male dominated society around me even though from the age of twelve on I was like without a father they were fathers all around me so even but today that is not the circumstance in fact government often encourages mothers to have kids without a father being around it's like men and women are equal but Rick but we're different and society says her mother you can do a great job what role does a father play and raising a son that a mother has difficulty doing the role of the roles tend to be boundary enforcement and her I'll get more into that in a minute mothers and fathers and children tend to bond by playing together like rough housing and the rough housing tends to be a ball and that allows the child to hear that boundaries of the father creams without rebelling against that the the father so for example that's a far more likely to rough housing than than moms are and well the three of the children of the father may take the three kids and throw them on the couch and say okay the game here now is for the three of you to jump on my back into the pin me down before I've been the three of you together down okay okay to that's great and so the the you know the kids jump on the fathers back the mothers looking I'm going home my god I feel like I had just one more child to monitor and then the mother is thinking like a lot well I don't want interfere that kids do seem like having a lot of fun but I just sensed that sooner or later this is going to end up in somebody being hurt somebody crying and she's about ninety nine point nine percent likely to be right and and so the other kids kids jump on the kids the the fathers back in the and they begin to pin the father down but then Jimmy just puts his elbow and and have sensors are hi and that goes well and then and then Jane starts crying and mom because well two things here one is finally data you will learn and be I'm beginning to feel a little guilty that I didn't intervene ahead of time all right at least Avelar now but instead but dad says is okay sweetie you can put your sister your elbow in your sister's eyes that's not a way of winning and if you do that again with that we'll be anymore rough housing dedicated to problems I will do it again then they get all excited again they do some version of that and that says okay this can't be done so they'll they'll be no more rough housing until tomorrow night and longer what you didn't learn your lesson from tonight wasn't clear enough you're going to do it again tomorrow night and so mom for like going all right I don't interfere don't be controlling without understanding that tomorrow night is so important because now the child has lost the rough housing as a result of not being empathetic to his sister's needs and so the child is learning empathy but he's only learning and to see if the next night he gets the same opportunity and news now the to lose the rest housing so when he goes to put his elbow in his sisters hi to get leverage to be eight to be the winner in the king the king and the king center the he knows that that is not going to lose the rough housing which is what it's giving all the fun so he's now in curry's George Forrester pressured into thinking of someone else's needs besides himself and that's why we're seeing is highly call connected to empathy not because the child so if the mother or the father the mother would say the same thing with the mother when the child violated that the mode to which we tend to repeat the the the the command to think of your sister over again but the child when considering the option of repeat command by the mother to think if your sister verses losing the rough housing the child the losing the excitement of accessing the child yeah let mom to so doctor for one we had these resolutions to mass shootings which are red flag laws or such as extensive more extensive background checks for all gun sales or notification requirements all that stuff it'll have nothing to do with the real problem which is lack of fathers you point out in your book worldwide boys are fifty percent less likely than girls to meet basic proficiency in reading math and science boys more than girls have a crisis in mental health they have a crisis and purpose many of these so called mass shooters have a purpose void in their life and so it is kind of like the core the seed grows and as it grows these boys do not connect with each other they're not part of something greater than themselves as less sports participation and when I was growing up I was told you're going to be a bread winner you're going to succeed get out there and make it happen but boys are told today that somehow the me too movement we need to heed to movement the me too movement says boys are sexist the races there's something wrong especially with white males you're not you stole the land from the Indians you brought slaves over and you're on the internet in your have this terrible self value self worth of yourself but you get on the internet and social media suddenly you're king of the internet and your blur the lines between fiction and fact menu and tell fantasies and aren't real is it true that there's a crisis in education among boys rice is in there is boy crisis period in education in exactly the areas you mention in all fifty six of the largest developed nations police are falling behind girls and every academic subject but especially in reading and writing and reading and writing at the two biggest predictors of success but it's not just in that area it's also in suicide boys when boys and girls are nine their suicide rate is the same when there is between ten and fourteen the suicide rate is twice that of girls between fifteen and nineteen is four times that of girls between twenty and twenty five is five five plus times at the girls the blue blazer the sperm counts are going down which means that they're the first tell the other children created from the partnerships is going to be more precarious the I. cues are going down they're much more likely to be imprisoned than they used to be is a seven hundred percent increase in prison population and prison and construction since the nineteen seventies we were seeing so what I would actually looked at his old seventy this seventy different areas like this throughout we get opioid crisis in Ohio you know about the POS system there's and deal with people who died from overdoses are two two to one male sources females boys are much more likely to be not just drug addicted and in Elko and an opioid but also alcohol addicted to to kill themselves indirectly by taking risk at risk students writing cars and and and in X. games that are oftentimes lead to their deaths in directly and silly when you and this is all this is so the the science behind this is absolutely amazing and so what I've done we do the research for the boy crisis I started you know looking at these different areas and seats so that there is seventy different ways that are our children who are our sins are beginning to our suffering and so and and and and what I discovered is in an almost all seventy of those different areas the dad deprivation boys that had minimal or no further contact they were in the most Japanese doctor I wonder how many mass mail shooters are from an intact family with a strong father strong mother what a high school education working living separately with their own children answers like nobody now the words no if you isolate the one of those issues alone the show that night in the cities that I did for the boy crisis I discovered that about ninety percent of the mass shooters are dead deprived children issue number two that they are they tend to be from they do they or if they're not if they're not dead deprive per se the family is using in in in chaos in a lot of a lot of havoc but that does not account for all the measures they're you know there are people that are that are different from that but he it to ninety percent level that's pretty powerful and so we started saying things like yeah well it's it's because in this family values it's it's president trump divisiveness in Cincinnati we blame it on but your daughters are subject to the same family values the same values on TV the same access to the same guns they have the same type of mental health problems and our daughters are not doing the shooting her sons are so we have to pay attention to what's happening to our sons and our sins don't have the role models number one the dads the number two when they don't have to as when you grew up as you were talking about before there was there was a greater likelihood that these nets have males were coaches that they were allowed to be a live voice counts for much more viable to come out to more viable faith based communities are more viable if you'd care if you're a single mom listening to this and here is what to do get your son involved in the cub scouts get him involved in the Boy Scouts take a look at the boy crisis since he will blind the cub scouts in the Boy Scouts and feet K. these communities are important do not take my word for it you'll understand what exactly the cuts counts please got faith based communities why it's are so important what's the dynamic that creates a better boy added that police need structure they need encouragement they need physical activity he need male coaches they need and they need help teachers and school they recess in school and they need the locational education we don't need to have about thirty percent of.

ninety percent seven hundred percent forty fifty years thirty percent fifty percent nine percent twelve years Four years
"forty fifty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:44 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Eight nine two two two and Richard wants to call us back it looks like we lost you over the break but we'd be happy to speak with you or anybody else wants to call please do not Jason last week you've got a suggestion for where to go in Switzerland it was a massive the lion yes the lion of lose there and that I was a place I want to see anyway so I was really happy that a listener called in to validate that no it we talked a little bit about the moment when the Swiss decided to be important to help others but stay out of the conflict the line of this year and is only for about a half a century before but it commemorates a moment the Swiss got too involved and paid for it maybe the last time this was cut too involved to pay for it basically during this French Revolution there a lot of Swiss guards who were working for the king in France and when the revolution came along the king was a little late warning them that they could get swept up in it and sure enough thousands of them were killed only about three hundred survive this with people it wasn't even their fight it was the revolution in France so about forty fifty years after that someone card the most beautiful sculpture you probably have ever seen and you might have seen a photograph of this it's of a lion at first you think he's asleep he's the sort of a amounts to over what looks to be a banner or something but then you notice in this side a spear has gone into his left flank he's cart up sort of in in each on a a very a tall I think this piece of granite or something and he's over a very still body of water right in front of him so the lion is dying it reflected back in front of this pool in front of it it's called the line of his there you see that I'm sure about a million and a half people go to see it every year and I see why because there's just something absolutely magical as as a car last week said about this culture it is so beautiful so that's it it's in the middle of of lose their and very very near very noisy traffic circle and only about a two minute walk from that panorama which in a way is an answer to it that we talked about earlier Mark Twain went to see it in a tramp abroad he wrote about it he's he described it as a sheltered repose full woodland knock remote from noise and stir in confusion on all this is fitting for lines do die in such places and you know what it hasn't changed at all it's if they preserved it beautifully with grass and trees than the tourists are all they can't touch it there across the water so this line is still sort of this untouchable thing of sculptural beauty that many people try to to duplicate but as Mark Twain wrote they're all labels upon him the kid eight don't nothing is as as magical as this one piece of yeah yeah that does sound magical and and it's nice that the tourist across the water from that you know in Europe just this past week there's been a lot of hope rounding tourists in our major destinations in in Italy Rome to be exact the police are are giving people I love being fined for doing things that would have been seen as innocent thank your ago like sitting on the Spanish steps and did you see anything like this in which Linden what were people saying about that and as the role interest and let's see I I tweeted about this I reach with someone on my Twitter account and I got a lot of push back the Italians are in strong defense of these new rules they say well of course you should be fine four hundred euros which is about four fifty four sitting on the steps because Burke protecting heritage if you don't have to be damage to get all you can just be sitting there and you can get the tensely find that much I guess if you if you talk back to the police they're sweeping people wait on them to go away first but if you don't obey then they'll give you a fine but on the times are all for it and the the tweets I got back when I talked about this we're just what we think source are terrible and they use in Tehran words to describe tourists so there's definitely an anti tourist under current to some of this and granted we all know about the problems of over tourism we all know there are lots of tourists who are absolutely disrespectful there was a German couple in Venice a week or two ago who got like I think an eight hundred euro fine because they decided to make coffee with a French press I think on the famous Rialto bridge which sounds bizarre because the coffee is not going to damage the Rialto bridge but as a matter of respect and that's what kinds of looking for they want people you know they've not to sit on the Trevi fountain not to sit on the Spanish steps anymore you know not to eat food on the sidewalk in Lawrence in case they drop rappers because tourists have been known to do that so there's this this is big strong I think the tie ins with the wish that their country was or is organized to switch all content here trying to enforce it yeah and there was another internet kerfuffle this time about somebody saying that adults shouldn't go to Disney world without kids am I getting this right yeah it was it was maybe because there's a posting about two weeks ago on you know how these things make the rounds on the on the internet for all that's worth there's a woman who was complaining about a millennial there who I guess heads wearing short shorts and hang out with her friends but had no kids and this person you know with an alternation between lower captain all caps was freaking out saying oh no you should never go to Disney unless you have kids with you in the start of a huge fight as as the silly social media memes do you know that the people who say you're right why would you go to Disney unless you have kids and all these other people saying what are you talking about it's for everybody don't be a snob I would which I write the Disney guide for Frommer's I think everyone should go I think this you don't have to be in love with furry characters you can it's fascinating for so many other reasons you know how they've made everything the way they've made them and why a grown person can get a lot of analyzing hello this stuff works but and case and I'm on the side of thinking it's going to be so much better with the kids has you know otherwise I think as an adult alone actually have gone to Disney world alone because I want films and things there and I I just found the frustrations overwhelms me the constant lines the crowd the lead back then not so great food it's probably gotten better but well did you how old are your kids do you get when you took them to Disney because if they were like for you might not say it was relaxing well and I didn't say was relaxing in fact when I took my kids to Disneyland the younger one was a year and a half that she was terrified of the the folks in costume it kind to your kind of was a disaster she was too young my older one absolutely and seeing it through her arrive.

Jason Richard forty fifty years two minute two weeks
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KTOK

"Go back thirty forty fifty years to take a context and take it completely out of context and I mean you know I I get all this information about other people's past and what they've done and not done and you know I'm I'm just gonna go there if we keep doing that that's I mean Moshi debated what we do from here for example this whole thing about race of a seat well you know I think you take a look our positions are any different as for finding now hello senator Harris yeah she sees it as a tool not a must in all circumstances well look at my record it is I'm not interested in going back all right quick break more with John Solomon he is the executive vice president for the hill investigative reporter more on the other side Hey listen let's say you have to mail something important something private something that has like your social security number your tax documents financial information I'm you wouldn't use a postcard right if you did that be pretty dumb well if you ever use public wifi believe it or not even password protected public wifi well it's like using a postcard instead of a sealed envelope in other words the cyber criminals are open very easily to your private information and that means that yeah they can get everything they need to rob your identity now in this day and age you need all of your device is protected that's where Norton secure VPN comes in a virtual private network that willing crypt all of your connections even I'm public wifi so whatever you send whatever you receive is safe from cyber criminals that want to steal your private information now it's simple to use you install it once you log in once it runs seamlessly in the background you don't even know it's there so to get Norton secured VP and it's only three dollars and thirty three cents.

executive vice president investigative reporter Norton VP senator Harris thirty forty fifty years three dollars
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:28 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"It's not like if somebody just came out of the blue didn't know anything but it's so easy to go back and go back thirty forty fifty years to take a context and take it completely out of context and I mean you know I I get all this information about other people's past and what they've done and not done and now I'm I'm just gonna go there if we keep doing that that's I mean we should debated what we do from here that's him saying look I don't have to be nice Joe I may not you know it's just FYI may not be nice Joe welcome back to the show I'm gonna last so there are or just were also watching this Jeffrey abstain thing because I was fascinated I I don't I didn't ask you guys to get the idea because it wasn't me but maybe we should Nancy Phyllis's daughter what is your name Alexander fluency she was documentary stuff she was quoted as saying that they need to have their eyes opened with us have seen sector she had said something to the effect of that many people there might be some of our favorite two are implicated or something to that effect because apparently there are a lot of receipt at least that's the word that's going around about this story this guy's a fruitcake he's a disgusting monster and I think the predator should be well make him afraid and the best way that you make our freight is I'm all for death penalty for predators like this now I not even bat an eyelash at it yeah she had said that need to close his daughter had said at that she was concerned J. that they are sorry I Christine publishing yes she said she tweeted deception cases horrific and the young women deserve justice it is a quite likely that some of our faves are implicated but we must follow the facts and let the chips fall where they may whether on Republicans or Democrats who the hell even needs to say anything like that I I who why why does that even need to be sad I will for these people their favorite of hers that would be good grief so yeah I don't care who anybody that had I don't care who it is anybody that's engaging in the style I don't care who they are that's it's it's horrific but we're gonna get more going to continue to watch this this he it is meant his Manhattan I'm just looking at some of the stuff that's coming out right now the seventy seven million dollar Manhattan that mansion they said that there was this is coming from local does a coming from New York media quite extraordinary volume of photographs of nude underage girls they said hundreds perhaps thousands of photographs they're not even getting into the car the CD is that have labels video yeah and I'm not even gonna get and all that because this is the so grotesque there's a lot this is just beginning so as we heard when we were we're coming in Joe Biden is considering to me that was him suggesting that look I don't have to be nice I don't have to not I I could play the gotcha game to that's essentially what he's saying Washington examiner had reported this saying that yeah we're it I it's not surprising that his campaign would even be getting any kind of dirt he says he goes court I mean I get all this information about other people's past and what they've done and not done I'm just not going to go there I mean if we keep doing that we should be debating what we do from here there was this quote you heard that everybody does apple so that's a V. in people are doing up against him anything calling Harris is going and digging around for every single thing that he's ever sat on busing that's right I mean that's how all of that comes about it's just a even in primaries Republican primaries Democrat primaries but the thing with Biden is that he is he's going for the elder statesman route remember I said that there's only gonna be really two ways that he can play this he either has to out nasty trump or because that's too for buying to be successful he cannot fight the other primary candidates yester solely because fights with trump and server is not really doing that the only other option he has and this is what he seems to be doing is taking the old the elder statesman route he's the one who's going to be the common sense candidate in this he's the individual who no really he has more sense and logic and reason and caution in these other candidates he's the best one to take on trump they're painting him and this is just some par for the course as and he's helping hit their position you have any specific positioning himself as a moderate on healthcare not even can you so a number of headlines about his see in an interview that he did over the weekend where he went after single payer he was supporting what he did while V. P. with Barack Obama but he also said that those democratic candidates who really are the individuals that that that gave the house the house that that Democrat they gave Democrats at house victory there to the right of people like Alexandria kasha Cortez these are individuals who are who are to to the right even kind of person shade on your summer twenty nine he even for a little bit a shade of Cortez signaling that he's in Palos you're kind of a line on this listen to this that's what this election is about I'm really I'm happy to debate that issue and all those issues with my friends because guess what again look who won the race is look one last time out we had and by the way I think I I think because your car chases a brilliant bright woman but she won't want to primary death in the general election fights who won mainstream Democrats who were very progressive on social issues and very strong on education health care yeah see what I'm saying that's exactly this is he is running he wants to position himself to the right of them and so Biden's so far it remember the debate when they're all saying that they would outlaw private insurance he's the only candidate thus far who has not done that and he criticized single payer but he also said that he wants to bring over the weekend he wants to bring the individual mandate back he wants to bring that mandate which I a I mean there's a number of ways that this could go but that the thing that was actually never popular and that's that it's being in any way describe disinterest and I've even seen some media on the right some conservative media because so many of these primary candidates are so far to the left he actually looks moderate how insane is this this is so and say I can't even play this is where we are right now he actually looks moderate he says that the individual mandate would be popular compared to what's being offered sure I don't I mean what compared to single payer is he talking about from Democrats or is he talking about what Republicans have done he never actually really answer that I would have loved to have seen a follow up question to that but there wasn't one yeah I because that's a very that's I think would be an interesting thing even for Democrat based in our right now speaking of Democrats and Republicans Justin Ammash's left the Republican Party he's what he's gonna be an independent now caucus with Republicans most likely I mean for crane allies not gonna caulk is a Democrat he's that representative Justin Ammash says it there were a lot more reasons than just Tromp as to why I wanted to leave he and of course trump tweeted that great news for the Republican Party is one of the dumbest impost disloyal men in Congress is quitting the party and this is all really stems from a marshy says that there's a strong case of impeachment against the president which I simply just disagree with I just don't think that there is and I've heard a must try to make the case before and I really disagree with his logic and I he's you know doubling down on a trickling down on it and that's fine I just don't think that the argument that he makes there is there's it's not there he waited of course for the fourth of July and then if he was is saying he was also declaring his independence and leaving the Republican Party so there was there were some I mean it was it was station he wanted to maximize the attention out of it now he was also part of the house freedom caucus that was the that was the caucus of conservative more conservative Republicans that most of those individuals came from the tea party the house freedom caucus was a direct result of the tea party which really helped take over and give that Republican victory as for the house the shellacking that Barack Obama said that he had this is back in two thousand and ten so this was an homage was one of the founding members of that house freedom caucus and he said that he'd want to be a further distraction and that he says that help he could get so he could get kicked off of combat committee since he's he's now an independent he says that he he anticipated being kicked off the oversight committee it cetera with all of this but I I just like I said I just don't necessarily I don't agree with the logic that has been used to that he that he uses as to why he thinks that and that seems to release them all from that it really does it seems to really they come from from all of that he's a he's like I just ate and he was he's been a Republican for I don't know how long and then he says he just couldn't do it anymore now he he's right where he says and he put this up on this is part of his Washington post PC says in this hyper partisan environment congressional leaders use every tool to compile party members to stick with the team they dangles chairmanships committee assignments Baba yeah I mean we all know that because it just by the way things are we are in this binary situation politically but when in the hell did he realize that this is how what worked did he not realize that this is our work when he was running for office as a Republican at what point did he this is always been partisanship has always been with the US politically always and a large touch up charges on debate and how it's hard to have debate right now he says that he goes we are fast approaching the point however Congress exist as a little more than a formality to legitimize outcomes dictated by the president as speaker of the house and Senate Majority Leader I disagree with that because if that were true wait where that would then why didn't we get the immigration outcomes that we wanted when we controlled all the both chambers in the White House why didn't we get a tax cuts made permanent why did we get those things because if that were were that true we would have all of that yet and yet we do not have it because that is not really ultimately how it works you have to vote so a a day he discusses at a bed he says that party leaders distract and divide the public by exploiting wedge issues and and and waging pointless and meaningless wars wedge issues I.

Joe I seventy seven million dollar thirty forty fifty years
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:05 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Project to the convention center. Here's couch member and kitchen. We generate quite a bit of, of tax revenues from the downtown area, but we have deeds throughout the city. Yeah. This plan unanimously passed a creates the palm district master plan, including operating that school. It creates the rainy street district fund a tourism public improvement district to battle homelessness. The goal of this is to create a special taxing district to collect money. About one point two billion dollars in expansion for the convention center, but also to help revitalize some, some neighborhoods that need some care. That's the goal of the city council. It's called it the rainy street district fund and a tourism public improvement district. That's a fancy way of saying, tick, tiff attacking increment district, if you will. And so, therefore, they'll collect a certain amount of money from everything that's bought and sold in that area to help pay for these, these special projects that we heard also in business news this morning with the Austin city council is laid out the framework for scooters and, and those rules are, are pretty interesting. Gotta have a helmet, you could be facing a twenty dollars to forty dollar fine if you're not wearing a helmet, that's for kids. Not sure how many kids are riding scooters downtown now I always see, you know, a little bit older folks, you know, twenty thirty forty fifty year olds even in some cases, they're not care about older people, I guess, I guess, I mean, they just say kids have to wear helmets and riders can use the. Sidewalks which has been the controversial side of all of this. Nobody wants the scooters on the sidewalks. You ride them on the sidewalks, then you're gonna leave the scooter on the sidewalk when you're done. And that has been the, you know, the ongoing problem there with, with these scooters, people are just sick and tired of them, actually five one two eight three six zero five. You've written a scooter. You write these scooters all the time. Don't you little pass the skater fame? My life. Yeah. No, no, this the only thing that's going to happen is an injury to myself. I'm gonna blow out that scooter. If I step on it, it's not happening. Maybe a little rascal or something like that. I have some more rack George stands. That's me. Hey, more and more companies are choosing to call cedar park home. And this is really cool curve based James Avery is among the recent expansions, but so is a UK based three d printing company known as addictive dead of additive manufacturing technologies. Cedar park will now be home at this company. The North American headquarters and economic developer devout development, director been white. That's his name of cedar park. His name's Ben white. Fees related. I don't think so. I mean, maybe what are the chances, he's the economic developer for shooter park. And he says, this is gonna bring a lot of jobs to town, creating over one hundred jobs or right at one hundred jobs over the next five years, their average wages eighty thousand there you go. So this deal reached expected to fetch about one point eight million dollars in sales tax revenue for the city of cedar park. Other big names, including that new, ice sports cedar park complex as well as the indigo ridge mix use development just booming up there in Williams. Williamson county is booming much faster right now compared to Travis county. I mean, you think about the Kalahari resorts on seventy nine in round rock. That's huge. You've seen it. You've driven past in round rock across from Dell diamond. Yes, this, this looks like a massive casino. Oh, it will be cool. It's gonna be really nice that ho stretches, seventy nine Williamson county is just boom and bust busting at the seams right now. But so is cedar park. You got the National Tennis association that setting up shop and cedar park. You got you got the big ice sports development project that it's going to be two to NHL regulation size hockey rinks, really with some outdoor ballfields baseball soccer and stuff like that. It's going to be a massive complex. I sports cedar park complex is what it's called up there on the toll road near one eighty three A and Scottsdale drive. It's going to be big cedar park. Williamson county is has has become a sports capital of Texas for sure. Think about it. You got the round rock express. You got you got that major round rock sporting events center. You got the Austin juniors, which is probably the most popular youth volleyball league in America. That's there in cedar park. You got the Spurs and the stars that played the center that'll areas become a real sports town, cedar park high school in their football championships. We could go on and on and on about the athleticism of cedar park in Williamson county. Why didn't they put the soccer place out there? Hey, good question only makes sense. Good question. It is six twenty three. Stay with us. Good update you on a story at a Dallas. There's a church in Dallas concord church. The looking for couples who were already living together, but have not tied, the knot the church wants to end that trend of cohabitation, and they're willing to pay everything for your wedding sixty couples who are shacking up to try to make them legit. Those are expensive. We'll tell you about it coming up the Todd and.

Cedar park cedar park Williamson county cedar park complex cedar park high school soccer developer Austin city council Dallas Dell Travis county Dallas concord church UK Ben white Austin NHL George James Avery
"forty fifty years" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

07:52 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"Bullets picks comes to us from New York City, where there is such a rousing acceptance for mayor de Blasios announcement of his candidacy for president. I guess they're still cheering their holidays. Really? It's a national outcry. Stay home. Look, mayor de Blasio. I think the latest Quinnipiac poll had seventy eight percent of New Yorkers saying he shouldn't run, right. He doesn't care. Never cared, what the city thought of him or what they wanted he is, basically always been about creating headlines that are flattering to himself, the city under his stewardship has gone straight downhill, and I'm not exaggerating the number of homeless on the street, like in some other. Blue cities has just gone through the roof. They've rolled back all kinds of laws that sort of impinge on actual residents quality of life, like vagrancy laws. It's now perfectly okay to go to the bathroom on the street. I mean, we had a friend just to bring this home who had a town house in New York. And there was a homeless man, that basically hung out outside their door and every day would defecate in front of their now. So they would clean it up. And then they went away for a week and this fellow kept it. It up. And when they got back, they got a summons 'per having a mess in front of their house. They packed up. They moved to Florida last we saw them. I mean can you imagine you know we hear a lot about what's happening in San Francisco? I mean, they have people on poop patrols cleaning up after people and to see, you know, I was watching video the other day and it's just heartbreaking to see what's going on in New York. And you know, me I mean I love I love Manhattan, I out side of the political, you know, craziness it can go there, but everything else about the city I've fell in love with what forty fifty years ago, I guess, when I first went there and to see how it's just. Gotten to this point as you say, human feces, and people are, you know ruining shoes and, and on and on. I mean, what it's more than that. I mean, and I've talked to some of the senior people in the police department they totally disagree with all this licentious nece, which has led to for example, rolling back the turnstile jump. No one gets arrested anymore for jumping the turnstile. Well, okay, what is the message that, that sends it basically is just, you know what what's happened is the opposite of broken windows policing thing decades ago when you were on the verge of total collapse? And it was it's a program where you basically take small infractions and you enforce the law, and the message is clear that bigger infractions are going to lead to much more serious penalties. And that was the policy that was then exported to Detroit and actually began to help Detroit. Turn itself around. It works, and I'll tell you, here's a really build the calamity as it is people in the minority communities who suffer worse, wet the worst when there's a breakdown in law and order, it's people who are surrounded by people who are not behaving, according to the law, and they want protection. You know, James Komi, who we all revile at this point, but nonetheless, he gave a speech during a bomb period in office, where he basically stood up for harsh police measures or not harsh. But you know enforcing the law. Along those exact lines. I said, why did we spend all our time policing in the black communities because they asked us to those were the communities that needed help, you know, all this well-meant, and it is, well, meaning I think, I don't mean that you, I think he's a total cynic, but the idea that rolling back policing is, is something that helps the minority community. It just simply isn't true. Exactly. Well, and the thing is this. This is a policy embraced by Democrats. I mean you got to call it for what it is. And you're exactly right. Liz, I mean, this is lawlessness. I mean what is lawlessness get you? But more lawlessness. Correct. The Bravo at light. Exactly. Right. And it has been extended now to various measures, which let people out of jail quicker. Well, the recidivism rate in, in a lot of categories of crime is above eighty percent. You let people out of jail, quick, again, what they're back in jail quicker. Mean where's that? And we've seen some pretty tragic consequences of these again. Well, meaning, but really blinded kind of policies anyway, as far as the Blasios concerned, I was with a very senior democrat near New York Democrat last night over dinner, and he I thought this was too, but I wasn't sure it was true. We were talking about the twenty four twenty three people. I guess now in the democratic race. And he pointed out that if you raise money and you don't spend it in a presidential contest, you get to keep it. So what do you think wants to do that? So we say goes out there and through who knows what kind of sleight of hand erases five or six million bucks, spends a million for the first time in his life. He actually has some money, and he can afford to basically, be out of work, which I think he will be exactly. Well that's what the other, you know. Pundits are saying is that he's looking for an exit ramp leads to a child, you know, whether you know he may be hoping. I mean like some of these candidates really, they don't have a realistic chance to, to get the nomination. But do they move up the pecking order and maybe have an opportunity to work in a, a democratic administration that, that's a possibility, although I don't think anyone would take the blah's HALE? And, and here's why I say that I'm not I'm not just fixated on him. Although, honestly, he has been a revolting mayor. But in the other issue, if you remember going back to the two thousand sixteen election, he'd hemmed and hawed over whether to support Hillary Clinton. Hillary Clinton created build a Blasio we would never have heard of him without her sponsorship, but you know, he wasn't sure she was progressive enough. He sort of dangled the idea of supporting Bernie Sanders at a time in their contest when that would have been. A pretty big deal goes at finally decides. Oh, yeah. Back Hillary Clinton. It goes out to Iowa to campaign on her behalf and the Clinton campaign shot him out. I mean he you know, he was left. I remember those videos of wandering the neighborhood suburban neighborhoods in Iowa. And there are some ringing doorbells, and people had no idea who he was. I mean, it was total humiliation. So I think yes, it he's not going to be someone that I think, is picked up by Joe Biden, or Bernie Sanders or anybody else. But I think for a lot of these candidates, look, Marianne Williamson who is that. No one knows who. She is. It's just a way of increasing your national profile, I just sat her name on a nationally syndicated radio station. You know, that's what this is all about for some of these people without a doubt. Well, it is amazing. I've never seen anything like this. Liz, when somebody in their hometown announces their candidate, Gennady, and.

Hillary Clinton New York City Blasio Bernie Sanders Liz mayor de Blasios Detroit Marianne Williamson president San Francisco Florida Iowa Joe Biden James Komi Manhattan Gennady New York seventy eight percent
"forty fifty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

07:44 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"We've asked you to call us if you're over forty and you haven't saved anything for retirement. Two seven seven KTAR. The reason we're asking you to call. It's just explain why that is because it's a new study that says half of Americans have nothing in retirement, save half of older Americans. Basically anybody over forty fifty years old. Yeah. Have nothing forty eight percents that they'd nothing put away in a 4._0._1._K style defined contribution plan or an IRA or individual retirement account. That's an improvement from fifty two percent without retirement in two thousand thirteen. But I mean, we've been talking about this for years. Don't have the people, basically. Yeah. I mean, you're talking three or four percentage points. Why is it that you don't have anything in in retirement? Is there a reason to seven seven KTAR over forty no money in retirement? All right. Steve you're in Mesa. Tell us your story. A I'm forty two years old a few years ago, we moved from out of state, and we went to a single income. So we cashed out. What I had for down payment on a house here back in Mesa, and then we adopted twins. So my wife didn't go back to work. So just circumstance led to it's just my income, and I couldn't actually afford now start saving stuff and put it away. So I had it cashed it out to move and then went to a single income. So you'll know about this the government gives you money if you've adopted children, if you're a foster parent you have to be a foster foster parent, I to get paid. I don't know what your circumstances is Steve Steve you could have gone to another country, and that's money out of your pocket to adopt a baby, China or Korea or something like that. But if you're a foster parent, they pay you to be a foster parent, and then you get something from the state. Yes. Okay. This is this is true. In our case. We we foster adopted twin baby boys here locally, well, wait a minute. If they're from the foster care system, you're getting money to take care of them. Right. This is correct. Okay. So could you take some of that money? Maybe start an IRA or some kind of retirement from that. It's possible. There's option. But having my wife, not work with both, nurses, and then when income with way, and we're just relying on mine, it became a little paycheck to paycheck business. It's hard to certain things aside. All right, especially to kids. Right. It's very expensive. You're gonna be using that money that the state is giving and and and and not complaining, but you go from zero to two kids that is a that is a disaster for your checkbook, you go it's not like you get pregnant you have nine months, you get one child and you have another child on two incomes to one or two their half of older Americans have nothing in retirement savings. You're calling us if you have nothing in retirement savings, you're telling us why. All right. Robert, you're in Queen creek. Tell us your story. You know, the board alimony child support, and you have to pay taxes are what being able to claim your children. He also makes it very difficult. Save anything. Anything you do get God. So take, you know, pay income is a third here thirty year, and I had to live on the other third. Anything is there a plan though? I mean, the kids will be eighteen at some point where you have to pay alimony until you're dead. Is there a plan down the road for you? Oh, yeah. The Alamo is child borders Bill going on that data arrears. But yet when that's over and done that's still about a five or six years down the road. And I'm already past the fifty Mark over fifty. Yeah. Okay. All right. Yeah. Divorce can wipe you out. There's no question about it. There are people. And I think, you know, somebody or, you know, a couple, and I know I know a couple of couples they won't get a divorce because they would lose too much money. So they stay together. They just live separate lives the divorce. I I hear you. Yeah. They say the divorce would be too expensive. They would lose too much. I think you could sit down at a table without lawyers and figure it out. But I heard that before they don't wanna do that. Dave, you're in north Phoenix. Tell us your story day while you don't have a retirement plan over forty. Hey, guys. Well, basically, I haven't had a raise wage increase or cost of living increase since the economic crash of two thousand eight on a professional automotive mechanic for thirty years and the wages have been going down across the board. It's it's gotten so bad. I've spent the last six years in the local miracle college is trying to get a degree in management. So I can just you know, maybe try another another career, but the the wages out there. They just they don't pay in the service industry whatsoever anymore. Certain job. Well, Dave, do I understand you? Right. You've been a mechanic, and it doesn't I thought mechanics were in like in demand because nobody wants to fix cars anymore. I don't know. Well, nobody nobody wants to fix cars anymore because or an entry level mechanic. You can go to McDonald's and get an entry level wage McDonald's that is literally more than an entry level wage for mechanic and mechanics are spending thirty thousand dollars per education. Another ten thousand tools to walk out to be offered. Fifteen dollars an hour as a mechanic. Wow. And they're only making that because the minimum wage is going up. Okay. Okay. I did not know that. All right. Let's take one more. All right. Karen? You're in Phoenix. Why do you not have a retirement, Karen? Because I don't plan on retiring. So what does that mean that you're planning to work until the day? You literally die. No. No sixty two about a year or so I'm going to retire. But I'm still gonna work part time at my job that I have now they do offer that and then just continue to work. Okay. All right is is that a plan though. I mean, if you don't backup if you don't have money, you gotta keep working. Well, then you can't work. I mean, then what do you do? I wonder if people think, you know, what I'm gonna think I'm going to take care of it tomorrow and then tomorrow and then tomorrow, and before, you know, at twenty thirty forty years goes by so what are the reasons that half of Americans have nothing saved in retirement to put a bow on this just from our phone calls. Well, Steve moved with his wife from another state, and then went down to a single income and adopted two kids that'll take money out of retirement or out of your Bank any cashed out his his retirement to buy a house. Yeah. Robert went through divorce alimony all that kind of stuff for the kids. Dave is in a job where wages have gone down. And he hasn't had a raise since a wait. And Karen hasn't had QE. It sounds like Erin hasn't had money most of her life, and she's working paycheck to paycheck. Right. It's not good. It's it's it's very tough to do that. I know when I was in my twenties. I was petrified to be. Without money one day. And so I just saved even if interest to here, and there, that's interesting. But so was I yeah. But we were in the minority. Don't you think I remember our friends being this concerned about it when we were in our twenty? I know why was the same way. I know one person who doesn't have any money and retire for retirement. But he's going to he's going to have his parents inheritance. And he's in. Oh, well, they're I mean, that's a totally different. I'm I'm just saying that's totally different than you're right. Is he going to have anything though, really? Let's say live to be one hundred ten that's what will they run out of money. Yeah..

Steve Steve Dave Karen Robert KTAR Mesa McDonald Phoenix Bill Queen creek Erin China Korea six years twenty thirty forty years thirty thousand dollars fifty two percent
"forty fifty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Markets coming up, we're gonna be talking about closing the skills gap with a lot of companies saying they just can't find the workers they need. Plus, we take a look at some changing consumer tastes right now, though, let us head over to our own Greg Jarrett for a Bloomberg business flash. Greg. Thank you. Lisa. Treasury tenure yields or below two point four percent rates on benchmark German bonds sinking deeper below zero after European Central Bank. President Mario Draghi said that an accommodative policy stance is still needed. The S P is little changed drop dropping commodity shares offset gains, it industrial countries oil holds near sixty dollars a barrel. As the reports that crude oil inventories rose two point eight million barrels of the complex web of you at web of US pipelines Tangshan export terminals itself. Make America the world's top oil producers causing a headache for some crude buyers as various types of crude pass through the supply chain for inland. Shielfield they're picking up impurities before reaching Asia, which is causing problems, Paul Sankey Mizzou, ho America's oil and gas analyst tells Bloomberg he doesn't think this is that big deal. We've only just started exporting oil in the past couple of years. Now, we're exporting three million barrels a day, and in the process, given this a said, you know, it's so new you're gonna get some teething problems that really on that big a deal against the mega theme here, which is to go back over thirty forty fifty years cycle really is how long it is since US production was growing in terms of oil west Texas intermediate crude right now is down a tenth of a percent of fifty nine ninety one a barrel. We check the markets every fifteen minutes after trading day on Bloomberg radio be five hundred 's up a tenth of a percent to. To the Dow's up two tenths of a percent of forty seven and the NASDAQ's little change down about one the ten years up twelve thirty seconds yield two point three seven percents. Comex gold is down three tenths of a percent at thirteen seventeen thirty in the dollar-yen is one ten forty eight the euro dollar twelve fifty four and the British pound a dollar thirty two. That's a Bloomberg business flash. I'm jerry. You're listening to Bloomberg markets with Lisa Abramowicz impulse. We need on Bloomberg radio. As automation in high tech continues to rise across the economy workers must continuously retrain to.

Bloomberg Greg Jarrett Lisa Abramowicz US President Mario Draghi European Central Bank Asia America Texas Paul Sankey ho America analyst thirty forty fifty years eight million barrels three million barrels twelve thirty seconds
"forty fifty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Talia Kawai helps develop fuel cell infrastructure for Toyota did know any security all si Salah says right now Japan relies heavily on Middle East oil producing hydrogen fuel is energy intensive but how'd you in is abundant in the fuel could be produced anywhere, Toyota and other carmakers like Honda and Hyundai are also banking on the fact that hydrogen fuel cell cars are more convenient Yoshikazu Tanaka is tweet us chief engineer. You might charge gung music guy. Tanaka says filling up a car with hydrogen is easier and faster then charging a battery on an electric vehicle. It makes more sense for people who live in dense cities and don't have a convenient place to plug in a tank of hydrogen gets you farther than a fully charged battery which makes it more efficient for trucks and buses Ken coma. From the institute of energy economics Japanese, think tank agrees. That hydrogen is a good bet we always talking about long run future. It's not the next year or five year time where is it twenty thirty forty fifty years because if we are really thinking about climate change, it's a very very long term strategy. But so far there are only about eleven thousand fuel cell vehicles on the road worldwide nearly half in California. The biggest challenge is building the infrastructure needed to drive them or first order of business now is to. To fill up the tank Tonny back in Tokyo. We find a station that has a big h two side. Nobody's here. Just a..

Yoshikazu Tanaka Toyota Talia Kawai institute of energy economics Middle East chief engineer Ken coma Salah Japan Hyundai Honda Tokyo California twenty thirty forty fifty year five year
"forty fifty years" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

Heather Dubrow's World

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

"But if it was five, but knowing that the next thirty forty fifty years of your life are handled are. Yeah. But what is the what is the possibility that the five is going to turn into twenty because the five after four months of intense work realizes, it didn't fix it. I think you need to talk to her and say, listen, I'm willing to spend this amount of money. And I believe in you. And I love everything that you've done in. I appreciate you helping me. But just tell me what I can do with this amount. Right feel because I think that an open ended number then I think she's just going to keep on going. I think if you just say, listen, I'm willing to spend this. Let's see what we can do with that. Or do I say so does that wrap it up? Don't ask her don't put a question Mark to next. Like is it like, you know, you know, if you have a procedure done, and you need a revision sometimes they just throw it in for free, right? Like that. I mean, you given her so much press too. I feel like she's got a throw in a few extra prayers for that. And I just don't know you've got to put your foot down. I think you have to say, listen, I'm willing to spend this amount of money. Let's let's see what we can do with that. And then go from there. This is what I don't wanna do. It. Don't wanna drive all the way back there and sit in front of her and have her tell me, and then I have to figure it out while I'm sitting there like a one or two text ban. Tell me or call me on the phone, right? So I don't feel pressured the do that. Then maybe I'll do that do that. But things really are going very loyal. Good. And I'm feeling very good. Yeah. Give the s-h-i-t sandwich. Right. Serta subtler though. So bad. I'm excited that it's working. You have Tim. What are you doing this weekend? My nephew's birthday. What are they doing daily? Esters? Luke held is eight nine okay. That's a good party for them. But it's crazy heart. They're having a lot of kids a lot of kids. Yeah. That's the craziest party. Dave and Buster's. There's just it's almost a little too big. Because now, they're running everywhere. Give them all cards, or would you just walk with it round with them and parents have to stay? Yeah. But at least they have alcohol and food and all that for oh. That'll be fine. Yeah. It'll be crack she liked Dave and busters. I don't like. I don't think did I ever party, the only Dave and Buster's party. I had there was for max. But we did it was in a private room. Yeah. So it wasn't like through the there are a lot. But with us. Yeah. But not for parties are saying if they go to a party like one of us has to be with you. Oh, go one of us has to be with them because there's too many exits where they're going into the bathroom. You have to have very clear rules. Yeah. You should tell her to give them like badges like glow in the dark badges or something. So they're all wearing the same thing. So she could spot them because my really organ there and make sure there's a buddy system better than Chucky cheese in any of those. But the thing about Chucky cheese it self contained. So there's one way in there's one way out they stamp you when you walk in. So no one can take your kid. Yeah. It's a little more relaxed. Yeah. That's true. But I've done them. All I mean, you know, it's sort of a right of passage. You'll be fine. Yeah. You'll have a lot of us really going. No. He's doing a charity event at Disneyland. When on Sunday for what it's a fundraiser, the Disney's putting together. And so it's about twenty three shifts from different restaurants and each table has their own.

Esters Dave Buster Disney Disneyland Mark Luke Tim thirty forty fifty years four months
"forty fifty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"forty fifty years" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Paul sweeney. Are we on the brink of a more serious downturn? I've always thought of the municipal bond market is a little bit of a safe haven. Thanks are going to have to start paying that. Positives? More. Are we still in that mode? We're buying the dips breaking market news and insight from Bloomberg experts. You're looking treasury bills provides a high return stocks and bonds here in the US consumer is a woman, you're more likely to be a growth company rates can go down even with short-term effects. Sogang up a little bit. This is Bloomberg markets win Lisa Abramowicz on Bloomberg radio. We are waiting comments from President Trump was in the missile defense review announced an Arlington Virginia. We will bring you those when we get them. In the meantime, we're gonna be speaking about Jack Bogle, the legendary investor really transformed the entire industry you really did. You know, he just he democratized investing. I think for the individual investors. Incredible life slow remember him after his death right now. Let's head over to Greg Jarrett for Bloomberg business flash back. I just don't they unveiled a uniform for the space for such a pretty amazing stocks fluctuating lease says a batch of disappointing earnings counter data showing strengthen the US economy. The dollars up. Treasuries are down Simon French ham. Your Gordon chief economist tells Bloomberg that for the shorter term he is negative on US equity markets look at the long-term relationship. We're talking forty fifty years in corporate profits and the US equity, Mark. It's still decouple upsides for the derating. I think to come.

Bloomberg US Paul sweeney Jack Bogle Greg Jarrett chief economist Treasuries Lisa Abramowicz Virginia Trump Gordon Arlington President forty fifty years
Liechtenstein And Thirty Forty Fifty Years discussed on Morning Edition

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Liechtenstein And Thirty Forty Fifty Years discussed on Morning Edition

"Have shown that too much saturated fat can be a problem. So that would be things like coconut oil palm oil or palm kernel oil and then animal fats. So that would either be me chat or dairy fast. Those studies also show that if we replace those types of fat with unsaturated fats, like corn oil sunflower oil or olive oil will reduce our risk of cardiovascular disease and be healthier Liechtenstein has seen a lot of fad diets. Come and go. Why things like coconut oil somehow slipped under the radar is a little bit unclear but it's not consistent with any of the recommendations that have occurred over the past thirty forty fifty years. So it's okay to use coconut oil just don't use it all the time. What you wanna do is shift the ratio

Liechtenstein Thirty Forty Fifty Years
Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

Morning Edition

03:25 min | 3 years ago

Is Coconut Oil All It's Cracked Up To Be? Get The Facts On This Faddish Fat

"Of coconut oil has about twelve grams of saturated fat, whereas olive oil has to butter comes in the middle there around seven. So just one tablespoon of coconut oil contains most of the saturated fat, many Americans are supposed to have in one day. That's not leaving any room for yogurt or meet and forget desert still a lot of people think coconut oil is different. Adding fat your diet in this idea that it's going to bust your belly fat. No, not going to happen. Studies. Just haven't worn it out. Well, some preliminary research shows that coconut oil raises, the levels of good cholesterol. It also raises the levels of bad cholesterol. Dunker Sloot says there are many options. All right. Let's go. Check out the oils at the store we drive to Jade's a local gourmet market near her house here the oil. I'll looks. A lot like the cereal aisle with tons of choices. Wow. This is quite a beautiful array of oil. Here's a grape seed, walnut almond oil and bottles and bottles of olive oil. How about this pumpkin seed oil never heard of it? So how do you choose? I look for the oils with the lowest amount of saturated fat Alice Lichtenstein directs the cardiovascular nutrition lab at Tufts University, she basically looks at Howard diets affect our hearts since the nineteen sixties Liechtenstein says well controlled clinical trials have shown that too much saturated fat can be a problem. So that would be things like coconut oil palm oil or palm kernel oil and then animal fats. So that would be me chat or dairy fat. Those studies also show that if we replace those types of fat with unsaturated fats, like corn oil sunflower oil or olive oil will reduce our risk of cardiovascular disease and be healthier Liechtenstein has seen a lot of fad diets come and go why things. Coconut oil somehow slipped under the radar is a little bit unclear but it's not consistent with any of the recommendations that have occurred over the past thirty forty fifty years. So it's okay to use coconut oil just don't use it all the time. What you wanna do is shift the ratio more towards unsaturated fat and away from saturated fat? And that means more olive, flax and canola oil and less coconut, oil and bacon. When it comes to your diet. It's all about the balance, April, Fulton NPR news, Los Angeles. All right. The holiday season is winding down this time of year often feels like it's all about the cute and the cuddly take listen to this clip from Disney's lady and the tramp in which the wife darling gets a big puppy on Christmas morning. House weet. You like your down. Oh, I love her. Now, here's

Liechtenstein Alice Lichtenstein Dunker Sloot Tufts University NPR Jade Los Angeles Disney Thirty Forty Fifty Years One Tablespoon Twelve Grams One Day
The $24 trillion case for a strong, global carbon tax

Climate Cast

04:40 min | 3 years ago

The $24 trillion case for a strong, global carbon tax

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. So how much is climate change costing you? I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hefner. This is climate cast. We hear about the cost of climate change solutions. But what about the cost and risk of doing nothing every year the cost of climate inertia rises, but it's not a steady curve. It's more like the trajectory of a rocket. Another five years of delay, a university of Minnesota policy brief says that's a striking twenty four trillion dollar loss in consumption. That's the equivalent of a worldwide recession. Bob litter men helped write that brief he's the chairman of the risk committee an advisory panel at kep owes capital. I asked him how we are already paying for climate change, lots of different kinds of impacts. And it certainly true. That in many cases insurance rates are going to be going up. There's going to be cost many of which are born by the government, which then is passed onto tax payers. So in recent years, you've seen sometimes hundreds of billions of dollars in damages that. Can be attributed to climate change. Bob, you write about inaction, but what sort of action can slow atmospheric warming to that one point five or two degrees celsius goal where it makes the most difference if we were to put on a strong carbon tax globally today. We could probably keep warming well below two degrees. But if we wait until twenty thirty then we're above two degrees c and that may not seem like a lot. But given where we are today in what we're already seeing for the people who are living say forty fifty years in the future when we will hit those peak temperatures, another three tenths of a degree c could mean a major difference in their world, you mentioned a carbon tax. Let's let's boil it down to the simplest aspects for those who haven't heard of it. What is it? And why do you think it would work to fight climate change, the basic ideas to create the appropriate incentives to reduce emissions right now. There are plenty of taxes. That actually incentivize both the consumption and production of fossil fuels. We've gotta change that we've got to create an appropriate incentive to reduce emissions. The simplest ways just to create a tax at the source of the fossil fuel proportional to the amount of emissions that would be created. But once you impose it there. The users of that fossil fuel will end up paying appropriately for the amount of pollution that they're creating Bob what's the most important things, you think people who are connected to and concerned about climate change should think about when it comes to the cost of inaction what they should think about is what it means for, you know, their grandchildren. I think about that all the time. Sadly, we've already gone so far down this road that the world that they will live in will not be the same world that we live in. There will be massive changes to ecosystems to human well-being to health. So that's what they should be thinking about Bob litter men, chairman of the risk committee and founding partner of kept host capital. Thanks for sharing your economic insight today. Go my pleasure. Thank you. My name's Elizabeth Arnold. And I'm a second year science technology and environmental policy master's student at the Humphrey school of public affairs. And I'm studying energy policy. And I'm part of a group from the university of Minnesota that's going to Puerto Rico for an interdisciplinary trip doing research and collaborating with two professors from Puerto Rico and Puerto Rican communities. We're focused on the energy transition. I'm from the Humphrey school of public affairs. So I'm really really interested in the policy piece, how can federal policy territorial policy and local policies impact. These changes that need to happen to really provide the energy that Puerto Rico needs to be sustainable going forward. People got power back after eleven months of being in the dark, which is the longest blackout in US history. So we want to make sure that doesn't happen. Not just in Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico is really going to benefit the rest of the world. In terms of being an example of how things can be done in a more resilient sustainable way. They really have an opportunity to get to one hundred percent renewable by twenty fifty. This is the work that communities all over the world needs to be doing. And so there's a lot that we can learn from Puerto Rico. That's climate cast. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton her.

Puerto Rico BOB Chairman Chief Meteorologist Bank Of America Humphrey School Of Public Affa University Of Minnesota Fdic Paul Hefner NPR Government MPR United States KEP Elizabeth Arnold Paul Hutton
Billionaire Afiniti CEO Says AI Needs More Humans

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:44 min | 3 years ago

Billionaire Afiniti CEO Says AI Needs More Humans

"Zia Chishti CEO of startup affinity. And if you're keeping score the creator of invis- line, he's now shifting gears and working on improving customer, call centers the St. welcome to the podcast studio. How's that? Oh perfect. Got it. We this is this is my first try it deserted. First of all welcome to the studio really excited to have you here invisible on everyone knows that it was quite a breakthrough. But was very different tech arizo. I just wonder how to spearheading tech in this day and age differ from from doing it back. Then first and foremost, I think there's more similarities than differences. I would start with that. There are many common themes. You've got to build a great team. You've got a powerful technology that scalable, yet arrays Financing's all those things are true in terms of differences compute power is way up. So the miracles that we have to work back in the late nineties now or really rather commonplace in as much as you have much faster processors if there was. Then an acceptance of the start of culture now, it's a big theme in the US economy. So the notion of building a big company from scratch is much more widely accepted now than it was back then than evidence of that is just the unicorn phenomenon right back then having a billion dollar company Pri public was almost unheard of. Now. It's rather commonplace. There's there's just less of an impression of unusualness that's associated with that outcome affinities so interesting because it tackles a very specific field of tech with call centers. And I think it's I mean, it's so relatable the inescapable on bearable part of life for most of us. Right. First of all, thank you for helping us out a change of gears, though, what made you decide to set your specific sites there. I'm curious a lot of that has to do with my personal journey. So when I left align technology back in two thousand two I founded a private equity firm called TRG of the firms. Mandates was was to invest in business process outsourcing companies and technologies that support those companies so. We had a call center in our portfolio assets. And we looked at how we might optimize it, and we concluded that the most powerful single thing that we could do was changed. How calls float in that environment which consumer spoke to which agents, and that was the Genesis for a company affinity which blossomed in its own, right? I wanna talk a little bit more about your process because often when companies utilize a I, you know, you see the focus shifting away from the human element. You have an opposite approach. How have you found that to be a key strategy? Well, first of all this. I thing is really overblown if you actually look at the number of jobs that had replaced AI to date. I imagine it's extremely small percentage of the overall. That's that's a good point. That's just not as big as the popular hyperbole around. I would suggest. So I would discount the view that we're rapidly losing jobs in any pace in terms of what we do. That's really actually the dominant use of AI, which is simply pattern recognition often in support of humans and anytime that you can give humans tools that improve their efficiency, actually. Increased demand for those human. So we look at it as very different. We don't think this is extraordinarily or unusual or counter to the major themes of. It's just what we do we enhance how humans operate and that increases the demand for humans, and that's a good for the employment, and as any tech entrepreneur knows. And as you know, it takes a certain drive to stay in the game as especially as you have for so long. You have a very unique story that I'd love you to share with listeners. And I wonder how your story as a Pakistani American how that's impacted how you do business. And how you make your way around this this very unique world. So it's humorous when I first arrived in the United States after twelve years fourteen years of being really out of the country. It was quite a culture shock. I came in nineteen eighty eight to go to college. And the last time was really really here was when I was two years old in nineteen Seventy-three. So so it was a very big adjustment curve associated. But having said that, you know, the the United States is such an amazing place to start a business. This almost sounds a little bit flag-waving. But it really is. I mean, the college education that I got I got a degree in economics and computer science at me up really well for what proved to be a revolution in the economy that was really oriented around those two disciplines. So from there, I went to Morgan Stanley, and I learned about finance that was a very very powerful experience for the rest of my life. I could look at companies in the way that investors look at companies, you can construct a narrative and a business that really appeals and then in nineteen Ninety-seven, I graduated from business school, and that was the really the heart of the tech boom of the internet boom was happening right about that. And that gave me the courage and inspiration to become an entrepreneur. So I think it is a uniquely American story. I don't think this would have happened if I had grown up in Pakistan or really anywhere else in the world share. So having said that. You know, what's next for affinity? And how do you see affinity taking the next steps towards your goal of saving us off from call center. We will we will make the experience more pleasant to be sure it looks. So this goes back to original few few words tiny. I I'm just not a believer in the current AI. Boom. Yeah. I just think there's a massive amount of over hype around it. I don't think that the high priviliged substantiated by what is true progress on the ground. I think people confuse the increase in computational capacity associated with Moore's law would some kind of algorithm improvement over time we've been doing basically the same things in quote, a unquote for the last thirty forty fifty years. So there's nothing really new or breakthrough. Here know, we may have slightly contrarian opinions on that. But I think there's a lot of overkill in the market in terms of supposition around power and ability to replace human. So I'd like to obstruct away what we do from the bandwagon, which I think like many of these is going to boom and bust and. We'd rather be clear of that association. From our point of view is just a tool it it allows us to analyze it large amount of data and find patterns in data. That's useful. In a commercial context, you whether you call that AI or pattern recognition or machine learning or just algorithms doesn't really matter. So when you abstract away that nomenclature around the industry what we're really about is solving how people interact with each other figuring out what behaviors are for an enterprise's customers. Figuring out what behaviors are for an enterprise employees. And then finding ways to bring them together in a patterned way that improves enterprises performance, and that's very powerful. It makes her clients hundreds of millions sometimes billions of dollars a year. And that's where we'd like to focus, which is the commercial power of what we do as opposed to being momentarily associated with a bit of a solar flare if a trend in the in the equity

AI United States Zia Chishti CEO Pri Public TRG Pakistan Morgan Stanley Moore Thirty Forty Fifty Years Billion Dollar Fourteen Years Twelve Years Two Years
Sunny Hostin Blasts Melania Trump: 'We Finally Said A Woman's Word Is Enough' On Sexual Assault

The View

03:09 min | 3 years ago

Sunny Hostin Blasts Melania Trump: 'We Finally Said A Woman's Word Is Enough' On Sexual Assault

"The media goes too far and the way they portray some stories, it's it's not correct. It's not right. So the message is the message that is the media's fault I want. What is the message? I don't know what that piece of it is this media piece, but I will say this, you know, back in the day, I would say maybe forty fifty years ago. It was very difficult for women to bring sexual assault cases because the law was different, and it was this British jurists. Matthew HALE who said rape was our sex assaults was the only crime where you need it more than a woman's word in the law for any crime. A person's testimony is enough after forty years. We finally changed the law. We've finally set a woman's word is enough. I've taken many cases to trial with. And now you have the first lady of the United States telling women everywhere your word is not enough. I think it does so much damage and quite frankly, that isn't the law. So you don't need cooperation. There's no winning in the situation. There's nothing Mamani wrong, we'll can. I can. I say something really quick, so I was watching. I watched Sunday shows every Sunday and a Toronto Burke, who is the activists who started the hashtag metoo movement, everybody Chuck Todd, and she said, and I was watching with my husband. And I remember thinking that what she said was so interesting because she said, quote, when we say believe survivors, it's not believe them without investigation. This is her words believe them with investigation. Can we start with the premise that people do not often lie about the pain and trauma of sexual violence? We start with that premise that we believe that it's true then you can have an investigation. So she's also not saying believe survivors. This is her quote. It's not believe them without investigation. Leave them without interrogation. There's a lot of gray in this issue with a lot of this. And I do think that I believe in the constitution, it I believe in due process, and I do believe in the presumption of innocence over guilt and what's being brought into play here is the presumption that I need to believe guilty over innocence which something is protected by the constitution. Also. This this woman, she, she has an orange horse in the race and her orange horse has been. Accused credibly by at least seventeen women. This is also the same woman that in the midst of what happened to Puerto Rico ward jacket that said, I really don't care, do you. So when she threw down that gauntlet, I've decided not to care about anything. She says from now on what she wears. Topic that needs to be discussed and with everything you just said, but she is not the woman to say anything to me or any other about me. Black lives matter missing to her about anything. She has to say answers that question, I think in the interview about why she wore that Jag don't care. Do you.

Matthew Hale Rape United States Chuck Todd Assault Toronto Puerto Rico Burke Forty Fifty Years Forty Years
Nintendo Closing in on 20 Million Switch Sales

Nintendo Voice Chat

03:31 min | 4 years ago

Nintendo Closing in on 20 Million Switch Sales

"The crazy thing about this whole thing to me is that they re release. The n. e. s. classic on June twenty-ninth. Yeah, which means that it was, and I believe the fiscal are the the first quarter of the fiscal year ended or no. I guess it was just the last like two days of the month. Yeah. So, yeah, so empty tracks the entire thirty day span, right? Usually like four or five weeks late, which is why we're reporting these numbers now because we just get them about a month and so and just those few days, it just skyrocketing tune as the it beat actual real concept, which is not s- yeah. I mean, I think this is like, I don't think this is something that we're gonna see over and over again every time they flood the market with these because this to me feels like a make good. It's all those people that have been clamoring to get one since they were such a scarcity in two thousand sixteen like now that they're readily available and they're, they're out on the market. People are like, Finally, I can get one. I can't imagine that month over month. It's going to be like millions of people scrambling to buy the any any right. What you had a lot of people buying like five or six to trying to flip them in about nine, Jim, nine of them. Yeah, I'm gonna jacket out of them. That's good because you won't be able to sell them on EBay? No. Yeah. I think he'd be warm. I think it's really kind of just a product of Nintendo strategy when the s. mini I came out. Yep. And that they had this scarcity model where there wasn't that much in demand just kept growing and growing and growing and the stop, they stopped selling it. And now all of a sudden there's they're making them again, just the floodgates have opened. Like you won't see this with the SNES classic because there's been a like a pretty steady trickle of those. It's not like they're going to release a jillion of those. Those are gonna skyrocket through the roof because people have been able to get those like pretty steadily. Well, interestingly enough, I mean, I, I think obviously it shows that nostalgia sells very clearly. But if you look at the top heads. Oh, yeah, definitely. But so there was a backlash to this because people were just like, oh, it's just like cheapness. Nostalgia ploy. If you look at the top ten bestselling games in the empty this month, strictly on software eight out of ten of them make too well. No, at ten of the more based on Ps that existed for somewhere between ten and thirty or forty fifty years. Yeah, you know, like stuff like God of war, which is obviously a remake has, you know, has a couple of moments in it. They go like, hey member. Remember when we did this, Mario tennis is the best. One was the best selling game them on. There's also LEGO incredible which is based on like what sixty year old toys and a ten year old movie like or new movie that's based on the ten year old movie. So I mean everything in there is old. The only things that were new are the crew which is based on cars which have been around for thousands of years, and he'll look and beyond our, what's it go? Detroit becomes really. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So, yeah, Detroit crack top ten? Yeah, surprising, right. It wasn't gonna goes. Coach, yeah. Uh, so speaking of Nintendo switch sales or just Nintendo sales in general Nintendo's first quarter results are officially in and the switch sold. One point eight million units for the first quarter, which brings the total number of units as of their reports earlier to nineteen point six, seven million, which is just under twenty million. It's it's an incredibly high numbers. You, there's no doubt that the switches selling well butts Nintendo did go out and say that they're stretch goal or their goal for this entire fiscal year is twenty million units. Yeah, which is a lot, especially when you're comparing that they couldn't break two million units within this first quarter. So I think they're really going to need to sort of fill out the fault there, fall lineup or their winter lineup, just with some heavy hitters to really reach that twenty million number..

Nintendo Detroit JIM Ebay N. E. S. Ten Year Forty Fifty Years Five Weeks Sixty Year Thirty Day Two Days